Department of Geography and the Environment

Eugenio Arima


ProfessorPh.D., Michigan State University

Assistant Professor
Eugenio Arima

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-0714
  • Office: CLA 3.416
  • Office Hours: Spring 2015- Mon, Wed 11-noon or by appointment

Interests


Human-environment interactions, land change science, GIS/Science, applied quantitative methods, Latin America.

Biography


Dr. Arima received his bachelor degree in agricultural sciences from the University of Brasilia, Brazil, his masters in agricultural economics from PennState University and PhD in geography from Michigan State University.

His research lies in the intersection of land change science, spatial analysis, and landscape ecology. Broadly, he is a human-environmental geographer interested in understanding the motivations that drive humans to act upon and transform tropical landscapes and how that manifests spatially in terms of patterns. This link between human agency and landscape pattern is based on conceptual and theoretical approaches derived from behavioral theory and political economy. His work typically employs mixed-methods such as interview-based fieldwork, computer simulation, econometrics and spatial statistics, geographic information systems, and remote sensing. As a result of this theoretical and methodological diversity, Dr. Arima has published in a range of journals within geography, ecology, economics, and sociology. His externally funded projects include an NSF-IBSS collaboration with political scientists at UT, University of Michigan, University of Maryland, and BYU. This project investigates how local political competition, ethnic conflict, and climate change, collectively impact the effectiveness of international aid and ultimately food security. Dr. Arima has also been working in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Brasilia to study large scale agricultural expansion in the cerrado (savanna) of northeast-central Brazil. This region is a transition zone between two distinct ecosystems, the semi-arid caatinga and the evergreen Amazonian forest. Current regional climate models predict that this region will experience one of the highest decreases in average rainfall in Brazil. Nonetheless, little is known about the scale of rain-fed and irrigated agriculture (underground and stream-based) in the region and even less about adaptation strategies to droughts and watershed management initiatives, topics that will be addressed by the project. 

 

Selected Publications

Arima, E. A spatial probit econometric model of land change: the case of infrastructure development in Western Amazonia, Peru. PLOS One. 24 March 2016. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0152058.

Arima, E., P. Barreto, E. Araujo, B. Soares-Filho. Public policies can reduce tropical deforestation: lessons and challenges from Brazil. Land Use Policy 41 (2014): 465-473. 

Richards, P., R. T. Walker, E. Arima. Spatially complex land change: the indirect effect of Brazil’s agricultural sector on land use in Amazonia. Global Environmental Change 29 (2014): 1-9.

Arima, E., Walker, R., & Vergara, D. (2013). Assessing the performance of linear feature models: an approach to computation inference. Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing, 79(9), 847-855. 

Arima, E. Y., R. T. Walker, C. Souza Jr., R. Pereira, O. Canto. 2013. Spontaneous colonization and forest fragmentation in the Central Amazon Basin. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 103(3): 1485-1501.

Arima, E. Y., P. Richards, R. T. Walker M. Caldas. 2011. Statistical confirmation of indirect land use change in the Brazilian Amazon. Environmental Research Letters 6 (2011) 024010 doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/2/024010.

Walker, R., N. Moore, E. Arima, S. Perz, C. Simmons, M. Caldas, D. Vergara, C. Bohrer. 2009. Protecting the Amazon with Protected Areas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106(26): 10582-10586.

Arima, E. Y., Walker, R. T., Sales, M., Souza Jr., Perz, S. G. 2008. The fragmentation of space in the Amazon basin: emergent road networks. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 74(6): 699-709.

Arima, E., C. S. Simmons, R. Walker, and M. A. Cochrane. 2007. Fire in the Brazilian Amazon: a spatially explicit model for policy impact analysis. Journal of Regional Sciences 47 (3):541-567.

Moore, N., E. Arima, R. Walker, and R. R. Silva. 2007. Uncertainty and the changing hydroclimatology of the Amazon. Geophysical Research Letters 34 (L14707):doi:10.1029/2007GL030157.

Courses


GRG 356T • Geoprocessing

37245 • Fall 2016
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 1.402

Geoprocessing courses can encompass a variety of topics, ranging from what we would normally simply call ‘GIS’ to remote sensing techniques to computer science. This course will adopt a narrower definition: geoprocessing will be mostly about computer scripting and programming applied to georeferenced (spatial) data. The skills you will hopefully attain in this course are useful in a number of different ways. Scripting & Programming a) automates processes that are repetitive and time consuming, b) allows for the implementation of solutions that are not available as built-in functions, c) allows for easy replication of your work and of methods, among others. 

GRG 470C • Advanced Geographic Info Sys

37295-37300 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 1.102

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. Advanced GIS will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including watershed drainage analysis, ecological corridors and least cost path analysis. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, fuzzy set analysis, and location/allocation analysis. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

36650-36665 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.128

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

36520-36535 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.112

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 396T • Land Change Science

36600 • Fall 2015
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 0.108

This graduate level course will survey the current and past literature in the field of land change science. The course is divided into five major parts: part I) addresses the emergence of land change science as a fundamental component of environmental research; II) investigates the causes and drivers of land change and its theoretical foundations across certain social sciences’ disciplines; III) provides a glimpse of the land cover monitoring & characterization and modeling literature; IV) looks into the synergies and impacts of land change on other systems. Finally, part V) investigates the recent literature on forest transition, indirect land change, and land sharing/sparing and future directions of the field.
 

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

36740-36755 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.128

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 470C • Advanced Geographic Info Sys

37660-37665 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 3.102

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. Advanced GIS will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including watershed drainage analysis, ecological corridors and least cost path analysis. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, fuzzy set analysis, and location/allocation analysis. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project

GRG 396T • Regression Analysis In Geog

37735 • Fall 2014
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 1.102

This course will overview a wide range of statistical regression techniques applied to the social sciences and spatial contexts, including ordinary least squares, limited dependent variable models, and spatial regression models. The goal of the course is to equip geography masters and PhD students with sufficient knowledge of regression analysis to a) employ those methods in their own research, b) help them understand the empirical literature they read, and c) provide a basis for more advanced methods. Emphasis will be placed on the meaning of the assumptions needed to obtain consistent and/or unbiased estimators and cases when those assumptions may be violated. Although knowledge of college algebra and basic probability and statistics is required, the course will approach regression analysis empirically, with substantial time devoted to lab exercises, implementation of models, and interpretation of results, particularly in the context of causality and partial effects measurement.

 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37890-37905 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.128

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 396T • Land Change Science

37990 • Fall 2013
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 4.106

This graduate level course surveys the current and past literature in the field of land change science. The course is divided into five major parts:  part I) addresses the emergence of land change science as a fundamental component of environmental research; II) investigates the causes and drivers of land change and its theoretical foundations across certain social sciences’ disciplines; III) provides a glimpse of the land cover monitoring & characterization and modeling literature; IV) looks into the synergies and impacts of land change on other systems. Finally, part V) investigates the recent literature on forest transition, indirect land change, and land sharing/sparing and future directions of the field.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37535-37550 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.128

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 470C • Advanced Geographic Info Sys

37565-37570 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM CLA 1.102

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. This course will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including surface hydrologic analysis, viewshed, least cost path and corridor analysis, and fuzzy set multicriteria evaluation. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, error assessment, and spatial pattern statistics. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project. This course will expand and refine GIS concepts, applications, algorithms, and analysis beyond the introductory GIS course.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37440-37455 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GRG 102

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 396T • Land Change Science

37545 • Fall 2012
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM GRG 408

This graduate level course surveys the current and past literature in the field of land change science. The course is divided into five major parts:  part I) addresses the emergence of land change science as a fundamental component of environmental research; II) investigates the causes and drivers of land change and its theoretical foundations across certain social sciences’ disciplines; III) provides a glimpse of the land cover monitoring & characterization and modeling literature; IV) looks into the synergies and impacts of land change on other systems. Finally, part V) investigates the recent literature on forest transition, indirect land change, and land sharing/sparing and future directions of the field.

GRG 356T • Digital Terrain Modeling

37365 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GRG 206

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. This course will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including surface hydrologic analysis, viewshed, least cost path and corridor analysis, and fuzzy set multicriteria evaluation. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, error assessment, and spatial pattern statistics. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project. This course will expand and refine GIS concepts, applications, algorithms, and analysis beyond the introductory GIS course.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37390-37405 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GRG 102

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37410-37425 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GRG 102

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links