Department of Geography and the Environment

Large Rivers Group Published in Remote Sensing of Environment

Thu, July 6, 2017
Large Rivers Group Published in Remote Sensing of Environment
The large rivers team standing on the bank of the Amazon River after the acoustic Doppler and side-scan cross-sectional survey.

We are pleased to announce that Doctoral candidate Edward Park and Professor Edgardo Latrubesse published a paper in Remote Sensing of Environment, one of the most prestigious journals in remote sensing and environmental sciences. The article is titled The hydro-geomorphologic complexity of the Amazon River floodplain and hydrological connectivity assessed by remote sensing and field control. This research project is a part of the large rivers research program at UT-Austin Large Rivers: Long Term Basin Evolution, Morphodynamics, and Global Change funded by multiple grants including the NSF DDRI (#1558446) and NSF FESD (#1338694) awards.

Abstract: Hydrological connectivity processes along the lower Amazon River floodplain at Lago Miratuba Floodplain (LMF) were analyzed based on remote sensing and field measurements. Connectivity processes are related to 12 geomorphic sub-units of the floodplain that are interconnected at different stage thresholds through channelized and overbank flow paths, while lakes act as reservoirs for flood waters, local rainfall, and water table saturation-see pages. An interesting finding is that connections with the river for all units were initiated through channelized flows below the bankfull stage of the Amazon River. The connectivity processes over different geomorphic units are also not correlated with their minimum distance (shortest lines) from the river. This implies that a “flood pulse” model largely concerned with lateral connectivity (mostly through overbank diffusion) only partially explains the complex hydrological connectivity processes at a regional scale along the complex lower Amazon River floodplain. Thus, for hydrological connectivity assessments in the Amazon River floodplain, reach-by-reach scale studies have to be carried out, relating the hydro-geomorphologic processes (channelized flow routing paths, overbank diffusion, and local recharge) to the internal geomorphic variability and complexity of the floodplain.

Edgardo and Maxi preparing surface water bucket samples collected over river and floodplain lakes for grain size distribution analysis.

 

(L-R) Edgardo and Maxi preparing surface water bucket samples collected over river and floodplain lakes for grain size distribution analysis. Edward and Lahn measuring the floodplain channel width of Lago.

 

 

 

 

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