The Department of French and Italian

Cinzia Russi


Associate ProfessorPhD Linguistics 2003, University of Washington

Associate Professor, French Linguistics
Cinzia Russi

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-7024
  • Office: HRH 3.110B
  • Office Hours: Spring 2015 T-Th 2-3:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Interests


Historical linguistics, Grammaticalization, Aspectualizers, Morphosyntax, Morphology, Italian Dialects, Comparative Romance Linguistics, Cognitive Grammar, Pragmatics, Lexical Semantics

Courses


FR 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

36670 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as LIN 383)

FR 396K – Introduction to Romance Linguistics

T–TH 12:30–2 MEZ 1.104

 

Instructor:      Cinzia Russi

Office:                                    HRH 3.110B

Office hours:             T–TH 2:00–3:30 and by appointment (please, feel free to contact me via email any time)

Email:                         russi@austin.utexas.edu

 

 

Course description

 

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the Romance languages, both as a set of closely related linguistic systems that share a common ancestor and as a major historical, linguistic and cultural phenomenon.

We will start with a brief introduction and classification of the Romance languages presently spoken, followed by a short discussion of the crucial tenets of the major theoretical frameworks currently adopted (i.e., functionalism and formalism). We will continue with sketching their historical background, starting with an overview of their common ancestor, Latin. We will then move to the diachronic analysis of the major Romance languages.

Detailed linguistic analysis of (extracts of) texts from different historical periods will serve as a tool to assess our learning, and will give it an empirical, concrete dimension.

The course will include lecture sessions and in-class discussion sessions.

  1. a.   In the lecture sessions, I will present linguistic structures and data, which will be summarized in handouts. It will be the students’ responsibility to go over the material presented in class and, whenever needed, integrate it through further independent reading that I will suggest.
  2. b.   During the in-class discussion sessions I expect active participation, in the form of giving concrete and lively input to the discussion, from all the students. Therefore, the students a required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus.
  3. c.    I assume that all the students are familiar with the fundamental notion of the main areas of linguistics (i.e., phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics). I also assume that students will actively seek my assistance whenever they deem necessary.

By the end of this course, students will have:

  1. a.   Developed or strengthened the analytical skills necessary for reading scholarly articles; have become familiar with the most important scholars in the field.
  2. b.   Mastered how to write abstracts for conference presentations and articles and how to deliver a paper to a peer audience.
  3. c.    Improved the skill required to conduct research and write scholarly articles.

 

v Class attendance and participation policy – Since this course cover a relatively large amount of material, students really cannot afford missing class. Thus, I strongly advise you to look carefully at the calendar in order to plan any activity that may take you away from school appropriately. Should you be forced to miss a class meeting, please, try to inform me as soon as possible so that we can make plans to catch up.

v Course Readings/MaterialsAll our readings will be posted on Canvas.

v Course work

  1. a.   Written assignments – They will include:

           i.       Summaries of assigned readings.

         ii.       Textual analyses, which usually will be assigned after we complete each topic. The written assignments will be corrected and discussed in class then they will be collected and checked. Full credit will be received only for complete and neat work.

  • Ø Written assignments must be typed; handwritten assignments will not receive credit.
  1. b.   Oral presentations The students will give two class presentation:

           i.       Presentation of one article from the reading list.

         ii.       Presentation of their term paper.

  • Ø The oral presentations are expected to be about 20 minutes long and will be followed by a question/discussion period.
  1. c.    Term paper – The students will write a research paper of a length of about 20-25 pages, which will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. The only restriction that applies to the research topic is that it falls within the domain Romance linguistics. In other words, the final paper can focus on any Romance language (or dialect), and any subfield of linguistics. Although there are basically no restrictions to the choice of the research topic, students are required to discuss it with the instructor before they start their research. The topic should be chosen within the first four weeks of class. The students are required to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before starting their research and/or data collection. The research paper will consist of three parts:

           i.       Abstract, which will include the following:

  • A brief presentation of the topic;
  • A clear and detailed statement of the main research question/s that the paper will address;
  • A meaningful explanation of why you chose this specific topic and why you consider it worth of investigation.

         ii.       A preliminary annotated bibliography.

       iii.       The final paper. The final paper will be a ‘standard’ linguistic paper, in which the research questions are addressed thoroughly and coherently, and the proposed analysis is theoretically justified and supported by empirical data. More detail on the organization, format, etc. will be provided during the semester.

v GradingGrades will be calculated as follows:

  • Written assignments                       15%
  • Class discussion                              15%
  • Abstract of the term paper               10%
  • Annotated bibliography                    10 %
  • Oral presentations                           20%
  • Term paper                                     30%

 

ITL 330K • Change/Var Contemp Italian

36830 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.208

ITL 330K – Fall 2016 (Unique 36830)

L’italiano del terzo millennio: Variazione e cambiamenti linguistici nell’italiano contemporaneo

(The Italian of the third millennium: variation and change in contemporary Italian)

T–TH 9:30–11:00, MEZ 1.208

                                                                                                                          

Instructor:      Cinzia Russi

Office:                                    HRH 3.110B

Office hours: T–TH 2:00–3:30 and by appointment

Email:                         russi@austin.utexas.edu

 

Course description

The primary objective of this course is to identify and analyze the distinctive features of contemporary Italian (both written and spoken) and frame them within a diachronic perspective .

The course is divided into two main parts. In the firs part, we will start with tracing a brief historical outline of the Italian language then we will continue with a sketch of contemporary Italian, giving particular emphasis to sociolinguistic aspects.

In the second part of the course we will first examine the main features of different varieties of Italian along different dimensions (e.g., geographical, social, ) and compare them to standard Italian; then, we will discuss the present status of the Italian dialects and their relationship with italiano standard.

The course will be taught in Italian although, given the complexity of the topic compared to the students’ level of language competency, the instructor will switch to English when needed. Also, students should keep in mind that they are more than welcome to seek the instructor’s assistance during office hours

 

v Participation Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, and so on.

  • Ø This policy will be strictly enforced.

 

v Reading assignments Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus. The course will be conducted as a seminar; therefore, students are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion. Students should be aware of the fact that the readings are in Italian and they may be challenging at times; therefore, they should allow themselves ample time. Also, students should keep in mind that they are not expected to understand everything they read. Since the material will be presented in detail by the instructor, students are expected to come to class with a good general understanding of what they read. They are strongly encouraged to prepare a list of the main concepts they grasped from the assignment and a list of questions to ask the instructor. Asking questions during class will in fact constitute the main part of students’ participation to class discussion.

 

v Written assignments Written assignments will include:

  • exercises from textbook;
  • answering three to five questions in form of ‘micro’ essays (for a total of one to two pages)

The assignments will be given regularly, usually after completing each chapter; they will be written in Italian. Written assignments must be typed; handwritten assignments will not receive credit.

 

v Written exams The examswill include answering questions in essay format and textual analysis. Both the mid-term and the final exam will be take-home exams and will be written in Italian.

 

v Grading policy

  • Written assignments     25%    
  • Class discussion           25%
  • Written exams             50% (25% each)

 

v Textbook (required) –  Sobrero, A. A. and A. Miglietta. 2016. Introduzione alla linguistica italiana. Roma/Bari: Laterza. (available on Amazon, http://www.amazon.it/Introduzione-linguistica-italiana-Alberto-Sobrero/dp/8842079421)

  • Additional reading material will be posted on Canvas.

 

ITC 349 • Itl Tv Ads: Fashion/Food/Cars

36345 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.118
(also listed as EUS 347, WGS 340)

ITC 349  Italian television advertising: Fashion, food, cars

Unique # 36345

Spring 2016

T & TH 11:00–12:30   MEZ 1.118

Instructor:     Cinzia Russi

Office:            HRH 3.110 B

Phone:            471 7024

E-mail:           russi@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours: T & TH 1:00–3:90, and by appointment 

Course Description

Italy is a country associated with “style”—life style (il dolce far niente), fashion style (Valentino, Prada, Gucci, etc.), film style (Fellini and the like), and, for better or for worse, a certain sort of rather effusive political style (Mussolini, Berlusconi, and their ilk, among others). The specific objective of this course is to categorize and analyze the major changes that have taken place in the peculiarly Italian style of television advertising during the past fifty years.

After a general introduction to the language of television advertising, students will compare chronologically ordered versions of Italian TV commercials for a variety of high-use products (for instance, food, detergents, personal care items, cars) in order to identify changes that have taken place at the level of vocabulary, grammar, and language register as a result of new socio- cultural dynamics that have come to characterize present-day Italy. The Italian commercials will then be compared to/contrasted with equivalent ads broadcasted in US to uncover similarities and differences.

Although the course will focus on language change, it will also draw attention to socio-cultural changes that have taken place in the Italian society since the second half of the 20th century, particularly with respect to the role and figure of women (and how they are portrayed in TV commercials vis-à-vis to men), and the structure, life style and values of the ‘typical’ (or ‘stereotypical’) Italian family.

Course material

Selected chapters/sections from the texts listed below. All the the reading material will be available on Canvas.

Attendance & Class Participation

Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion are required. More that three will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points will be deducted for the fifth absence, and so forth, up to a maximum of ten points. This policy will be strictly enforced.

Assignments

  • Journal: Weekly entries summarizing and commenting on class lecturers and readings, to be submitted for grading as indicated in the syllabus.The amount of pages for each entry will change during the semester and will be assigned in class prior to each deadline.
  • Eight thought pieces (500-750 words) in which students comment on the different versions of a commercial.
  • Eight in-class unannounced quizzes.
  • One mid-term exam: Short-answer questions on assigned readings and commercials.
  • Research project: In groups of three/four, students will:

a.   Write a short paper on the ‘history’ of a commercial of their choice;

b.   Create an original commercial for the product selected which will be presented in class.

Grading:

  • Participation                   15%
  • Thought pieces               20%
  • Quizzes                           15%   
  • Mid-term exam               25%
  • Research project             15%
  • Oral presentation           10%

 

Use of Canvas          

In this class, I use Canvas, a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu, to distribute some course materials. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Tutors Please refer to the French and Italian Department’s web page or visit the French and Italian Department’s Undergraduate Office in HRH http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/student-resources/Tutors--Translators.php

Be aware that tutors ARE NOT ALLOWED to do homework for you rather give you individual attention in mastering complex grammatical structures and oral skills. Moreover, if the professor deems – due to a discrepancy with your oral and written performance in class – that your homework has been done with the help of a computer-translation-program or a tutor, you will receive a ‘no-grade’ for that paper; the ‘no-grade’ will neither lower nor raise your overall grade average. Please read carefully the policy on Scholastic Dishonesty.                

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36210 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.122

ITL 328 COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

Unique # 36210

Spring 2016

T & TH 9:30–11:00   MEZ 1.122

 

Instructor:     Cinzia Russi

Office:                                    HRH 3.110B

Phone:                        417 7024

Email:                                    russi@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours: T & TH 1:00–3:00, and by appointment

 

Course Description

Objectives       

The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture.

*** This course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

 

Attendance     

Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, up to a maximum of 10 points.

*** This policy will be strictly enforced.

 

Participation and preparation          

Students are expected to have read the assignment for every given day and be prepared to discuss it in class in Italian. We are bound to this syllabus, which gives you an overview of the course goals, organization, requirements, and assessment

Your participation in class activities is a crucial component of this course and will give you the opportunity to improve your understanding of readings and films, to share your opinions with others, as well as to develop your language skills.

Your participation in class discussion clearly depends on your preparation. It is fundamental that you come to class prepared, making sure that you completed all homework for the day.

Homework are not graded but must be written and brought to class in order to receive full credit. Handwriting is acceptable, as long as it is legible.

 

 

Writing Flag 

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Writing assignments

  1. a.     5 compositions on topics related to the assigned You must hand in your written assignments in class, on the due date. In exceptional cases, extensions may be granted, provided you request the extension in writing at least three days before the deadline.  Otherwise, one percentage point will be deducted from your grade for the assignment for each day it is late.  Also, please make sure your papers:

                        i.         have a title;

                      ii.         are stapled;

                    iii.         are paginated.  

  • One percentage point will be deducted from your grade for each of these that is missing.
  • All written assignments, including the final paper, must be typed in 12 points Times New Roman, 1 inch margins. See Class Schedule for more details on assignments and due dates.
  • Ø  Students will have the opportunity to write two drafts of their compositions. Both drafts will be graded; the final grade will be the average of the two. Students will receive extensive feedback on each paper, which will include grammatical and lexical corrections as well comments on the organization and content of the paper, stylistic choices, and selection and effective use of appropriate arguments.
  1. b.     Final paper (four pages). Scrittura creativa

In this composition students will write about the city/town they feel most attached to, following as example one of the assigned readings.

  1. c.     Mid-Term Exam. The mid-term exam will focus on grammar structures and vocabulary learned and reviewed in class.

Oral presentation      

Students will present on a reading or video assigned for the day. A detailed description of the assignment, including expectations and grading rubric, will be distributed in class in advance.

  • No reading allowed! Index cards can be used if extremely necessary.

Texts    There are no required textbooks for this course. All reading material will be available on Canvas.

NOTE: Students are required to bring reading material to class, either in printed or electronic version

Film      Gomorra (Matteo Garrone, 2008), Io sono Li (Andrea Segre, 2011). Students will watch the movies at home.

Grade policy              

The final grade will be computed as follows:

  • Class participation                  15%
  • Homework                                          5%     
  • Compositions                         30%
  • Midterm exam                         20%
  • Oral presentation                    15%     
  • Final paper                              15%  

Use of Canvas            

In this class, we use Canvas, a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu, to distribute some course materials. You can find support in using Canvas at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Electronic Devices

All students have the right to learn in a supportive environment: don’t let your use of a laptop or mobile device distract others. Your phone must be in your bag or pocket and cannot be used at any time. Laptops or pads may be used, WITHOUT ANY SOUND, during lectures or class discussions only for note-taking or instructor-directed web-surfing. 

Tutors 

Please refer to the French and Italian Department’s web page or visit the French and Italian Department’s Undergraduate Office in HRH http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/student-resources/Tutors--Translators.php

Be aware that tutors ARE NOT ALLOWED to do homework for you rather give you individual attention in mastering complex grammatical structures and oral skills. Moreover, if the professor deems – due to a discrepancy with your oral and written performance in class – that your homework has been done with the help of a computer-translation-program or a tutor, you will receive a ‘no-grade’ for that paper; the ‘no-grade’ will neither lower nor raise your overall grade average. Please read carefully the policy on Scholastic Dishonesty.

FR 396K • Grammaticalizatn In Rom Langs

35875 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as LIN 383)

FR 396K Grammaticalization processes in Romance languages

Unique # 35875

Fall 2015

T/TH 12:30-2:00pm MEZ 1.104

 

Instructor:       Cinzia Russi, HRH 3.110B, russi@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours:   T & TH 2:30–4:00, and by appointment

 

 

Course Description

After an discussion on grammaticalization both as a general diachronic process of morphosyntactic change by which linguistic forms undergo a more or less substantial loss of

syntactic independence accompanied by increase of their grammatical function and a theoretical framework for historical linguistic analysis, and a review of grammaticalization within linguistic theory in general, this course will survey some methodological issues related to grammaticalization and some domains of grammaticalization (namely, semantic change, lexicalization and pragmaticalization).

We will then examine in specific grammaticalization processes, focusing on processes that pertain verbs, nouns and pronouns, determiners and negation.

Next, we will discuss how grammaticalization stands with respect to and is viewed within traditional (generative based) diachronic linguistics, focusing on two strictly interrelated issues, which have raised controversy mostly, although not exclusively, among grammaticalization ‘opponents’: (a) the unidirectionality of grammaticalization processes and (b) the phenomenon of degrammaticalization.

GRADING POLICY

  • Active class discussion (and critique) of reading assignments (15%)
  • Two oral presentations (30%)
    • Presentation of one article from the reading list (15%)
    • Presentation of term paper (15%)
    • Research paper proposal with annotated bibliography (20%)
    • Final research paper (35%)

READING ASSIGNMENTS

Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus; even when they are not presenting, they are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion.

TERM PAPER

Students will write a 20/25-page research paper on a grammaticalization process of their choice, or on theoretical aspects of grammaticalization that have particularly raised their interest. The paper will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. Students are essentially free in the choice of the topic; however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before they start their research.

Course Material

Readings packet, provided on Canvas

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36090 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.208

FLAGS:   Wr

ITL 328 COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

Unique # 36090

Fall 2015

T & TH 9:30–11:00   MEZ 1.208

 

 

Instructor:                   Cinzia Russi

Office:                         HRH 3.110 B

Phone:             471-7024

E-mail:                         russi@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours:   T & TH 2:30–4:00, and by appointment

 

Instructor:                   Paola Bonifazio

Office:                         HRH 3.110 A

Phone:             471-1561

E-mail:             pbonifazio@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours:   T & TH 1:30-3:00, and by appointment

 

Course Description

Objectives       

The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture.

*** This course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

 

Attendance     

Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, up to a maximum of 10 points.

*** This policy will be strictly enforced.

 

Participation and preparation          

Students are expected to have read the assignment for every given day and be prepared to discuss it in class in Italian. We are bound to this syllabus, which gives you an overview of the course goals, organization, requirements, and assessment

Your participation in class activities is a crucial component of this course and will give you the opportunity to improve your understanding of readings and films, to share your opinions with others, as well as to develop your language skills.

Your participation in class discussion clearly depends on your preparation. It is fundamental that you come to class prepared, making sure that you completed all homework for the day.

Homework are not graded but must be written and brought to class in order to receive full credit. Handwriting is acceptable, as long as it is legible.

Writing Flag 

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Writing assignments

  1. a.     5 compositions on topics related to the assigned You must hand in your written assignments in class, on the due date. In exceptional cases, extensions may be granted, provided you request the extension in writing at least three days before the deadline.  Otherwise, one percentage point will be deducted from your grade for the assignment for each day it is late.  Also, please make sure your papers:

                        i.         have a title;

                      ii.         are stapled;

                    iii.         are paginated.  

  • One percentage point will be deducted from your grade for each of these that is missing.
  • All written assignments, including the final paper, must be typed in 12 points Times New Roman, 1 inch margins. See Class Schedule for more details on assignments and due dates.
  • Ø  Students will have the opportunity to write two drafts of their compositions. Both drafts will be graded; the final grade will be the average of the two. Students will receive extensive feedback on each paper, which will include grammatical and lexical corrections as well comments on the organization and content of the paper, stylistic choices, and selection and effective use of appropriate arguments.
  1. b.     Final paper (four pages). Scrittura creativa

In this composition students will write about the city/town they feel most attached to, following as example one of the assigned readings.

  1. c.     Mid-Term Exam. The mid-term exam will focus on grammar structures and vocabulary learned and reviewed in class.

Oral presentation      

Students will present on a reading or video assigned for the day. A detailed description of the assignment, including expectations and grading rubric, will be distributed in class in advance.

  • No reading allowed! Index cards can be used if extremely necessary.

Texts    There are no required textbooks for this course. All reading material will be available on Canvas.

NOTE: Students are required to bring reading material to class, either in printed or electronic version

Film      Gomorra (Matteo Garrone, 2008), Io sono Li (Andrea Segre, 2011). Students will watch the movies at home.

Grade policy              

The final grade will be computed as follows:

  • Class participation                  15%
  • Homework                                          5%     
  • Compositions                         30%
  • Midterm exam                         20%
  • Oral presentation                    15%     
  • Final paper                              15%  

Use of Canvas            

In this class, we use Canvas, a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu, to distribute some course materials. You can find support in using Canvas at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Electronic Devices

All students have the right to learn in a supportive environment: don’t let your use of a laptop or mobile device distract others. Your phone must be in your bag or pocket and cannot be used at any time. Laptops or pads may be used, WITHOUT ANY SOUND, during lectures or class discussions only for note-taking or instructor-directed web-surfing. 

Tutors 

Please refer to the French and Italian Department’s web page or visit the French and Italian Department’s Undergraduate Office in HRH http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/student-resources/Tutors--Translators.php

Be aware that tutors ARE NOT ALLOWED to do homework for you rather give you individual attention in mastering complex grammatical structures and oral skills. Moreover, if the professor deems – due to a discrepancy with your oral and written performance in class – that your homework has been done with the help of a computer-translation-program or a tutor, you will receive a ‘no-grade’ for that paper; the ‘no-grade’ will neither lower nor raise your overall grade average. Please read carefully the policy on Scholastic Dishonesty.                       

Required UT University Notices and Policies

University of Texas Honor Code       

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Documented Disability Statement                

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone).  Faculty are not required to provide accommodations without an official accommodation letter from SSD.

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)     

If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

Q drop Policy            

The State of Texas has enacted a law that limits the number of course drops for academic reasons to six (6).  As stated in Senate Bill 1231:

“Beginning with the fall 2007 academic term, an institution of higher education may not permit an undergraduate student a total of more than six dropped courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at another institution of higher education, unless the student shows good cause for dropping more than that number.”

Emergency Evacuation Policy          

Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made.  Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:

  • Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.
  • If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class.
  • In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.

Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office.

 

 

Tentative Class Schedule

 

Giovedì 27 Agosto                

  • Introduzione al corso

 

UNITÀ 1         Mass media nell’Italia contemporanea: cronaca, pubblicità

Martedì 1 settembre

  • Compiti:
  • Lettura: Corriere della sera (22 maggio 2015): Studente precipitato, «non era ubriaco e non aveva preso lassativi»
  • Video: L’articolo (video di Giuseppe Patota)
  1. Non sottovalutare la potenza dell’articolo (3m57s)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skQZy0d354w&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=14

  1. Le forme dell’articolo determinativo. L’articolo e i nomi (3m35s)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxYMibxC8dk&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=15

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Analisi dell’articolo di cronaca

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

 

Giovedì 3 settembre

  • Compiti
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #1 Scrivi un articolo di cronaca (1 pagina)
    • Video: L’articolo (video di Giuseppe Patota)
  1. Gli articoli indeterminativi (3m26s)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PagDiMgHdXg&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=18

  1. Il caffè o un caffè – che differenza c’è (2m18s)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68TJonEWUaY&index=19&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB

Attività in classe

?       Video: Telegiornale

?       Conversazione: Differenze e similarità tra il telegiornale e le news

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

 

Martedì 7 settembre Labor Day

 

Giovedì 10 settembre

  • Compiti
    • Video: Carosello
  1. Algida:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6i_xEHR94Bo
  2. Simmenthal:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lEzXtgqmCw
  3. Acqua Lete:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MS03PE-Jzvk
  4. Sambuca Molinari:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzkD9q0S-NE
  5. Ferrero Mon Chéri:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qgGAvRnEFs

 

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Analisi e commento alle pubblicità da Carosello

 

Martedì 15 settembre

  • Compiti
    • Video: Pubblicità TV in US
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #1 Articolo di cronaca (seconda versione)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Differenze e similarità tra gli spot italiani e quelli americani

 

Giovedì 17 settembre

  • Compiti
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #2: Scrivi l’analisi di uno degli spot da Carosello (2 pagine)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Analisi di pubblicità tratte da riviste

?       Scrittura: scrivi un nuovo testo per una delle pubblicità analizzate (in gruppo)

 

Martedì 22 settembre

  • Compiti
    • Video: Il nome (video di Giuseppe Patota)
  1. Tutto quello che avreste voluto sapere sul nome e non avete mai chiesto (4m22s)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-j6vLF28S4&index=21&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNBMaschile e femminile - regole ed eccezioni (2m12s)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alk6_gPCx-g&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=22

v Attività in classe

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

 

UNITÀ 2         Terra di vitelloni e casalinghe?

Giovedì 24 settembre

  • Compiti
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #2 (seconda versione)
    • Esercizi di grammatica (la concordanza)

v Attività in classe

?       Conversazione: “Italiani e italiane” da Bar Italia

?       Ascolto e scrittura: “Radio 24”da Espresso 2        

?       Grammatica: Gli aggettivi (concordanza, comparativi, superlativi)

 

Martedì 29 settembre

  • Compiti:
    • Lettura con domande: La famiglia italiana cambia faccia (da Espresso 2)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: commento alla lettura

?       Video: una scena da Ricordati di me (2003) di Gabriele Muccino

?       Grammatica: Aggettivi e avverbi

 

Giovedì 1 ottobre      

  • Compiti:
    • Lettura: Leggi “Rimatori e cantautori” e fai le attività 1 e 3

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: commento alla lettura e alle attività fatte a casa

?       Video: (canzone) Voglio una donna di Roberto Vecchioni https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASLpGEU6kqE

?       Ripasso grammaticale: Il condizionale

 

Martedì 6 ottobre

  • Compiti:
    • Lettura e ricerca in rete: “Cattolici italiani favorevoli ai Pacs e anche a divorzio e aborto” e fai una ricerca in rete su i PACS.
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #3: Scrivi un “articolo di fondo” sull’argomento: sei favorevole o contrario? (2 pagine)

v Attività in classe

  • Conversazione: “L’uomo deve essere galante?” (da Espresso 2)
  • Lettura e scrittura: Il fotoromanzo Un marito per Anna Zaccheo

      

Giovedì 8 ottobre

  • Compiti: 
    • Scrittura creativa: Usa le immagini di un film e componi una pagina di fotoromanzo 

v Attività in classe

?       Presentazione dei fotoromanzi

?       Ascolto e scrittura: Una scena da Catene (1949) di Raffaello Matarazzo

 

Martedì 13 ottobre               

  • Compiti:
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #3: “Articolo di fondo” (seconda versione)

v Attività in classe

  • Ripasso per il mid-term

 

Giovedì 15 ottobre               

  • MID-TERM

 

UNITÀ 3           Tecnologia e cultura

Martedì 20 ottobre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura: “Il telefonino, la ‘bella figura’ e i ‘messaggini’: riflessioni sui ‘gadgets’ degli italiani” (da Bartalesi-Graf)
  1. Video: I plurali doppi (video di Giuseppe Patota)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFCpA00fkEg&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=27 (2m37s)
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFt9NMCf870&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=28 (3m06s)
  3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaXP22nw3CQ&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=29 (3m26s)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Commento alla lettura: usi (e abusi) del cellulare

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

 

Giovedì 22 ottobre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura: “Lo scritto trasmesso” (da Introduzione alla linguistica italiana)
    • Esercizi: da Sobrero & Miglietta

v Attività in classe

?       Video: TBA

?       Esercizi: Correzione esercizi

 

Martedì 27 ottobre

  • Compiti
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #4: Scrivi il riassunto dell’articolo on-line (2 pagine)
    • Video: Come si formano i tempi composti  (video di Giuseppe Patota)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDz4Ie3uxxc&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=32 (4m02s)

v Attività in classe

?       Video: Avere o essere - scegliere l'ausiliare giusto (video di Giuseppe Patota)      

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3xKqG1YlpE&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=33 (2m29s)
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1O5T5-iGkw&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=34 (3m08s)

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

 

Giovedì 29 ottobre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura: “Gli italiani e la tecnologia”

v Attività in classe

  • Discussione: Commento alla lettura

 

UNITÀ 4         Criminalità organizzata

Martedì 3 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #4: Riassunto dell’articolo on-line (seconda versione)
    • Lettura: Introduzione storica (da Bartalesi-Graf)

v Attività in classe

  • Discussione: Commento alla lettura
  • Video e scrittura: una scena da Il Mafioso di Alberto Lattuada

 

Giovedì 5 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Film: Gomorra di Matteo Garrone (2008); guarda il film e compila la scheda di comprensione
    • Video: Indicativo o congiuntivo (video di Giuseppe Patota)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfbHdpuJ44w&index=48&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB (4m16s)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione e analisi del film

?       Ripasso grammaticale: Usi del congiuntivo: il congiuntivo presente

 

Martedì 10 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura: “Ragazzi di mafia”  di Alessandro Leogrande

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Commento alla lettura

?       Ripasso grammaticale: Usi del congiuntivo: il congiuntivo passato

 

Giovedì 12 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #5: Recensione del film Gomorra (3 pagine).
    • Video:
  1. Andrea Camilleri: Portatori sani di mafia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9eDbjWD9EY
  2. Andrea Camilleri: Per crescere al sud

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUTGUYL4HsI

  1. Roberto Saviano: Per crescere al sud

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkIqBdkAzc8

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Commento ai video

 

UNITÀ 5         Migrazioni

Martedì 17 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura: “Gli affari migliori? Alle nove di mattina” di Marco Gasparetti
    • Video: Passato prossimo e passato remoto (video di Giuseppe Patota) 
  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvkkBa1-lVQ&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=43 (2m33s)
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzNV3VEfze0&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=44 (2m39s)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Commento alla lettura

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

?       Video:

 

Giovedì 19 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura: “Il crocefisso” (da Bartalesi-Graf)
    • Video: Passato prossimo e passato remoto (video di Giuseppe Patota)
  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHnY17RqMjI&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=45 (2m18s)
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvXwU-j6a7c&list=PL59GcrPDHI8JimcXIKCqBKNbWbD9IqTNB&index=46

 

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: Commento alla lettura

?       Grammatica: Esercizi

 

Martedì 24 novembre

  • Compiti
    • Film: Io sono Li (2011) di Andrea Segre
    • Scrittura: COMPOSIZIONE #5: Recensione del film Gomorra (seconda versione)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: commento e analisi del film

 

Giovedì 26 novembre            THANKSGIVING

 

Martedì 1 dicembre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura:La mia casa è dove sono di Igiaba Scego (prima parte, pp. 9-21)

v Attività in classe

?       Discussione: commento alla lettura

?       Video: Jovanotti, Questa è la mia casa (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgt91OWfcfw)

 

Giovedì 3 dicembre

  • Compiti
    • Lettura:La mia casa è dove sono di Igiaba Scego (seconda parte, pp. 21-34),

v Attività in classe:

  • Scrittura: attività di scrittura creativa in gruppo
  • Ø ESAME FINALE: da consegnare giovedì 10 dicembre via email

Scrittura creativa: Qual è la città a cui ti senti più legata/o? Ci sono luoghi particolarmente importanti perché legati a esperienze importanti nella tua vita? Scrivi le tue memorie legate a questo spazio urbano e “disegna” una mappa della tua città seguendo l’esempio di Igiaba Scego. (4 pagine)

 

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36270 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM HRH 2.112

Please see syllabus.

FR 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

37045 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.104

See syllabus

ITL 330K • Change/Var Contemp Italian

37220 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM HRH 2.112

Please see Syllabus

FR 396K • Romance Morphosyntax

37220 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.106C

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37445 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.108

FR 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

36870 • Fall 2012
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM HRH 2.106C
(also listed as LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K)

FR/ITL 396K – Introduction to Romance Linguistics

T 3:30-6:30 HRH 2.106C

 

Instructor:       Cinzia Russi

Office:             HRH 3.110B

Office hours:   T 10-11 and by appointment (please, feel free to contact me via email any time)

Email:              russi@mail.utexas.edu (preferred form of contact)

Phone:                        (512) 471 7024

 

I.       Course Objectives 

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the Romance languages, both as a set of closely related linguistic systems that share a common ancestor and as a major historical and cultural phenomenon.

After a brief introduction and classification of the Romance languages currently spoken, we will continue with sketching their historical background, starting with an overview of their common ancestor, Latin. We will then move to the diachronic analysis of the major Romance languages.

Detailed linguistic analysis of (extracts of) texts from different historical periods will serve as a tool to assess our learning, and will give it an empirical, concrete dimension.

By the end of this course, students will have:

  1. Developed or strengthened the analytical skills necessary for reading scholarly articles; have become familiar with the most important scholars in the field.
  2. Mastered how to write abstracts for conference presentations and articles and how to deliver a paper to a peer audience.
  3. Improved the skill required to conduct research and write scholarly articles

 

II.      Format and Procedures

The course will include lecture sessions and in-class discussion sessions.

  1. In the lecture sessions, I will present linguistic structures and data, which will be summarized in handouts. It will be the students’ responsibility to go over the material presented in class and, whenever needed, integrate it through further independent reading.
  2. During the in-class discussion sessions I expect active participation, in the form of giving concrete and lively input to the discussion, from all the students. Therefore, the students a required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus .
  1. I assume that all the students are familiar with the fundamental notion of the main areas of linguistics (i.e., phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics). I also assume that students will seek my assistance whenever they deem necessary.

 

III.    Course Requirements

Graduate standing is required. Consent of Graduate Adviser must be obtained.

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37020 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206

Course Description

Objectives The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture.

We will reach these goals by:

a.   Reading short stories and passages from novels, and reviewing the grammatical structures they exhibit

b.   Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos/short movies

« The course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

Participation Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, and so on.

M This policy will be strictly enforced.

Students will be asked to come to class well prepared on the readings, to complete all the grammar exercises assigned, and to be ready to participate to class discussions.

Compositions Proper use of grammar as well as content will both greatly affect the composition grade. In order to get full credit, students must turn in compositions on the days indicated on the syllabus.

Oral presentations Students will give one oral presentations in class. This will be a group presentation. Each group will comprise three students and each presentation is expected to be 20-25 minutes long No reading allowed! You may use index cards if extremely necessary, but please, be prepared to act out your “role” as much as possible without reading.

You are free to choose the “genre” of your presentation: a satire, a comedy, a drama, an interview, a movie, etc. (if you choose to videotape your presentation, remember that you must have at least a “live” introduction in class). The subject must be based upon the material we have studied in the course; you can focus on one reading/author/film or two, or combine all of them together.

*** Evaluation criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, creativity, fluency of expression.

Texts Folder of Xerox-copied material

Dizionario Harper Collins Sansoni, standard edition (or equivalent dictionary)

Useful sites         Garzanti Linguistica http://www.garzantilinguistica.it

Eulogos http://www.eulogos.it

Grade policy The final grade will be computed as follows:

Class participation                  10%

Compositions                          20%

Quizzes                                  15%

Two exams                             20 % each

Oral performance                    15%

ITL 380L • Hist Of The Italian Language

37045 • Spring 2012
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM HRH 2.106C

FR/ITL 396K – History of the Italian Language

(Unique 37045)

W 1:00–4:00pm HRH 2.106C

Instructor:                  Cinzia Russi, HRH 3.110B, russi@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours:              T & TH 9:00-10:30, and by appointment

Survey of the development of Italian from spoken Latin to the present day.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The objective of this course is to trace the development of the Italian language from its origins (spoken Latin) to the present day from a language internal perspective (i.e., reviewing and analyzing the main diachronic changes at the phonological, morphological, syntactic and lexical levels) as well as from a language external point of view (i.e., examining social, political and cultural changes). The most important linguistic changes that characterize the evolution of the language will be traced through the analysis of various texts from different stages. Special attention will be given to the linguistic diversity of Italy.

? The course will be taught in Italian.

Grading policy:

  • Active class discussion (and critique) of reading assignments (15%)
  • Textual analyses (15%)
  • Research paper proposal with annotated bibliography (15%)
  • Presentation of term paper (15%)
  • Final research paper (40%)

Reading assignments

Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus; even when they are not presenting, they are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion.

Term Paper

Students will write a 20/25-page research paper on an aspect of the history of Italian of their choice. The paper will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. Students are essentially free in the choice of the topic; however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before they start their research.

Texts

  • Marazzini, Claudio. 2002. La lingua italiana. Profilo storico. Bologna: Il Mulino.
  • Patota, Giuseppe. 2007. Nuovi lineamenti di grammatica storica dell’italiano. Bologna: Il Mulino.

FR 396K • Grammaticalizatn In Rom Langs

36730 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.106C
(also listed as ITL 396K, LIN 383, SPN 396K)

FR/ITL 396K –Grammaticalization processes in Romance languages

M W 2:00-3:30pm HRH 2.106C

Instructor:    Cinzia Russi, HRH 3.110B, russi@mail.utexas.edu 

Office hours:            M & W 9:00-10:30, and by appointment

After an introductory discussion on grammaticalization (a general diachronic process of morphosyntactic change by which linguistic forms undergo a more or less substantial loss of syntactic independence accompanied by increase of their grammatical function), this course will examine specific grammaticalization processes pertaining to the following categories: (a) verbs, (b) demonstratives, (c) pronouns, (d) adverbs

We will then go on to discuss the nature of the relationship between grammaticalization and lexicalization. Next, we will examine how grammaticalization stands with respect to and is viewed within traditional (generative based) diachronic linguistics, focusing on two strictly interrelated issues, which have raised controversy mostly, although not exclusively, among grammaticalization ‘opponents’: (a) the unidirectionality of grammaticalization processes, (b) the reality/possibility of ‘degrammaticalization’

Grading policy:

  • Active class discussion (and critique) of reading assignments (15%)
  • Two oral presentations (30%)
  • Research paper proposal with annotated bibliography (15%)
  • Final research paper (40%) 

Reading assignments

Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus; even when they are not presenting, they are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion.

Term Paper

Students will write a 20/25-page research paper on a grammaticalization process of their choice, or on theoretical aspects of grammaticalization that have particularly raised their interest. The paper will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. Students are essentially free in the choice of the topic; however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before they start their research.

Texts

  • Readings packet. (Required)
  • Heine, Bernd, Ulrike Claudi and Friederike Hünnemeyer. 1991. Grammaticalization: A conceptual framework. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (On reserve)
  • Hopper, Paul, & Elizabeth C. Traugott. 2003. Grammaticalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (On reserve)

 

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36955 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BEN 1.108

ITL 328 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (Unique 36955)

Fall 2011

M, W & F 1:00-2:00

BEN 1.108

 

Instructor: Cinzia Russi

Office: HRH 3.110B

Phone: 471 6390

E-mail: russi@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours: M & W 10-12, and by appointment

Descrizione del corso

Objectives                The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by:

  1. a.    Reading short stories and passages from novels, and reviewing the grammatical structures they exhibit
  2. b.    Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos/short movies

« The course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

Participation           Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, and so on.

M This policy will be strictly enforced.

Students will be asked to come to class well prepared on the readings, to complete all the grammar exercises assigned, and to be ready to participate to class discussions.

Compositions         Proper use of grammar as well as content will both greatly affect the composition grade. In order to get full credit, students must turn in compositions on the days indicated on the syllabus.

Oral presentations          Students will give one oral presentations in class. This will be a group presentation. Each group will comprise three students and each presentation is expected to be 20-25 minutes long No reading allowed! You may use index cards if extremely necessary, but please, be prepared to act out your “role” as much as possible without reading.

You are free to choose the “genre” of your presentation: a satire, a comedy, a drama, an interview, a movie, etc. (if you choose to videotape your presentation, remember that you must have at least a “live” introduction in class). The subject must be based upon the material we have studied in the course; you can focus on one reading/author/film or two, or combine all of them together.

*** Evaluation criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, creativity, fluency of expression.

Texts           Patota, Giuseppe. 2003. Grammatica di riferimento della lingua italiana per stranieri. Firenze: Le Monnier.

Folder of Xerox-copied material 

Useful sites            Garzanti Linguistica      http://www.garzantilinguistica.it

                          Eulogos http://www.eulogos.it

 

Grade policy                                    The final grade will be computed as follows:

Class participation             10%

Compositions                    20%                

Quizzes                            15%

Two exams                       20 % each

Oral performance               15%                            

Grading system       Starting in the Fall of 2009, the University will use a plus/minus system for grading. The following table illustrates the correspondences between letter grade, GPA points and percentage grade.

Letter Grade

GPA Points

Percentage Grade

A

4.0

93%-100%

A-

3.67

90%-92%

B+

3.33

87%-89%

B

3.0

83%-86%

B-

2.67

80%-82%

C+

2.33

77%-79%

C

2.0

73%-76%

C-

1.67

70%-72%

D+

1.33

67%-69%

D

1.0

63%-66%

D-

0.67

60%-62%

F

0

Less than 60

Class and University Policies

Religious holidays              By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Use of Blackboard                        In this class, I use Blackboard, a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu, to distribute some course materials. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Academic Integrity

University of Texas Honor Code                   The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. Each student in this course is expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code.

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty                     Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

For further information, visit the Student Judicial Services web site http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/. This site offers excellent resources on how to cite sources and paraphrase. Copying materials from other people or from sources on the Internet, for example, or having your work edited by somebody else, constitutes a fraudulent submission. Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student’s own work and will acknowledge others’ work as appropriate (e.g., citing sources).

Other University Notices and Policies

Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students   It is the student’s responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at

 http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html.

Documented Disability Statement                   The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. If you require special accommodations, you must obtain a letter that documents your disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to me at the beginning of the semester so we can discuss the accommodations you need. No later than five business days before an exam, you should remind me of any testing accommodations you will need. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)                   If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

Emergency Evacuation Policy              Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made. Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:

  • Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building.
  • Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.
  • If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class.
  • In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.
  • Do not re-enter a building unless you are given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT-Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office.

Critical Dates          Please note the following critical dates for class administration:

  • August 29: Monday Last day of the official add/drop period; after this date, changes in registration require the approval of the department chair and usually the student’s dean. (See General Information, chapter 4, for details.)
  • Last day undergraduate students may register and pay tuition without the approval of the registrar.
  • Last day an undergraduate student may add a class except for rare and extenuating circumstances.
  • Payment for added classes (add bill) due by 5:00 pm.
  • Last day to drop a class for a possible refund. (See General Information, chapter 4, for details.)
  • Last day a student may change registration in a class to or from the pass/fail or credit/no credit basis.
  • September 9: Friday Twelfth class day; this is the date the official enrollment count is taken.
  • November 1: Tuesday Last day an undergraduate student may, with the dean’s approval, withdraw from the University or drop a class except for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons.

 

FR 383M • Struc Of Fr: Syntax And Semant

36950 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM BEN 1.106

 

 Objectives of the course

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the linguistic analysis of modern French syntax and semantics. Particular emphasis will be given to acquiring the skills needed to conduct syntactic analysis. A second goal of the course is to become acquainted with the fundamental principles and methods of modern linguistic research.

Although no previous knowledge of linguistics is presumed, students are expected to have a basic knowledge of traditional grammatical terminology.

The course will be fast-paced and cover a vast amount of material, rather than deal with selected topics in detail. A large number of theoretical concepts and problems will be discussed in relatively short time. Therefore, regular attendance and class preparation are crucial.

Among the topics to be covered are: the notion of grammar; grammar and the lexicon; linguistic categories; verb system; tense and aspect; grammatical functions; valence; the pronominal system; phrase and sentence structure.

The course will be taught in English.

 

Computation of grade

Written homework assignments: 25%

Two midterms: 20% each

Final exam: 35%

 

Required course material

Reading packet

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37245 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BEN 1.106

FR 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

36520 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.106
(also listed as ITL 396K, LIN 383)

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing in language and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser. 

Same as FR 396K, LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K

Course Description:  The main objective of this course is to introduce the students to the Romance languages, both as a set of closely related linguistic systems that share a common ancestor and as a major historical and cultural phenomenon.

After a brief introduction and classification of the Romance languages currently spoken, we will continue with sketching their historical background, starting with an overview of their common ancestor, Latin. We will then move to the diachronic analysis of the major Romance languages.

Detailed linguistic analysis of (extracts of) texts from different historical periods will serve as a tool to assess our learning, and will give it an empirical, concrete dimension.

We will conclude with a brief general overview of ‘neo’-Romance languages.

Course packet (required)

Course Requirements

Graduate standing required. Consent of Graduate Adviser must be obtained.

 

Grading Policy

Assignments and class discussion 25%

Assignments 15%

Class discussion 10%

One written exam 25%

One preliminary paper 10%

Final paper and oral presentation 40%

Final paper 30%

Oral presentation 10%

 

ITL 330K • Change/Var In Contemp Italian

36770 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 304

COURSE TITLE: The Italian of the third millennium: change and variation in contemporary Italian

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The objective of this course is to identify and examine some important evolutionary trends that are at work in present-day Italian (both spoken and written), focusing in particular on the consequence that these trends may have for the reduction/disappearance of the dichotomy between Standard language vs. non-standard varieties. The study of these novel developments will be conducted through a review of the relevant linguistic literature but also by way of direct analysis of raw empirical data.

The course will be divided into two main parts. The first part will start with an outline the essential features of italiano standard, italiano popolare (as well as the most vital sub/nonstandard varieties of the language) and a brief discussion of the current status of the dialects; then, we will examine the most significant changes and patterns of variation observed with respect to the areas of the language such as:

  • The pronominal system
  • The verb system:

§       status and vitality of the subjunctive mood

§       modal values of the future tense

  • The lexicon:

§       influence of English and other foreign languages (e.g., languages of immigration)

 

During the second part, we will look at how the innovative features identified in the first part of the course characterize some specific language varieties, namely:

  • The language of television and cinema
  • The language of newspapers
  • The language of the youth

 

Grading Policy

Written assignments and class discussion 40%

Assignments 25%

Class discussion 15%

Two written exams 30% each

 

Textbook: course packet (required)

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37360 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WRW 113

ITL 330K • History Of Italian Language

37620 • Fall 2008
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 2.128

Please see Syllabus

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  • Department of French and Italian

    University of Texas at Austin
    201 W 21st Street STOP B7600
    HRH 2.114A
    Austin, TX 78712-1800
    512-471-5531