The Department of French and Italian

Guy P Raffa


Associate ProfessorPhD, Indiana University

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-5492
  • Office: HRH 3.104A
  • Office Hours: TTH 1-2 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Interests


Dante Studies, medieval Italian literature and culture, digital humanities, history and philosophy of science, Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco

Biography


Guy Raffa has taught at the University of Texas at Austin since 1991. He holds a B.S. in mathematics and computer science from Duke University and a Ph.D. in Italian Literature from Indiana University. His primary scholarly field is medieval Italian literature--Dante above all--with a secondary interest in modern Italian authors, particularly Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco. In addition to articles, book-essays, and reviews, he has published three books: Divine Dialectic: Dante's Incarnational Poetry (Toronto, 2000), Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Inferno" (Chicago, 2007), and The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Chicago, 2009). He won a gold award for innovative instructional technology with his Danteworlds Web site and has received a number of other awards and fellowships, including a President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award and a Raymond Dickson Centennial Endowed Teaching Fellowship. For work-in-progress on Dante's graveyard history, he won a Humanities Research Award from the University of Texas and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has been interviewed for articles in Investor's Business DailySlate, and The Atlantic, and has written for The Chronicle of Higher EducationPopMatters, and Military History Quarterly.

DanteWorlds    Inferno  Divine Dialectic 

 

Courses


ITC 349 • Dante

36960 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.122
(also listed as CTI 345, E 366D, EUS 347)

Dante: Fall 2016

ITC 349, same as E 366D, crosslisted with EUS 347 and CTI 345

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://guyraffa.la.utexas.edu

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and contains flags for Writing and Global Cultures.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in responses to study questions (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will rewrite based on my feedback, will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis and scholarly research. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Required Texts: (you must use the editions of these texts ordered for the class)

            Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

            Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

Recommended Text: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations (pdf), grades, and a discussion forum (for posting responses to study questions). You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas.

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

10%: 1500-word essay on the Inferno (credit for successful completion)

25%: Major rewrite of this essay incorporating scholarly research (graded)

5%:   Annotated bibliography of research sources (credit for successful completion)

5%:   Peer-review (credit for successful completion)

10%: Responses to study questions in Canvas Discussion Forum (credit for successful completion)

30%: Two in-class examinations  (graded: 15% each)

15%: Classwork and participation

 

ITL 390K • Dante II

36850 • Fall 2016
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM HRH 2.106C
(also listed as MDV 392M)

Dante II

ITL 390K (36850), crosslisted with MDV 392M (41020)

W 12-3 in HRH 2.106C

Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

HRH 3.104A; 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu

Home page: http://guyraffa.la.utexas.edu

Note: While the language of instruction is English, students are encouraged—and Italian Studies students are required—to read primary Italian texts in the original language.    

            This course focuses on Dante's Commedia—the Purgatorio and Paradiso above all—within late medieval literary, intellectual, and historical contexts by attending to his engagement with works by classical authors and medieval poets, philosophers, and theologians. The Danteworlds commentary and website will provide much of this background material and help guide your reading of the Commedia. We will supplement and complement this focus with discussion of Dante's earlier life and poetry (Vita nuova), his treatise on the vernacular (De Vulgari Eloquentia), and selections from the poet's other works (Inferno, Convivio, De Monarchia).

            Given Dante's vital importance for teaching and research across disciplinary and temporal boundaries, the course is designed to work for motivated graduate students in various departments, programs, and schools, including Comparative Literature, Medieval Studies, English, History, Art History, Religious Studies, Music, and other language and literature programs in addition to Italian Studies. The class makeup will therefore help determine final decisions on course readings. However, all students are encouraged to (re)read or review the Inferno before the beginning of the semester.

           Since a goal of the course is to become familiar with major voices in Dante Studies, our discussion of Dante's works will be informed by selected works of criticism (available on Canvas). You are required to write a short response essay—both descriptive and analytical—to one of these critical works in relation to Dante's text(s). For the final project, you will present your research to the class and write a polished section (12-15 pages, with full documentation) of a full-blown research essay.

Required Texts: Inferno (Garzanti, 2008); Purgatorio (Garzanti, 2008); Paradiso (Garzanti, 2006); Vita nuova (Garzanti, 2009); De vulgari eloquentia (Cambridge, 1996).

Recommended: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009) 

Assignments

Classwork and participation (including weekly Discussion Forum entries on Canvas): 20%

Short essay (750-1000 words) on a critical text in dialogue with a primary work: 15%

Discussion leader for a lesson on material for your research paper: 15%

Research paper of 10-15 pages (2500-3750 words) with full documentation: 50%

Selected Critical Works on Canvas (with indication of assigned pages) 

Singleton, Dante Studies I (84-98), Barolini, Dante's Poets (153-73); Musa, Advent at the Gates (85-109), Barolini, The Undivine Comedy (122-42), Wetherbee, The Ancient Flame: Dante and the Poets (161-88, 196-202), Musa, Advent at the Gates (111-28), Hawkins, Dante's Testaments: Essays in Scriptural Imagination (54-71, 159-79), Singleton, Dante Studies 2: Journey to Beatrice (15-38), Mazzotta, Dante's Vision and the Circle of Knowledge (34-55, 154-96), Barolini, Dante's Poets (57-84), Havely, Dante and the Franciscans (123-53), Schnapp, Transfiguration of History at the Center of  Dante's "Paradise" (14-35), Raffa, Divine Dialectic (147-64, 178-86), Ascoli, Dante and the Making of a Modern Author (67-129), Cestaro, Dante and the Grammar of the Nursing Body (49-76), Moevs, Metaphysics of Dante's "Comedy" (147-67), Botterill, Dante and the Mystical Tradition (64-107), Freccero, Poetics of Conversion (245-57)

 

ITC 349 • Dante

36350 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106
(also listed as CTI 345, E 366D, EUS 347)

Dante: Spring 2016

ITC 349, same as E 366D, crosslisted with EUS 347 and CTI 345

TTH 2-3:15 in BEN 1.106

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and contains flags for Writing and Global Cultures.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in responses to study questions (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will rewrite based on my feedback, will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis and scholarly research. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.   

Required Texts: (you must use the editions of these texts ordered for the class)

            Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

            Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

Optional Text: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations (pdf), grades, and a discussion forum (for posting responses to study questions). You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas. For help with Canvas, consult the student tutorials (http://edutech.ctl.utexas.edu/students/) or contact support staff (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028).

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

10%: 1500-word essay on the Inferno (credit for successful completion)

25%: Major rewrite of this essay incorporating scholarly research (graded)

5%:   Annotated bibliography of research sources (credit for successful completion)

5%:   Peer-review (credit for successful completion)

10%: Responses to study questions in Canvas Discussion Forum (credit for successful completion)

30%: Two in-class examinations  (graded: 15% each)

15%: Classwork and participation

 

ITC 349 • Dante

36230 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 3.116
(also listed as CTI 345, E 366D, EUS 347)

FLAGS:  GC | Wr

Dante: Fall 2015

ITC 349, same as E 366D, crosslisted with EUS 347 and CTI 345

TTH 11-12:15 in GAR 3.116

Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TH 12:45-1:45, W 11-12, and by appointment in HRH 3.104A; phone: 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and contains flags for Writing and Global Cultures.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in responses to study questions (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will rewrite based on my feedback, will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis and scholarly research. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Required Texts: (you must use the editions of these texts ordered for the class)

            InfernoPurgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

            Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

Optional TextThe Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Assignments and Computation of Grade: 

10%: 1500-word essay on the Inferno (credit for successful completion)

25%: Major rewrite of this essay incorporating scholarly research (graded)

5%:   Annotated bibliography of research sources (credit for successful completion)

5%:   Peer-review (credit for successful completion)

10%: Responses to study questions in Canvas Discussion Forum (credit for successful completion)

30%: Two in-class examinations  (graded: 15% each)

15%: Classwork and participation

Attendance Policy: Your attendance, which obviously influences your classwork and participation grade, is expected at all class meetings. You are expected to arrive on time to class and to stay for the entire lesson. Repeated late arrivals to—or early departures from—will count as absences. For every class that you miss (for whatever reason) after the fifth absence your final course grade (on a 100-point scale) will be reduced by 3 points up to a maximum of 15 points.

Late Work: Late work will lose a full letter grade for each day it is late except in the case of documented emergencies (e.g., serious illness, death in the family), religious holidays (see university policy below), or university-sponsored events (with prior notification).

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations (pdf), grades, and a discussion forum (for posting responses to study questions). You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas. For help with Canvas, consult the student tutorials (http://edutech.ctl.utexas.edu/students/) or contact support staff (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028).

Writing Flag: This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Global Cultures Flag: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.        

 

ITL 390K • Dante's Afterlives

36115 • Fall 2015
Meets W 12:30PM-3:30PM HRH 2.106C

Dante's Afterlives (Fall 2015)

ITL 390K (39449), crosslisted with CL 382 and MDV 392M: W 12:30-3:15 in HRH 2.106C

Guy P. Raffa, HRH 3.104A; guyr@utexas.edu; 232-5492

Office Hours: TH 12:45-1:45, W 11-12, and by appointment

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

       Summarizing Dante's popularity in Italy in the early twentieth century, one critic amusingly observed that the medieval "was cooked in every sauce, served hot and cold, grilled and in gelatin, whole and ground, alone or with sides, with critical mayonnaise and historical croutons: there was something for all tastes, for strong stomachs and for dyspeptic ones, for women and for men, for kindergartners and for doddering academics." In this course we will seek intellectual nourishment at the banquet of Dante's legacy by closely examining a broad range of responses to the poet—the man and his works—from Giovanni Boccaccio's biography in the late Middle Ages to Roberto Benigni's performances of TuttoDante and Dan Brown's Inferno. Between the Dante-inspired works of Boccaccio and Brown, we will study various, often conflicting, versions of "Dante" in literature, art, film, politics, history, and popular culture. After establishing a foundation for Dante's influence by discussing his political treatise (Monarchia) and selected cantos of his Commedia (most from Inferno), we will embark on an interpretive journey tracing Dante's evolution from a regional to a national (then nationalist) figure before he attained the global status he enjoys today. Giuseppe Mazzini famously called Dante—Ugo Foscolo's "Ghibelline fugitive"—the "Prophet of the Italian Nation": we will accordingly examine appeals to Dante's authority in promoting the liberation and unification of Italy, but we will also consider his role as a beacon of liberty in the United States. Among other areas of inquiry, we will discuss Catholic interpretations of Dante as a neo-Guelph advocate of papal political power, nationalist appropriations of the poet for territorial expansion and military interventions, and recent representations of Dante as an icon of Italian culture on the world stage.

Touchstone texts in our tour of Dante's legacy across time, space, discipline, and culture will include: writings by Boccaccio, Alfieri, Foscolo, Mazzini, Byron, Leopardi, Carducci, Cordelia Ray, Longfellow, D'Annunzio, Marinetti, T. S. Eliot, Samuel Beckett, Primo Levi, Matthew Pearl, Dan Brown, and others; artwork by Botticelli, Blake, Flaxman, Doré, and Suloni Robertson; and films (and clips) by FrancescoBertolini(1911), Harry Lachman (1935), Spencer Williams (1944), Peter Greenaway and Raúl Ruiz (1989), Woody Allen (1997), Vincent Ward (1998), Sandow Birk (2008), and Michael Patrick King (2008).        

Required Texts (at COOP): Dante, Inferno (Garzanti, 2008) and Monarchy (Cambridge, 1996)

Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

[Other sources and critical works will be posted on Canvas.]

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Class preparation and participation: 15%

Two brief papers (3-5 pages) on assigned material: 20%

Oral research presentation (the basis for a conference presentation): 10%

Research paper of 18-25 pages with full documentation (the basis for a scholarly article): 50%

Sample syllabus for an undergraduate course on Dante's legacy: 5%

Danteworlds Web site (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu): In addition to entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains numerous images from works by Sandro Botticelli, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson (a UT graduate).

Sources for Videos and Images

Canvas contains links to the following streaming videos: 1911 silent Inferno (set to music by Tangerine Dream), Harry Lachman's Dante's Inferno (1935), Spencer Williams's Go Down, Death! (1944), the 2008 Puppet Inferno based on the artwork of Sandow Birk, and A TV Dante (1989): Cantos 1 and 5 by Peter Greenaway, and Cantos 9-14 by Raúl Ruiz. In addition to containing entries with abridged commentary from The Complete Danteworlds, the Danteworlds Web site (DW: http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu) hosts galleries of artistic images (Botticelli, Vellutello commentary, Blake, Flaxman, Doré, Robertson) that you should consult as part of your preparation for the assigned Inferno cantos. I also encourage you to visit the "Dante Today" Web site for modern Dante sightings / citings as we proceed through the Inferno. Over 1000 images from Cornell University's Divine Comedy Image Archive are available on Shared Shelf Commons (http://www.sscommons.org/openlibrary/welcome.html), an open-access image library. For links to other on-line collections of Dante images, see the "World of Dante" Web site: http://www.worldofdante.org/gallery_main.html.

Other Dante Web Sites

Dante Today (Dante in contemporary culture): http://learn.bowdoin.edu/italian/dante

Dartmouth Dante Project (commentaries on the Divine Comedy): http://dante.dartmouth.edu

World of Dante: http://www.worldofdante.org

Princeton Dante Project: http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html

Dante On-Line (Società Dantesca Italiana): http://www.danteonline.it/italiano/home_ita.asp

Course Objectives

1) Mastery of the course content through intensive study of a wide range of creative responses to Dante and his work. From Boccaccio to Benigni, Botticelli to Blake, Byron to Birk, Beckett to Brown (to list just the B's), we will look critically at Dante-inspired and Dante-related works across time, space, media, genres, disciplines, and cultural registers.

2) Systematic, targeted attention to research, writing, and oral communication skills to produce scholarly work fit for presentation at an academic conference and, with reasonable revision, for inclusion in a dissertation or for publication in a reputable venue.

3) To advance the reciprocity of scholarly and teaching excellence, we will explore pedagogical strategies to inform a potential undergraduate course on Dante's cultural legacy with knowledge of the material studied and researched this semester.

 

ITC 349 • Dante

36415 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106
(also listed as CTI 345, E 322, EUS 347)

Dante: Spring 2015

ITC 349, same as E 322, crosslisted with EUS 347 and CTI 345

TTH 2-3:30 in Ben 1.106

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and contains flags for Writing and Global Cultures.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in responses to study questions (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will rewrite based on my feedback, will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis and scholarly research. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Required Texts: (you must use the editions of these texts ordered for the class)

            Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

            Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

Optional Text: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

10%: 1500-word essay on the Inferno (credit for successful completion)

25%: Major rewrite of this essay incorporating scholarly research (graded)

5%:   Annotated bibliography of research sources (credit for successful completion)

5%:   Peer-review (credit for successful completion)

10%: Responses to study questions in Canvas Discussion Forum (credit for successful completion)

30%: Two in-class examinations  (graded: 15% each)

15%: Classwork and participation

Attendance Policy: Your attendance, which obviously influences your classwork and participation grade, is expected at all class meetings. You are expected to arrive on time to class and to stay for the entire lesson. Repeated late arrivals to—or early departures from—will count as absences. For every class that you miss (for whatever reason) after the fifth absence your final course grade (on a 100-point scale) will be reduced by 3 points up to a maximum of 15 points.

Late Work: Late work will lose a full letter grade for each day it is late except in the case of documented emergencies (e.g., serious illness, death in the family), religious holidays (see university policy below), or university-sponsored events (with prior notification).

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations (pdf), grades, and a discussion forum (for posting responses to study questions). You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas. For help with Canvas, consult the student tutorials (http://edutech.ctl.utexas.edu/students/) or contact support staff (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028).

Writing Flag: This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Global Cultures Flag: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.        

Grading and Plagiarism: All graded assignments will be marked on a 100 point scale and converted to letter grades consistent with university policy:

A (94-100) = 4.0, A- (90-93) = 3.67, B+ (88-89) = 3.3, B (84-87) = 3.0, B- (80-83) = 2.67, C+ (78-79) = 2.3, C (77) = 2.0, C- (70-73) = 1.67, D+ (68-69) = 1.3, D (64-67) = 1.0, D- (60-63) = 0.67, F (below 60) = 0.0

Plagiarism, intentional or not, will result in an automatic F on the assignment—the numerical grade (0-59) depending on the extent of the plagiarism and the quality of the non-plagiarized portion of the essay—as well as possible disciplinary action. For the definition of plagiarism and the University's policy on it, see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

Writing Center: For questions and feedback on writing, you are encouraged to meet with consultants at the Undergraduate Writing Center (FAC 211; for appointments and information, see http://uwc.utexas.edu/or call 471-6222).

All cell phones, tablets, laptops, and similar electronic devices must be turned off (or put in airport mode) and put away during class except if the instructor grants permission to use them for specific activities. Students who use devices in class without permission will be marked absent. 

ITC 349 • Dante

37360 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.118
(also listed as CTI 345, E 322, EUS 347)

Dante: Fall 2014

ITC 349 (37360) and E 322 (35700), cross-listed with EUS 347 and CTI 345

TTH 11-12:15 in MEZ 1.118

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TTH 1:30-2:30 and by appointment in HRH 3.104A; phone: 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and carries the writing flag and the global cultures flag.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this material in discussion postings (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will revise and expand based on feedback, will assess your ability to engage scholarly research and support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poem with detailed textual analysis. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. You are expected to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class meetings.

Required Texts: Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum); Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds). Please note: you must use these translations.

Optional Text: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

5%: Five times during the semester you will post an entry to a discussion forum on Canvas. Entries may include answers to study questions, but other responses to Dante's poem are welcome as well. Each submitted entry must contain at least 200 of your own words. Entries, worth 1 point each, will receive full credit for successful, on-time completion.

15%: 1000-word essay on the Inferno

25%: Significant revision and expansion of this essay (based on teacher feedback) that incorporates material from Purgatorio and / or Paradiso and scholarly research. 1500-2000 words. 

5% Peer-editing (full credit for successful, on-time completion)

30%: Two short-answer examinations (15% each)

20%: Classwork and participation. You are expected to read the assigned material before class meetings and to participate—through attentive listening and informed contributions—in class activities and discussion.

Attendance Policy: Your attendance, which obviously influences your classwork and participation grade, is required at all class meetings. You are expected to arrive on time and to stay for the entire lesson. Repeated late arrivals to—or early departures from—will count as absences. For every class that you miss (for whatever reason) after the fourth absence, your final course grade (on a 100-point scale) will be reduced by 3 points up to a maximum of 15 points.

Late Work: There are no make-up exams—and other graded assignments will lose a full letter grade for each day they are late—except in the case of documented emergencies (e.g., illness, death in the family), religious holidays, or university-sponsored events (with prior notification).

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations, grades, and a discussion forum. You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas. For help with Canvas, consult the student tutorials (http://edutech.ctl.utexas.edu/students/) or contact support staff (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028).

Writing Flag: Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline—in this case, literary criticism and humanities research. You will write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will have the opportunity to revise and expand an essay, and you will read and discuss your peers’ work. A substantial portion of your grade will therefore come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Global Cultures Flag: Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present—in this case Europe (Italy in particular) in the late Middle Ages as represented in Dante's Divine Comedy.

Grading: All assignments will be graded on a 100 point scale and converted to letter grades consistent with university policy:

A (94-100) = 4.0, A- (90-93) = 3.67, B+ (88-89) = 3.3, B (84-87) = 3.0, B- (80-83) = 2.67, C+ (78-79) = 2.3, C (74-77) = 2.0, C- (70-73) = 1.67, D+ (68-69) = 1.3, D (64-67) = 1.0, D- (60-63) = 0.67, F (below 60) = 0.0

Plagiarism, intentional or not, will result in an automatic F on the assignment as well as possible disciplinary action. For the definition of plagiarism and the University's policy on it, see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

Dante Web Sites

Danteworlds (the course Web site): http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu

Dante Today (Dante in contemporary culture): http://learn.bowdoin.edu/italian/dante

Dartmouth Dante Project (commentaries on the Commedia): http://dante.dartmouth.edu

World of Dante: http://www.worldofdante.org

Princeton Dante Project: http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html

Digital Dante: http://dante.ilt.columbia.edu

 

ITL 390L • Crtv Chaos: Galileo To Calvino

37245 • Fall 2014
Meets W 12:30PM-3:30PM HRH 2.106C

Creative Chaos from Galileo to Calvino

Note: While the language of instruction is English, students are expected to read the primary Italian texts in the original language.

"One could sketch a history of civilizations," writes Italian critic Cesare Segre, "according to the various ways in which they represent order and chaos to themselves.” Italy itself has been a catalyst and cauldron for evolving theories and practices of chaos and order in literature, art, science, philosophy, and politics. This course examines selected works across time and disciplines—from Galileo's reflections on heavenly bodies to Primo Levi's responses to Nazi-Fascism and the Shoah—that attest to the imagining of chaotic and order-driven values and their relation to one another in Italian cultural production. Throughout the semester we will work inductively—at times abductively—to identify, develop, and refine models of chaos and order that arise from the works under consideration, to place these models into dialogue with contemporary theoretical ideas, and to assess their implications and significance.

The course is divided into two parts. In most of the semester, weeks 1-10, the class will work together on a sequence of five interrelated units: 1) "Classical and Medieval Catalysts" (weeks one and two) identifies paradigms of chaos and order in foundational texts by Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Cicero, Augustine, Boethius, and Bernardus Silvestris; 2) "Ordering Heaven and Hell" (week three) looks at how Dante and Galileo complicate the traditional privileging of order over chaos in their otherworldly visions; 3) we leap several centuries in "A Semiotics of Chaos and Order" (weeks four through six) but maintain (postmodern) contact with the Middle Ages through a close reading of Umberto Eco's Il nome della rosa; 4) Primo Levi's Il sistema periodico, on the other hand, combines scientific elements to create the "Ethics of Chaos and Order" that we discuss in weeks seven and eight; 5) Italo Calvino's Le città invisibili (weeks nine and ten) perhaps best embodies the "Dialectic of Chaos and Order" at the heart of this course, including the postmodern reconsideration of such traditionally chaotic notions as dissonance, imperfection, turbulence, and unpredictability.
Course texts for the final five weeks will be determined and provided by students based on the direction of their research for the final paper. Individual research may explore in greater depth material introduced in first part of the course or it may focus on other works, traditions, or disciplines that illuminate the imagining of chaos and order in Italian studies.

Required Texts: Umberto Eco, Il nome della rosa (Bompiani; I grandi tascabili; 2013); Primo Levi, Il sistema periodico (Einaudi tascabili; 2005); Italo Calvino, Le città invisibili (Mondadori; 1996). Selections (on Canvas) from Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Cicero, Augustine, Boethius, Bernardus Silvestris, Dante, and Galileo.

Critical and Theoretical Works (on Canvas) include selections from N. Katherine Hayles, Chaos Bound: Orderly Disorder in Contemporary Literature and Science; Penelope Reed Doob, The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages; Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers, Order out of Chaos; Edward Lorenz, The Essence of Chaos; Benoit Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature; and essays by Umberto Eco ("Abduction in Uqbar"), Michel Serres (“Lucretius: Science and Religion”), Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari ("Rhizome"), Rita Levi Montalcini (from Elogio dell'imperfezione), Victor Turner ("Passages, Margins, and Poverty: Religious Symbols of Communitas"), and Luisa Muraro and Adriana Cavarero (from Diotima: Il pensiero della differenza sessuale).

Assignments
Classwork and participation (including weekly Discussion Forum entries on Canvas): 20%
Short essay (3-5 pages) on a theoretical or critical text in dialogue with a primary work: 15%
Discussion leader for a lesson on texts for your research paper: 15%
Research paper of 15-20 pages with full documentation (the basis for a scholarly article): 50%

Course Objectives

1) Mastery of the course content through close analysis of a wide range of primary, critical, and theoretical works across temporal and disciplinary boundaries.

2) Systematic, targeted attention to research, writing, and oral communication skills to produce scholarly work fit for presentation at an academic conference and, with reasonable revision, for inclusion in a dissertation or for publication in a reputable scholarly venue.

3) To advance the reciprocity of scholarly and teaching excellence, we will explore pedagogical strategies to inform a potential undergraduate course on chaos and order with knowledge of the material studied and researched this semester.

ITL 390K • Dante II

37580 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106

Spring 2014                                       Dante II

 

ITL 390K (37580), crosslisted with MDV 392M (41745): TTH 2-3:30 in BEN 1.106

Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian, HRH 3.104A; 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

 

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence focused on Dante’s Commedia and his other works. This semester we will read the second half of the Purgatorio (cantos 18-33), the Paradiso, books 2 and 4 of the Convivio, the De vulgari eloquentia, and the Eclogues. Placing our close reading of these texts within a series of literary, intellectual, and historical contexts, we will attend to Dante's engagement with works by classical authors (Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, Cicero) and other medieval poets, philosophers, and theologians. The Danteworlds commentary and the complementary Web site (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu) will provide much of this background material and help guide your reading of the Commedia. Since a goal of the course is to become familiar with major voices in Dante Studies, our discussion of Dante's works will be informed by selected works of criticism (available on Canvas).

Twice during the semester you are required to write a short response essay—both descriptive and analytical—to one of these critical works. For your final research paper (25-30 pages, with full documentation) you are encouraged to revise and expand your paper from Dante I. You are expected to attend class regularly, to be well prepared, and to participate actively in class discussion.

Required Texts: Purgatorio (Garzanti, 2008); Paradiso (Garzanti, 2006); Convivio (Garzanti, 2005); De vulgari eloquentia (Cambridge, 1996).

Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Two 750-1000 word critical responses (10% each): 20%

Research project (paper and presentation): 50%

Class preparation and participation: 30%

 

 

ITC 349 • Dante

37585 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 201
(also listed as E 322)

Dante: Fall 2013

ITC 349 (37585), Same as E 322 (35687)

TTH 12:30-1:45 in Parlin 201

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TTH 1:45-3:15 in HRH 3.104A; phone: 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in two exams. Take-home essays will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

Two in-class examinations (30% each): 60%

Two take-home essays (15% each): 30%

Class work (including journal entries and / or quizzes): 10%

Regular attendance is required: No student who misses more than 6 classes (3 weeks) for any reason can complete the course with a passing grade.

REQUIRED TEXTS: Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

OPTIONAL TEXT: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Grading and Plagiarism: All assignments will be graded on a 100 point scale and converted to letter grades consistent with university policy:

A (94-100) = 4.0, A- (90-93) = 3.67, B+ (88-89) = 3.3, B (84-87) = 3.0, B- (80-83) = 2.67, C+ (78-79) = 2.3, C (74-77) = 2.0, C- (70-73) = 1.67, D+ (68-69) = 1.3, D (64-67) = 1.0, D- (60-63) = 0.67, F (below 60) = 0.0

Plagiarism, intentional or not, will result in an automatic F on the assignment as well as possible disciplinary action. For the definition of plagiarism and the University's policy on it, see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

ITL 390K • Dante I

37480 • Fall 2013
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM BEN 1.108

Dante I (Fall 2013)

ITL 390K, crosslisted with MDV 392M: T 330-630 in BEN 1.108

Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian, HRH 3.104A; 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence focused on Dante’s Commedia and his other works. This semester we will read the Inferno, the Vita nuova, two books of the Convivio (1 and 3), the Monarchia, and the first half of Purgatorio. Placing our close reading of these texts within a series of literary, intellectual, and historical contexts, we will attend to Dante's engagement with works by classical authors (Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, Cicero) and medieval poets, philosophers, and theologians. The Danteworlds commentary and the complementary Web site (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu) will provide much of this background material and help guide your reading of the Commedia

Since a goal of the course is to become familiar with major voices in Dante Studies, our discussion of Dante's works will be informed by selected works of criticism (available on Blackboard or in a course packet). Twice during the semester you are required to write a brief response—both descriptive and analytical—to one of these critical works. Other graded assignments include a take-home exam and a substantial research project consisting of a paper and a formal presentation to the class. For the paper, you are required to write a significant draft (15+ pages, with full documentation) that you will likely expand and revise in the spring semester. You are expected to attend class regularly, to be well prepared, and to participate actively in class discussion.

Required Texts: Inferno (Garzanti, 2008); Purgatorio (Garzanti, 2008); Vita nuova (Garzanti, 2009); Convivio (Garzanti, 2005); Monarchy (Cambridge, 1996)

 Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Two 500-1000 word critical responses (10% each): 20%

Take-Home Exam: 20%

Research project (paper and presentation): 30%

Class preparation and participation: 30%

ITL 390K • Dante's Afterlives

37165 • Spring 2013
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.208

Dante's Afterlives (Spring 2013)

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

     Summarizing Dante's popularity in Italy in the early twentieth century, one critic amusingly observed that the medieval poet "was cooked in every sauce, served hot and cold, grilled and in gelatin, whole and ground, alone or with sides, with critical mayonnaise and historical croutons: there was something for all tastes, for strong stomachs and for dyspeptic ones, for women and for men, for kindergartners and for doddering academics." In this course we will seek intellectual nourishment at the banquet of Dante's legacy by closely examining a broad range of responses to the poet—the man and his works—from Giovanni Boccaccio's biography in the late Middle Ages to Roberto Benigni's recent performances of TuttoDante. Between the Dante-inspired works of Boccaccio and Benigni, we will study various, often conflicting, versions of "Dante" in literature, art, film, politics, history, and popular culture. After establishing a foundation for Dante's influence by discussing his political treatise (Monarchia) and selected cantos of his Commedia (most from Inferno), we will embark on an interpretive journey tracing Dante's evolution from a regional to a national (then nationalist) figure before he attained the global status he enjoys today. Giuseppe Mazzini famously called Dante—Ugo Foscolo's "Ghibelline fugitive"—the "Prophet of the Italian Nation": we will accordingly examine appeals to Dante's authority in promoting the liberation and unification of Italy, but we will also consider his role as a beacon of liberty in the United States. Among other areas of inquiry, we will discuss Catholic interpretations of Dante as a neo-Guelph advocate of papal political power, nationalist appropriations of the poet for territorial expansion and military interventions, and recent representations of Dante as an icon of Italian culture on the world stage.

Touchstone texts in our tour of Dante's legacy across time, space, discipline, and culture will include: writings by Alfieri, Foscolo, Mazzini, Byron, Leopardi, Carducci, Cordelia Ray, Longfellow, D'Annunzio, Marinetti, T. S. Eliot, Samuel Beckett, Mussolini, Primo Levi, Matthew Pearl, Karen Russell, and others; artwork by Botticelli, Blake, Flaxman, Dorè, and Suloni Robertson; and films (and clips) by FrancescoBertolini(1911), Harry Lachman (1935), Spencer Williams (1944), Peter Greenaway and Raúl Ruiz (1989), Woody Allen (1997), Vincent Ward (1998), Sandow Birk (2008), and Michael Patrick King (2008).

Required Texts (at COOP): Dante, Inferno (Garzanti, 2008) and Monarchy (Cambridge, 1996)

Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

[Other sources and critical works will be posted on Blackboard or gathered in a packet.]

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Class preparation and participation: 25%

Three 500-1000 word critical response essays: 15%

Oral research presentation (the basis for a conference presentation): 10%

Term paper of 15-25 pages with full documentation (the basis for a scholarly article): 50%

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

37240 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112

Introduction to Italian Literature (Middle Ages - 18th Century): Spring 2011

 

ITL 326K: TTH 2-3:15 in HRH 2.112

Prof. Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TTH 10-11 in HRH 3.104A; phone: 471-6390

E-mail: guyr@uts.cc.utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

 

In this course we will read and discuss selected works from the Middle Ages and early modern period. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Italian. Since love is a central, unifying theme of many course texts, we shall consider several of its nuances and representations: spiritual love; adult sexual and emotional intimacy; family relationships; friendships; group solidarity; and love of one's homeland. In addition to selections from Dante's Inferno and Boccaccio's Decameron, we will read and discuss works by Francesco d'Assisi, Angela da Foligno, Caterina da Siena, Giacomo da Lentini, Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Cecco Angiolieri, Compiuta Donzella, Francesco Petrarca, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Vittoria Colonna, Niccolò Machiavelli, Gaspara Stampa, Galileo and Virginia Galilei. We will strategically use materials from contemporary Italian culture—including popular music (Ferro, Nek, Giorgia, Alexia, Jovanotti) and Pasolini’s film adaptation of the Decameron—to put these works of early Italian literature into dialogue with more recent representations and issues.

 

Grading Policy

Two exams: 50%

Two essays: 25%

Preparation and participation (including quizzes): 25%

Regular attendance is required: No student who misses more than 6 classes (3 weeks) for any reason can complete the course with a passing grade.

Required Texts

Dante Alighieri, Inferno (Garzanti, 2008)

Francesco Petrarca, Poesie (Bonacci, 1996)

Course packet (I.T. Copy, 512 W. MLK Blvd; phone: 476-6662)

 

ITC 349 • Dante

36900 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 203
(also listed as E 322, EUS 347)

Instructor: Raffa

ITL 390L • Umberto Eco And Italo Calvino

36795 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.120

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing is required.

Calvino and Eco:  Fiction, Theory, and Criticism

The responses of Umberto Eco and Italo Calvino to the interrelations of author, reader, and text, and the future of literature and literary studies show that in a cultural moment favorable toward multi-disciplinarity at least two general directions coexist: an encounter with multiple discourses of knowledge in order to mark more clearly their boundaries, and a belief that new epistemological configurations arise from the interplay--and even contamination--of different lines of inquiry.  We shall explore the important contribution of these two Italian writers to contemporary literary and intellectual debate by examining selected creative, critical, and theoretical texts.  Not satisfied only to show how their theory and fiction "reflect" one another, we shall also attend to the ideological assumptions and implications of Eco’s and Calvino’s works.  

In addition to the texts in the bookstores, there will be a number of works on reserve in the PCL, including secondary sources essential for your research paper of substantial proportions (15-25 pp. with full documentation).  This paper will account for 60% of your grade, with the remaining 40% evenly divided between class participation and two short response essays (2-4 pp.).  Although class discussion will be in English, texts will be available in both Italian and English.      

 

Required Texts

Calvino: Lezioni americane (Mondadori, ISBN = 9788804485995), Tutte le cosmicomiche (Mondadori,  ISBN = 9788804520467), Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore (Mondadori, ISBN =  9788804482000), Visconte dimezzato (Mondadori, ISBN = 9788804370871)

Eco: Nome della rosa (Bompiani, ISBN = 9788845246340), Isola del giorno prima (Bompiani, ISBN = 9788845246449), Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge, ISBN = 9780521425544), Six Walks in the Fictional Woods (Harvard, ISBN = 9780674810518)

On Reserve / Blackboard: selections from Uses of Literature, Limits of Interpretation, Role of the Reader, Semiotics and the Philosophy of Language

 

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

37040 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.122

ITL 326K (attached)

ITL 390K • Dante II

37080 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.122

ITL 390K (attached)

ITC 349 • Dante

37495 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as EUS 347)

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante

36585 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112
(also listed as EUS 347)

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante-W

37515 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112

Please check back for updates.

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

37420 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 2.112

ITL 326K

In this course we will read and discuss selected works from the Middle Ages and early modern period. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Italian. Since love is a central, unifying theme of many course texts, we shall consider several of its nuances and representations: spiritual love; adult sexual and emotional intimacy; family relationships; friendships; group solidarity; and love of one's homeland. In addition to selections from Dante's Inferno and Boccaccio's Decameron, we will read and discuss works by Francesco d'Assisi, Angela da Foligno, Caterina da Siena, Giacomo da Lentini, Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Cecco Angiolieri, Compiuta Donzella, Francesco Petrarca, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Vittoria Colonna, Niccolò Machiavelli, Gaspara Stampa, Galileo and Virginia Galilei. We will  use materials from contemporary Italian culture, including popular music and film, to put these works of early Italian literature into dialogue with more recent representations and issues.

Required Texts:
Dante Alighieri, Inferno (Rizzoli edition, 2001)
Giovanni Boccaccio, Dieci novelle dal Decameron (Guerra Edizioni Guru, 1997)
Course packet


Grading Policy:
2 Exams: 50%
2 Papers: 25%
Participation: 25%

ITC 349 • Dante-W

38160 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.210

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante-W

36835 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112

Please check back for updates.

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

36740 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 2.112

ITL 326K

In this course we will read and discuss selected works from the Middle Ages and early modern period. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Italian. Since love is a central, unifying theme of many course texts, we shall consider several of its nuances and representations: spiritual love; adult sexual and emotional intimacy; family relationships; friendships; group solidarity; and love of one's homeland. In addition to selections from Dante's Inferno and Boccaccio's Decameron, we will read and discuss works by Francesco d'Assisi, Angela da Foligno, Caterina da Siena, Giacomo da Lentini, Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Cecco Angiolieri, Compiuta Donzella, Francesco Petrarca, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Vittoria Colonna, Niccolò Machiavelli, Gaspara Stampa, Galileo and Virginia Galilei. We will  use materials from contemporary Italian culture, including popular music and film, to put these works of early Italian literature into dialogue with more recent representations and issues.

Required Texts:
Dante Alighieri, Inferno (Rizzoli edition, 2001)
Giovanni Boccaccio, Dieci novelle dal Decameron (Guerra Edizioni Guru, 1997)
Course packet


Grading Policy:
2 Exams: 50%
2 Papers: 25%
Participation: 25%

ITC 349 • Dante-W

37585 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 3.102A

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante-W

35770 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 3.102A

Please check back for updates.

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

35680 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM HRH 3.102A

ITL 326K

In this course we will read and discuss selected works from the Middle Ages and early modern period. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Italian. Since love is a central, unifying theme of many course texts, we shall consider several of its nuances and representations: spiritual love; adult sexual and emotional intimacy; family relationships; friendships; group solidarity; and love of one's homeland. In addition to selections from Dante's Inferno and Boccaccio's Decameron, we will read and discuss works by Francesco d'Assisi, Angela da Foligno, Caterina da Siena, Giacomo da Lentini, Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Cecco Angiolieri, Compiuta Donzella, Francesco Petrarca, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Vittoria Colonna, Niccolò Machiavelli, Gaspara Stampa, Galileo and Virginia Galilei. We will  use materials from contemporary Italian culture, including popular music and film, to put these works of early Italian literature into dialogue with more recent representations and issues.

Required Texts:
Dante Alighieri, Inferno (Rizzoli edition, 2001)
Giovanni Boccaccio, Dieci novelle dal Decameron (Guerra Edizioni Guru, 1997)
Course packet


Grading Policy:
2 Exams: 50%
2 Papers: 25%
Participation: 25%

ITC 349 • Dante-W

35450 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 3.102A

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante-W

34360 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 3.102A

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante-W

33095 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 284

Please check back for updates.

ITC 349 • Dante-W

33100 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 3.102A

Please check back for updates.

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies-W

32215 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BAT 302

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

ITC 349 • Dante-W

33230 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A209A

Please check back for updates.

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies-W

32630 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BAT 104

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

ITC 349 • Dante-W

33660 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CBA 4.330

Please check back for updates.

ITC F349 • Dante-W

84405 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BEN 210

ROME STUDY PROGRAM

 

ITC F349 – Rome

Rome in Words, Images and Music

 

Instructor: Daniela Bini

 

 

Course Description:

 

The course will briefly sketch the rich life of the Eternal City through literary texts, architecture, painting, sculpture, lyric opera and cinema. Choosing some pivotal periods in its history, we will learn of ancient Rome from Livy, Ovid and Virgil, but also from the Forum and the Ara Pacis.  Michelangelo and Raphael will take us into the magnificence of Renaissance Rome, and with Borromini and Bernini will enter its sumptuous Baroque palaces and churches.  Giacomo Puccini’s opera Tosca will lead us into the Risorgimento movement, the revolts against the Pope and its temporal power. Fascism will be examined with Moravia’s novel The Conformist, and Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. We will conclude with Federico Fellini’s films La dolce vita and Roma that well demonstrate the director’s ambivalent feelings for this unique city where decadence and beauty coexist.

 

Textbooks:

 

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased in Austin)

Alberto Moravia, The Conformist (in English, to be purchased on amazon.com)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

 

30%    Short quizzes

50%    Two exams

10%    Oral Reports

10%    Participation

 

ITC 349 • Dante-W

32855 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 202

Please check back for updates.

ITC F349 • Dante-W

84520 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BEN 210

ROME STUDY PROGRAM

 

ITC F349 – Rome

Rome in Words, Images and Music

 

Instructor: Daniela Bini

 

 

Course Description:

 

The course will briefly sketch the rich life of the Eternal City through literary texts, architecture, painting, sculpture, lyric opera and cinema. Choosing some pivotal periods in its history, we will learn of ancient Rome from Livy, Ovid and Virgil, but also from the Forum and the Ara Pacis.  Michelangelo and Raphael will take us into the magnificence of Renaissance Rome, and with Borromini and Bernini will enter its sumptuous Baroque palaces and churches.  Giacomo Puccini’s opera Tosca will lead us into the Risorgimento movement, the revolts against the Pope and its temporal power. Fascism will be examined with Moravia’s novel The Conformist, and Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. We will conclude with Federico Fellini’s films La dolce vita and Roma that well demonstrate the director’s ambivalent feelings for this unique city where decadence and beauty coexist.

 

Textbooks:

 

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased in Austin)

Alberto Moravia, The Conformist (in English, to be purchased on amazon.com)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

 

30%    Short quizzes

50%    Two exams

10%    Oral Reports

10%    Participation

 

Digital Humanities


Danteworlds Website

Welcome to Danteworlds: A multimedia journey--combining textual commentary, artistic images, and audio recordings--through the three realms (Inferno, Purgatory, Paradise) of Dante's Divine Comedy. This site contains, in addition to an abridged version of the original commentary in The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy and Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Inferno, Italian recordings of selected verses and a vast gallery of images depicting characters and scenes from the Divine Comedy. Like the books, the Danteworlds Web site is structured around a geographic representation of Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise--the three worlds of Dante's Divine Comedy.

Danteworlds is "an invaluable resource for specialists and novices alike," writes E. S. Hierl (Harvard University) in Choice Reviews Online, "the sort of multimedia experience that those in the digital humanities strive for" (August, 2010). The subject of an interview on the home page of the University of Texas at Austin, Danteworlds was selected for inclusion on EDSITEment in 2008 as "one of the best online resources for education in the humanities," and was featured in the literary blogs of the New Yorker (Jan. 8, 2009) and the Los Angeles Times (Jan. 14, 2009).

AWARDS, GRANTS, AND HONORS

2007         Gold Award, Innovative Instructional Technology Awards Program

2007         UT-Austin nominee, Chancellor's Council Innovations in Education Awards

2003         Silver Award, Innovative Instructional Technology Awards Program

2003         Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Grant

2001         Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Grant 

PRESENTATIONS

"Danteworlds: DHing the Scholar-Teacher in the Piazza," FL@DH: Foreign Languages in the Digital Humanities," University of Texas at Austin, February 6, 2016.

"Dante's Web: Research and Teaching in the Virtual Piazza," Modern Language Association, Austin, Texas, January, 2016.

"Barking up a Different Tree: A Digital Humanities Complement to Distant Reading," American Association of Italian Studies, Boulder, Colorado, March, 2015.

"Danteworlds: A Multimedia Journey through Dante's Divine Comedy," Humanities Lecture Series, University of Texas at Austin Continuing Education, October, 2004.

"Danteworlds: A Visual Journey through Dante's Afterlife," Iona College, April, 2004.

Books


The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (University of Chicago Press, 2009, second printing in 2011).

Seamlessly combining a major work of scholarship with extensive pedagogical features, this multi-purpose book is a valuable resource for researchers, teachers, students, and other ambitious readers of Dante's Divine Comedy. The poem's earliest commentators and Giovanni Boccaccio's public lectures on it in the fourteenth century inaugurated a tradition—interpreting and explicating the Comedy in piecemeal fashion (from individual verses to a single canto)—that has been carried on by Dante scholars down to the present. Based on original research and written in lively prose, The Complete Danteworlds contributes to this tradition with a new scholarly commentary that covers the entire Divine Comedy. It does so, moreover, in a highly innovative way: unique among Dante commentaries, the entries in this book are conceived and arranged according to the geography of Dante's afterlife: rather than line by line notes, the over 240 entries in The Complete Danteworlds follow the path traveled by Dante and his guides as they descend through the circles of Hell, climb the terraces of Mount Purgatory, and traverse the spheres of Paradise. This geographical organization, truer to Dante's visual imagination than a purely textual ordering, has born fruitful scholarly results by providing new information and critical insights on topics that received only partial or scattered treatment in earlier commentaries.  Published by a top-tier university press and widely reviewed in academic journals, The Complete Danteworlds combines the best qualities of a monograph and a textbook by embodying the productive reciprocity of original research and innovative pedagogy.

In his superbly written and always engaging presentation of the three realms of the afterlife Guy Raffa displays the rare ability to see, as it were, both the forest and the trees, capturing the grand outlines and shape of Dante’s poem as well as identifying and providing incisive commentary on its myriad components—people, places, events, themes. Not only will first-time readers of the Comedy appreciate Raffa’s meticulous overview, but seasoned scholars will also profit from his many critical insights. Danteworlds will have a major impact on the ways we read, teach, and study the Comedy. - Christopher Kleinhenz (Carol Mason Kirk Professor Emeritus of Italian, University of Wisconsin-Madison)

The commentary and structure of the guide constitute a very impressive work of scholarship in that it admirably fulfills its goal of presenting Dante’s poem in all of its complexity without reductionism. - Peter Bondanella (Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature, Film Studies, and Italian, Indiana University)

Dante Studies are in safe hands when such energy and creativity is brought to bear on the Comedy. . . . This book deserves a wide audience, both inside and outside the academy. - Notes and Queries

Under the author’s skillful guidance, the world of Dante’s creative output is lucidly explored and engagingly presented. - Forum Italicum


 Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Inferno (University of Chicago Press, 2007)

This is the first guide to Dante's Inferno to take readers on a geographic journey through the poet's underworld—not canto by canto but circle by circle, similar to how Dante and Virgil proceed in their infernal descent. The heart of Danteworlds is an original commentary arranged according to the physical layout of Dante's Hell. Each chapter (or "region") of the book, from the "Dark Wood" down to the ninth circle of Hell, begins with a summary of the action and contains detailed entries followed by significant verses and useful study questions. The entries, based on a close examination of the poet's sources (biblical, classical, and medieval) in addition to the most up-to-date scholarship, treat the characters and creatures encountered by Dante on his journey as well as a vast array of references to religion, philosophy, history, politics, and literature. For news of people and events from Dante's time and place, Danteworlds provides information and entertaining anecdotes drawn from the poem's earliest commentators. The book's critical methodology is grounded in the conviction that there is no substitute for revisiting and analyzing the primary sources (in the original languages) from the ancient world to the late Middle Ages that fired Dante's imagination and for examining closely how he fashioned this material into a literary masterpiece.

Guy Raffa provides lucid, concise information on all the major persons, deities, and creatures encountered in the course of his journey. - Deborah Parker (Professor of Italian, University of Virginia)

Throughout, Raffa finds ways to provide context and clues that encourage the reader to return to Dante's poem for a fresh look. The book, therefore, is not only useful for first-time readers, but also for those who regularly teach the Comedy to such readers. - The Medieval Review

 . . . it does a remarkable job of conveying a great deal of information as well as a lively sense of the richness, interest, and relevance of the Inferno. - Speculum


Divine Dialectic: Dante's Incarnational Poetry (University of Toronto Press, 2000)

Divine Dialectic: Dante’s Incarnational Poetry offers a fresh reading of Dante’s major literary works—the Vita nuova and the Divine Comedy—by combining central tenets of incarnational theology and dialectical thought. Recognizing Dante as a poet who paradoxically embraces both opposition and reciprocity, this book shows how Dante challenges such conventional dichotomies as human desire and divine love, artistic fame and spiritual humility, sacrifice and triumph, and political action and philosophical contemplation. Divine Dialectic ultimately argues that Dante crosses textual and theological boundaries to promote the paradoxical union of contradiction and resolution as a way of reading his poem and, by extension, the world itself.

This book is commendable for being daring and Dantean in the truest sense of the word. - Renaissance Quarterly

Lucid, erudite, and thought provoking, this is an important contribution to Dante studies that will be obligatory reading for advanced students and scholars of the Commedia. - Choice

This is a book, though, not just for Dante Scholars. Anyone interested in medieval Christianity will find it informative and enriching. - Christianity and Literature

This impressive book, Guy Raffa's first, shows from the outset a genuinely remarkable degree of scope and ambition. . . . This is an important contribution to the field that will compel its readers to reconsider some of their most cherished preconceptions about the workings of Dante's mind and poetry. . . . He leaves his readers permanently indebted to him, both for a compelling general interpretation of Dante's major works and for countless illuminating observations of textual detail that enlarge our readerly understanding. - Symposium

The reviewer read every page of this book with keen interest and found it to be one of the most satisfying works of criticism on Dante that he knows. . . . It achieves a remarkable level of readability and grace, comprehensiveness and control, telescoping whole fields of scholarship in ways that focus their exact pertinence for specific points in Dante's text. It deserves to become a widely read and highly esteemed work of American Dante criticism. - Letteratura Italiana Antica

 

Articles and Essays


"Fragments of Freedom: Dante's Relic in the Re-United States." Forthcoming in California Italian Studies 6.2 (2016). 9500 words.

"Dante at Arms." MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History 28.4 (2016): 86-89.

"What Rod Dreher Ought to Know about Dante and Same-Sex Love." Electronic Bulletin of the Dante Society of America. November 2, 2015. Reprinted in PopMatters, January 22, 2016.

"Bones of Contention: Ravenna's and Florence's Claims to Dante's Remains." Italica 92.3 (2015): 565-81.

"Dante and Don: The Word Made Flesh and the Word Made Cash," PopMatters, Sept. 2, 2015. Reprinted as "Happy Birthday to Dante and Don" in Life & Letters: College of Liberal Arts Magazine (Fall 2015): 31-32.

"Dante's Hell and Its Afterlife." Signature Course Stories: Transforming Undergraduate Learning. Ed. Lori Holleran Steiker. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2015. 43-45.

"What the Head of Hiring at Google Doesn't Understand About Skills." The Chronicle of Higher Education. "The Conversation." May 28, 2014. Reprinted in The Chronicle Review. June 20, 2014: B2.

"Calvino's Scientific Humanism," in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Italo Calvino, ed. Franco Ricci. New York: MLA, 2013. 37-41.

"A Beautiful Friendship: Dante and Vergil in the Commedia." MLN 127.1 (Supplement) (2012): 72-80.

"Eco's Scientific Imagination," in New Essays on Umberto Eco, ed. Peter Bondanella. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. 34-49.

"'Io amo New York': Calvino's Creatively Chaotic City," in Science and Literature in Italian Culture from Dante to Calvino, ed. Pierpaolo Antonello and Simon A. Gilson. Oxford: Legenda, 2004. 276-91.

"Dante's Poetics of Exile," Annali d'italianistica 20 (2002): 73-87.

"Usury," "Greeks," and "Five Hundred Ten and Five." The Dante Encyclopedia. New York and London: Garland, 2000.

"Carlo Levi's Sacred Art of Medicine," Annali d'Italianistica 15 (1997): 203-20.

"Dante's Mocking Pastoral Muse," Dante Studies 114 (1996): 271-91.

"Eco and Calvino Reading Dante," Italica 73.3 (1996): 388-409.

"Dante's Beloved Yet Damned Virgil," in Dante's "Inferno": The Indiana Critical Edition, ed. Mark Musa. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. 266-85.

"Enigmatic 56's: Cicero's Scipio and Dante's Cacciaguida," Dante Studies 110 (1992): 121-34.

"Love's Duplicity in the Vita Nuova," Italian Culture 10 (1992): 15-26.

"From Two's to Three's in Inferno II," Lectura Dantis 10 (1992): 91-108.

"La bestialità ne Il Decameron e due strutture contrapposte," The Rackham Journal of the Arts and Humanities (1991-92): 35-42.

Invited Lectures (Selected)


"Danteworlds: DHing the Scholar-Teacher in the Piazza," FL@DH: Foreign Languages in the Digital Humanities," University of Texas at Austin, February 6, 2016.

"Dantemania: Looking Back Today for a Better Tomorrow." University Lecture Series, Bass Concert Hall, University of Texas at Austin, September 29, 2014. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKCoLNCmBPw)  

"Dante's Immortal Remains: From Florentine Martyr to Global Icon," Annual Dante Lecture, Center for Renaissance Studies, Newberry Library, Chicago, November 15, 2013.

"Dante and the Popular Imagination: A Historical Perspective," Annual Meeting of the Dante Society of America, MLA, Los Angeles, January 8, 2011.

"Romancing the Tomb: Dante's Bones and Italian History," Annual Dante Lecture, Yale University, October 20, 2010.


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