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Rabun M Taylor


Associate ProfessorPhD 1997, University of Minnesota

Rabun M Taylor

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-0677
  • Office: WAG 14b
  • Office Hours: F 2012: Fridays 9-10, 1-3
  • Campus Mail Code: C3400

Biography


InterestsGreek and Roman art, architecture, archaeology, urbanism, social history, and material culture— particularly as understood through the lens of social sciences such as anthropology and religious studies.

FieldsRoman Archaeology, Urbanism, Roman Material Culture, Greek and Roman Art.

Courses Taught:

Fall 2010:  CC 307D:  Introduction to Roman Archaeology; CC 340:  Pompeii.

Spring 2011:  CC 317:  Classical Archaeology:  Methods and Approaches; CC 383:  Greeks and Romans on the Bay of Naples.

Fall 2011:  CC 307D:  Introduction to Roman Archaeology; UGS 303:  Technology in the Greek and Roman World.

Spring 2012:  CC 317:  Classical Archaeology:  Methods and Approaches; CC 380:  Ostia.

Fall 2012:  CC 307D:  Introduction to Roman Archaeology; UGS 303:  Technology in the Greek and Roman World.

Spring 2013:  CC 340:  Pompeii; CC 380:  Roman Architecture.

 

Fieldwork: Morea, Cosa, Naples, Rome, Manziana, Bracciano

 

 

 

 


Courses


C C 340 • Pompeii

33000 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 208
(also listed as URB 353)

Buried in an eruption in 79 AD and rediscovered only in the mid-eighteenth century, the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum offer modern visitors a panoramic view of Roman life.  The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today.  Our task is to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds.  Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of Mt. Vesuvius, seeking through artifacts — some magnificent and others merely interesting — to recollect a way of life.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 380 • Roman Architecture

33040 • Fall 2016
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM GDC 2.402

This course will encompass Roman architecture in its many dimensions:  as a process, and a product; as an expression of cultural continuity and a medium of innovation; as a product of high artifice, and an organic component of urban and rural landscape; as the product of complex systems of planning, administration, and organization; and as a vehicle of signification through time.  Special attention will be given, on the one hand, to Vitruvius and the fraught relationship of his architectural treatise to the emergence of a distinctly Roman classicism, and to monumental architecture of the Roman Imperial period from Nero to Maxentius.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

32170 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 112

Classical Archaeology: Methods and Approaches

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

32545 • Spring 2016
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

C C 340 • Water And The Roman City

32205 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 302
(also listed as URB 353)

Water—whether desired or unwanted, whether for navigation, consumption, display, or industry—is a central presence in every urban landscape.  For city-dwelling Romans, it acquired a level of cultural importance that had never been seen before and, arguably, has never been seen since.  The result was a proliferation of technologies, cultural adaptations, and cults of veneration related to the abundance and necessity of water.  Drawing principally from case studies, we will examine Roman urban development, design, and adaptation from the perspective of three basic categories of knowledge:

  • Hydrology—natural water sources, rainfall, flood management, drainage, rivers, natural ports, etc.
  • Hydraulics—water delivery, storage, and management; water-powered mechanisms; etc.
  • Cult and culture—water and healing cults, bathing culture, the aesthetics and urban image of water, etc.

This course will combine lectures and class discussions on a weekly basis.

Texts:

  • A. T. Hodge, Roman Aqueducts and Water Supply (London 1994).
  • B. Longfellow, Roman Imperialism and Civic Patronage: Form, Meaning, and Ideology in Monumental Fountain Complexes (Cambridge 2011).
  • G. Fagan, Bathing in Public in the Roman World (Ann Arbor 1999).
  • N. Purcell, “Rivers and the Geography of Power,” Pallas 90 (2012), 373-87.
  • R. Taylor, “River Raptures: Containment and Control of Water in Greek and Roman Constructions of Identity,” in C. Kosso and A. Scott, eds., The Nature and Function of Water, Baths, and Hygiene from Antiquity through the Renaissance (Amsterdam 2009). 21 42.
  • Selections from G. Aldrete, Floods of the Tiber in Ancient Rome (Baltimore 2007).
  • Selections from J. Richard, Water for the City, Fountains for the People (Turnhout 2012).
  • Selections from F. Yegül, Baths and Bathing in Classical Antiquity (Cambridge, Mass. 1992).

Grading:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a midterm and final exam, a research project, and writing assignments.

C C 380 • Meth & Thry In Clascl Archaeol

32270 • Fall 2015
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM BEN 1.118

Methods and Theory in Classical Archaeology

Classical archaeology, the oldest species of archaeology in the world, is both burdened and enriched by its heritage.  Long confined to a fairly narrow compass of art historical inquiry, over the last half century it has broadened its scope dramatically to confront almost every imaginable question that could be put to surviving material remains.  Organized thematically, this seminar provides a forum for the exploration and discussion of the intellectual principles and debates that inform modern archaeology of the Aegean and Classical worlds.  Students will be expected to evaluate a wide variety of arguments, principles, and methods introduced through readings, guest presentations, electronic media, and possibly visits to a museum or the GIS center.  Subject matter may include, on the one hand, such theoretical topics as historiography; quantitative approaches to space; gender; colonial studies; religion and ritual; agency; processual and postprocessual theory; identity; economy, technology, and trade; and social structure; and, on the other hand, such applied topics as ceramic chronologies; field survey; GIS and other computer applications; and various other archaeometric technologies.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

32370 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

Classical Archaeology: Methods and Approaches

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 340 • Pompeii

32415 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

Buried in an eruption in 79 AD and rediscovered only in the mid-eighteenth century, the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum offer modern visitors a panoramic view of Roman life.  The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today.  Our task is to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds.  Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of Mt. Vesuvius, seeking through artifacts — some magnificent and others merely interesting — to recollect a way of life.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33620 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 308

Classical Archaeology: Methods and Approaches

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

T C 302 • Roman Art And Society

43420 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CRD 007B

Description:

This course will examine Roman social values by way of one of the most abundant resources surviving from antiquity, art.  More widespread — and sometimes more honest — than the literature that has survived down to our own time, fashioned images and constructed spaces made cultural messages available to people of all classes, fortunes, and occupations.  To the aristocratic connoisseur of Greek culture just as to the simple slave serving him dinner, to the gladiator and to his wealthy patroness, to the prostitute and the prefect, visual representation communicated the values of a complex and vibrant society.  Sometimes the language of this communication is cryptic and puzzling.  Students will work to find meaning in a diverse array of artworks aligned with a number of major themes.  These may include politics and ideology; portraits and personal identity; death and commemoration; the roles and status of women and minorities; sexuality and eroticism; life in the private sphere; urban spectacle; and religious devotion. 

Among the course activities will be included likely field trips to the Blanton Museum, which houses a collection of modern casts of Greek and Roman sculpture, and the San Antonio Museum of Art, home of one of the finest collections of original Roman art in the nation.  Students will have the opportunity to give presentations, examine objects in depth, and formulate topics of discussion. 

Texts/Readings: (Subject to change)

M. Beard and J. Henderson, Classical Art: From Greece to Rome

J. Clarke, Art in the Lives of Ordinary Romans

E. D’Ambra, Roman Art

E. Mayer, The Ancient Middle Classes

P. Stewart, The Social History of Roman Art

P. Zanker, The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus

Assignments:

Oral communication. 20%

Written exercises and papers.  40%

Final evaluation. 20%

Class participation. 20%

Visit to San Antonio Museum of Art and attendance at University Lecture Series

About the Professor:

Rabun Taylor specializes in the fields of Roman Archaeology, Urbanism, Roman Material Culture, and Greek and Roman Art. He has conducted fieldwork in Greece and Italy. His research and other work focuses on Greek and Roman art, architecture, archaeology, urbanism, social history, and material culture. His recent publications include Roman Builders: A Study in Architectural Process (2003); and The Moral Mirror of Roman Art (2008). He is currently the co-author, with Katherine Rinne, of a forthcoming book on the urban history of the city of Rome.

C C 340 • Pompeii

33205 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.120

The towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried in an eruption of 79 AD, offer modern visitors a panoramic surface view of Roman life. This course will delve deeper by examining the ancient remains in context. The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today. Our task it to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds. Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of these towns, seeking through artifacts--some magnificent and others merely interesting--to recollect a way of life.

Students will be evaluated according to performance in class, on a midterm and final exam, on several writing assignments, and on other tasks assigned by the instructor.

C C 380 • Roman Architecture

33295 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as ARC 388R)

This course will encompass Roman architecture in its many dimensions:  as a process, and a product; as an expression of cultural continuity and a medium of innovation; as a product of high artifice, and an organic component of urban and rural landscape; as the product of complex systems of planning, administration, and organization; and as a vehicle of signification through time.  Special attention will be given, on the one hand, to Vitruvius and the fraught relationship of his architectural treatise to the emergence of a distinctly Roman classicism, and to monumental architecture of the Roman Imperial period from Nero to Maxentius.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

33055 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 420

This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity.  It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities.  Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents.  After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

Three quizzes: 5 percent each (15 total) Midterm: 30 percent Special Assignments: 20 percent Final exam: 35 percent.

 The textbook is Fred Kleiner, A History of Roman Art (2007).  It’s at the Co-op.

Other readings are listed in the week-by-week entries of the course calendar below.  Apart from Kleiner, all readings will be available electronically—either on e-reserves, or as an e-book.  You can access both resources through UT Libraries.  In general, you should try to have the weekly readings done by the Thursday class session.

E-reserves page:  http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu/eres/default.aspx

E-reserves password for this course:  servius

 

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33065 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 201

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion. 

 

 

This course fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.  As a prerequisite, students must have taken one of the following:  AHC 319 (Topic 1:  The Ancient Mediterranean World); ANT 304; ARH 302; ARY 301; C C 301, 302, 307C, 307D, 319D; HIS 319D.  

C C 380 • Ostia

33170 • Spring 2012
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as R S 387M)

Decades on from the large-scale Italian excavations of the ancient Roman port city of Ostia and Russell Meiggs’ epochal synthesis published in 1973, a new wave of archaeological discoveries and historical interpretations has shed much light on the city and its companion community of Portus—not just in their physical and local aspects, but also in the ways that they interacted with Rome and the Mediterranean at large.  Focusing on recent work in archaeology, history, and religious studies, this seminar takes a multidisciplinary approach to Ostia, scrutinizing its complex and often unique physical and social structures, its many religious and commercial institutions, its art and architecture, and its broader significance in Roman life and culture.

 

Texts

Please note these are provisional:Aurea Roma:  dalla città pagana alla città cristiana.  2000.Bakker, J.T.  1994.  Living and Working with the Gods:  Studies of Evidence for Private Religion and Its Material Environment in the City of Ostia (100-500 AD).Boin, D.  2010.  “Temples and Traditions in Late Antique Ostia, 250-600 C.E.”  Ph.D. thesis, University of Texas – Austin.Bruun, C. and A.G. Zevi, eds.  2002.  Ostia e Portus nelle loro relazioni con Roma.Descoeudres, J.-P., ed.  2001.  Ostie – port et porte de la Rome antique.Egelhaaf-Gaiser U.  2002.  “Religionsästhetik und Raumordnung am Beispiel der Vereinsgebäude von Ostia.”  In Religiöse Vereine in der Römischen Antike. Untersuchungen zu Organisation, Ritual und Raumordnung,123-72.Falzone, S.  2007.  Ornata aedificia.  Pitture parietali delle case ostiensi.Gering A. 2004.  “Plätze und Strassensperren an Promenaden. Zum Funktionswandel Ostias in der Spätantike.” RM 111, 299-382.Hainzelmann, M.  2000.  Die Nekropolen von Ostia.Hermansen, G.  1981.  Ostia:  Aspects of Roman City Life.Keay, S. et al., eds.  2005.  Portus:  An Archaeological Survey of the Port of Imperial Rome.Martin A. et al. 2002.  “The Urbanistic Project on the Previously Unexcavated Areas of Ostia (DAI-AAR 1996-2001).” MAAR 47, 259-304.Meiggs, R.G.  1973.  Roman Ostia.Muntasser, N.  2003.  “The Late Antique Domus in Ostia.”  Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas – Austin.Olsson, B. et al., eds.  2001.  The Synagogue of Ostia and the Jews of Rome:  Interdisciplinary Studies.Pavolini C. 2002.  “La trasformazione del ruolo di Ostia nel III sec. d.C.”  MEFRA 114, 325-352.Pavolini, C.  2006.  Ostia.  Guida archeologica Laterza.  2nd ed.Priester S. 2002.  Ad summas tegulas. Untersuchungen zu vielgeschossigen Gebäudeblöcken mit Wohneinheiten und Insulae im kaiserzeitlichen Rom.Rickman, G.  1982.  The Corn Supply of Ancient Rome.Rieger, A.-K.  2004.  Heiligtümer in Ostia.Steuernagel, D.  2004.  Kult und Alltag in römischen Hafenstädten. White, L.M.  1997.  "Synagogue and Society in Imperial Ostia: Archaeological and Epigraphic Evidence," Harvard Theological Review 90:1, 23-58.White, L.M.  1999.  “Reading the Ostia Synagogue: A Reply to A. Runesson,” Harvard Theological Review 92:4, 435-464.Zevi, A.G. and A. Claridge, eds.  1996.  “Roman Ostia” Revisited:  Archaeological and Historical Papers in Memory of Russell G. Meiggs.Zevi, A.G. and J. Humphrey, eds.  2004.  Ostia, Cicero, Gamala, Feasts and the Economy.Zevi, A.G. and R. Turchetti, eds.  2004.  Le strutture dei porti e degli approdi antichi.

Grading

Grades will be assigned according to individual performance in class discussions, presentations, and a research paper.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

32920 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 201

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity. It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities. Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents. After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

 

Three quizzes (Tuesdays, in class): Midterm (Tuesday, Oct. 5, in class): Two critical essays on outside lectures: Final exam (Monday, Dec. 13, 2-5 p.m.):5 percent each (15 total) 30 percent 20 percent 35 percent.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33315 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 201

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion. 

 

This course fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.  As a prerequisite, students must have taken one of the following:  AHC 319 (Topic 1:  The Ancient Mediterranean World); ANT 304; ARH 302; ARY 301; C C 301, 302, 307C, 307D, 319D; HIS 319D. 

C C 383 • Greeks/Romans On Bay Of Naples

33430 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Mythic haunt of the great heroes Odysseus, Aeneas and Hercules; historic birthplace of Greek colonization; haven of Hellenism in the west; playground and pleasance of the Roman aristocracy; cultural and commercial powerhouse:  the Bay of Naples played a role second only to Rome in the cultural geography of ancient Italy.  Emphasizing the population centers of the western Bay—particularly Neapolis, Puteoli, Baiae, Misenum, and Cumae, and their Phlegraean coast and hinterland—this seminar seeks to redress a colossal imbalance in Anglo-American scholarship on the region, which has focused almost exclusively on Pompeii, Herculaneum, and a handful of Vesuvian villas.  We will investigate this region across several disciplines, including archaeology, social and political history, architectural history, geology, numismatics, epigraphy, and religious studies.  Reading knowledge of Italian is highly desirable but not required.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

32210 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 201

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity. It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities. Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents. After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

 

Three quizzes (Tuesdays, in class): Midterm (Tuesday, Oct. 5, in class): Two critical essays on outside lectures: Final exam (Monday, Dec. 13, 2-5 p.m.):5 percent each (15 total) 30 percent 20 percent 35 percent.

C C 340 • Pompeii

32235 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 0.128

Buried in an eruption in 79 AD and rediscovered only in the mid-eighteenth century, the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum offer modern visitors a panoramic view of Roman life.  The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today.  Our task is to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds.  Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of Mt. Vesuvius, seeking through artefacts — some magnificent, all interesting — to recollect a way of life. 

EUS 346 • Topog & Monuments Of Anc Rome

36140 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 308
(also listed as C C 340)

This course is a general survey of the architecture and urban development of Rome from its beginnings until late antiquity.  By studying the city’s monumental center, students will gain an understanding of Rome’s immense cultural legacy in general, and in specific a familiarity with the spatial and topographical vocabulary inherited by the modern urban West.  Additionally, by examining the remains of ancient Rome’s infrastructure, they will confront the city as an organic and historical entity.

GRADING:

Class participation and attendance:  10 percent

Map quizzes:  10 percent

2 Midterms:  30 percent

Presentation:  20 percent

5- to 8-page research paper (for grad students, 15-20 pages):  30 percent

 

TEXTBOOKS:

Claridge, A.  Rome:  An Oxford Archaeological Guide.  Oxford.

Favro, D.  The Urban Image of Augustan Rome.  Cambridge.  (Currently on order at Coop, due in mid-September)

Packer, J.  The Forum of Trajan in Rome:  A Study of the Monuments in Brief.  Berkeley.

Stambaugh, J.  The Ancient Roman City.  Baltimore and London.

Course packet.

Optional purchase:

Holloway, R.  The Archaeology of Early Rome and Latium.

T C 302 • Roman Art And Society-W

43540 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CRD 007A

T C 302:  First-Year Honors Seminar:  Roman Art and Society
Unique number:  43540
TTh 11-12:30, CRD 007A

Professor Rabun Taylor, rmtaylor@mail.utexas.edu
Office hours:  Waggener Hall 14b, T 2-4, Th 2-3, or by appointment
E-reserves password:  augustus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Rome is forever before our eyes.  It is not just in our museums, or in archaeological sites across the Atlantic.  It resides in our public buildings and gathering places, our churches and cemeteries, our coinage, our art, our homes, our entertainment. Rome is both us, and the Other; near, and distant.  Therefore the purpose of this course is twofold:  to explore Roman life as mediated through its material remains, and to explore the ways in which it has been twisted, straightened, smoothed, and roughened to accommodate modern Western values and aesthetics. More widespread — and sometimes more honest — than the literature that has survived down to our own time, Roman imagery and built space made cultural codes available to people of all classes, fortunes, and occupations.  To the aristocratic connoisseur of Greek culture just as to the simple slave serving him dinner, to the gladiator and to his wealthy patroness, to the prostitute and the prefect, visual representation communicated the values of a complex and vibrant society.  Sometimes the language of this communication is cryptic and puzzling.  We will work to find meaning in a diverse array of artworks aligned with a number of major themes, such as politics and ideology; portraits and personal identity; death and commemoration; the roles and status of women and minorities; art and ideology; urban spectacle; and religious devotion.  But rather than try, in vain, to remove the filter of our own cultural prejudices and predispositions, this course will shine a light on them.  Thus a recurring theme will be to find strands of the Roman in our own material and intellectual heritage, to probe their histories, and thereby to seek a better understanding of our own attitudes and beliefs.

The seminar format allows for flexibility in assignments and a wide variety of approaches to learning.  Although the syllabus provides the general outlines for the course (including major due dates), I will issue more precise assignments on a week-to-week basis.  These may consist of readings (some from your textbooks, others from e-reserves), short writing exercises, or fieldwork—interviews, attending lectures outside class, reporting, examining artworks, buildings, etc.  You will be evaluated on the basis of your class participation, written assignments, presentations, a research paper, and a final exam.  Your formal presentation at the end of the semester will be on a topic related to your research paper.  This is a Writing Flag course, so you will be writing papers or essays in several different formats and lengths.  They break down as follows:

1.    Informal responses to readings or other assignments, posted on Blackboard.
2.    Professional-style review of readings for the first two weeks of class.  2 pages.
3.    Review of a University Lecture (see below).  2-3 pages.
4.    Essay on the Battle Cast Collection or sculpture cast collections in general, based on your research and interaction with other students.  4-5 pages.  Rewrite optional.
5.    Descriptive analysis of a work of Roman art.  3 pages.  Rewrite required.
6.    Research paper.  8-10 pages.  Rewrite required (exemption possible in exceptional cases).


Here are some primary examples of the kind of fieldwork you will be undertaking in this course:

Field trip to the San Antonio Museum of Art Roman art collection.  We will arrange to do this on a Saturday or Sunday in the first half of the semester.  If you can return to the museum later, ether alone or with a group, you will be encouraged to make use of this wonderful collection in your research.  Here you will encounter a feast of “real” Roman art, brought up from the earth. You will find, perhaps to your surprise, that virtually none of these objects can be traced back to their archaeological contexts.  That fact alone tells us a great deal about what was valued, and what wasn’t, in our own cultural past.  Yet so much information is preserved in each item (some of it easy to decode, some not) that you will find yourself trying to think like a Roman.
Investigating the Battle Cast Collection.  This remarkable collection of plaster casts of Classical sculpture commissioned for UT by William Battle in the early 20th century is now in the possession of the Blanton and Stark Museums.  The history and nature of cast collections, the part they have played in educating generations of students in Classical culture, and their subsequent devaluation and reevaluation in academic contexts will be a central issue in this course.  For this exercise, you will become historians and reporters, fanning out around campus conducting interviews and research, digging up the history of the collection and framing your findings within European and American intellectual history.  Periodically, we will return to questions that have haunted Western intellectuals for centuries:  Wherein lies originality, and wherein imitation?  What is an “original,” and what value does it hold exclusively?  Do those “real” Roman artworks in San Antonio seem so real when we realize that almost all of them were copies or derivatives of lost “originals,” themselves produced from casts—that is, if they aren’t simply modern fakes, or imaginative restorations?
Attending a University Lecture.  You will be required to attend and write about one of the lectures in the University Lecture Series.  I will have more to say about this when the series is announced.

GRADING:
Class participation and attendance:  20 percent
Report and presentation:  25 percent (10 and 15 respectively)
Written descriptive analysis of a Roman artwork:  10 percent
Other writing assignments and quizzes:  15 percent
8-10-page research paper:  20 percent
Final exam:  10 percent

Final exam:  Probably Saturday, May 15, 7-10 p.m.  Exact time will be confirmed.  

Required Texts:
M. Beard and J. Henderson, Classical Art from Greece to Rome (Oxford 2001).
E. D’Ambra, Roman Art (Cambridge 1998).

CALENDAR
Themes and readings listed here are approximate.  I will refine the assignments over the course of the semester.

Week 1 (Jan. 19-21):  Greetings and introduction.
For Thursday, read:  D’Ambra 9-37.
Week 2 (Jan. 26-28):  Reading Roman art.
For Tuesday, read:  Beard & Henderson 1-63.  If you’re unfamiliar with mythical names or stories cited in the text, consult Wikipedia (which is OK for quick lookups ONLY) or—even better—an authoritative general guide, such as the Oxford Concise Guide to Classical Literature.
Week 3 (Feb. 2-4):  Writing workshop.
Tuesday or Thursday:  1-hour presentation by the Undergraduate Writing Center.
For this week, you will write a 2-page (double-spaced) review of your readings for weeks 1 & 2.
Week 4 (Feb. 9-11):  Production I:  Roman artists and patrons.
Tuesday or Thursday:  Battle casts.  Meet at Blanton Museum entrance.
For Tuesday, read:  Stewart, “Who Made Roman Art?” in The Social History of Roman Art (Cambridge 2008), 10-38 (e-reserves).
For Thursday, read:  E. Bartman, “Sculptural Collecting and Display in the Private Realm,” in E. Gazda, ed., Roman Art in the Private Sphere (Ann Arbor 1991), 71−88 (e-reserves).  
Week 5 (Feb. 16-18):  Production II:  Art and imitation.
For Tuesday, read:  Beard & Henderson 65-105.
Week 6 (Feb. 23-25):  Production III:  Casts vs. originals.
This week will be devoted to your reports related to the Battle Cast Collection.
For Tuesday, read:  S. Miller, et al.  Plaster Casts at Berkeley (Berkeley 2005), pages 1-20.  Skim the rest.  Link:  http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/2ch893d5
Week 7 (March 2-4):  Roman portraits and personal identity.
2-3-page essay on the value of casts vs. originals due this week.
Possible readings:  D’Ambra 25-37 (review), 93-112; Beard & Henderson 205-38.
Week 8 (March 9-11):  Art and ideology.
Draft of descriptive analysis due this week.
Possible readings:  Beard & Henderson 147-202.

SPRING BREAK

Week 9 (March 23-25):  Death and commemorative art.
Possible readings:  D’Ambra 112-25; M. Koortbojian, “In commemorationem mortuorum:  Text and Image Along the ‘Streets of Tombs,’” in J. Elsner, ed., Art and Text in Roman Culture (Cambridge 1996), 210-233; J. Whitehead, “The ‘Cena Trimalchionis’ and Biographical Narration in Roman Middle-Class Art,” in P. Holliday, ed., Narrative and Event in Ancient Art (Cambridge 1993), 299-325.
Week 10 (March 30-Apr. 1):  Art and social status.
Final descriptive analysis due this week.
Possible readings:  D’Ambra 39-57; B. Kellum, “The Spectacle of the Street,” in B. Bergmann and C. Kondoleon, eds., The Art of Ancient Spectacle (Washington, DC and New Haven 1999), 283-99; J. Elsner, Imperial Rome and Christian Triumph (Oxford 1998), 91-101.
Week 11 (Apr. 6-8):  City and spectacle.
Possible readings:  D’Ambra 70-80; J. Clarke, “Spectacle:  Entertainment, Social Control, Self-Advertising, and Transgression,” in Art in the Lives of Ordinary Romans (Berkeley 2003), 130-59; H. Morales, “The Torturer’s Apprentice:  Parrhasius and the Limits of Art,” in Elsner, Art and Text, 182-209.
Week 12 (Apr. 13-15):  The roles and status of women.
Paper drafts due Thursday, April 15.
Possible readings:  Selections from D. Kleiner and S. Matheson, eds., I Claudia:  Women in Ancient Rome (Austin 1996); M. Wyke, “Woman in the Mirror:  The Rhetoric of Adornment in the Roman World,” in L. Archer, et al., eds., Women in Ancient Societies:  An Illusion of the Night (New York 1994), 134-51.
Week 13 (Apr. 20-22):  Presentations.
Week 14 (Apr. 27-29):  Presentations.
Week 15 (May 4-6):  Presentations.
Final papers due.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS:
Some religious holidays may conflict with class sessions.  If you expect to miss class because of a religious holiday, you will be allowed to make up any assessed work you missed on that day.  But you must notify me at least 14 days in advance.  For religious holidays that fall within the first two weeks of the semester, the notice should be given on the first day of the semester.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 or 471-4641, or go to http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd.  Keep in mind that this course is heavily oriented toward visual information.

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:
Scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated.  It includes any kind of cheating; for more information, contact Student Judicial Services at 471-2841, or go to http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

32655 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 4.134

This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity.  It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities.  Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents.  After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 380 • Meth & Thry In Clascl Archaeol

32740 • Fall 2009
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 10

Methods and Theory in Classical Archaeology

Classical archaeology, the oldest species of archaeology in the world, is both burdened and enriched by its heritage.  Long confined to a fairly narrow compass of art historical inquiry, over the last half century it has broadened its scope dramatically to confront almost every imaginable question that could be put to surviving material remains.  Organized thematically, this seminar provides a forum for the exploration and discussion of the intellectual principles and debates that inform modern archaeology of the Aegean and Classical worlds.  Students will be expected to evaluate a wide variety of arguments, principles, and methods introduced through readings, guest presentations, electronic media, and possibly visits to a museum or the GIS center.  Subject matter may include, on the one hand, such theoretical topics as historiography; quantitative approaches to space; gender; colonial studies; religion and ritual; agency; processual and postprocessual theory; identity; economy, technology, and trade; and social structure; and, on the other hand, such applied topics as ceramic chronologies; field survey; GIS and other computer applications; and various other archaeometric technologies.

C C 340 • Pompeii-W

32715 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLM 7.112

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 348 • Art/Myth In Greece & Rome-Hon

32720 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A303A

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33065 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A121A

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 340 • Topog & Monuments Of Anc Rome

33137 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 214

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

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