The Department of French and Italian

David P Birdsong


ProfessorPhD, Harvard University, Romance Languages and Literatures

Professor, French Linguistics
David P Birdsong

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-7299
  • Office: HRH 2.122
  • Office Hours: Thursdays 10:30 - 11:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Interests


second language acquisition, psycholinguistics, bilingualism, French linguistics

Courses


FR 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

36640 • Fall 2016
Meets W 5:00PM-6:00PM HRH 2.112

Required of all first-year graduate students in the Department of French and Italian.  

FR 392K • Experimental Research & Design

35990 • Spring 2016
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM CLA 1.404

Experimental Research and Design in the Language Sciences

David Birdsong  HRH 2.120  Tel:  512 471-7299  e-mail:  birdsong@austin.utexas.edu

 

OVERVIEW 

This course introduces qualified graduate students to the design of experiments around linguistics-based hypotheses, the use of various statistical measures and software, techniques of data gathering and reporting, and proper interpretation of results.  Emphasis will be placed on studies dealing with the processing and acquisition of French, Spanish, and English.

The course provides a foundation for conducting procedurally sound empirical research in the language sciences.  As such, it is not to be conceived as adequate preparation for all future quantitative research; for this, additional experience in statistics and experimental methodology will be required.

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the language sciences, there is a rich interplay of theory and data.  Quantitative methods are critical to theory-based investigations of on-line sentence parsing, speech segmentation and perception, neurological representation of language processes, and language acquisition by infants, children, and adults, to mention just a few domains of inquiry.

            This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate this research--and to carry it out. Toward these ends, one must become familiar with the pertinent literature, as well as fundamental principles of quantitative data gathering and statistical analysis.  Accordingly, the course aims to enhance students' abilities in three equally important domains:

 

(1) LINGUISTIC:  Ability to understand theoretical and descriptive accounts of the language in which people perform. Knowledge of language and linguistics is thus at the heart of the course, and is what distinguishes it from other experimental design and statistics courses on this campus. Since we will also be looking at acquisition and processing, familiarity with these areas is essential as well.  Simply put, an experimental study can’t be designed and executed without knowledge of the domain of research.

            Your progress in this area is measured in part by performance on projects (see handouts), particularly in terms of:  (a) thoroughness and accuracy in reporting relevant research in the literature review; (b) generation of testable and well-motivated hypotheses; (c) reasonable interpretation of results vis à vis the hypotheses; (d) insightful discussion of results and thoughtful suggestions for future study. 

 

(2) STATISTICAL:  Ability to work comfortably with basic statistical procedures (e.g. t-tests, ANOVAs, correlations) and familiarity with other procedures (e.g. multiple regression, ANCOVA).  Our two texts (see below) are good introductions to statistical methods and considerations of experimental design. They are relatively light on the pure mathematics of statistics and relatively heavy on execution of statistical analyses using software packages (Excel and SPSS).

           

(3) CONCEPTUAL/METHODOLOGICAL:  Ability to think like an experimental researcher.  This involves:  (a) cautious attribution of causality in linguistic behavior; (b) designing projects that do not ignore latent or intervening variables; (c) sensitivity to construct validity and ecological validity; (d) prudent interpretation of data with respect to stated hypotheses; (e) avoiding pitfalls of various kinds.  One must continually ask oneself "What is good evidence?"  The answer to this question depends as much on understanding the targeted behavioral / brain-based phenomena and linguistic issues as it does on statistics and experimental design. 

           

 

Your progress in (2) and (3) is measured mainly by performance on quizzes, homework, and a final exam.  (See components of the final grade, below.)

 

To contextualize and exemplify these three domains, we will closely examine several noteworthy studies.  One set of studies we’ll read deals with the processing of Romance languages, another with age-related differences in second language (L2) acquisition.  In addition, the Larson-Hall text (see below) features summaries of and raw data from a variety of L2 studies.

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS (tentative as of 10/2015)

 

Larson-Hall, J. (2009).  A Guide to Doing Statistics in Second Language Research Using SPSS. New York: Routledge.

Salkind, N. J. (2009). Statistics for People Who (think they) Hate Statistics, 2nd edition, Excel 2007 edition.  Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

 

 

COMPONENTS OF THE FINAL GRADE (tentative as of 10/2015)

                                   

Quizzes (3 X 10%)                    30%

Homework                                10%

Project                                     30%

Presentation of project               5%

Final exam                                25%

 

 

• Quizzes will be announced in advance, and cover the readings and classroom discussion.  At least one of the quizzes will require work on the computers in the classroom, using a statistical software package (SPSS, Excel).

 

• Homework may include exercises in the texts, mini-critiques of experimental studies (in addition to those already indicated on the syllabus), outlines of experimental designs and anticipated results, etc.

 

• Students have two options for the final project.  The first is an exercise wherein students will create raw data.  You will be asked to motivate the experiment with reference to the relevant literature, state hypotheses, outline the experimental procedure(s), concoct all the raw data, statistically analyze these data, and interpret the results.   No actual subjects will be run. Another possibility for the final project involves use of actual data that you have or will have collected.  All projects must be proposed to and approved by the instructor, and all will be presented in class.  Projects involving pairs of students are allowed under certain conditions with consent of the instructor.Please see accompanying handout for details.

 

• The final exam is comprehensive.  Details of content are given on a handout. There will be review materials and a review session.

FR 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

35840 • Fall 2015
Meets W 5:00PM-6:00PM HRH 2.112

Fall 2015

French Graduate Proseminar

“Introduction to Studies in Literature and Culture”

FR 180P (35840)                                   Wednesdays 5:00-6:00                    HRH 2.112

David Birdsong         HRH 2.122     Office hours Thursdays 10:00 – 11:30 and by appointment

 

Your success in graduate school and beyond is not only about doing well in your classes; it depends in large measure on the guidance and mentoring you receive from members of the department (graduate faculty and your fellow grad students alike) who understand, and are sincerely devoted to, your interests. With this in mind, the purpose of the French Graduate Proseminar is to jump-start your successful graduate career by exposing you to best practices in academic and professional training.

 

The first session (September 2nd) reviews the structuring of departmental financial support and time to degree – and how these go together – with an emphasis on taking advantage of funding opportunities and anticipating graduate career milestones. This session is led by Graduate Coordinator Catherine Jaroschy.

 

The next two sessions are about making the most of graduate school, and are conducted by your fellow graduate students, Jocelyn Wright and Ashley Voeks (September 9th) and Stephanie Brynes and Maxence Leconte (September 16th). How do you position yourself for success in grad school? At UT there are many competing demands on your time: How do you prioritize? How do you choose a faculty advisor, and how can s/he guide you through your graduate career and beyond? What are the opportunities for professionalization at the department and university levels? What is it like to present a working paper? A conference paper? How do you get started in publishing? In-class exercises.

 

UT-Austin is an organization. Every component of an organization exists for a reason and has a purpose. How do you fit into, and benefit from, UT’s organizational scheme? On September 23rd David Birdsong reviews the administrative, academic and research structures of UT, the College of Liberal Arts, the Department of French and Italian, and the Graduate Program in French, with an emphasis on the policies, initiatives, research groups, committees, administrators, and staff that support and expand your graduate experience.  In-class exercises.

 

On September 30th Marc Bizer opens the Proseminar up to consider what the 21st century might have in store for scholar-teachers in French. What will be the relationships between technology, research, and teaching? Between the Humanities and the Social Sciences? What will be the cutting edge, and how will you stay on it?

 

Our graduate programs in French Studies and French Linguistics promote interdisciplinary training. In the October 7th session, led by David Birdsong, we start by defining and exemplifying interdisciplinary research, then move on to a discussion of interdisciplinarity. (How) Can one become competent in more than one discipline? Can (Should?) linguists do literary criticism? How might one fruitfully juxtapose Nerval, Nihilism and Neuroscience? How might one fruitfully oppose Data vs. Dada? Three required readings will be posted to Canvas ahead of the class to inform the discussion. Homework and in-class exercises.

 

On October 14th Alex Wettlaufer will lead a complementary session on the topic of interdisciplinarity. She will first discuss her personal interdisciplinary training in the visual arts and comparative literature. Then she will present examples of interdisciplinary research from Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal, for which she is the new Executive Editor.

 

The following three meetings (October 21st, October 28th, and November 4th) are devoted to the practicalities of promoting yourself professionally. Turning your term paper or Walther Research project into a conference presentation, writing an abstract for a conference presentation or article, preparing for the conference presentation experience – these are essential elements in the move from classroom student to independent scholar.  How do these activities connect to, and enhance, your dissertation research? How do you become known in the field before you receive your degree? The sessions will be conducted, respectively, by Cinzia Russi, Hélène Tissières, and Carl Blyth and Fanny Macé.

 

On November 11th, we expand on the practical process of scholarship. Hervé Picherit will focus on success at every stage of article publication, from developing a winning Walther research proposal, to drafting and honing the paper, to choosing and submitting the manuscript to an appropriate journal, to the peer-review process, to revising and resubmitting, and to eventual publication.

 

In the November 18th session, Barbara Bullock will talk about landing a job in academe. How do you build a strong dossier for an academic position? What kinds of academic jobs are “out there” and how do you plan for them? How do you make the most out of what UT has to offer (e.g. courses, mentoring by professors and peers, workshops, “boot camps”)? What opportunities do you have here for preparing your CV and practicing for job interviews? It’s not too early to think in these terms!

 

The final session, on December 2nd, allows us a moment to synthesize the Proseminar presentations. Prior to the class each student will choose an scholarly article, upload it to Canvas for others to read, then lead a brief discussion in class around the following questions: Is the scholarship rigorous? Persuasive? Does it engage you intellectually? In terms of your graduate studies and professional development, what would it take for you to “become like” that author? David Birdsong will guide the discussion. Homework and in-class exercises.

 


 

FR 392K • Tpcs In Second Lang Acquisitn

36115 • Spring 2015
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM HRH 4.102B

Topics in Second Language Acquisition 

Spring 2015

FR 392K  Unique 36115

Wednesdays 3:00 – 6:00   HRH 4.102B

 

David Birdsong       HRH 2.114               471-7299                 birdsong@austin.utexas.edu

Office Hours: Thursdays 10:30-11:30 and by appointment

 

 

DESCRIPTION:  This course addresses major themes in current second-language (L2) acquisition theory.  These include age and the end state of L2 acquisition; critical periods; extraction of information from input (parsing and perception); neural representation and processing in bilingualism; consequences and nature of bilingualism; deficits versus capacities; L2 and cognitive neurofunction; individual differences in L2 acquisition and use; nativelikeness; language dominance in bilingualism.  Special attention will be devoted to this last topic.

The acquisition and use of French will be featured; readings relating to French or available in French are indicated as such on the syllabus.  Some knowledge of French will be helpful, but is not required. This course assumes basic knowledge of linguistic terminology and analysis as well as some exposure to psycholinguistic issues and methods.  The course does not concern the foreign-language learning (classroom) context.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS:

                  • A presentation that synthesizes and contextualizes one or more designated readings.

 

• An exam the fifth week of class, to test your understanding of basic concepts and research findings.  Having a solid command of this information will be essential for the remainder of the course.

 

• Two reaction statements.

 

                  • A final project, relating to an approved topic. This may involve contributing to a group research project, the design of a study, a critical review of one or more published studies, or a small-scale experiment or case study. Due Saturday, May 16th at 10:00 p.m.

                 

Specifics on each of these four components are given on a separate handout.

 

                  • In addition, you will be required to complete ad hoc assignments such as writing thumbnail summaries of readings, sharing comments and ideas on Canvas, etc.You’ll also be required to meet graduate-level expectations for attendance, participation, and preparedness. That is, you should come to class having read the materials and be prepared to answer questions, make insightful comments, draw connections with previous readings, etc.

                 

 

GRADING:  Final course grades will be determined as follows:

                                                     

Presentation                                                                 20%

                                                      Exam                                                                               30%

                                                      Reaction statements (2 X 5%)                                 10%

Final project                                                                  30%

                                                      Participation, preparedness                                   

                                                         & ad hoc assignments                                            10%

 

 

READINGS:  All readings are available on CANVAS. A separate handout provides bibliographic information for these readings.

Topics in Second Language Acquisition

FR 392K  Unique 36115  Spring 2015  

SYLLABUS

 

 

 

* = concerns knowledge, use or acquisition of French

† = selected pages only

instructor presentation = in-depth reading of the article is not required of students

assignments for student presentations will be decided by week 4

 

Week 1                     Introduction

Jan. 21                      The discipline of SLA

                                    Approaches and topics in SLA

                                    Factors in learning and use

                                    Age, initial state, end state

Brain, behavior, biology, biography

Deficits vs. capacities

                                    Cutler et al. (1989) – 2 handouts with in-class reading and discussion

 

Week 2                     L1 - L2 differences

Jan. 28                      Birdsong (2009), sections I-V

                                    † Bley-Vroman (1989)

                                    † White (2003)

                                    * Coppieters (1987)

 

Week 3                     Age of acquisition of L2 morphosyntax

Feb. 4                        Ortega (2009), pp. 13-30

* † Birdsong (1992)

                                    † Johnson & Newport (1989)

                                    Birdsong & Molis (2001)

                                   

Week 4                     Sources and interpretation of age effects in L2

Feb. 11                     Birdsong (2009), sections VI-VIII

                                    DeKeyser (2000)

                                    Flege, Yeni-Komshian & Liu (1999)—instructor presentation

                                    Review for exam

                                   

Week 5                     Exam

Feb. 18                     Critical periods from a developmental perspective I

Werker, Young & Yoshida (2012)

 

Week 6                     Critical periods from a developmental perspective II

Feb. 25                     Werker & Hensch (2014)

                                    Kuhl (2011) – student presentation

                                    † Hensch (2005)

                                    Native and non-native speech perception

                                    Williams & Escudero (2014)

 

Week 7                     L2 speech perception

Mar. 4                       * Peperkamp et al. (2010)

                                    * Dupoux et al. (2010) —student presentation

                                    Amengual (2014) – student presentation

                                    Cristia et al. (2012) accented speech across the lifespan

                                   

 

 

Week 8                     Language dominance in bilingualism I

Mar. 11                    Grosjean (1989; 1998)

Birdsong (2014; in press)

                                    Treffers-Daller (in press)

 

Week 9                     SPRING BREAK

 

Week 10                                    Language dominance in bilingualism II

Mar. 25                    (Same readings as above)

 

Week 11                                    L1 attrition and adoptees

Apr. 1                        * Pallier et al. (2003)

                                    * Ventureyra et al. (2004)—student presentation [with Pierce et al.]

                                    † Hyltenstam et al. (2009)

                                    * Pierce et al. (2014) – student presentation [with Ventureyra et al.]

 

Week 12                                    Cognitive neurofunction in adult L2 use and acquisition

Apr. 8                        Abutalebi (2008)

                                    Steinhauer (2014)—student presentation

                                    Speech category learning in adults – neurological perspectives

Yi et al. (2014)

Chandrasekaran, Koslov & Maddox (2014)

                                    GUEST SPEAKER: Bharath Chandrasekaran => reaction statement due 4/15/2015

 

Week 13                                    Individual differences in language acquisition and processing I

Apr. 15                      Ortega (2009) 145-167

                                    Park & Bischof (2011)—instructor presentation

† Birdsong (2007)

                                    Moyer (2014)

 

Week 14                  Individual differences II

Apr. 22                      Diaz et al. (2008)—student presentation

Ettlinger, Bradlow & Wong (2012) – student presentation

Morgan-Short et al. (2012) – student presentation

Ingvalson et al. (2014)

Kanai & Rees (2011) – instructor presentation

 

Week 15                                    Nativelikeness

April 29                     Birdsong & Gertken (2013)

                                    Clahsen & Felser (2006) – student presentation

                                    † Dabrowska (2012)

                                    In-class reaction statement activity => reaction statement due 5/6/2015

 

Week 16                  Wrap-up and synthesis of course

May 6                      

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone).  The web site is http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.  Penalties for violations of the Honor Code include a grade of zero on the work in question and a failing grade for the course.  The link to the University Honor Code is: http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/gi09-10/ch01/index.html

 

Religious observances: By UT-Austin policy, students must notify the instructor of pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day.  If you miss a class, an exam, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after (or before) the absence.

 

From the Office of Campus Safety and Security, 512-471-5767, http://www.utexas.edu/safety/ 

-- Occupants of buildings on The University of Texas at Austin campus are required to evacuate buildings when a fire alarm is activated. Alarm activation or announcement requires exiting and assembling outside.

-- Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of each classroom and building you may occupy.  Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when entering the building.

-- Students requiring assistance in evacuation shall inform their instructor in writing during the first week of class.

-- In the event of an evacuation, follow the instruction of faculty or class instructors.

-- Do not re-enter a building unless given instructions by the following: Austin Fire Department, The University of Texas at Austin Police Department, or Fire Prevention Services office. 

-- Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL):  512-232-5050

-- For information on emergency evacuation routes & emergency procedures: www.utexas.edu/emergency

 

 

 

 

FR 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

37015 • Fall 2014
Meets W 5:00PM-6:00PM HRH 2.112
(also listed as ITL 180P)

Required of all first-year graduate students in the Department of French and Italian.  

FR 392K • Experimental Rsch In Lang Sci

37385 • Spring 2014
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM HRH 4.102B
(also listed as LIN 392)

FR 392K #37385 / LIN 392 #41600

Experimental Research & Design in the Language Sciences

Spring 2014

 

David Birdsong  HRH 2.114  Tel:  471-7299  e-mail:  birdsong@austin.utexas.edu

 

OVERVIEW 

This course introduces qualified graduate students to the design of experiments around linguistics-based hypotheses, the use of various statistical measures, techniques of data gathering and reporting, and proper interpretation of results.  Emphasis will be placed on studies dealing with the processing and acquisition of French, Spanish, and English.

The course provides a foundation for conducting procedurally sound empirical research in the language sciences.  As such, it is not to be conceived as adequate preparation for all future quantitative research; for this, additional experience in statistics and experimental methodology will be required.

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the language sciences, there is a rich interplay of theory and data.  Quantitative methods are critical to theory-based investigations of on-line sentence parsing, speech segmentation and perception, neurological representation of language processes, and language acquisition by infants, children, and adults, to mention just a few domains of inquiry.

            This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate this research--and to carry it out. Toward these ends, one must become familiar with the pertinent literature, as well as fundamental principles of quantitative data gathering and statistical analysis.  Accordingly, the course aims to enhance students' abilities in three equally important domains:

 

(1) LINGUISTIC:  Ability to understand theoretical and descriptive accounts of the language in which people perform. Knowledge of language and linguistics is thus at the heart of the course, and is what distinguishes it from other experimental design and statistics courses on this campus. Since we will also be looking at acquisition and processing, familiarity with these areas is essential as well.  Simply put, an experimental study can’t be designed and executed without knowledge of the domain of research.

            Your progress in this area is measured in part by performance on projects (see handouts), particularly in terms of:  (a) thoroughness and accuracy in reporting relevant research in the literature review; (b) generation of testable and well-motivated hypotheses; (c) reasonable interpretation of results vis à vis the hypotheses; (d) insightful discussion of results and thoughtful suggestions for future study. 

 

(2) STATISTICAL:  Ability to work comfortably with basic statistical procedures (e.g. t-tests, ANOVAs, correlations) and familiarity with other procedures (e.g. multiple regression, ANCOVA).  Our two texts (see below) are good introductions to statistical methods and considerations of experimental design. They are relatively light on the pure mathematics of statistics and relatively heavy on execution of statistical analyses using software packages (Excel and SPSS).

           

(3) CONCEPTUAL/METHODOLOGICAL:  Ability to think like an experimental researcher.  This involves:  (a) cautious attribution of causality in linguistic behavior; (b) designing projects that do not ignore latent or intervening variables; (c) sensitivity to construct validity and ecological validity; (d) prudent interpretation of data with respect to stated hypotheses; (e) avoiding pitfalls of various kinds.  One must continually ask oneself "What is good evidence?"  The answer to this question depends as much on understanding the targeted behavioral / brain-based phenomena and linguistic issues as it does on statistics and experimental design. 

           

 

Your progress in (2) and (3) is measured mainly by performance on quizzes, homework, and a final exam.  (See components of the final grade, below.)

 

To contextualize and exemplify these three domains, we will closely examine several noteworthy studies.  One set of studies we’ll read deals with the processing of Romance languages, another with age-related differences in second language (L2) acquisition.  In addition, the Larson-Hall text (see below) features summaries of and raw data from a variety of L2 studies.

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS (tentative as of 10/10/2013)

 

Larson-Hall, J. (2009).  A Guide to Doing Statistics in Second Language Research Using SPSS. New York: Routledge.

Salkind, N. J. (2009). Statistics for People Who (think they) Hate Statistics, 2nd edition, Excel 2007 edition.  Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

 

 

COMPONENTS OF THE FINAL GRADE (tentative as of 10/10/2013)

                                   

Quizzes (3 X 10%)                    30%

                                    Homework                                10%

                                    Project                                     30%

                                    Presentation of project               5%

                                    Final exam                                25%

 

 

• Quizzes will be announced in advance, and cover the readings and classroom discussion.  At least one of the quizzes will require work on the computers in the classroom, using a statistical software package (SPSS, Excel).

 

Homework may include exercises in the texts, mini-critiques of experimental studies (in addition to those already indicated on the syllabus), outlines of experimental designs and anticipated results, etc.

 

• Students have two options for the final project.  The first is an exercise wherein students will create raw data.  You will be asked to motivate the experiment with reference to the relevant literature, state hypotheses, outline the experimental procedure(s), concoct all the raw data, statistically analyze these data, and interpret the results.   No actual subjects will be run. Another possibility for the final project involves use of actual data that you have or will have collected.  All projects must be proposed to and approved by the instructor, and all will be presented in class.  Please see accompanying handout for details. 

 

• The final exam is comprehensive.  Details of format and content are given on a handout. There will be review materials, practice questions, and a review session.

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

37110 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM HRH 4.102B

FR 324L  -  PRACTICAL PHONETICS               

Fall 2013  Unique #37110
TTH 9:30am - 11:00am HRH 4.102B                    

 

David Birdsong
Office hours:  HRH 2.114B Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30, and by appointment
Telephone:  471-7299  email:  birdsong@austin.utexas.edu

 

Required materials: 

(1) TEXT: D. Dansereau, Savoir Dire2nd Edition.  Available at the Co-Op. 

(2) Red course packet “CAHIER ROUGE”(CR) available at Paradigm, 2116 Guadalupe, inside Austin Text Books.  (472-7986)

 

Overview.  This introduction to French phonetics provides upper-division students with a practical and analytic understanding of French sounds in isolation and in context.  The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic transcription are taught.  Audio exercises emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels and the [u]-[y] contrast, as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, etc.).  The class is conducted in French.  Written materials are in French as well.  An ability to read, speak, write, and understand French at an advanced level is assumed.  Pre-requisite: upper division standing in French.  Recommended: FR 320E / FR 322E.

 

Organization of the course.  There are two basic components of the course:

Descriptive linguistics.  Required materials and lectures provide detailed analyses of features of spoken French, e.g., la liaison, l’enchaînement, la ‘loi de position’, ‘e-caduc’, etc.

Practice in pronunciation and discrimination.  Applying your knowledge of linguistic description and phonetic transcription, you sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.  In this process, the textbook exercises and audio program are essential.  Selected audio exercises will be reviewed in class; however, it is your responsibility to practice them outside of class on a consistent basis.

 

Improvement.  Five percent of the final grade will reflect your personal pronunciation improvement over the course of the semester.  Improvement will be measured by comparing your pronunciation on the First Diagnostic Exercise (see first-day handout) at the beginning of the term with your reading of this and related material at the end of the term.  The related material includes the Texte Diagnostique (excerpts from Valéry; see first-day handout).  

 

Grading.  Plus/minus letter grades will be given. The final course grade will be determined as follows:

 

               Homework, preparedness, participation, quizzes                                               10%

               Exam 1 Chs. 1-2 in text; CR p. 1; 6-18; 80                                                    20%

               Exam 2 Chs. 3-4 in text; CR pp. 19-37                                                         20%

               Exam 3 Chs. 5-6 in text; CR pp. 38-45; 58-62                                               20%

               Exam 4 (written part) Ch. 7 in text; CR pp. 46-57; 93-94                             15%

               Exam 4 (oral parts)      Ch. 7 in text; CR p. 92                                             5%

Comprehensive: All text chapters + CR; CR p. 92;         5%

            first day handouts

Comparison beginning vs. end of term; CR p. 92;          5%                                                     first day handouts                       

              

• Since the chapters in the Savoir Dire text build upon each other, all exams after the first are to some degree cumulative.  All exams will have a written component, and an oral production component; exams 1-3 will have comprehension – discrimination  - dictation components. The written and oral production components of Exam 4 are spread over several days; see dates on syllabus.  There is no final exam.

 

• For every unexcused absence after the third, 3 points will be deducted from your final course grade, up to a maximum of 15 points.

 

• To access the audio program for the Savoir Dire text, go to LAITS Audio Catalog www.laits.utexas.edu/itsaud; scroll down to fr-2-94 Savoir Dire, second edition. If you receive a prompt for a password, type in dansereau or danserau. To match the numbered audio exercises (séquences) with pages/exercises in the text, consult the correspondence key at the back of the CR, pp. 96-110.

FR 392K • Experimental Rsch In Lang Sci

36770 • Spring 2012
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 2.120
(also listed as LIN 392)

FR 392K

Experimental Research & Design in the Language Sciences

Spring 2012

 

David Birdsong  HRH 3.112B  Tel:  471-7299  e-mail:  birdsong@austin.utexas.edu

 

 

OVERVIEW 

This course introduces qualified graduate students to the design of experiments around linguistics-based hypotheses, the use and manipulation of various statistical measures, techniques of data gathering and reporting, and proper interpretation of results.  Emphasis will be placed on studies dealing with the processing and acquisition of Romance languages and English.

The course provides a foundation for conducting procedurally sound empirical research in the language sciences.  As such, it is not to be conceived as adequate preparation for all future quantitative research; for this, additional experience in statistics and experimental methodology will be required.

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the language sciences, there is a rich interplay of theory and data.  Quantitative methods are critical to theory-based investigations of on-line sentence parsing, speech segmentation and perception, neurological representation of language processes, and language acquisition by infants, children, and adults, to mention just a few domains of inquiry.

            This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate this research--and to carry it out. To achieve these ends, one must become familiar with the pertinent literature, as well as fundamental principles of quantitative data gathering and statistical analysis.  Accordingly, the course aims to enhance students' abilities in three equally important domains:

 

(1) LINGUISTIC:  Ability to understand theoretical and descriptive accounts of the language in which people perform. Knowledge of language and linguistics is thus at the heart of the course, and is what distinguishes it from other experimental design and statistics courses on this campus. If acquisition and/or processing are involved in the study, familiarity with these areas is essential as well.  To put it simply, a project can’t be designed and executed without knowledge of the domain of research.

            Your progress in this area is measured in part by performance on projects (see handouts), particularly in terms of:  (a) thoroughness and accuracy in reporting the relevant linguistic issues in the literature review; (b) generation of testable hypotheses, derived from understanding the linguistic questions; (c) reasonable interpretation of results vis à vis the hypotheses; (d) insightful discussion of results and thoughtful suggestions for future study. 

 

(2) STATISTICAL:  Ability to work comfortably with basic statistical procedures (e.g. t-tests, ANOVAs, correlations) and familiarity with other procedures (e.g. multiple regression, ANCOVA).  Our two texts (see below) are good introductions to statistical methods and considerations of experimental design. They are relatively light on the pure mathematics of statistics and relatively heavy on execution of statistical analyses using software packages (Excel and SPSS).

 

(3) CONCEPTUAL/METHODOLOGICAL:  Ability to think like an experimental researcher.  This involves:  (a) cautious attribution of causality in linguistic behavior; (b) designing projects that do not ignore latent or intervening variables; (c) sensitivity to construct validity and ecological validity; (d) prudent interpretation of data with respect to stated hypotheses; (e) avoiding pitfalls of various kinds.  One must continually ask oneself "What is good evidence?"  The answer to this question depends as much on understanding the targeted behavioral / brain-based phenomena and linguistic issues as it does on statistics and experimental design. 

 

 

Your progress in (2) and (3) is measured mainly by performance on quizzes, homework, and a final exam.  (See components of the final grade, below.)

 

To contextualize and exemplify these three domains, we will examine closely and critically several noteworthy studies.  One set of studies we’ll read deals with the processing of Romance languages, another with age-related differences in second language (L2) acquisition.  In addition, the Larson-Hall text (see below) features summaries of and raw data from a variety of L2 studies.

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS

 

Larson-Hall, J. (2009).  A Guide to Doing Statistics in Second Language Research Using SPSS. New York: Routledge.

Salkind, N. J. (2009). Statistics for People Who (think they) Hate Statistics, 2nd edition, Excel 2007 edition.  Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

 

 

COMPONENTS OF THE FINAL GRADE

 

Quizzes (3 X 10%)                    30%

                                    Homework                                10%

                                    Project                                     30%

                                    Presentation of project             10%

                                    Final exam                                20%

 

 

• Quizzes cover the readings and classroom discussion.  At least one of the quizzes will require work on the computers in the classroom, using a statistical software package (SPSS, Excel).

 

Homework may include exercises in the texts, mini-critiques of experimental studies (in addition to those already indicated on the syllabus), outlines of experimental designs and anticipated results, etc.

 

• The project is an exercise wherein students will create raw data.  You will be asked to motivate the experiment with reference to the relevant literature, state hypotheses, outline the experimental procedure(s), concoct all the raw data, statistically analyze these data, and interpret the results.   No actual subjects will be run.  Your projects will be presented in class using Power Point.  Please see accompanying handout for details.

 

• The final exam is comprehensive.  Details of format and content are given on a handout. There will be review materials, practice questions, and a review session.  The exam will be administered during the period assigned by the registrar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FR 392K • Tpcs In Second Lang Acquisitn

36970 • Spring 2011
Meets W 4:30PM-7:30PM HRH 4.102B
(also listed as LIN 392)

Coming soon.

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36425 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 4.102B

Prerequisites 

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This introductory course in French phonetics provides third-year students with an understanding of French sounds in isolation and in context. The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic notation are taught. Audio exercises will emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels, the /u/-/y/ constrast, the French /r/'s, etc., as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, poetic recitation, etc.). The class is conducted in French.

Organization of the course:
There are two basic components of the course:
Descriptive linguistics. The text offers linguistic descriptions of the phenomena you will be studying, e.g., liaison, e muet, nasalisation, enchaînement, etc.

Practice in pronunciation and discrimination. With the background of linguistic description, you proceed to sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.

Grading Policy

Homework, attendance, preparedness, participation, quizzes 10% 

Exam 1 (Chs. 1-2) 20%

Exam 2 (Chs. 3-4) 20%

Exam 3 (Chs. 5-6) 20%

Exam 4 (Ch. 7) 30%

*Since the chapters in the textbook build upon each other, all exams after the first one are to some degree cumulative.
*All exams will have an oral component. Some will have a comprehension/disrimination or diction component.

Texts

D. Dansereau, Savoir Dire + CD. Heath, 2nd edition, 1990.

Packet of handouts, available at Paradigm, 402 W. 24th St. (472-7986)

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36430 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 4.102B

Prerequisites 

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This introductory course in French phonetics provides third-year students with an understanding of French sounds in isolation and in context. The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic notation are taught. Audio exercises will emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels, the /u/-/y/ constrast, the French /r/'s, etc., as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, poetic recitation, etc.). The class is conducted in French.

Organization of the course:
There are two basic components of the course:
Descriptive linguistics. The text offers linguistic descriptions of the phenomena you will be studying, e.g., liaison, e muet, nasalisation, enchaînement, etc.

Practice in pronunciation and discrimination. With the background of linguistic description, you proceed to sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.

Grading Policy

Homework, attendance, preparedness, participation, quizzes 10% 

Exam 1 (Chs. 1-2) 20%

Exam 2 (Chs. 3-4) 20%

Exam 3 (Chs. 5-6) 20%

Exam 4 (Ch. 7) 30%

*Since the chapters in the textbook build upon each other, all exams after the first one are to some degree cumulative.
*All exams will have an oral component. Some will have a comprehension/disrimination or diction component.

Texts

D. Dansereau, Savoir Dire + CD. Heath, 2nd edition, 1990.

Packet of handouts, available at Paradigm, 402 W. 24th St. (472-7986)

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36955 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM HRH 4.102B

Attachment

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

37140 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM HRH 4.102B

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

37575 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM HRH 4.102B

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

37020 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.302

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

34890 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.302

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

PSY 341K • Language And Thought-W

42595 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 3

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

32545 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 323

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

PSY 341K • Language And Thought-W

41140 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 109

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

32275 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 419

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

PSY 341K • Language And Thought

40937 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 303

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Language And Thought

41145 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 1.146

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

LIN 373 • Intro To Cognitive Science

36900 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 206
(also listed as PHL 365)

This course is an introduction to formal syntax, which refers to the use of a mathematically precise formalism to model the syntax of human languages.  Formulating precise models allows us to study the properties of particular human languages empirically, testing our theories against the challenge of new data.  The course will introduce students to Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar (HPSG).  In HPSG, the words of a language are equipped with information about the way they combine with other words and phrases and the meaning of the resulting combination.   The forms and meanings of the parts of a sentence are combined bit by bit until we derive a meaning for the whole sentence. The lexicon also encodes the systematic relations between word forms, such as voice alternations and derivational cognates.  Since HPSG is a complete, fully explicit framework for grammatical description, students will be able to grasp the workings of an entire language, from morphemes to words to sentences, including a formal semantic system for representing meaning.  This is a hands-on course in which we will tackle syntax puzzles of increasing complexity.  LIN 372L is not an official prerequisite, but it is recommended as background to this course.

Textbook: Ivan Sag, Thomas Wasow, and Emily Bender. 2003. Syntactic Theory: A Formal Introduction, 2nd Edition. Stanford: CSLI Publications.

Basis for grading:  Class participation (10%), Problem sets (60%), Tests (30%)

Prerequisites:  LIN 306

Publications


 

List of all publications:

Google Scholar

Recent Publications

 

Age of Second-Language Acquisition: Critical Periods and Social Concerns. 
D. Birdsong and J. Vanhove
The American Psychological Association. Press, pp. 163-181

 

 

2016

Dominance in bilingualism: Foundations of measurement, with insights from the study of handedness.Language Dominance in Bilinguals: Issues of Measurement and Operationalization                                                                                                                                       D. Birdsong, C. Silva-Corvalán and J. Treffers-Daller
Eds. Cambridge U. Press, pp. 85-105

 

 

2015

Processing focus structure in L1 and L2 French: L2 proficiency effects on ERPs
R. Reichle, D. Birdsong
Studies in Second Language Acquisition

 

 

2014

In faint praise of folly: A critical review of native/non-native speaker comparisons, with examples from native and bilingual processing of french complex syntax
D. Birdsong, L. Gertken
Language, Interaction and Acquisition, 4:2

 

 

2013

The Critical Period Hypothesis for second language acquisition: Tailoring the coat of many colors
D. Birdsong
Essential topics in applied linguistics and multilingualism, 43-50

 

 

2013

Three perspectives on non-uniform linguistic attainment
D. Birdsong
Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism 2 (3), 255-259

 

 

2012

Selected Earlier Publications

 

Uninterpretable features: Psychology and plasticity in second language learnability
D. Birdsong
Second Language Research 25 (2), 235-243

 

 

2009

Age and the end state of second language acquisition
D. Birdsong
The new handbook of second language acquisition. Amsterdam: Elsevier

 

 

2009

Age and second language acquisition and processing: A selective overview
D. Birdsong
Language Learning 56 (s1), 9-49

 

 

2006

On the evidence for maturational constraints in second-language acquisition
D. Birdsong, M. Molis
Journal of memory and language 44 (2), 235-249

 

 

2001

Regular-irregular dissociations in L2 acquisition of English morphology
D. Birdsong, J.E. Flege
BUCLD 25: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development

 

 

2001

Introduction: Whys and why nots of the Critical Period Hypothesis for second language acquisition
D. Birdsong
Second language acquisition and the Critical Period Hypothesis, 1-22

 

 

1999, 2013 (paperback)

Ultimate attainment in second language acquisition
D. Birdsong
Language 68 (4), 706-755

 

 

1992

 

 


  • Department of French and Italian

    University of Texas at Austin
    201 W 21st Street STOP B7600
    HRH 2.114A
    Austin, TX 78712-1800
    512-471-5531