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Kathleen M Higgins


ProfessorPhD, Yale

Kathleen M Higgins

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-5564
  • Office: WAG 203
  • Office Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:45-11:45 a.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3500

Interests


Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Philosophy of emotion, philosophy of art, music, non-Western philosophy, philosophy of religion

Biography


Kathleen Higgins's main areas of research are continental philosophy, aesthetics, and philosophy of music.  She has written Comic Relief: Nietzsche's Gay Science (Oxford, 2000), What Nietzsche Really Said (with Robert Solomon, 2000), A Passion for Wisdom (Oxford, 1997), A Short History of Philosophy (with Robert Solomon, Oxford, 1996), The Music of Our Lives (1991), and Nietzsche's Zarathustra (1987), which Choice named an outstanding academic book of 1988-1989. She has edited or co-edited several others on such topics as German Idealism, aesthetics, ethics, erotic love, and non-Western philosophy. She has been a Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center and a Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University Philosophy Department and Canberra School of Music. She is a frequent Visiting Professor at the University of Auckland.

Courses


PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

42385-42425 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 0.102

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, with some comparison with the aesthetic traditions of other societies.  Particular attention will be given to the nature of aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer and the relationship between art and reality.

PHL 385 • Emotion And The Arts

42575 • Fall 2016
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 310

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

This course will consider basic issue in philosophy of emotion and their application to issues in philosophy of the arts, with special (but not exclusive) emphasis on music.  Among the issues to be considered are the following:  What mechanisms are involved in emotional responses to the arts?  How does art express emotion?  How does emotion contribute to meaning in art?  Should moral considerations restrict our emotional responses to art?  What can we learn from our emotional responses to art?  Why do we enjoy “negative” emotions (horror, sadness) in art?  How does emotional expression relate to emotional arousal?  Can we have real emotional reactions to characters and plots that we know are fictional, and if so, how?  Do emotions require objects? If they do, are there musical emotions?  Can music express cognitively complex emotions?  Are emotional responses to art universal in any sense?

Grading Policy

Term paper: 80%   Participation (including a brief introduction of some discussion questions for particular week’s readings): 20%

Texts

Robert C. Solomon, ed., What Is an Emotion?, 2nd ed. 

Albert Hofstadter and Richard Kuhns, eds., Philosophies of Art and Beauty  Mette Hjort and Sue Laver, eds.,

Emotion and the Arts

A packet of articles

PHL 375M • Philosophy And Feminism

41780 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 308
(also listed as WGS 345)

This course will critically examine the social implications of feminism. Topics to be considered include: the legacy of historical philosophical understandings of women; the concept of gender; and relationship between sexism and racism; the possiblitiy and desirability of feminist approaches toward traditional areas of philosophy (such as ethics, aesthetics, epistemology and ontology); the diversity of feminisms and their various social and polictical agendas; and the viability of particular institutional changes advocated by feminists (in connection with such arenas as weomen's rights, chil-rearing, the interaction of the sexes, work, etc).

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

41500-41540 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.306

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, with some comparison with perspectives from Japan (and perhaps other societies).  Particular attention will be given to the nature of aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer and the relationship between art and reality.

PHL 387 • Nietzsche On Ethics/Morality

41760 • Fall 2015
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 312

This course will consider Nietzsche as both a critic of the moral tradition and a positive ethical thinker.  Among the issues to be considered are the following: 1) What is Nietzsche’s immoralism? 2) What implications does genealogy have for morality? 3) What is the point of revaluation of values, and what should come in its wake? 4) What are the implications of the theory of will to power for ethical life? 5) What is Nietzsche’s positive ethical vision? 6) Does Nietzsche think his ethical ideals are humanly attainable? 7) Is Nietzsche a virtue ethicist?.

PHL 375M • Chinese Philosophy

42105 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 22

This course will be an overview of basic themes in Chinese philosophy, concentrating on the ancient texts of Confucianism and Daoism.  Emphasis will be placed on: the respective emphases of Confucianism, Daoism, and Chinese Buddhism, with consideration of the way in which these emphases have been synthesized and conjoined in more recent Chinese philosophy.

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

42940-42965 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 100

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, with some comparison with perspectives from Japan (and perhaps other societies). Particular attention will be given to the nature of aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer and the relationship between art and reality.

PHL 385 • Emotion And The Arts

43160 • Fall 2014
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 312

This course will consider basic issue in philosophy of emotion and their application to issues in philosophy of the arts, with special (but not exclusive) emphasis on music.  Among the issues to be considered are the following:  What mechanisms are involved in emotional responses to the various arts?  How does art express emotion?  How does emotion contribute to meaning in art?  Should moral considerations restrict our emotional responses to art?  What can we learn from our emotional responses to art?  Why do we enjoy “negative” emotions (horror, sadness) in art?  How does emotional expression relate to emotional arousal?  Can we have real emotional reactions to characters and plots that we know are fictional, and if so, how?  Do emotions require objects? If they do, are there musical emotions?  Can music express cognitively complex emotions?  Are emotional responses to art universal in any sense?Are emotional responses to art universal in any sense?

 

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

43270-43280 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 302

Classic issues in the philosophy of art and beauty, illustrated from the fine arts and contemporary media: literature, drama, music, painting, film, and television. 

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

43015-43017 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 100

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, as well as offering a brief overview of some perspectives from Japan.  Particular attention will be given to the distinction between art and reality, and to the nature of the aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer.

PHL 381 • Nietzsche

43190 • Fall 2013
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 312

This course will consider Nietzsche as both a critic of the moral tradition and a positive ethical thinker.  Among the issues to be considered are the following: 1) What is Nietzsche’s immoralism? 2) What implications does genealogy have for morality? 3) What is the point of revaluation of values, and what should come in its wake? 4) What are the implications of the theory of will to power for ethical life? 5) What is Nietzsche’s positive ethical vision? 6) Does Nietzsche think his ethical ideals are humanly attainable? 7) Is Nietzsche a virtue ethicist?

PHL 385 • Emotion And The Arts

42735 • Fall 2012
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

This course will consider basic issue in philosophy of emotion and their application to issues in philosophy of the arts, with special (but not exclusive) emphasis on music.  Among the issues to be considered are the following:  What mechanisms are involved in emotional responses to the various arts?  How does art express emotion?  How does emotion contribute to meaning in art?  Should moral considerations restrict our emotional responses to art?  What can we learn from our emotional responses to art?  Why do we enjoy “negative” emotions (horror, sadness) in art?  How does emotional expression relate to emotional arousal?  Can we have real emotional reactions to characters and plots that we know are fictional, and if so, how?  Do emotions require objects? If they do, are there musical emotions?  Can music express cognitively complex emotions?  Are emotional responses to art universal in any sense?

PHL 381 • Nietzsche On Ethics & Morality

42695 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 312

This course will consider Nietzsche as both a critic of the moral tradition and a positive ethical thinker.  Among the issues to be considered are the following: 1) What is Nietzsche’s immoralism? 2) What implications does genealogy have for morality? 3) What is the point of revaluation of values, and what should come in its wake? 4) What are the implications of the theory of will to power for ethical life? 5) What is Nietzsche’s positive ethical vision? 6) Does Nietzsche think his ethical ideals are humanly attainable? 7) Is Nietzsche a virtue ethicist?

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

42425-42450 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 100

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, with some comparison with perspectives from Japan (and perhaps other societies).  Particular attention will be given to the nature of the aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer.

PHL 318 • Introduction To Ethics

42455-42465 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 302

This course will consider major ethical theories in the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions as guides to practical living.  The primary question to be addressed is:  What is the good life for human beings, in theory and in practice?

PHL 325L • Business, Ethics, And Publ Pol

43020 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 214

This goal of this course is for students to participate in a debate that has engaged philosophers and social critics for at least 2,500 years regarding the social benefits and successes, as well as the risks and moral failures of commercial life.  The focus will be the role of business and the modern corporation in American life and the role of the individual (worker, manager, executive, consumer, citizen) in commercial life. We will consider not just the moral challenges and obstacles of modern commercial life, but also its moral opportunities. We will examine the diverse moral complexity of commercial life by exploring topics such as the relationship between market equilibrium and social optimality, the myth of homo economicus, the connection between freedom and capitalism, and the role of business in the attainment of the good life. Some of the philosophical issues will also include some general concerns of ethics with specific application to business, questions of justice, and the virtues and vices of capitalism. Some of the practical business issues will include the concept of corporate social responsibility, the ethical implications of mergers and takeovers, business ethics and the environment, and the ethical role of the consumer.  Theoretical considerations will be augmented by presentations from professionals in the Austin business community whose business practices and social entrepreneurship projects engage and respond to the moral and social issues covered during the course.  The discussion section will be an essential part of the class. The course will try to strike a balance between the practical and the theoretical. 

PHL 366K • Existentialism

43125-43165 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM WEL 2.246

 “Existentialism” was hardly a philosophical movement in the traditional sense, for few of its major figures would have described themselves as existentialists.  And yet the existentialists do represent a movement in the sense that they sharing certain concerns, such as emphasis on how reflective thought relates to our actual lives, skepticism regarding reason, reevaluation of traditional approaches to ethics, and insistence on passionate engagement as essential for a meaningful life.  Among the figures we will consider are Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Martin Heidegger, and Simone de Beauvoir.

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

42418-42424 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 100

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, with some comparison with perspectives from other societies.  Particular attention will be given to the nature of the aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer.

PHL 318 • Introduction To Ethics

42425-42435 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 420

This course will consider major ethical theories in the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions as guides to practical living.  The primary question to be addressed is:  What is the good life for human beings, in theory and in practice?

PHL 375M • Chinese Philosophy-W

43295 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A205A

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

43330-43340 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM RAS 213

This course will consider some of the answers given in the Western philosophical tradition to questions about the nature of art and beauty, with some comparison with perspectives from other societies.  Particular attention will be given to the distinction between art and reality, and the nature of the aesthetic experience from the standpoint of both the artist and the observer.

PHL 318 • Introduction To Ethics

43345-43355 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.124

This course will consider several major ethical theories in the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions as guides to practical living.  The primary question to be addressed is:  What is the good life for human beings, in theory and in practice?

PHL 381 • Nietzsche On Ethics & Morality

42520 • Spring 2009
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 375M • Philosophy And Feminism-W

43510 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 301 • Introduction To Philosophy

42470 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEL 328

A survey of principal topics and problems in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of religion. 

PHL 375M • Chinese Philosophy-W

43060 • Spring 2007
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM PAR 303

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 375M • Philosophy And Feminism-W

44185 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SZB 278

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 381 • Nietzsche, Religion, & Values

44230 • Fall 2006
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 307

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

42105-42140 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 100

Classic issues in the philosophy of art and beauty, illustrated from the fine arts and contemporary media: literature, drama, music, painting, film, and television. 

PHL 375M • Chinese Philosophy-W

40802 • Spring 2005
Meets T 3:00PM-5:00PM GAR 313

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 375M • Nietzsche-W

39365 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.338

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 301 • Introduction To Philosophy

39425 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 112

A survey of principal topics and problems in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of religion. 

PHL 375M • Chinese Philosophy-W

39515 • Spring 2003
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.340

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 301 • Introduction To Philosophy

39000-39015 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 302

A survey of principal topics and problems in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of religion. 

PHL 317K • Intro To Philos Of The Arts

39985-40000 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM WAG 302

Classic issues in the philosophy of art and beauty, illustrated from the fine arts and contemporary media: literature, drama, music, painting, film, and television. 

HMN 379 • Conference Course

36070 • Spring 2002

Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. May be repeated for credit.

PHL 301 • Introduction To Philosophy

38425-38440 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM BUR 108

A survey of principal topics and problems in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of religion. 

PHL 334K • Nietzsche

39330-39345 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302

Critical study of the philosophical implications of the works of selected modern thinkers from the nineteenth century to the present day. 

PHL 381 • Nietzsche

40470 • Fall 2001
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

27240-27255 • Spring 2001
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

PHL 302 • World Philosophy

37820-37835 • Spring 2000
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 302

Basic issues of philosophy in Western and non-Western traditions, such as the nature of philosophy, its relation to religion and science, the self, knowledge, and virtue. 

PHL 381 • Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche

38670 • Spring 2000
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

Books


 

Original Books


Nietzsche's Zarathustra

Nietzsche's Zarathustra

Kathleen M Higgins

Nietzsche's Zarathustra
April 2010
Lexington Books

 

The Music of Our Lives

The Music of Our Lives

Kathleen M Higgins

The Music of Our Lives
February 2011
Lexington Books

 

A Short History of Philosophy

A Short History of Philosophy

Robert C. Solomon, Kathleen M Higgins

A Short History of Philosophy
February 1996
Oxford University Press

 

A Passion for Wisdom: A Very Brief History of Philosophy

A Passion for Wisdom: A Very Brief History of Philosophy

Robert C. Solomon, Kathleen M Higgins

A Passion for Wisdom: A Very Brief History of Philosophy
January 1999
Oxford University Press

 

Comic Relief: Nietzsche's Gay Science

Comic Relief: Nietzsche's Gay Science

Kathleen M Higgins

Comic Relief: Nietzsche's Gay Science
January 2000
Oxford University Press

 

What Nietzsche Really Said

What Nietzsche Really Said

Robert C. Solomon, Kathleen M Higgins

What Nietzsche Really Said
January 2001
Schocken Books

 

The Music between Us: Is Music a Universal Language?


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Edited Books


Reading Nietzsche, co-edited with Robert C. Solomon (New York, Oxford University Press, 1988).


The Philosophy of (Erotic) Love, co-edited with Robert C. Solomon (Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1991).


From Africa to Zen: An Invitation to World Philosophy, co-edited with Robert C. Solomon (Lanham, Maryland: Roman and Littlefield, 1993); second edition, 2003; Chinese translation, 2004.


Routledge History of Philosophy, Vol. VI: The Age of German Idealism,co-edited with Robert C. Solomon (London: Routledge, 1993).


A Companion to Aesthetics, co-edited with Stephen Davies, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker, and David Cooper, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2009).


Passion, Death, and Spirituality: The Philosophy of Robert C. Solomon, co-edited with David Sherman, Sophia Studies in Cross-Cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures 1 (Dordrecht: Springer, 2012).


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New Editions


Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, trans. Clancy Martin, co-edited with Robert C. Solomon (New York: Barnes and Noble Classics, 2005).


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Textbooks


Thirteen Questions In Ethics, co-edited with Lee Bowie and Meredith Michaels (San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1992; Thirteen Questions in Ethics and Social Philosophy, 2nd edition (Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace, 1998).


World Philosophy: A Text with Readings, co-edited with Robert C. Solomon (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995).


Aesthetics in Perspective (edited) (Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace, 1996).


The Big Questions, co-authored with Robert C. Solomon, 8th ed. (Belmont, Ca.: Wadsworth, 2010); 9th ed., 2014.


Introducing Philosophy, co-authored with Robert C. Solomon and Clancy Martin, 10th ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012); 11th edition forthcoming, 2015.


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Articles


“Festivals of Recognition: Nietzsche’s Idealized Communities,” in Nietzsche and Community, ed. Julian Young (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014), pp. 77-92.


“Post-Truth Pluralism: The Unlikely Political Wisdom of Friedrich Nietzsche,” Breakthrough Journal 3 (Winter 2013): 101-106.


“Moral Equivalents,” in Value and Values: Economics and Justice in an Age of Global Interdependence, ed. Roger T. Ames and Peter D. Hershock (Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2014). [forthcoming]


“La lecture de l’oracle (Oracular Reading),” in “L’art de bien lire”, Nietzsche et la philologie, ed. Jean-François Balaudé and Patrick Wotling (Paris: Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 2012), pp. 241-252. (French only)


“Loyalty from a Confucian Perspective,” in Loyalty, ed. Sanford Levinson and Paul Woodruff, Nomos LIV (New York: New York University Press, 2012), pp. 22-38.


“Bob on Meaning in Life and Death,” in Passion, Death, and Spirituality: The Philosophy of Robert C. Solomon, co-edited with David Sherman (Dordrecht: Springer, 2012), 259-267.


“Introduction,” in Passion, Death, and Spirituality: The Philosophy of Robert C. Solomon, co-edited with David Sherman (Dordrecht: Springer, 2012), ix-xv.


“Introduction: Robert C. Solomon and the Spiritual Passions” in Special Issue on Robert C. Solomon and the Spiritual Passions, Guest Editor: Kathleen M. Higgins, Sophia: International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Metaphysical Theology, and Ethics, 50 (June 2011): 239-245.


“Biology and Culture in Musical Emotions,” Emotion Review, Special Issue on Social-Constructionist Approaches to Emotion, ed. James Averill, 4:3 (2012): 273-282.


“Visual Music and Synaesthesia,” in The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music, ed. Andrew Kania and Theodore Gracyk (New York: Routledge, 2010), 480-491.


“Love and Death,” in On Emotions: Philosophical Essays, ed. John Deigh (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), 159-178.


“Refined Emotions in Aesthetic Experience: A Cross-Cultural Comparison,” in Aesthetic Experience, ed. Richard Shusterman and Adele Tomlin, Routledge Studies in Contemporary Philosophy (New York: Routledge, 2008), 106-126.


“Leadership through Music,” in Leadership at the Crossroads, ed. Joanne B. Ciulla, in 3 vols., Vol. 3: Leadership and the Humanities (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 2008), 151-171.


“Suffering in Nietzsche’s Philosophy,” in Reading Nietzsche at the Margins, ed. Steven V. Hicks and Alan Rosenberg (West Lafayette: Purdue University Press, 2008), 59-72.


“The Cognitive and Appreciative Import of Musical Universals,” Revue Internationale de Philosophie 60/238 (December 2006): 487-503.


“Nietzsche, Empty Names, and Individuality,” International Studies in Philosophy 38/3 (2006): 117-130.


“An Alchemy of Emotion: Rasa and Aesthetic Breakthroughs,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Special Issue: Global Theories of the Arts and the Aesthetic 65 (2007): 43-54.


“Musical Education for Peace,” in Educations and Their Purposes: A Conversation among Cultures, ed. Roger T. Ames and Peter D. Hershock (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2008), 389-404.


“Negative Virtues: Zhuangzi’s Wuwei,” Virtue Ethics: Old and New, ed. Stephen Gardiner (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005), 125-141.


“Rebaptizing Our Evil: Nietzsche’s Revaluation of Values,” in The Companion to Nietzsche, ed. Keith Ansell-Pearson (London: Blackwell, 2005), 404-418.


“Nietzsche and the Mystery of the Ass,” in A Nietzschean Bestiary: Animality Beyond Docile and Brutal, ed. Ralph R. Acampora and Christa Davis Acampora (Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004), 100-118.


“Music or the Mistaken Life,” International Studies in Philosophy 35:3 (2003): 117-130.


"Musical Synesthesia :Why We Feel Like Dancing" in Frontiers of Transculturality in Contemporary Aesthetics, ed. Grazia Marchianò and Raffaele Milani (Turin: Trauben/ Casalini Libri, 2001), 319-337.


"Double-Consciousness and Second Sight," in Critical Affinities: Reflections on the Convergence of Nietzsche and African-American Thought, ed. Todd Franklin and Jacqueline Scott (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2006), 51-73.


"Chinese Music and the Family," in An Introduction to Chinese Culture Through the Family, ed. Howard Giskin and Bettye Walsh (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), 107-122.


"Television, Realism, and the Distortion of Time," in Television: Aesthetic Reflections, ed. Ruth Lorand (New York: Peter Lang, 2002), 107-126.


“Danto: On the Use and Disadvantage of Hegel for Art,” co-authored with Robert C. Solomon, in The Philosophy of Arthur C. Danto, ed. Randall E. Auxier and Lewis Edwin Hahn, The Library of Living Philosophers Series, Vol.33 (Chicago: Open Court, 2013), pp. 645-663.


“Beyond Irony: Nietzsche in the Twenty-First Century,” International Studies in Philosophy XXXIII:3 (Fall 2001): 37-51.


“Beauty and Its Kitsch Competitors,” in Beauty Matters, ed. Peg Zeglin Brand (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000), 87-111; in abridged form as “Beauty, Kitsch, and Glamour,” in Twenty Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy, edited by Lee Bowie, Meredith Michaels, and Robert C. Solomon, 4th ed. (Fort Worth: Harcourt, 2000), 777-783.


"Mass Appeal," in Philosophy and Literature 23 (1999): 197-205.


"Death and the Skeleton," in Death and Philosophy, ed. J. E. Malpas and Robert C. Solomon (London: Routledge, 1998), 39-49; in abridged form in Twenty Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy, edited by Lee Bowie, Meredith Michaels, and Robert C. Solomon, 4th ed. (Fort Worth: Harcourt, 2000), 501-504.


"Music and the Ten Thousand Things: Musical Metaphysics in China," Proceedings of the Pacific Rim Conference on Transcultural Aesthetics, ed. Eugenio Benitez (on disk, ISBN 0-646-28504-1, 1997), 81-95.


"Schopenhauer and Nietzsche: Temporality and Temperament," in Willing and Nothingness: Schopenhauer as Nietzsche's Educator, ed. Christopher Janaway (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998), 151-177.


"Waves of Uncountable Laughter," in Nietzsche 's Futures, ed. John Lippitt (London: Macmillan, 1997), 82-98.


"The Whip Recalled," Journal of Nietzsche Studies 12 (Autumn 1996):1-18.


"Musical Idiosyncrasy and Perspectival Listening," in Music and Meaning, ed. Jenefer Robinson (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), 83-102.


"Gender in ‘The Gay Science,’" Philosophy and Literature 19/2 (October 1995): 227-247; also in Feminist Interpretations of Friedrich Nietzsche, ed. Kelly Oliver and Marilyn Pearsall (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998), pp. 130-151.


"Bad Faith and Kitsch as Models for Self-Deception," in Self and Deception: A Conversation in Comparative Philosophy, ed. Roger T. Ames and Wimal Dissanayake (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996), pp. 123-141.


"Nietzsche's Nursery Rhymes," Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques 21/3 (Fall 1995): 397-417.


"Atomism, Art and Arthur: Danto's Hegelian Turn" (with Robert C. Solomon), in Danto and His Critics, ed. Mark Rollins (London: Basil Blackwell, 1993), pp. 107-126. Japanese translation in Bigaku Kenkyu (publication of Graduate School of Letters, Osaka University) 1 (2001): 69-94.


"The Good, the True, and the Beautiful," in Falling in Love with Wisdom: American Philosophers Talk about Their Calling, ed. David Karnos and Robert Shoemaker (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), pp. 223-225.


“‘Zarathustra’ Is a Comic Book," Philosophy and Literature, 16/1 (April 1992): 1-14.


“Arthur Schopenhauer," in Routledge History of Philosophy, Vol. VI: The Age of German Idealism, ed. Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen Higgins (London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 330-362.


“Apollo, Music, and Cross-Cultural Rationality," Philosophy East and West 42/4 (October 1992): 623-641.


“The Music of Our Lives," in Twenty Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy, edited by Lee Bowie, Meredith Michaels, and Robert C. Solomon, 2nd ed. (Fort Worth : Harcourt Brace, 1992), pp. 671-675; 3rd ed. (Fort Worth : Harcourt Brace, 1995), pp. 734-738; Aesthetics, ed. Susan Feagin and Patrick Maynard (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 141-148.


“‘On the Genealogy of Morals’ -- Nietzsche's Gift," in Nietzsche, Genealogy, Morality: Essays on Nietzsche's “Genealogy of Morals,” ed. Richard Schacht (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994), pp. 49-62.


"Sweet Kitsch," in The Philosophy of the Visual Arts, ed. Philip Alperson (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 568-581.


“‘Zarathustra’ IV and Apuleius: Who Is Zarathustra's Ass?", International Studies in Philosophy, XX/3, (1988): 29-53; also in Nietzsche: Critical Assessments, ed. Daniel W. Conway with Peter S. Groff, Vol. I: Incipit Zarathustra/Incipit Tragoedia: Art, Music, Representation, and Style (New York: Routledge, 1998), 166-189.


"Nietzsche and Postmodern Subjectivity," in Nietzsche as Postmodernist: Essays Pro and Contra, ed. Clayton Koelb (Albany: State University of New York Press, l990), pp. 189-215.


"Music, Muzak Everywhere: Is Anybody Really Listening?" in Twenty Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy, edited by Lee Bowie, Meredith Michaels, and Robert C. Solomon, 1st ed., (San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988), 660-670.


"Reading ‘Zarathustra,’" in Reading Nietzsche, ed. Higgins and Solomon (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 132-151.


"Nietzsche's View of Philosophical Style," International Studies in Philosophy XVIII/2 (Summer 1986): 67-81.


"Nietzsche on Music," Journal of the History of Ideas, XLVII/4 (October-December 1986): 663-672; also in Essays on the History of Aesthetics, ed. Peter Kivy (Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 1992), 367-376.


"The Night Song's Answer," International Studies in Philosophy XVII/2 (Summer 1985): 33-50.


"Music in Confucian and Neo-Confucian Philosophy," in International Philosophical Quarterly, XX/4 (December 1980): 432-451.


Videos


World Philosophy

"World Philosophy," lecture series, The Teaching Company, 2001.


The Will to Power:  The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

"The Will to Power:  The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche," lecture series (with Robert C. Solomon), The Teaching Company, 1999.

Among shapers of contemporary thought—including Darwin, Marx, and Freud—Friedrich Nietzsche is perhaps the most mysterious and least understood. His aphorisms are widely quoted, but as both man and thinker he remains an enigmatic figure, "philosophizing with a hammer" and hurling unsettling challenges to some of our most cherished beliefs.


The Great Minds of the Western Intellectual Tradition

Guest Lectures on Schopenhauer and Nietzsche for Darren Staloff and Michael Sugrue, “The Great Minds of the Western Intellectual Tradition” lecture series, The Teaching Company, 1999.

Awards & Honors


American Society for Aesthetics Outstanding Monograph Prize (for The Music between Us), 2013.

Rappaport-King Scholar Mentor Award, College of Liberal Arts, The University of Texas at Austin, 1997, 2011

Alumni Achievement Award, Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri, Kansas City, 1999

Resident Scholar, The Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center, October 1993

Nietzsche's “Zarathustra” named one of the Outstanding Academic Books of l988-89 by Choice

University Research Institute Summer Research Award, The University of Texas at Austin, 1985

 


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