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Adam T Rabinowitz


Associate ProfessorPhD 2004, University of Michigan

Associate Professor; Assistant Director, Institute of Classical Archaeology
Adam T Rabinowitz

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-9319, 512-471-0197
  • Office: WAG 17
  • Campus Mail Code: C3400

Interests


Greek colonization, cultural interaction, ancient food and drink, archaeology of daily life, digital approaches to archaeology

Courses


C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32915 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 308

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

UGS 302 • Tales Of The Trojan War

62145 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MAI 220E

I have taught this course in 2008, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. In both 2015 and 2016, students in this course won first place for their research papers in an annual University-wide Information Literacy Award competition.

 

Within the last hundred years, the world has seen a transportation revolution, a communication revolution, and most recently an information revolution, not to mention two world wars and dozens of political revolutions of varying merit and success. Our own battles are increasingly fought with digital tools, with the results instantly visible in full color on television or YouTube. In this time of lightning-fast change, why should anyone care about a war that may or may not have been fought 3200 years ago, or read a poem about that war composed by, or written down by, or cobbled together by someone, or several people, or a host of anonymous bards somewhere between 400 and 600 years after that war was supposed to have taken place? At a glance, it seems a little ridiculous to spend a semester at the beginning of the 21st century thinking about Troy.

 

Look again. The Iliad is arguably the very first work of literature in the Western tradition, the ancestor of all the character-driven novels and movies that are a fundamental part of modern culture. For more than 2500 years, the broader narrative of the Trojan War has provided people and societies with a story they could use to work through their own experiences of war, violence, and human relationships. Its themes and characters reappear throughout Western art and literature, and the mutations they undergo provide a powerful tool to understand the cultures and times that produced them. And the irresistible 19th-century desire to find the historical truth behind the legend led, in large part, to the development of the discipline of Classical Archaeology. Even the inanimate finds from the first excavation at Troy refuse to give up their hold on the present: the golden treasure that Heinrich Schliemann smuggled out of the Ottoman Empire was carried from the smoldering ruins of Berlin to Moscow, where it was dramatically rediscovered when another empire crumbled. Scholars now fight each other over Homer's value to modern education, while the general public enjoys Brad Pitt as Achilles. The Iliad resonates even more powerfully at this moment in history, in which the experience of war, bitter hatreds, and the destruction of cities is yet again all too familiar. The Trojan War, it seems, is still not over. In the end, what could be better to think about for a semester in the early 21st century?

 

This course is about Homer and the ancient world, but even more than that, it is about the persistence of the past. I will ask you to become familiar with the stories of Troy, the world in which they were first written down, and the world to which they seem to refer. I will then ask you to use that familiarity to look at the way themes, images, characters and events from the Trojan War are used and transformed from antiquity to our own time. We will discuss together what those transformations mean for the places and times in which they occurred, including the present. In the process, you will encounter the birth of modern archaeology, the decipherment of Linear B, Greek and Roman art and literature, World War II, academic politics, post-traumatic stress disorder, and Hollywood.

 

AHC 378 • Space And Place

32070 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112
(also listed as C C 375)

Intended principally for third-year majors in Classics, Latin, Classical Archaeology, Ancient History and Classical Civilization, this course will take a widely multidisciplinary approach to the cultural concepts of space (a geographically defined location that can be physically occupied) and Place (a space encoded with cultural meaning).  Ranging broadly across Greek and Roman literary, historical, and archaeological sources, students will explore a variety of ancient approaches to the physical world around them, on the level of both landscape and the built environment. Students will also be introduced to some of the online and digital resources that have emerged from the “spatial turn” in the humanities since the 1990s, many of which are focused specifically on the Classical world.

C C 340 • Food/Hlth/Cul Anct Mediterr

32205 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

Food, Health, and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean

Food is a major issue in contemporary culture: where it comes from, who has access to it, how it's prepared and consumed, how it affects our health. Furthermore, a number of current theories about nutrition base their approach on claims about the foodways of people in the past. It is therefore worthwhile to examine the actual evidence for the way past cultures produced, consumed, and thought about food. The ancient Mediterranean is a particularly good laboratory for this sort of investigation: it provides us with evidence from numerous and diverse sources, including literature, art, and archaeology, including the study of human remains. We can use this evidence to compare the relation between food and culture in antiquity with contemporary food issues, and to evaluate claims about the health and diet of ancient peoples.

This class will investigate food and drink in the ancient Mediterranean world from France and Italy to Egypt and Mesopotamia and from the late Neolithic to Late Antiquity, with a particular focus on Greek and Roman culture. We will read primary textual sources to understand what people thought about what they ate; we will look at ancient art to see how ancient peoples represented eating and drinking; we will examine archaeological evidence to see what the textual and artistic sources don’t tell us; and we will explore the field of bioarchaeology, which applies scientific analyses to plant, animal, and human remains to illuminate questions of diet, health, and nutrition in the past. By studying the values, social practices, and nutritional choices reflected in ancient foodways, we will come to a better understanding of the relationship between food, health and culture in both the past and the present.

Required texts: J. Wilkins and S. Hill, Food in the Ancient World (Wiley-Blackwell, 2006) (ISBN 978-063123551); J.-L. Flandrin, M. Montanari, A. Sonnenfeld, Food: A Culinary History (Penguin, 2000) (ISBN 978-0140296587); A. Dalby and S. Grainger, The Classical Cookbook: Revised Edition (Getty Museum , 2012) (ISBN 978-1606061107)

Grades will be based on participation in in-class discussions (20%), weekly blog posts (10%), two short (5-6 page) writing assignments (15% each = 30%), a midterm exam (20%) and a final exam (20%).

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32125 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

C C S301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

81595 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 201
(also listed as CTI S310)

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

 

Grading:

Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, class participation, and three hour-long in-class exams. Grading will be roughly as follows: participation (15%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), and exams (3 x 20% each = 60%).Required Texts:

  • Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)
  • Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)
  • Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)
  • Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)
  • Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

Optional Text:Herodotus, The Histories (trans. R. Waterfield, Oxford UP, 2008: ISBN 9780199535668) (an online interactive text of Herodotus will be our primary reading, so buy this only if you feel more comfortable with a paper copy)

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

32365 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 380 • Grk Settlement W Med/Black Sea

32510 • Spring 2015
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Greeks away from Home: Greek settlement in the Western Mediterranean and the Black Sea

This course will focus on the ancient Greek diaspora that took place between the 8th and the 6th centuries B.C., when Greeks from the Aegean established new communities from the Mediterranean coast of Spain to the Sea of Azov. Although this movement is traditionally referred to as “Greek colonization”, the Greeks themselves referred to these settlements as apoikiai, or “homes away from home.” The term “colonization” has been called into question in recent years, and scholars have been searching for new theoretical models to describe and explain the complex tangle of factors -- social, political, economic, religious -- that led Greeks to settle new areas and that conditioned the subsequent development of those settlements. This course will consider both historical and archaeological sources and their contributions to this discussion.

We will begin by exploring the notion of “colonization” and the theoretical discourse surrounding it, and we will examine alternate explanatory and descriptive models for this phenomenon in the Greek world. We will also address comparative  evidence for other ancient “colonial” movements (e.g. Phoenician, Hellenistic, and Roman), to better understand the idiosyncrasies of the Greek experience. Once we have established a basic theoretical and historical framework, we will spend the rest of the course on a series of archaeological and historical case-studies of individual sites, in which we will investigate both their local context and their development across time. Specific sites will be agreed on by the class, but the regions covered will include the Western Mediterranean (Sicily, South Italy, Spain and France), the Southern Mediterranean (Cyrenaica and Egypt), and the Black Sea.

Each student will be responsible for the investigation of a particular site, which will ideally play a significant role in a final seminar paper. Students will be expected to present articles, a site-based case study, and their research papers. Students will also be required to write a formal review (BMCR style) of a book relevant to the topic of the course. Grades will be based on participation in class discussions, article and case-study presentations, the book review, and the final research paper. Readings will be placed on physical reserve or will be available in digital form through Canvas. Primary texts will be read in English translation, although students with a knowledge of Greek and/or Latin are encouraged to read in the original languages.

Recommended text: J. Boardman, The Greeks Overseas, 4th ed. (1999), ISBN 978-0500281093

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33190 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21
(also listed as CTI 310)

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C S301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

82280 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 201
(also listed as CTI S310)

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

Grading:

Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, class participation, and three hour-long in-class exams. Grading will be roughly as follows: participation (15%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), and exams (3 x 20% each = 60%).

Required Texts:

Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)

Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)

Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)

Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)

Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

Optional Text:

Herodotus, The Histories (trans. R. Waterfield, Oxford UP, 2008: ISBN 9780199535668) (an online interactive text of Herodotus will be our primary reading, so buy this only if you feel more comfortable with a paper copy)

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

AHC 378 • Herodotus, Ethnograph, & Arch

33515 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as C C 375)

This course will focus on the ethnographic component of the Histories of Herodotus: that is, his discussion of the customs and cultures of non-Greek peoples, especially in books 3 and 4. Scholars continue to argue over the extent to which these descriptions accurately depict the neighbors of the Greeks, and the extent to which they reflect Herodotus' literary strategies rather than reality. Initially the accounts of the Egyptians, Persians and Scythians were taken as literal evidence for historical realities; then they were reinterpreted as symbolic narratives of the Other, a mirror for Greek identity; and more recently a middle course between these two poles has been charted. We will explore the primary text, the way it has been analyzed in scholarship across time, and the archaeological remains on the ground that relate to Herodotus' claims. In the process, we will discuss the modern concept of ethnography and the relevance of comparative anthropological evidence for the study of the ancient Mediterranean.

This course is also intended as a trial of new digital approaches to ancient texts. It will serve as a test-bed for a digital interface for Herodotus that provides interactive tools for mapping and network analysis. The Hestia2 project -- an initiative of the Open University UK -- builds on both the existing Hestia project, which maps the places mentioned in Herodotus' work, and the GAPVis project, which seeks to extract spatial and relational information from texts related to the ancient world (http://gap.alexandriaarchive.org/gapvis/index.html#index). These tools are meant to allow students and the general public to extract new meaning from ancient texts, and they will not require any technical expertise beyond the ability to use a web browser. The course will include a brief introduction to digital tools and resources for geography and networks in ancient studies. Students will be expected to make use of these tools and those developed by the Hestia2 project for both in-class discussions and research assignments.

All readings of ancient sources will be in translation, although students with the appropriate language skills will be encouraged to work directly with the original texts in their research.

This course carries the Writing Course and Independent Inquiry flags.

Grades will be based on participation in in-class discussions (25%), two short digital-resource assignments (20%), the presentation of an article or issue (15%), and a significant research paper that students will draft and revise over the course of the semester (40%).

Required texts:

  • The Landmark Herodotus (Anchor Books, 2009)
  • R. Munson, ed., Herodotus: Volume II (Oxford University Press, 2013)

C C 348 • Food And Drink

33670 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 201

Food, Health, and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean

Food is a major issue in contemporary culture: where it comes from, who has access to it, how it's prepared and consumed, how it affects our health. Furthermore, a number of current theories about nutrition base their approach on claims about the foodways of people in the past. It is therefore worthwhile to examine the actual evidence for the way past cultures produced, consumed, and thought about food. The ancient Mediterranean is a particularly good laboratory for this sort of investigation: it provides us with evidence from numerous and diverse sources, including literature, art, and archaeology, including the study of human remains. We can use this evidence to compare the relation between food and culture in antiquity with contemporary food issues, and to evaluate claims about the health and diet of ancient peoples.

This class will investigate food and drink in the ancient Mediterranean world from France and Italy to Egypt and Mesopotamia and from the late Neolithic to Late Antiquity, with a particular focus on Greek and Roman culture. We will read primary textual sources to understand what people thought about what they ate; we will look at ancient art to see how ancient peoples represented eating and drinking; we will examine archaeological evidence to see what the textual and artistic sources don’t tell us; and we will explore the field of bioarchaeology, which applies scientific analyses to plant, animal, and human remains to illuminate questions of diet, health, and nutrition in the past. By studying the values, social practices, and nutritional choices reflected in ancient foodways, we will come to a better understanding of the relationship between food, health and culture in both the past and the present.

Required texts: J. Wilkins and S. Hill, Food in the Ancient World (Wiley-Blackwell, 2006) (ISBN 978-063123551); J.-L. Flandrin, M. Montanari, A. Sonnenfeld, Food: A Culinary History (Penguin, 2000) (ISBN 978-0140296587); A. Dalby and S. Grainger, The Classical Cookbook: Revised Edition (Getty Museum , 2012) (ISBN 978-1606061107)

Grades will be based on participation in in-class discussions (20%), weekly blog posts (10%), two short (5-6 page) writing assignments (15% each = 30%), a midterm exam (20%) and a final exam (20%).

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33240 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

33155 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 420

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on in-class quizzes (10%), participation in discussions both in class and online (15%), a group project (15%), two hour exams (15% each) and a comprehensive final exam (30%).  The required text below will be supplemented by frequent readings in electronic form posted on Blackboard.

Texts: J. G. Pedley, Greek Art and Archaeology. 5th edition, 2012.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

33370 • Spring 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506. We will complete Luschnig’s Introduction to Ancient Greek and then, if time permits, we will read selections from ancient Greek authors, with an emphasis on Attic Greek (Xenophon, Plato, and the orators). There will be daily assignments on grammar, vocabulary, and translation. Regular attendance and active participation are essential. Grades will be based on participation/preparedness (10%); homework (5%); quizzes (15%); two hour exams (22.5% each); and a final hour exam (25%). Prerequisite: Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek). This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

Texts: C. A. E. Luschnig, An Introduction to Ancient Greek. 2nd edition, 2007.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33000 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21
(also listed as CTI 310)

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

 

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

 

Grading:

Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, contributions to an online discussion board, two midterms, and a final exam. Grading will be roughly as follows: discussion board (5%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), midterms (2 x 20% = 40%), and final exam (35%).

 

Required Texts:

Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)

Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)

The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, Anchor, 2009: ISBN 1400031141)

Aeschylus, Oresteia (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1984: ISBN 0140443339)

Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)

Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)

Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

 

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

C C 380 • Meth & Thry In Clascl Archaeol

33130 • Fall 2012
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Classical archaeology, the first branch of archaeology to emerge as a coherent discipline, is both burdened and enriched by its heritage. Long pressed into the service of historical research or confined to a fairly narrow compass of art historical inquiry, it has broadened its scope dramatically over the last half century to include almost every possible aspect of the material remains of past human activity. Methods and perspectives developed in other fields, from social theory to literary criticism to anthropology, are increasingly incorporated into the classical archaeologist’s toolkit. At the same time, classical archaeology is intimately connected with the study of ancient Mediterranean languages and literatures, and those who seek to carry out -- or use the results of -- archaeological research in the Classical world must be aware of the particular set of issues raised by this connection.

 

This thematically-organized seminar provides a forum for the exploration and discussion of the intellectual principles and debates that inform modern archaeologies of the Bronze Age Aegean and the Classical Greek and Roman worlds. It is intended both for students who expect to carry out archaeological research and for students of history or literature who seek a better understanding of the issues surrounding the collection and interpretation of the archaeological evidence they may draw on in their own work. Students will be expected to evaluate a wide variety of arguments, principles, and methods introduced through readings, presentations by guest speakers and the students themselves, electronic media, and visits to various campus or regional resources (the GIS center, SAMA, etc.). Subject matter may include, on the one hand, such theoretical topics as historiography, landscape, gender, colonial and post-colonial studies, agency and habitus, ethnicity and identity, the ancient economy, and mortuary analysis; and, on the other hand, such applied topics as epigraphy and numismatics, the study of ceramics, principles of field survey, remote sensing and geophysical prospection, excavation methodologies, GIS and computer applications, archaeometric analyses, and various other technologies and approaches. 

Texts:

B. Trigger, A History of Archaeological Thought, 2nd ed. (Cambridge 2006: ISBN 978-0521600491)

M. Johnson, Archaeological Theory: An Introduction, 2nd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell 2010: ISBN 978-1405100151)

S. Alcock and R. Osborne, Classical Archaeology, 2nd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell 2012: ISBN 978-1444336917)

C C S301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

82790 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM JGB 2.218
(also listed as CTI S310)

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

 

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

 

Grading:

 Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, class participation, and three hour-long in-class exams. Grading will be roughly as follows: participation (15%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), and exams (3 x 20% each = 60%).

Required Texts:

Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)

Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)

The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, Anchor, 2009: ISBN 1400031141)

Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)

Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)

Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

 

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

C C 380 • Food/Drink/Body Class Archaeol

33010 • Fall 2011
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

CC380: Food, Drink, and the Body in Classical Archaeology

This course will explore material and iconographic evidence for the

production, consumption, and social meaning of food and drink, and for

their effects on the human body, in the Greek and Roman worlds.

Although the focus of the course will be primarily archaeological, we

will also bring literary and historical sources to bear on the

relationship between human beings and the things they ingest. In

addition, we may venture beyond the bounds of the Greek and Roman

world to discuss comparative evidence from other places and times, and

there will be extensive consideration of social and anthropological

theory related to eating and drinking. Students will be expected to

present and lead discussion of various articles, and the course will

culminate in a research paper on a topic developed by each student.

Students will also be required to write a formal book review of a book

related to the subject of the course.

 

Grades will be based on article presentations, participation in

discussion, the book review, and the final research paper. Readings

will be placed on physical reserve or will be available in digital

form through Blackboard. Primary texts will be read in translation,

although students with a knowledge of Greek and/or Latin are

encouraged to read in the original languages.

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

33310 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.102

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on in-class quizzes, on-line discussions and assignments, two hour exams and a comprehensive final exam.  The required text below will be supplemented by frequent readings in electronic form on reserve on BlackBoard.

 

Texts:
J. G. Pedley, Greek Art and Archaeology. 4th edition, 2007.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

32200 • Spring 2009
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

C C 383 • Gk Vase Painting: Blanton Col

32810 • Spring 2008
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM ART 3.432

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

C C 348 • Food And Drink-W

33140 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 208

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 307K • Greek Archaeology Survey

32645 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 214

Everyone knows about the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, but how many people can actually name them or even say where they were located? These feats of engineering, artistic and architectural majesty were spread across the ancient world from Babylon to Egypt to Greece. Many of them are now lost, but others remain. In this course we will explore the physical evidence for the Seven Wonders and also consider their cultural context and historical importance, as well as their significance for later writers and travelers. We will use these objects, sites and monuments to explore issues related to the study of the ancient past, but also the reception of that past in the modern era. Classes will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be required to present in class and to conduct a research project. The course has no prerequisites. It carries a Global Cultures flag and may be counted as an elective.

C C 380 • Roman Archaeology

31145 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

C C 380 Seminar in Classical Archaeology:

Topics given in recent years include methods and theory, Greek and Roman Naples, landscape archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

30485 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM FAC 21

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

C C W362 • Conf Crs In Clas Archaeol-Crm

82845 • Summer 2005

Advanced archaeological instruction and research in classical archaeology. No knowledge of Greek is required.

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

29855 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

30265 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WEL 1.316

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

Forthcoming publications


Rabinowitz, A., R. Shaw, S. Buchanan, P. Golden, and E. Kansa. "Making sense of the ways we make sense of the past: the PeriodO project," Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 59:2 (2016).

 

Rabinowitz, A., "Response: Mobilizing (ourselves) for a critical digital archaeology," in E. Averett, D. Counts, and J. Gordon, eds., Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future: The Potential of Digital Archaeology, forthcoming with The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota (in press).

 

Rabinowitz, A., "Il bere Graeco more tra vivi e morti: simposio e tomba in Sicilia e Magna Grecia," [Drinking Graeco more between the living and the dead: symposium and tomb in Sicily and Magna Graecia] in R. Panvini and L. Sole (eds.), "Nel Mondo di Ade": La vita dopo la morte nell'antichità (Caltanissetta: Soprintendenza BB. CC. AA. di Caltanissetta) (in press, expected publication date 2016).

 

Rabinowitz, A., "'Museum of Ancient Art' or white elephant? The Battle Collection of Plaster Casts at The University of Texas at Austin," in A. Alexandridis and L. Winkler-Horacek, eds., untitled volume forthcoming in the De Gruyter series Transformationen der Antike (in peer review).

 

Rabinowitz, A., "Constructing relationships from destruction: perspectives on stratigraphic context in Byzantine archaeology," in K. Kourelis and W. Caraher (eds.), Beyond Icons: Theories and Methods in Byzantine Archaeology (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press) (accepted, expected publication date ???).

 

Publications available online


Articles available on academia.edu


Rabinowitz, A., "The Work of Archaeology in the Age of Digital Surrogacy", in B. Olson and W. Caraher (eds.), Visions of Substance: 3D Imaging in Mediterranean Archaeology (The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota, 2015), 27-42.

 

Shaw, R., A. Rabinowitz, P. Golden, and E. Kansa. "A sharing-oriented design strategy for networked knowledge organization systems," International Journal on Digital Libraries 16 (2015), 1-13. doi:10.1007/s00799-015-0164-0.

 

Rabinowitz, A., "Drinkers, hosts, or fighters? Masculine identities in pre-Classical Crete", in G. Seelentag and O. Pilz (eds.), Cultural Practices and Material Culture in Archaic and Classical Crete (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2014), 91-120.

 

Rabinowitz, A., "GeoDia: or, Navigating archaeological time and space in an American college classroom", in G. Earl, T. Sly, A. Chrysanthi, P. Murrieta-Flores, C. Papadopoulos, I. Romanowska, and D. Wheatley, eds., CAA 2012: Proceedings of the 40th Annual Conference of Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Southampton, England (Amsterdam: Pallas Publications, 2013), 263-272.

 

Rabinowitz, A., M. Esteva, and J. Trelogan, "Ensuring a future for the past: long-term preservation strategies for digital archaeological data", in L. Duranti and E. Shaffer, eds., Proceedings of The Memory of the World in the Digital Age: Digitization and Preservation. An international conference on permanent access to digital documentary heritage, 26-28 September 2012, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (Vancouver: UNESCO, 2013), 941-954.

 

Trelogan, J., A. Rabinowitz, M. Esteva, and S. Pipkin, "What do we do with the mess? Managing and preserving process history in an evolving digital archaeological archive", in F. Contreras, M. Farjas, and F. J. Melero, eds., CAA 2010: Fusion of Cultures. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology, Granada, Spain, April 2010 (Oxford: Archaeopress, 2013), 597–600.

 

Rabinowitz, A., and L. Sedikova, "On whose authority? Interpretation, narrative, and fragmentation in digital publishing", in E. Jerem, F. Redo, and V. Szeverényi, eds., On the Road to Reconstructing the Past: Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA). Proceedings of the 36th International Conference, Budapest, April 2-6, 2008 (Budapest: Archaeolingua, 2011), 134-140.

 

Rabinowitz, A., C. Schroer and M. Mudge, "Grass-roots imaging: a case study in sustainable heritage documentation at Chersonesos, Ukraine", in B. Frischer, J. Crawford, and D. Coller, eds., Making History Interactive: Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA). Proceedings of the 37th International Conference, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States of America, March 22-29, 2009 (Oxford: Archaeopress, 2010), 320-328.

 

Rabinowitz, A., L. Sedikova, and R. Henneberg, "Daily life in a provincial Late Byzantine city: recent multidisciplinary research in the South Region of Tauric Chersonesos (Cherson)", in F. Daim and J. Drauschke (eds.), Byzanz – Das Römerreich im Mittelalter. Monographien des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums 84, vol. 2, 1 (Mainz: Schnell & Steiner, 2010), 425-478.

 

Rabinowitz, A., L. Sedikova, and R. Henneberg, "Povsednevhaya zhizn' provintsial'novo goroda v pozdnevizantijskij period: mezhdistsiplinarnye issledovaniya v Yuzhnom Rajon Khersonesa" [Daily life of a provincial city in the Late Byzantine period: interdisciplinary research in the South Region of Chersonesos, in Russian], МАИЭТ 15 (2010), 196-274.

 

Rabinowitz, A. and L. Sedikova, "Novyj sarkofag s izobrazheniem podvigov Gerakla iz Khersonesa" [A new sarcophagus with a depiction of the Labors of Herakles from Chersonesos, in Russian], Bosporos Studies 23 (2010), 335-362.

 

Rabinowitz, A., "Drinking from the same cup: Sparta and late Archaic commensality", in S. Hodkinson (ed.), Sparta: Comparative Approaches (Swansea: Classical Press of Wales, 2009), 113-192.

 

Rabinowitz, A., L. Sedikova, J. Trelogan and S. Eve, "Novi metodologii doslidzhennya pam'yatki davnini: tzifrovi technologii ta rozkopki u Pivdennomu rajoni Chersonesa Tavrijs'kovo" [New methodologies at an ancient site: digital technology and excavation in the Southern Region of Crimean Chersonesos, 2001-2006, in Ukrainian] (Part 1), Archeologia 2008 (1), 71-81.

 

Rabinowitz, A., L. Sedikova, J. Trelogan and S. Eve, "Novi metodologii doslidzhennya pam'yatki davnini: tzifrovi technologii ta rozkopki u Pivdennomu rajoni Chersonesa Tavrijs'kovo" [New methodologies at an ancient site: digital technology and excavation in the Southern Region of Crimean Chersonesos, 2001-2006, in Ukrainian] (Part 2), Archeologia 2008 (2), 69-78.

 

Rabinowitz, A., S. Eve, and J. Trelogan, "Precision, accuracy, and the fate of the data: experiments in site recording at Chersonesos, Ukraine", in J. Clark and E. Hagemeister, eds., Digital Discovery: Exploring New Frontiers in Human Heritage. Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA). Proceedings of the 34th Conference, Fargo, United States, April 2006 (Budapest: Archaeolingua, 2007), 243-255.

 

Rabinowitz, A., T. Yashaeva, and H. Nikolaenko, "The Chora of Chersonesos: excavations at Bezimenna, 2002," in Archaeology at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (Kyiv: National University of Kyiv and Institute of Classical Archaeology, 2005), 146-157.

 

Rabinowitz, A., "P. Cornell inv. II, 43: Lease of part of a house and workshop," Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists 38 (2001), 51-62.

 

Born-digital publications


Rabinowitz, A., "It's about time: historical periodization and Linked Ancient World Data", in T. Elliott, S. Heath, and J. Muccigrosso, Current Practice in Linked Open Data for the Ancient World (ISAW Papers 7, 2014), http://dlib.nyu.edu/awdl/isaw/isaw-papers/7/rabinowitz/.

 

Fentress, E. and A. Rabinowitz, "Part 2: the stratigraphy," in E. Fentress et al., An Intermittent Town: Excavations at Cosa, 1991-1997 (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003). http://www.press.umich.edu/webhome/cosa.

 

Reviews


Review of Wecowski, The Rise of the Greek Aristocratic Banquet (Oxford University Press, 2014), Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2015. http://www.bmcreview.org/2015/10/20151042.html.

 

Review of Stolba and Rogov, Panskoye I, Volume 2: The Necropolis. Archaeological investigations in Western Crimea (Aarhus University Press, 2012), Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2013. http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2013/2013-05-10.html.

 

Review of Bodard and Mahony, Digital Research in the Study of Classical Antiquity (Ashgate, 2010), Internet Archaeology 30 (2011). http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue30/rabinowitz.html.

 

Review of Campanella, Il cibo nel mondo fenicio e punico d'Occidente (Fabrizio Serra Editori, 2008), Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2010. http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-01-37.html.


Review of Hodos, Local Responses to Colonization in the Iron Age Mediterranean (Routledge 2006), Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008. http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2008/2008-08-29.html.

Publications available in print only


Review of Brisart, Un art citoyen. Recherches sur l'orientalisation des artisanats en Grèce proto-archaïque (Académie Royale de Belgique, 2011), Journal of Hellenic Studies 133 (2013), 262-263.

 

Yashaeva, T., E. Denisova, N. Ginkut, V. Zalesskaya, and D. Zhuravlev. The Legacy of Byzantine Cherson (Sevastopol and Austin: Telescope and Institute of Classical Archaeology, 2011). I was Scientific editor (with Yashaeva and Zalesskaya), editor of English and Greek texts, and final Russian-to-English translator of this trilingual (Russian/English/Ukrainian) catalogue of 500 Byzantine objects from Chersonesos in the collections of the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesos, the State Hermitage, and the Moscow State Historical Museum, 708 pp.

 

Kaci, A., A. Drine, E. Fentress, T. Morton, A. Rabinowitz, and A. Wilson, "The Excavations", in E. Fentress, A. Drine and R. Holod, An Island through Time: Jerba Studies I. The Roman and Punic Periods (Portsmouth, RI: Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplement 71, 2009), 212-240.


Fentress, E. and A. Rabinowitz, "Excavations at Cosa 1995: Atrium Building V and a new Republican temple," Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 41 (1996), 221-236.

Reports


The full text of all of these reports, along with several other publications and reports of the Institute of Classical Archaeology, is available on ICA's website (https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/ica/publications/reports.php).

 

Rabinowitz, A., ed., The Study of Ancient Territories: Chersonesos and South Italy. Report for 2008-2011. Institute of Classical Archaeology, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

 

Rabinowitz, A., "A note from the Assistant Director" and "Chersonesos, 2006-2007," in J. Carter, ed., The Study of Ancient Territories: Chersonesos and South Italy. Report for 2006-2007. Institute of Classical Archaeology, The University of Texas at Austin (2008), 5-19.

 

Rabinowitz, A. and L. Sedikova, "Excavation in the South Region of Chersonesos, 2005," in J. Carter, ed., The Study of Ancient Territories: Chersonesos and South Italy. 2005 Annual Report. Institute of Classical Archaeology, The University of Texas at Austin (2005), 7-16.

 

Rabinowitz, A. and L. Sedikova, "Excavations in the South Region of Chersonesos," in J. Carter, ed., The Study of Ancient Territories: Chersonesos and Metaponto. 2004 Annual Report. Institute of Classical Archaeology, The University of Texas at Austin (2004), 5-12.

 

Rabinowitz, A., T. Yashaeva, and G. Nikolaenko, "The chora of Chersonesos: excavations at Bezymyannaya," in J. Carter, ed., The Study of Ancient Territories: Chersonesos and Metaponto. 2002 Annual Report. Institute of Classical Archaeology, The University of Texas at Austin (2002) 9-17.

 

Blog posts


"Why does an archaeologist archaeologize?," post for the Day of Archaeology 2016 community blog, July 29, 2016. http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/why-does-an-archaeologist-archaeologize/

 

"Making that connection", post for the Day of Archaeology 2015 community blog, July 25, 2015. http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/making-that-connection/.

 

"Adam’s Day of DH: management vs. making", post for the Day of Digital Humanities 2015 community blog, May 19, 2015. http://dayofdh2015.uned.es/adamrabinowitz/2015/05/20/adams-day-of-dh-management-vs-making/.

 

"Archaeologists tossed on the tides of history", post for the Day of Archaeology 2014 community blog, July 12, 2014. http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/archaeologists-tossed-on-the-tides-of-history/.

 

"Reading Herodotus spatially in the undergraduate classroom", guest post in three parts on the Hestia Project blog, June 5, June 8, and July 22, 2014. http://hestia.open.ac.uk/reading-herodotus-spatially-in-the-undergraduate-classroom-part-i/; http://hestia.open.ac.uk/reading-herodotus-spatially-in-the-undergraduate-classroom-part-ii/; http://hestia.open.ac.uk/reading-herodotus-spatially-in-an-undergraduate-classroom-part-iii/.

 

"It’s about time (or almost too late)", post for the Day of Digital Humanities 2014 community blog, April 8, 2014. http://dayofdh2014.matrix.msu.edu/adamrabinowitz/.

 

"The work of archaeology in the age of digital surrogacy", guest post on the blog The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World, authored by William Caraher, included in a series on 3D archaeology, November 14, 2013. http://mediterraneanworld.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/the-work-of-archaeology-in-the-age-of-digital-surrogacy/.

 

"Representing archaeology", post for the Day of Archaeology 2013 community blog, July 27, 2013. http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/representing-archaeology/.

 

Series of posts on teaching with technology for the Day of Digital Humanities 2013 community blog, April 7-22, 2013. http://dayofdh2013.matrix.msu.edu/rabinowitz/2013/04/07/hello-world/ (and following).

 

Digital projects


Principal Investigator

Periods, Organized (PeriodO): a gazetteer of period assertions for linking and visualizing periodized data: perio.do, http://n2t.net/ark:/99152/p0 (websites for an NEH and IMLS-funded Digital Humanities project: see the lightning talk for the NEH DH Start-up grant here: https://youtu.be/UI-rxeEnhvk?t=1202); NEH grant number HD-51864-14, products and white paper at https://securegrants.neh.gov/PublicQuery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HD-51864-14; IMLS grant number LG-70-16-0009-16, details and proposal narrative at https://www.imls.gov/grants/awarded/lg-70-16-0009-16

Online database of excavations in the South Region of Tauric Chersonesos: http://ica.tacc.utexas.edu/chersonesos/ark/

GeoDia: http://geodia.laits.utexas.edu; http://code.google.com/p/geodia/

Participant

Oxford Classical Dictionary 5 (digital only: Senior Editor for Greek Archaeology, Archaic to Hellenistic)

Frontiers in Digital Humanities: Digital Archaeology (Review Editor)

Pleiades (Associate Editor)

Open Context (member of editorial board)

Pelagios Commons (member of Pelagios Commons Committee)

Fasti Online (member of the Scientific Committee)

Hestia (member of web development team); see also the Open University learning unit on Herodotus at http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/classical-studies/herodotus-the-histories

 

Scholarly presentations


"Periods, Organized (PeriodO): A Linked Data period gazetteer and approach to the modeling of scholarly assertions", refereed paper delivered as part of panel entitled "What do we mean by 'Digital Curation'?" at the 2016 Society of American Archaeology Conference held in Orlando, Florida, on April 9, 2016. Archived slides and text of talk at http://core.tdar.org/document/404077/periods-organized-periodo-a-linked-data-period-gazetteer-and-approach-to-the-modeling-of-scholarly-assertions.

 

"PeriodO: a gazetteer of period assertions for linking and visualizing data. Why is it important to include periods in a Linked Data infrastructure, and how do we do it?", invited paper for the Mellon-funded Linking the Middle Ages workshop at The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, May 11, 2015. Video of presentation available online here; white paper from workshop available at http://dx.doi.org/10.15781/T2MW2C.

 

"Living pictures: computational photography and the Digital Classics", refereed paper delivered in the joint AIA/APA panel "Getting started with Digital Classics" at the 115th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, Chicago, Illinois, on January 3, 2014. Online at http://youtu.be/6R_9GzSM7Js.

 

"Periods, Organized (PeriodO): a Linked Data gazetteer to bridge the gap between concept and usage in archaeological periodization", refereed paper co-authored with Ryan Shaw and Eric Kansa and delivered at the 2014 Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology at the University of the Sorbonne, Paris, France, on April 24, 2014. Slideshare available at http://www.slideshare.net/atomrab/periodo-caa2014

 

"Digital archaeology and the hundred-year archive: experiments in field recording, dissemination and long-term data preservation at Chersonesos (Crimea, Ukraine)", refereed paper co-authored with Maria Esteva and Jessica Trelogan and delivered at the 114th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, Seattle, Washington, on January 6, 2013. Online at http://youtu.be/L0e70-R1mMA.

 

"The fault is not in our databases, but in ourselves: messy data, metadata, and interoperability", invited presentation delivered at the stocktaking workshop for the Australian NeCTAR-funded "Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems" (FAIMS) project at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, on August 17, 2012. Online at https://www.fedarch.org/research/#workshop

 

Presentation on work on GeoDia and archaeological metadata at the 2012 NEH-funded Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) held at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, New York, New York, on May 31-June 2, 2012. http://www.slideshare.net/atomrab/rabinowitz-at-lawdi

 

"Modeling time and place in an interactive spatial timeline", invited talk delivered at the Pelagios workshop at Kings College London, London, United Kingdom, on March 24, 2011. Slideshare available at http://www.slideshare.net/atomrab/pelagios-workshop-rabinowitz-geodia

 

UGS 302: Tales of the Trojan War


I have taught this course in 2008, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. In both 2015 and 2016, students in this course won first place for their research papers in an annual University-wide Information Literacy Award competition.

Within the last hundred years, the world has seen a transportation revolution, a communication revolution, and most recently an information revolution, not to mention two world wars and dozens of political revolutions of varying merit and success. Our own battles are increasingly fought with digital tools, with the results instantly visible in full color on television or YouTube. In this time of lightning-fast change, why should anyone care about a war that may or may not have been fought 3200 years ago, or read a poem about that war composed by, or written down by, or cobbled together by someone, or several people, or a host of anonymous bards somewhere between 400 and 600 years after that war was supposed to have taken place? At a glance, it seems a little ridiculous to spend a semester at the beginning of the 21st century thinking about Troy.

 Look again. The Iliad is arguably the very first work of literature in the Western tradition, the ancestor of all the character-driven novels and movies that are a fundamental part of modern culture. For more than 2500 years, the broader narrative of the Trojan War has provided people and societies with a story they could use to work through their own experiences of war, violence, and human relationships. Its themes and characters reappear throughout Western art and literature, and the mutations they undergo provide a powerful tool to understand the cultures and times that produced them. And the irresistible 19th-century desire to find the historical truth behind the legend led, in large part, to the development of the discipline of Classical Archaeology. Even the inanimate finds from the first excavation at Troy refuse to give up their hold on the present: the golden treasure that Heinrich Schliemann smuggled out of the Ottoman Empire was carried from the smoldering ruins of Berlin to Moscow, where it was dramatically rediscovered when another empire crumbled. Scholars now fight each other over Homer's value to modern education, while the general public enjoys Brad Pitt as Achilles. The Iliad resonates even more powerfully at this moment in history, in which the experience of war, bitter hatreds, and the destruction of cities is yet again all too familiar. The Trojan War, it seems, is still not over. In the end, what could be better to think about for a semester in the early 21st century?

 This course is about Homer and the ancient world, but even more than that, it is about the persistence of the past. I will ask you to become familiar with the stories of Troy, the world in which they were first written down, and the world to which they seem to refer. I will then ask you to use that familiarity to look at the way themes, images, characters and events from the Trojan War are used and transformed from antiquity to our own time. We will discuss together what those transformations mean for the places and times in which they occurred, including the present. In the process, you will encounter the birth of modern archaeology, the decipherment of Linear B, Greek and Roman art and literature, World War II, academic politics, post-traumatic stress disorder, and Hollywood.

Syllabus

Teaching materials for digital group projects


Assignments and digital student projects related to groupwork in my Introduction to Ancient Greece and Introduction to Greek Archaeology classes are available in Box at: https://utexas.box.com/s/n1ttumoepqq0ujuzymlswwjpg5rs4o77

 

Google map of contributions to the Pleiades spatial gazetteer produced by students in Introduction to Greek Archaeology in 2013 and 2015: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Kr2zeRTSQgWqwRs9GPM5G4kXAkE&usp=sharing

 


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