Department of Germanic Studies

Jason Roberts


M.A., University of Texas at Austin

Graduate Student, Teaching Assistant II

Contact

Biography


Jason is a PhD candidate in an ad hoc program in Germanic studies and is completing a PhD portfolio in Religious Studies. He also holds an MA in Slavic Languages and Literature from UT Austin and an MM in piano from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. Jason has also studied in Bayreuth and Köln, Germany. His research focuses on theology as intellectual history and its impact on historical metanarratives and the social sciences. His dissertation examines 15th and 16th century Hermetic texts in the discourse of European religious reform. Other areas of interest include Siberian shamanism, divination, and ritual theory. 

Courses


EUS 346 • Northern Lands And Cultures

35445 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 214
(also listed as GRG 356T, REE 345)

FLAGS:   GC

Description:

Designed to develop a geographical understanding of the Circumpolar region of the North, an ancient human habitat and a home to distinct, millenia old, civilizations. These indigenous Arctic cultures and livelihoods are being constantly challenged by modern industrial powers, and the clash between two contesting realities is profound. Emphasis is given to a historical geographical perspective on the major processes forming cultural and natural landscapes (including global warming), and influence society, economy, spiritual life and politics. Regions include: Alaska, the Canadian northern territories, Scandinavian North, including Sapmi (Lapland), Iceland, Greenland, the Russian North, and Siberia.

Requirements and Grading

The final grade for the course is based on 3 exams

HIS F306N • Magic And Power In Prague

84215 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 228
(also listed as R S F306, REE F302)

In this course we examine authentic historical texts from four different magical traditions to find the truth behind the fiction and the historical events that sometimes permitted and sometimes persecuted the religions, philosophies, and sciences we have come to call “magic.” In this course you will study post-Reformation Bohemia and the practice of magic during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II in the discourse of heresy. We will concern ourselves primarily with how the practice of magic affected politics and religion as well as with how politics and religion affected the practice of magic.  You will also expand your knowledge of the history of Bohemia and the city of Prague and begin to separate four very different mystical and religious traditions, which are too often misleadingly grouped together under the undifferentiated term “magic.”

For more information about the course: https://www.facebook.com/MAGICandPOWERinPRAGUE

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

44445 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM BUR 128

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ?????!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

CZ S301K • Magic And Power In Prague

87545 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 228

In this course we examine authentic historical texts from four different magical traditions to find the truth behind the fiction and the historical events that sometimes permitted and sometimes persecuted the religions, philosophies, and sciences we have come to call “magic.” In this course you will study post-Reformation Bohemia and the practice of magic during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II in the discourse of heresy. We will concern ourselves primarily with how the practice of magic affected politics and religion as well as with how politics and religion affected the practice of magic.  You will also expand your knowledge of the history of Bohemia and the city of Prague and begin to separate four very different mystical and religious traditions, which are too often misleadingly grouped together under the undifferentiated term “magic.”

For more information about the course: www.facebook.com/magicandpowerinprague

GRC 327E • Heret/Frdom Fghtrs, 1350-1650

38690 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CPE 2.206
(also listed as CZ 324, EUS 346, HIS 362G, R S 357, REE 325)

This course reaches back to the first centuries of Protestantism in Central Europe, from about 1400 to about 1700. The Czech Lands, under the names of Bohemia and Moravia, and under the dominion of the Habsburg Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire, were heavily implicated in the various breaks from and returns to Catholicism, as the reformation started by Luther gave way to the counter-reformation of the organized Catholic Church, resisting the fracturing of its One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. This hotbed of religious dissidence pitted newly emerging Protestant groups on several sides of each doctrinal and political issue that arose as the region sought its religious identity: Utraquists, Hussites, Lutherans, Calvinists, and Czech Brethren, and others.  

The course will explore the theologies, politics, and personal identities that emerged, and passed away in this era through the accounts in primary sources, including the writings of the reformers as well as through the lenses provided by current scholarship. In addition, the course examines the visual arts and music (especially hymns) that played such a huge role in this battle for land, power, hearts, and minds shaping the lives of believers and non-believers alike. The course concludes with an examination of the evolutions within Catholicism reflected in the Catholic catechism as a result of the Counter-Reformation.

Prerequisites: none

Readings: The reading list will consist mainly of primary sources, available digitally in the public domain and scholarly articles to which the students have digital access through the library. In addition, there will be some required film viewing and music recordings.

Grading: attendance and participation 10%, multiple précis (one page written assignments) throughout the semester 40%, mid-term 20%, final exam 30%

CZ S301K • Magic And Power In Prague

87867 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM RLM 5.112

In this course we examine authentic historical texts from four different magical traditions to find the truth behind the fiction and the historical events that sometimes permitted and sometimes persecuted the religions, philosophies, and sciences we have come to call “magic.” In this course you will study post-Reformation Bohemia and the practice of magic during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II in the discourse of heresy. We will concern ourselves primarily with how the practice of magic affected politics and religion as well as with how politics and religion affected the practice of magic.  You will also expand your knowledge of the history of Bohemia and the city of Prague and begin to separate four very different mystical and religious traditions, which are too often misleadingly grouped together under the undifferentiated term “magic.”

For more information about the course: www.facebook.com/magicandpowerinprague

CZ 324 • Heret/Frdom Fghtrs, 1350-1650

44958 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 208
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 362G, R S 357, REE 325)

This course reaches back to the first centuries of Protestantism in Central Europe, from about 1400 to about 1700. The Czech Lands, under the names of Bohemia and Moravia, and under the dominion of the Habsburg Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire, were heavily implicated in the various breaks from and returns to Catholicism, as the reformation started by Luther gave way to the counter-reformation of the organized Catholic Church, resisting the fracturing of its One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. This hotbed of religious dissidence pitted newly emerging Protestant groups on several sides of each doctrinal and political issue that arose as the region sought its religious identity: Utraquists, Hussites, Lutherans, Calvinists, and Czech Brethren, and others.  

The course will explore the theologies, politics, and personal identities that emerged, and passed away in this era through the accounts in primary sources, including the writings of the reformers as well as through the lenses provided by current scholarship. In addition, the course examines the visual arts and music (especially hymns) that played such a huge role in this battle for land, power, hearts, and minds shaping the lives of believers and non-believers alike. The course concludes with an examination of the evolutions within Catholicism reflected in the Catholic catechism as a result of the Counter-Reformation.

Prerequisites: none

Readings: The reading list will consist mainly of primary sources, available digitally in the public domain and scholarly articles to which the students have digital access through the library. In addition, there will be some required film viewing and music recordings.

Grading: attendance and participation 10%, multiple précis (one page written assignments) throughout the semester 40%, mid-term 20%, final exam 30%

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37970 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM JES A307A

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Homework (20%)

3      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4      Chapter tests (30%)

5      Regular quizzes (10%)

6      Reading journals (5%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

There are no incompletes given in German 507. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

HIS S306N • Magic And Power In Prague

85635 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 0.132
(also listed as CZ S301K, R S S306, REE S302)

In this course we examine authentic historical texts from four different magical traditions to find the truth behind the fiction and the historical events that sometimes permitted and sometimes persecuted the religions, philosophies, and sciences we have come to call “magic.” In this course you will study post-Reformation Bohemia and the practice of magic during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II in the discourse of heresy. We will concern ourselves primarily with how the practice of magic affected politics and religion as well as with how politics and religion affected the practice of magic.  You will also expand your knowledge of the history of Bohemia and the city of Prague and begin to separate four very different mystical and religious traditions, which are too often misleadingly grouped together under the undifferentiated term “magic.”

For more information about the course: www.facebook.com/magicandpowerinprague

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37885 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A305A

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1  Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2  Homework (15%)

3  Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4  Chapter tests (25%)

5  Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

6  Regular quizzes (10%)

7  Short collaborative video project (10%)

8  Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37985 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM JES A303A

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge.. Besides the textbook, authentic texts representing a number of genres (especially popular film) will be used to enrich students’ developing content knowledge of the German-speaking world.

The communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members. 

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories: 

1      Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2      Daily homework (20%)

3      Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

4      Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

5      Chapter tests (30%)

6      Regular quizzes (10%)

7      Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

 There are no incompletes given in German 612.

RUS F506 • First-Year Russian I

88305 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTH 8:30AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.122

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended

• Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck!

I.            General

Course Content: This course is the first semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover Units One through Unit Six in the textbook (Vol. 1), spending about two weeks on each unit.

Attendance Policy: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) absences, excused or otherwise, during the semester.  Each absence beyond the fifth shall result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritic (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.). A student shall be considered absent after 15 minutes have elapsed from the beginning of class and the student has failed to arrive. 

Tardiness: You are to arrive to class on time. Students who arrive after class has begun shall incur a tardy. A total of three (3) tardies shall be equivalent to one (1) absence and shall count towards the five absences allowed each student. Students are expected to be aware of their own accumulated absences and tardies. Although the instructor will maintain daily records of attendance, he/she will not update students on the status of their attendance unless otherwise requested.

Course Requirements: A Course Syllabus for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xx in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the Workbook. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class. Note that Days Eight and Nine in the syllabus are combined into ONE review day for us.  You are also responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

Technology Policy:  Students should turn off all cell phones and pagers before class begins.  Texting or taking/making calls during class is unacceptable and shall reflect poorly on students' participation grade. Although many students prefer to take notes on a computer, a language class is generally not conducive to this type of note taking.  Please refrain from using a computer during class unless you have sought and received the express consent of the instructor. 

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Slavic Department will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

Testing:  There will be six in-class one-hour tests and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on September 16, September 30, October 14, October 28, November 11, and November 29. A comprehensive final exam will be given during the University's exam period between December 8 and 15, 2010.

 

II. Grading

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  55%

In-class tests: 25%

Final exam: 30%

Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  30%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit (4) / no credit (7) basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  15%

 

Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm.

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

98 – 100 = A+

94 – 97 = A

90 – 93 = A-

88 – 89 = B+

84 – 87 = B

80 – 83 = B-

78 – 79 = C+

74 – 77 = C

70 – 73 = C-

68 – 69 = D+

64 – 67 = D

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F 

III. Supplementary Materials

Your Textbook comes with an audio CD and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using these media in your iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible.  If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are

facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies also has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states.  These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view.  Many of the DVDs have both English subtitles (which can help you build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.  

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37750 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A307A

Course Description

Welcome to German 507! It is a 2nd semester course that continues where GER 506 left off. If you earned an A or B in 506, you have a good foundation for GER 507. If you earned a C, you have some deficiencies you need to address. There is a review period during at the beginning of the semester, and you should use it to full advantage. If you earned a D in GER 506, you are not eligible to take this course. If you did not take GER 506 at UT, see your instructor soon; you will need to familiarize yourself with the material covered in GER 506. As GER 506, this course also emphasizes equally listening, speaking, reading and writing. The primary goal of instruction in 507 is to help you develop your ability to communicate in German. German 507 is a five-credit course that meets Mondays through Thursdays. How much time you should spend studying outside of class depends on a number of individual factors such as your linguistic aptitude, self-discipline, your desire to learn a foreign language, etc. You should, on average, plan to spend at least 1-2 hours each day studying German: completing written homework, reviewing, reading, and building your vocabulary. Your instructor can offer some tips on how to study effectively.

Grading Policy

All German 507 students are evaluated according to the same criteria: A. 5 chapter exams = 50% B. 2 Oral examinations = 10% Each oral exam is worth 5% of your grade. The first one will be administered during the first half of the semester, the second one during the second half of the semester. The best preparation for these exams is regular and active participation in class. The more you participate in class, the more fluently you will speak. C. Brief Quizzes = 15% These quizzes are given in class and can be announced or unannounced. D. Class participation and homework = 25% This grade includes participation and attendance (5%), hand-in homework, attendance at the German Film Series (at least twice / semester), assignments from the Kurspaket, the WebQuests, from Grimm Grammar, etc. (15%).

There is no final exam during the final exam period in GER 507 due to the cumulative nature of all of the tests you take. If you show up late for a test, you will still have to finish the test at the same time as the other students. If you do not show up for an exam without having obtained permission from your instructor in advance of the test, you will not receive any credit for the test. Emergencies that can be substantiated to the satisfaction of your instructor will be treated as exceptions. There are no Incompletes given in German 506.

Texts

Deutsch im Blick (2008). Kurspaket (combined textbook & workbook) Available for purchase at IT Copy (512 MLK Boulevard; 476-6662). The video clips can be found at: http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/dib (If you find any links that don't work, please report them to Dr. Per Urlaub at urlaub@mail.utexas.edu, Dr. Abrams at zsabrams@mail.utexas.edu). Grimm Grammar is the grammar portion of the online program. The topics you need to learn are included in each chapter of your Kurspaket, and can be reached through the GG homepage at: http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/gg

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37952 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM RLM 6.120

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1  Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2  Homework (15%)

3  Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4  Chapter tests (25%)

5  Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

6  Regular quizzes (10%)

7  Short collaborative video project (10%)

8  Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 506 • First-Year German I

38325 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A305A

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Jane Grabowski, & Megan McKinstry (2016). Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. Second Edition. Vista Higher Learning.
  2. Sag mal Basic Supersite
  3. Sag mal WebSAM (Student Activities Manual)

 

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

1  Class participation assessed weekly (10%)

2  Homework (15%)

3  Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)

4  Chapter tests (25%)

5  Structured reflections on learning experiences (5%)

6  Regular quizzes (10%)

7  Short collaborative video project (10%)

8  Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

 

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

Curriculum Vitae


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