The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV 310L • American Government

38465 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A121A
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GOV 310L  38465  American Politics

Course Description

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to American Government. It is designed to give you a basic idea of the functions, activities, and interactions of our federal system. Our government is a dynamic entity that has evolved over time and shaped by both internal and external forces. The goal of this class is to provide you with tools to understand American Institutions.  Through learning the duties, powers, and limitations of government, you can better appreciate the impact of current events upon America.  This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the American and Texas government component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility

 

Required Reading:

American Politics Today, 4rd Essentials Edition by William T. Bianco and David T. Canon  2015 W. W. Norton and Company.

ISBN: 978-0-393-93702-2

 

 

Grading policy

Grades will based on the following:

Test 1                                         30%
Test 2                                         30%
Test 3                                         30%
2 Paper Assignments: Total Weight is 5% each or 10% total

I do use plus/minus grading.


GOV 310L • American Government

38495-38500 • Shaw, Daron
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
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Title:                        American and Texas Government

Course #:               Govt. 310L

Unique #:              38495-38500

 

Prerequisites:   

 

None.

 

Course Description:

 

This is the online section for the Introduction to American Government course. Students will access a live stream lecture twice a week, viewing lectures and participating in in-class assignments. The class covers a wide range of topics, including the founding of the U.S., the Constitution, federalism, interest groups, political parties, public opinion and voting behavior, campaigns and elections, the media, the presidency, the Congress, the courts, and public policy. Students are expected to master the basics facts of American government, but they are also asked to use broader, theoretical perspectives to analyze contemporary issues and dilemmas.

 

Grading Policy:

 

Students will be graded based on three midterm examinations (each worth 100 points), as well as textbook and in-class assignments (100 points).

 

Texts:

 

The class relies on webtexts: one focusing on American government and another focusing on Texas government. The total cost for these materials is approximately $115.


GOV 310L • American Government

38470 • McIver, John
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A121A
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GOV 310L Course Description/McIver

 

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the institutions, processes and actors that make up the American political system and to encourage you to think critically about the nature and quality of American democracy. To achieve these objectives, I have chosen a textbook that focuses attention of the role of citizens as key actors in the democratic experiment that we call the United States of America.

 

Requirements

None

 

Textbooks

Christine Barbour & Gerald C. Wright, Keeping the Republic, The Essentials (8th Edition/Paper),

Washington DC: CQ Press.  Keeping the Republic provides a simple but powerful framework for helping you to think about how our complicated political system works. The framework will help you see how government, politics and the larger society (economy, society, culture, position in the international system) are deeply and systematically intertwined. The framework is explained in Chapter 1 of the textbook and is referred to frequently throughout the rest of the book.

 

 A second required text is the on-line book Texas Politics. We will use this e-book throughout the semester to provide a comparison between the national government and the state government of Texas.

 

A Newspaper.  You are responsible for keeping up to date on major national and local news.

If you choose not to spend the money, you can access many local and national papers on-line and in most cases at no charge. 

 

Web-based and supplemental readings - See the "Syllabus" section of these web pages.

 

Grading

A midterm and final examination

Term paper

Attendance and Participation


GOV 310L • American Government

38475 • Miller, Kenneth
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 101
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GOV 310L

 

Prerequisites

None

 

Course Description

A basic survey of American government, including fundamental political institutions, federal, state, and local; special attention to the United States and Texas Constitutions. Part of a six-semester-hour integrated sequence, the second half of which is Government 312L. Part of a six-semester-hour integrated sequence, the second half of which is Government 312L.

Fulfills first half of legislative requirement for government.

Meets core curriculum requirement for Government (I).

 

Grading Policy

Two exams

In-class quizzes

 

Texts

Fiorina, Peterson, Johnson and Mayer. 2011. The New American Democracy, 7th Ed. Pearson


GOV 310L • American Government

38485 • Apfeld, Brendan
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ B0.306
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Prerequisites: None

 

Description: This course provides an introduction to American and Texas politics.  The class will examine the American political system and explore the political dynamics at play.  The course will also examine these topics in the Texas context and present them in a comparative perspective as appropriate.  Course topics include an introduction to the structure and function of American political institutions (Congress, Presidency, Courts), the relationship between the mass public and politics (public opinion and participation), and the role of intermediary organizations (interest groups, media, parties) in that relationship. In addition to mastering a set of basic facts about American government, students will learn theories addressing “big questions” in American politics, and will explore critical assessments of the evidence brought to bear on these questions.

 

This course has four primary objectives.  First, students will obtain basic descriptive information about the American and Texas political systems by examining important political institutions, actors, and processes.  Second, students develop analytical skills by which to understand complex political relationships and phenomena.  Third, students will gain exposure to the work of political scientists by concentrating on the paradigms and techniques of the discipline.  Fourth, students will strengthen their knowledge of and ability to fulfill their role in a well-functioning democracy.

 

Grading Policy: Two midterm exams; Reaction papers; Reading quizzes; Attendance

 

Texts: The American Political System, Kollman, any full edition (with policy chapters). Norton Publishing.

Additional required readings will be made available through Canvas.


GOV 310L • American Government

38480 • Dizard, Jacob
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112
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GOV 310L, American Government

Jake Dizard

Spring 2017

 

Prerequisites: None.

 

Description: This course is an introduction to American government and politics. While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

 

Grading Policy: Midterm and Final Exam, In-class quizzes throughout semester. This course will use the university’s plus/minus letter grading system.

 

Texts: This course will use American Government: Power and Purpose, Thirteenth Edition, 2014 Election Update, by Lowi, Ginsberg, Shepsle, and Ansolabehere. Additional required readings will be made available through Canvas.


GOV 310L • American Government

38490 • Kelly, Kristin
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 101
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GOV 310L, American Government

Alexander Hudson

Spring 2017

 

Prerequisites: None.

 

Description: This course is an introduction to American government and politics. While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

 

Grading Policy: This course will use the university’s plus/minus letter grading system.

 

Texts: This course will use American Government: Power and Purpose, Brief Thirteenth Edition, 2014 Election Update, by Lowi, Ginsberg, Shepsle, and Ansolabehere. ISBN: 978-0-393-26419-7. Other assigned readings will be available online, free of charge.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies Amer Gov-Ut/Dc

38505 • Spence, David
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Hon

38510 • Wellhausen, Rachel
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.302
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GOV 312 Honors with Writing Flag • United States in the World Economy

This course explores the changing role of the United States in the world economy over the last 150 years and the consequences for American politics. Some of the key issues to be considered include: How have the politics around the US economy changed over time, and are there lessons from the past for the present? How have phenomena like financial crisis, international trade, debates over US manufacturing, and the growth of multinational corporations shaped politics in the United States? How does the political economy of developing nations influence American politics? We will use a variety of readings from political scientists and economists to explore these issues. Course requirements include short assignments as well as two essays that will be substantially revised and expanded throughout the semester. No prerequisites are required.

Grading Policy:

Short assignments, quizzes, and activities                   20%

Peer review                                                               10%

Essay 1: First draft                                                    10%

Essay 1: Final draft                                                   20%

Essay 2: First draft                                                    20%

Essay 2: Final draft                                                   20%

 

Textbooks:

Jeffry Frieden (2006). Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century.

Pietra Rivoli (2014). The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy: An Economist Examines the Markets, Power, and Politics of World Trade. (Second Edition.)

Tyler Cowen (2011). The Great Stagnation. 


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

38514 • McDonald, Patrick
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38535 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.102
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ISSUES & POLICIES IN AMERICAN GOVT: TEXAS POLITICAL HISTORY

 

Required Reading

 

Randolph B. Campbell, Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, 2012 (paperback)

 

Description

 

This course will examine the major events and personalities in Texas political history from 16th century Spanish Texas up to the present. We will adopt a narrative approach, stressing the issues and concerns that motivated the major actors who helped shape the history of this state and also seeing events in Texas in the larger context of European, Mexican, and American history.

 

Exams and Grades

 

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 questions on all three exams. 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38530 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.306
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38520 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.306
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312L Course Description

 

This course examines American democracy in its origins, its evolution, its strengths and weaknesses, and its enduring character. We will read primary texts from the American colonial period, the American Founding, the pre-Civil-war period, the Progressive era, and the late twentieth century. Much of the course will be devoted to Alexis de Tocqueville’s classic work Democracy in America, one of the most famous books ever written on American politics. Written in the 1830s, the work takes up questions and themes that continue to resonate almost two centuries later. Tocqueville was interested in analyzing American democracy from all angles and his work is a mix of sociology, history, and moral psychology, as well as political science. Key themes of our examination will be: the relationship between religion and politics, the relationship between American materialism (and America’s economic life more generally) to its politics, and the meaning of American equality. We will also take up Tocqueville’s wide-ranging observations on American intellectual life, family life, and the relations between the sexes, as they relate to the American political experiment. In the last third of the course, we will read authors who challenge Tocqueville’s key arguments, or take his assertions in a new direction, and we will consider how well his predictions have been borne out.

 

This course satisfies the second half of the legislative requirement in Government.

 

Grading and Requirements:

 

Option 1 (No paper):

Midterm Exam: 40%

Pop Quizzes: 10%

Final Exam: 50%

Option 2 (With paper):

Midterm Exam: 20%

Pop Quizzes: 10%

Final Exam:  30%

Paper: 40%

 

Attendance is required and four or more unexcused absences will causes a drop in one’s final grade.

 

Required Texts:

1. A COURSE READER, available at Jenn’s Copying and Binding, 2518 Guadalupe St., at the corner of Guadalupe and Dean Keeton, tel. 482-0779.

 

2. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volume I. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer and edited by Olivier Zunz. Library of America. 2012.

 

3. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volume II. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer and edited by Olivier Zunz. Library of America. 2012.

 

4. Online readings.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38540 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM PAR 204
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GOV 312L, Issues and Policies in American Government:

THE CONSTITUTIONAL DEBATES

                                                                    Professor Budziszewski

                                                       

Unique number:       38540

Class meets:               MW 4:00-5:30pm in Parlin 204

Prof's office hours:    MW 12:30-2:00pm in Mezes 3.106

Prof’s email:              jbud@undergroundthomist.org

Prof’s office phone:   232-7229; phone does not record messages; email strongly preferred

Course website:         Canvas

Prof’s website:           The Underground Thomist, http://UndergroundThomist.org

Course policies:           See the FAQ at the “Other Things My Students May Need” section of the Teaching page at my personal website.

 

PREREQUISITES, FLAGS, AND FIELD

 

The course carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  It also fulfills second half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American Government.  There are no prerequisites.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

Americans are often said to be obsessed with their Constitution.  So be it; but then it behooves us to know something about it.  The approach taken in this course is to return to the early debates surrounding its writing and ratification.  We make no use at all of textbooks; rather we study the political thinking of the early Americans in their own words.

 

Another old saw is that history is written by the winners.  However, this is not be a course in winner-worship:  Equal attention and respect are given, on the one hand, to those who wrote the Constitution and argued for its ratification, and on the other, to those who argued against it or demanded sweeping changes in its content.  There are several good reasons for such evenhandedness.  One is that, for all we know, the losers might have been right.  Another is that they might have had some influence on the winners.  Still a third is that we can't fully understand the arguments by which the winners won unless we understand what they were arguing against.

 

Having spoken of history, I should now admit that this is not a "history course" in the ordinary sense.  Rather it is a course in early American political thought -- in political theory and philosophy.  Another thing that you should understand is that this course puts heavy emphasis on the development of skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing.  For instance, it doesn't matter that you can read what a writer has written and figure out what he believes.  What matters is whether you can learn to figure out why he believes it, and how it is logically related to other things he believes.  In other words, when you read you are expected to look for arguments, not just propositions.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

Unit 1: Required analytical outline.

Unit 2:  Required take-home essay.  Extra credit for analytical outline.

Unit 3:  Required take-home essay.  Extra credit for analytical outline.

Thirteen short quizzes.

 

Final grades are calculated in four steps.  First, each student's TWO lowest quiz grades are dropped, and remaining quiz grades averaged.  Second, this average is "curved."  Third, the uncurved exam grades and the curved quiz average are weighted, as follows:

 

            Unit 1 analytical outlines                                                                     25%

            Unit 2 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)            25%

            Unit 3 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)            25%

            Curved quiz average                                                                           25%

 

Class participation and attendance modify grades.  Scholastic dishonesty results in a failing grade for the course.

 

See the “Other things my students may need” section at the bottom of the Teaching page at my personal website:  http://www.UndergroundThomist.org/teaching , especially the course policies in the FAQ, which I expect you to know.

 

TEXTS

 

The following required books have been ordered.  Each book must be purchased.  Always bring with you to class the books we are using at the moment.

 

1. Ralph Ketcham, ed., The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates, excerpts.

 

2. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, The Federalist, excerpts.

 

3. Herbert J. Storing, ed., with Murray Dry, The Anti-Federalist, excerpts.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38525 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.306
show description

No prerequisites.

 

Course description: 

This course addresses how United States officials have formed and pursued their ideas of national security from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the Arab Spring of 2011. The class will focus on the patterns and effects of US political and military interventions abroad. We will give particular attention to US foreign policy in the Middle East, including the United States' relationships with such influential countries as Egypt, Iran, Israel, and Saudi Arabia. 

 

Grading policy: 

Map and history quiz (10%), Exam 1 (30%), Exam 2 (30%), Exam 3 (30%).

 

Texts:

There is no textbook for this course. 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38545-38550 • Moser, Robert
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
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GOV 312L:  US Foreign Policy

 

Since its founding, the United States has played a central role in shaping the larger international political order.  American victories in World War I, World War II, and the Cold War coupled with its support for democracy and open global markets stand at the heart of this legacy.  At the same time, external pressures in the form of war, globalization, and the spread of transnational ideological movements have stressed American institutions and shaped an evolving American national identity.  This course explores this mutually interactive relationship by examining the making of American foreign policy over the past two centuries more broadly.  It explores such topics as American entry into World Wars I and II, the role of Congress in foreign policy making, the construction of the national security state in the twentieth century, competing partisan conceptions of America’s national interest, the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and proliferation, territorial expansion, trade liberalization, nation building, humanitarian intervention, and more recent challenges like terrorism and climate change. 

 

This course fulfills the second half of legislative requirement for government.  May be taken for credit only once.  

 

Course meets ONLINE at our assigned time twice a week.  Our content will be live streamed through Canvas.  Course topics are organized via MODULES, which will also include pre-recorded lecture segments and associated activities that students will complete before the live class.  Students will take three exams during the semester.  Given the size of the class and space limitations on campus, each exam will be administered on an evening during the semester.  These exam dates will be published in the syllabus.  There will be multiple time slots on these exam evenings to accommodate conflicts with other classes.  

 

Students are encouraged to visit http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/ to test their computer and network connection and learn about the course structure.

 

Grading Policy:

 

In-class quizzes:                                       15%

Exam 1:                                                 25%

Exam 2:                                                 30%

Exam 3:                                                 30%

 

Required Textbook:

 

  • None, readings will be drawn from articles that are accessible through the UT library’s website

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38554 • Altamirano, Giorleny
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38553 • Bambrick, Christina
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ B0.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38552 • Tafoya, Joe
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 100
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38560 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.202
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38555 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 308
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38565 • Ives, Anthony
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 1.108
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38600 • Pangle, Lorraine
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.118
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

Description:

This course explores the changing understanding of the human psyche in the history of political thought through the study of classic texts in philosophy and psychology. In roughly chronological order, we will examine several key philosophers’ accounts of the deepest human concerns—justice, happiness, and love—and the potential political life has to fulfill those yearnings. In the final part of the course, we will study Darwin’s evolutionary theory of the evolution of human mental faculties, Freud’s theory of unconscious psychological drives, and current theories of evolutionary psychology. We will discuss how these different views of human nature suggest different approaches to politics and ethics.

 

Prerequisites: none

 

Required Texts:

  • Plato, Republic; Symposium
  • St. Augustine, City of God
  • Hobbes, Leviathan
  • Rousseau, Discourse on the Origin of Inequality
  • Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals
  • Darwin, Descent of Man
  • Freud, Civilization and its Discontents
  • Wilson, E. O., On Human Nature
  • and selected articles on evolutionary psychology

 

Course Requirements and Grading Scheme:

  • weekly posts on discussion board and class participation: 20%
  • two short (1200-1500 word) papers: 25% each
  • final exam: 30%

GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38590 • Pangle, Lorraine
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.208
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

Description: 

This course explores the changing understanding of the human psyche in the history of political thought through the study of classic texts in philosophy and psychology. In roughly chronological order, we will examine several key philosophers’ accounts of the deepest human concerns—justice, happiness, and love—and the potential political life has to fulfill those yearnings. In the final part of the course, we will study Darwin’s evolutionary theory of the evolution of human mental faculties, Freud’s theory of unconscious psychological drives, and current theories of evolutionary psychology. We will discuss how these different views of human nature suggest different approaches to politics and ethics.

 

Prerequisites: none

 

Required Texts:

  • Plato, Republic; Symposium
  • St. Augustine, City of God
  • Hobbes, Leviathan
  • Rousseau, Discourse on the Origin of Inequality
  • Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals
  • Darwin, Descent of Man
  • Freud, Civilization and its Discontents
  • Wilson, E. O., On Human Nature
  • and selected articles on evolutionary psychology

 

Course Requirements and Grading Scheme:

  • weekly posts on discussion board and class participation: 20%
  • two short (1200-1500 word) papers: 25% each
  • final exam: 30%

GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38595 • O'Toole, Daniel
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.122
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

This course explores the changing role of human psychology in the history of political thought through the study of classic texts in philosophy and psychology. We will examine several key philosophers’ accounts of the deepest human concerns—justice, freedom, self-preservation, love, and happiness—and the potential of political life to fulfill those yearnings. We will focus on the works of Plato, Augustine, Hobbes, and Rousseau, and we will compare their reflections on human nature with those of Darwin and with contemporary theories of evolutionary psychology. We will discuss how these different views of human psychology suggest different approaches to ethics and politics.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38585 • Bennett, Zachary
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 208
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

This course explores the changing role of human psychology in the history of political thought through the study of classic texts in philosophy and psychology. We will examine several key philosophers’ accounts of the deepest human concerns—justice, freedom, self-preservation, love, and happiness—and the potential of political life to fulfill those yearnings. We will focus on the works of Plato, Augustine, Hobbes, and Rousseau, and we will compare their reflections on human nature with those of Darwin and with contemporary theories of evolutionary psychology. We will discuss how these different views of human psychology suggest different approaches to ethics and politics.


GOV 314 • Competing Visions Good Life

38580 • Abramson, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.130
(also listed as CTI 303)
show description

Course description: Government 314: Competing conceptions of the good life

Professor: Jeffrey Abramson

 

COMPETING VISIONS OF THE GOOD LIFE

    This is a basic introductory course to political philosophy. Through a reading of works of political thought from Plato to        the present, we confront enduring debates about the meaning of liberty, tolerance, equality, justice and the good life.

 

Prerequisites: none

 

Grading Policy:  plus or minus grades.   Midterm Exam counts 30%; Final exam counts 50%; attendance and participation counts 20%

 

Books for Purchase:

Plato:   Euthyphro, Apology, Crito (Library of Liberal Arts)

Plato:       Republic (Basic Books)

Sophocles:   Three Theban Plays (Penguin)

Aristotle:   Nichomachean Ethics (Hackett)

Aristotle:   Politics (Oxford)

Augustine:   Confessions (Penguin)

Machiavelli: The Prince and the Discourses (Modern Library)

Hobbes:      Leviathan (Penguin)

Locke:       Letter Concerning Toleration (Hackett)

Locke:       Second Treatise on Government (Hackett)

Rousseau:    Basic Political Writings (Hackett)

Mill:        On Liberty (Hackett)

Abramson:    Minerva’s Owl (Harvard)           


GOV 314 • Intro M East: Adj/Chg Mod Tm

38575 • Di-Capua, Yoav
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 100
(also listed as HIS 306N, MES 301L)
show description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century.

·        James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East; A History (Oxford: Oxford 

                 University Press, 2004).

·        James Gelvin, The Israel-Palestine Conflict : One Hundred Years of War 

                  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).


GOV 320K • US Const Devel: Structures

38605 • Sager, Alan
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CLA 1.104
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Government 320K                                                                                American Constitutional Development I

Spring 2017                                                                                                                                         Dr. Sager

                                                                                               

 Course Description

This course is an overview of American Constitutional Development.  Through an analysis of U.S. Supreme Court decisions, we will study the development of the Constitution from the Marshall Court to the Rehnquist Court.  This course focuses on what are called constitutional structures and processes.  Topics include the development of judicial, executive and legislative power, federalism, substantive due process, and property rights  and takings under the 5th amendment.

           

To deepen our insights into the development of the Constitution, in addition to case materials,  the course will utilize video and audio materials which include oral argument in the U.S. Supreme Court, histories and reenactments of famous cases, and brief biographies of current  and past Supreme Court Justices. 

           

There are four major goals for this course:

 1. To identify the major historical themes and controversies about our Constitution

 2. To better understand Constitutionalism and  our Constitution;  what  our Constitution is and  is not and how it  may have changed and developed over the past 200 years.

 3. To develop a high level of skill in  reading, briefing  and understanding Supreme Court opinions, with special attention on what questions to ask when reading an opinion   Part of this skill includes being able to see and understand the point of view of the person writing an opinion.

 4. To raise participants' "cultural literacy"  with regard to  our Constitution, and the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

To fulfill these goals, some of the questions we will attempt to answer include:

 1. What is a Constitution supposed to do and who is supposed to interpret it?

 2  What difference, if any does the context in which the  Constitution was
created matter and how much should it matter?

3. What differences, if any, have existed among the justices as to what the Constitution means?

4. How do various justices go about interpreting the Constitution? What accounts for their differences? In other words, what are the various theories of constitutional interpretation?

5. What impact does the Court and Constitution have on American society.?

 

To answer these questions, we will discuss each of the assigned cases.  Our cases provide the data for fashioning answers to these questions and for moving us toward the course goals.

 

Tenative Grading:                                      Approximate  Weight

3 hour examinations                                       64%(19%, 21%, 24%)

Class participation and preparation                  15%(Attendance and preparation)
Brief and short paper                                      21%(Brief  9%, paper 12%)

 

 

Required Textbooks and Readings:

Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker, Constitutional Law For A Changing America: Institutional Powers and Constraints, (9th edition)          

T.R. van Geel, Understanding Supreme Court Opinions, 8th Edition.

Bert Folsom,   New Deal, Raw Deal.
Larry Arne, The Founder’s Key

 

           

Class Participation   

The grade on this part consists of the following:

A. Demonstrating a reasonable level of daily preparation and understanding of the material covered

B. Contributions made to class discussion and analysis.

C. Overall attendance. More than 3 unexcused absences can affect your final average,


GOV 324J • Govs/Polit Of Eastern Europe

38610 • Liu, Amy
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 348, REE 335)
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Politics of Eastern Europe

Amy Liu, Department of Government

GOV 324J

 

 

Prerequisites

Students must have taken a foundational course in government, European studies, or Russian/East European studies. The course also assumes basic knowledge of world history.

 

 

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the politics of Eastern Europe. The course is divided into three parts. The first part (pre-communist era) focuses on the politics behind and the consequences of the collapse of two empires (tsarist Russia and the dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary). In the second part (communist period), we will pay special attention to the institutional differences between these otherwise ideologically similar states. And in the third part (post-communist years), we will study the different political trajectories adopted in response to a forthcoming European Union membership and once admitted into the Union.

 

 

Grading Criteria

  • 25%     Weekly Quiz
  • 25%     Midterm Examination
  • 25%     Final Examination
  • 25%     Data-Based Paper

 

 

Books

  • Krenz, Maria. 2009. Made in Hungary: A Life Forged by History. Boulder, CO: Donner Publishing. ISBN-13: 978-0982539309

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38615 • Somer-Topcu, Zeynep
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 216
(also listed as EUS 350)
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GOV324L: Government & Politics of Western Europe

Spring 2017

BUR 216

T-Th 9:30-11am

 

Professor: Zeynep Somer-Topcu, PhD

zsomer@utexas.edu

 

Office: BAT 3.124

Office hours: T-Th 2:30pm-4pm, or by appointment

 

Introduction

 

This course provides students with a general introduction to the political institutions, voter behavior, and issues in West Europe. The objective is to equip students with a broad overview of the politics and political systems of Western Europe, as well as on concepts, methods, and tools to understand and analyze contemporary developments. The course is organized thematically (rather than in a country-specific way) around a framework that emphasizes the political determinants and policy consequences of institutional differences.

 

We will start the course with a short overview of the countries and the history of Europe. We will then look at political institutions in Europe, and briefly discuss the European Union. Toward the end of the course we will discuss West European voters, their political behavior, and important issue areas and policies in Europe.

 

Course Requirements:

 

Class participation      5%

Three short papers     10% (each)

Two Midterms            20% (each)

Final Exam                25%      

 

Attendance

 

Attendance is NOT required. However, the exams will heavily rely on what we will discuss in class. I make the power-point slides available after class (on Canvas). However, there are more details beyond the slides we will discuss in class, and you will be responsible of those details in the exam. Therefore, I strongly encourage you to come to class.

 

While attendance is NOT required, I would like to strongly emphasize the following two points:

-       Given that some of you may be on the other side of the campus for an earlier class, you can be a few minutes late to the class. However, you should not be late to class for more than a few minutes (unless there is a exceptional circumstance like an exam, which should be notified in advance). Please do not be late and disturb the class.

-       You are NOT allowed to leave the class early. If you must leave early this can happen only once or twice during the semester. You must let me know in advance and can only leave within the last 10 minutes of the class.

 

Class Participation (5%)

 

Class participation is different from attendance. Throughout the course students are encouraged to raise questions and relevant discussion topics in class, and expected to contribute to class discussions. Students are expected to do the assigned readings before we discuss the topic in class, and arrive at class ready to discuss the readings.

 

Note that I make a distinction between attendance and participation. Attending every class, without ever speaking up or turning these assignments, does not constitute participation. If you do so, you will receive 60 points (D-) for this part of the class. To receive more credit for participation, students are required to ask questions, raise issues, express opinions, etc. regarding the topics covered.

 

I reserve the right to occasionally call your name to discuss a topic or answer a question.

 

Short papers (10% each):

 

There are seven topics with deadlines scattered throughout the semester. You have to choose three of these topics and write short papers. These short papers should not be longer than 6 pages

(double-spaced), or shorter than 3 pages (double-spaced), excluding the title page and the bibliography.

 

In these assignments, you will provide the facts about the question asked. However, you can receive full grade only if you provide a critical analysis for the question. You have to have a bibliography part and show your research. Wikipedia is not accepted as a scholarly citation.

 

There will be a sign-up sheet on my door (the date will be announced). Please come and sign up for three topics. There are limited slots available for each topic. If you do not sign up for a specific topic, you will be randomly assigned to three topics.

 

You can work in groups for these assignments but your write-up must be original and demonstrate your own point of view.

 

 

Midterm Exams (20% X 2) and Final Exam (25%)

 

Each exam will be a combination of multiple-choice questions, short or bullet-point answer questions, and a few long (one-page) essays. The final exam may also have one long essay (2-3 pages long). If you foresee problems with the exam dates, see me after class, during office hours, or contact me by e-mail at least two weeks before the assigned dates.

 

Required Text:

 

The following book is available for purchase at the bookstore:

 

Gallagher, Laver and Mair. 2011. Representative Government in Modern

Europe: Institutions, Parties, and Governments. McGraw Hill. 5th Edition. (Make sure you have the correct edition)

 

There will also be required news articles or editorials assigned for each class period. These will be based on the current events for the topic under discussion. We will post them on Canvas on Fridays before each week.

 

There will be additional required articles/chapters for some classes. These readings are denoted with an asterisk (**) in the syllabus, and will be available on Canvas in advance. 


GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

38625 • Budziszewski, J
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 304
(also listed as PHL 342)
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GOV 335M / PHL 342:

NATURAL LAW THEORY

Professor J. Budziszewski

 

 

Unique numbers:      GOV unique number 38625, PHL unique number 42575

Class meets:               MW 2:30-4:00pm in Parlin 304

Prof's office hours:    MW 12:30-2:00pm in Mezes 3.106

Prof’s email:              jbud@undergroundthomist.org

Prof’s office phone:   232-7229; phone does not record messages; email strongly preferred

Course website:         Canvas

Prof’s website:           The Underground Thomist, http://UndergroundThomist.org

Course policies:           See the FAQ at the “Other Things My Students May Need” section of the Teaching page at my personal website.

 

PREREQUISITES, FLAGS, AND FIELD

 

The course can be taken as either GOV 335M or PHL 342.  It carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  If taken as a government course, enrollment requires six semester hours of lower-division government.  The subfield is Political Theory / Political Philosophy.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

“Natural law” refers to moral law – in particular, the fundamental moral principles that are built into the design of human nature and lie at the roots of conscience.  Natural law thinking is the spine of the Western tradition of ethical and legal thought.  The founders of the American republic also believed in the natural law -- in universal and "self-evident" principles of justice and morality which the Declaration of Independence called "the laws of Nature and of Nature's God."   For generations afterward, most Americans took the reality of natural law for granted.  Thomas Jefferson appealed to it to justify independence; Abraham Lincoln appealed to it to criticize slavery; Martin Luther King appealed to it to criticize racial discrimination. You would hardly guess any of this from the present day, because belief in natural law has come to be viewed as "politically incorrect."  Nevertheless, the tradition of natural law is experiencing a modest renaissance.

 

Is there really a natural law?  What difference does it make to society and politics if there is?  Is it really "natural"?  Is it really "law"?  To consider these questions, we will read a variety of influential works on natural law from the middle ages to the present.  Probably, most of your liberal arts education has implicitly rejected the whole idea, but in this course, for a change, you have an opportunity to hear the other side.

 

We will focus on the classical natural law tradition, not the revisionist version which was popular among the social contract writers.  The first two units of the course focus on the ethical and legal thought of the most important and influential classical natural law thinker in history, Thomas Aquinas.  He is a difficult writer, but we will work through his Treatise on Law carefully and I will provide lots of help.  In the final unit, which is about the continuing influence of the classical natural law tradition, we will read a number of authors including Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Supreme Court Justice John McLean, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, C.S. Lewis, a contemporary theologian, and two contemporary philosophers.

 

GRADING POLICY

 

Unit 1, Foundations of Law:  Analytical outline (25%).

Unit 2, Natural and Human Law:  Take-home essay (25%).

Unit 3, Legacy of the Classical Natural Law Tradition:  Whole-course journal (25%).

Class participation (25%).

 

Absences also affect your grade.  Please read the attendance policy in the Frequently Asked Questions section of my personal scholarly website.

 

I do not use plusses and minuses.

 

TEXTS

 

Even if you prefer to use the PCL Reserve Room or read online, you must bring physical copies of the readings to class, even if only photocopies or printouts.  Electronic devices such as laptops, cellphones, sound recorders, and smart pens must be powered down and stowed away during class.  There are no exceptions except for pacemakers.

 

Required:

 

J. Budziszewski, Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law (Cambridge, 2014).  This is a paperback.

 

Additional shorter readings, which will be made available on Canvas or online.

 

Recommended:

 

J. Budziszewski, Companion to the Commentary (Cambridge, 2014).  This will be available through Canvas.


GOV 335M • Political Philo Of Rousseau

38620 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.210
(also listed as CTI 335)
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This seminar examines one of the most important and historically consequential contributors to the European Enlightenment: Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712–1778). His political theory influenced the French elite that guided the French Revolution as well as the colonial elite that guided the American Revolution. Some of his work championed deeply modernist forms of subjectivity and introspection. In his writings he advocated the education of the whole person for citizenship. As a novelist, he contributed to the genre of the sentimental novel that encouraged the idea of human rights.

Our seminar begins with one of Rousseau’s central questions: For all of its obvious benefits, Western modernity has created at least as many problems as it has solved (the First and Second Discourses). We first examine Rousseau’s political answer (On the Social Contract), then his pedagogical response (Emile or On Education), and finally his “post-political” response (The Reveries of the Solitary Walker).

Texts to be purchased (to coordinate our work in seminar, please purchase these particular ISBNs): 

First and Second Discourses. 1964 [1750; 1754]. St. Martin’s. ISBN 978-0-312-694401

On the Social Contract.1978 [1756/1762]. St. Martin’s. ISBN 978-0-312-694463

Emile or On Education .1979 [1762]. Basic Books. ISBN 978-0-465-019311

The Reveries of the Solitary Walker.1979 [1782] Penguin. ISBN 9780140443639


GOV 335M • The US And 3rd-World Feminisms

38630 • Hooker, Juliet
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as AFR 372C, WGS 340)
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GOV 335M

 

U.S. and Third World Feminisms

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. It is concerned with theintersections of gender, race, sexuality and social class, an analytical feminist perspective developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the West, such as liberal, Marxist, radical feminism, and standpoint feminism. We then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by U.S. women of color and third world feminists. We examine debates about the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, feminist politics, veiling, etc.

 

Grading:

Final grades (using a plus/minus scale) will be assessed based on class participation (20%), short papers (25% each for a total of 50%), and final paper (30%).

 

Required Texts:

  • bell hooks, Feminism is for Everybody (South End Press, 2000).
  • Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero (Zed Books, 2008).
  • Caryl Phillips, Cambridge (Vintage, 1993).
  • Angela Y. Davis, Women, Race, and Class (Vintage, 1983).
  • John Stuart Mill, “The Subjection of Women,” On Liberty and Other Essays (Oxford, 1998), p. 471-472, 502-556.*
  • Frederick Engels, “The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State,” The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton & Co., 1978), p. 734-751.*
  • Andrea Dworkin, “Pornography,” and Catharine Mackinnon, “Towards a Feminist Theory of the State,” Feminisms, p. 325-327, 351-358.*
  • The Combahee River Collective, “A Black Feminist Statement,” Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology (Kitchen

Table/Women of Color, 1983), p. 272-278.

  • Gloria Anzaldúa, “La Conciencia de la Mestiza: Towards a New Consciousness,” Borderlands/La Frontera: The New

Mestiza (Spinsters/Aunt Lute Book Co., 1987), p. 77-98.*

  • Audre Lorde, "Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power," in Sister Outsider, p. 53-59.*
  • Lama Abu Odeh, “Post-Colonial Feminism and the Veil: Thinking the Difference,” Feminist Review 43 (1993): p. 26-37; 

GOV 335N • Southern Political History

38635 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 420
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SOUTHERN POLITICAL HISTORY

 

Required Reading

 

Steve Bickerstaff, Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom DeLay, University of Texas, 2007.

Earl Black and Merle Black, The Rise of Southern Republicans, Harvard University

 Press, 2002.

William J. Cooper, Jr. and Thomas E. Terrill, The American South: A History,

         Volumes I and II, Fourth Edition, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009

 

Description

 

The course will review the political history of the American South from the 1780s to the present. In the first part of the course, we review the events which transformed the South from a region of progressive nationalism from the 1780s to the 1810s to a region of defensive sectionalism from the 1820s to the 1860s. Touching briefly on the Civil War, we then take up Reconstruction, “Redemption,” and the agrarian movement of the late 19th century, followed by the period of the “Solid South” in the first half of the 20th century. Next we examine the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, followed by the rise of southern Republicans in the late 20th century. Lastly, we examine Texas’s congressional redistricting in 2003.

 

Exams and Grades

 

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. The exams are not cumulative. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 points on all three exams. 


GOV 337M • Law & Democracy Latin Amer

38645 • Brinks, Daniel
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as LAS 337M)
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Gov 337 LAS 337 course description

 

Law and Democracy in Latin America

This course explores many of the challenges to the rule of law across Latin America, and their connection to democracy. We will begin by examining the relationship between law and democracy, then look at a series of issues that illustrate the strength or weakness of the rule of law in the region. Rather than focusing on one country at a time or a few countries in depth, we will use events and systems in various countries as illustrations of important themes. We will then look at the possible consequences of these challenges for democracy in the region, and possible solutions. The course materials will at times cover difficult and controversial topics such as violence, human rights violations, and corruption.

The readings are a collection of recent research on these issues and require the students to engage critically with the arguments presented. We will test authors’ claims against the evidence they present, challenge the logic of their arguments, and question their conclusions. The readings will often be challenging, including both qualitative and quantitative analyses, and containing both historical and more philosophical discussions of law and democracy in the region. Some of the readings are also quite long. Students are expected to come to class prepared and participate in the discussions. I will occasionally test students’ preparation with brief, unannounced written questions.

By the end of the semester you will have acquired some basic information about Latin American legal systems, and some basic concepts about the different ways courts work in that part of the world. More importantly, however, you will have a greater understanding of what a robust democracy should look like, and where different countries fall short. You should be able to engage in a discussion about the role courts and laws do play, should play and can play in the (democratic) political systems of Latin America, and their potential for improvement.


GOV 337M • Pol/Eco/Socty Cont Brazil

38650 • Hunter, Wendy
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

Course Description for Politics, Economy, and Society of Contemporary Brazil

GOV 337 M

 

This course will examine the major economic, political, and sociological developments of Brazil in the 20th and 21st centuries. It will concentrate on the broad themes of state-led industrialization and economic management; the alternation of authoritarian politics and democratic government; and the multiple problems brought on by high levels of socio-economic inequality. In addition to the many challenges that Brazil faces, the course will also examine the many opportunities the country has. 

The political topics to be covered include the institutions that allow elites to retain power and privilege, and those that foster corruption.  Economic topics include recent moves toward increased globalization and the tapping of Amazonian resources.  Sociological subjects include the high rates of crime and related problems that have arisen from the pursuit of a development model that has led to extreme concentrations of wealth and record levels of income inequality. The topic of race will also be covered as it relates to economics, politics, and sociology.  Brazil’s place in the world and its historical efforts to enhance its position in the region will also be treated.

The course assumes no prior knowledge or prerequisites.   

 

Two books are required and are available for purchase at the University bookstore.  All other readings will be made available on Canvas.    

 

Required Items for Purchase

 

Skidmore, Thomas E. 2009. Brazil: Five Centuries of Change. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

 

Bailey, Stanley. 2009. Legacies of Race: Identities, Attitudes, and Politics in Brazil.            

Stanford: Stanford University Press.

 

 Assignment:                                                   Grade Distribution                

Class participation                                           10 percent                     

First in-class examination                                10 percent                                 

Second in-class examination                            20 percent                               

Third in-class examination                               20 percent                                 

Essay on film                                                  10 percent                               

Final take home essay                                     30 percent


GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

38640 • Greene, Kenneth
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 201
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

GOV 337M / LAS 337M: The Politics of Mexico

 (Spring 2017)

 

Professor Kenneth Greene

Office: 4.112 Batts

TA:

Office: Batts 1.118

Class meets:

232-7206; kgreene@austin.utexas.edu

Email:

Unique codes:

http://kgreene.webhost.utexas.edu/

Office hours:

Office hours:

GOV 337M 

LAS  337M 

 

This course analyzes Mexico’s 20th century political and economic development, with a peek at current events. Why did Mexico experience both political stability and economic growth until the 1970s while other Latin American countries endured brutal military regimes? What accounts for Mexico’s severe economic crises of 1982 and 1994? Why did the PRI lose in 2000 after 71 years in power? How “democratic” is Mexico’s new democracy? The first portion of the course examines Mexico’s post-Revolutionary politics, the characteristics of the national political regime during the classic period of stability with economic growth, and the tumultuous political and economic environment from the 1970s to the end of the century. This material will be presented chronologically, but rather than a descriptive history, we will focus on explaining political and economic outcomes. Subsequently, we will examine key themes in Mexico’s new fully competitive democracy.

 

You have two grading options for this course. Option 1 consists of three exams (two in-class midterms and one take-home final essay).  Option 2 consists of two in-class midterm exams and one research paper. 

 

Research Paper for Option 2.  This will be an independent and largely self-directed 10-page research paper focused on a particular event in contemporary Mexican politics (i.e., after 1911).  As a political science paper it should seek to explain why the event occurred.  Answering a “why” question requires reviewing existing plausible arguments and making your own.  The paper should include, but be more than, a simple description of the event.  As a research paper, it should involve research using scholarly books and journal articles beyond those assigned on the syllabus.  Completing the research paper will require more work than taking the final exam, but it should be more rewarding.  Following the rules of citation and attribution is mandatory and plagiarism will earn a failing grade in the course and referral to the University for disciplinary action. Please review the university’s plagiarism guidelines at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php.

 

Students who plan to write a research paper must submit a one-page statement of research intent by October 15.  The statement should include a clear summary of the event to be explained and the actors involved.  It should also include at least three citations of sources you have already read for your research.  Researching and writing this one-pager will take real work, so budget about a week.  If the research topic is determined to be infeasible, students will have one week to hand in a revised statement for which the same rules apply. Students who pursue this option should plan on meeting with me to discuss the topic and progress, starting before the one-pager is due. Students that do not hand in the statement by October 15 or whose proposal is not accepted after two rounds will follow Option 1.

 

This course will use +/- grading and will not be curved. The final grade for the course will be determined as follows:

Option 1:                                              Option 2:                         

Midterm 1                     30%                 Midterm 1                     30%

Midterm 2                     30%                 Midterm 2                     30%

“Final” Essay                30%                 Research Paper           30%

Weekly write-ups            8%                 Weekly write-ups            8%

Participation in class       2%                 Participation in class       2%

 

Weekly write-ups. Submit a one-page (typed, normal margins, normal font) digest of the week’s readings, due by the end of class each Thursday, with no late assignments and no e-mail assignments accepted. You will earn up to 1% of your final course grade each week for a write-up and only one is allowed per week. You can earn a maximum of 8% toward your final grade, meaning that although you are encouraged to complete more than eight weekly write-ups, you need only complete eight for full credit.  The write-ups should be brief synopses of the theme/issues dealt with in the required course readings, not a summary of each individual reading and not a commentary based on lecture only. Try to bring the ideas together, using the lecture titles as a guide. Partial credit may be given so you will have to put some thought into this; however, it should not require more than 30 minutes of work after you complete the readings. Completing these assignments will do wonders for reading comprehension and exam preparation. As such, I view them as a crucial element of the course.

 

Participation: 2% of the final grade is based on participation in class. Although the course is structured as a lecture, I try to involve students each day. If you are present and engaged, and speak up some, you will earn full credit.

 

Make-up exams.  Early final exams will not be given. One midterm exam may be made-up if missed for medical reasons under the following conditions: 1) You must have a note signed by a doctor; 2) You must contact me before the exam by e-mail, telephone, or in-person unless you are unconscious; 3) The make-up exam must take place as soon as possible after the originally scheduled exam and before the graded exams are handed back to the class. Once the graded exams are handed back, a make-up exam will not be possible.

 

Extra credit.  The course has plenty of regular credit options.

 

Academic Flags.  This course fulfills the Cultural Diversity (CD) flag.

 

Spanish-language option for some readings: Students may substitute selected Spanish-language readings available for purchase in an optional packet for the English-language readings in the main packet. See me if you are interested in this option. All written assignments must be in English.

 

Class etiquette – my responsibilities. I will arrive on time, deliver lectures with enthusiasm and energy, encourage you to ask questions, think critically, and engage with the material. I will make myself available for questions and consultations during office hours and by appointment. I will be respectful of you and of the class.

 

Class etiquette – your responsibilities. I expect that you want to learn. Principally, this means that you engage the lectures and readings with enthusiasm and energy. I encourage you to wrestle with the material, criticize it and my lectures, and ask questions. In addition, I expect that you will arrive on time, complete assignments on time, and show respect for the teaching assistants, your fellow students, and the learning process. Please turn off your cell phones when you enter the classroom. If you use a computer during class either commit to keeping only a word processing program open or sit in the back row.

 

Economic hardship: No student should be unable to take this course due to economic hardship. If you cannot afford to purchase the required course materials and cannot utilize the reserve copies at PCL, please see me.

 

Students with disabilities: Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259, http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 

Religious holidays. Students who will miss an assignment due to recognized religious holidays should let me know as early as possible so that we can re-schedule that assignment.

 

Communication with the Instructor and TA: In addition to scheduled office hours, we will gladly make special appointments, when our schedules allow, if you have courses, a work schedule, or child/eldercare duties that conflict with our office hours. We can be reached by phone and by e-mail. Please be aware that we may not check e-mail in the evenings and on weekends. In addition, it is our policy not to respond to e-mail that does not use correct English (curmudgeonly, I know, but text messaging abbreviations have begun to show up in exams and papers).

 

Prior experience indicates that students cannot satisfactorily complete assignments without attending every lecture.

 

Required Readings:

  • Kenneth F Greene, Why Dominant Parties Lose: Mexico’s Democratization in Comparative Perspective (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), available for purchase at the Coop. I will donate 100% of profits I receive from Coop to the UT undergraduate scholarship fund.
  • Other readings will be uploaded to Canvas.

GOV 341M • Decision Theory

38660 • Enelow, James
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WAG 420
show description

DECISION THEORY

 

Required Reading

 

Joel Watson, STRATEGY: An Introduction to Game Theory. 2nd edition. W.W. Norton, 2008.

 

Below each reading are a chapter number and a list of exercises, which can be found at the end of the chapter. It is strongly recommended that these exercises be attempted before they are done in class. Parts of the Appendix (App) are also assigned. If you bought the 3rd edition of Watson, see me for the assignments.

 

Course Description

 

This is an applied math course and carries the Quantitative Reasoning flag. It is assumed that you are able to do simple calculations with fractions or decimals, solve linear equations in one or two variables, solve quadratic equations, and understand sets, functions, probability, expected value, and infinite series. If you are unfamiliar with any or all of these topics, please seek my help outside of class.

 

In addition, this course is supported by Peer-Led Undergraduate Studying. PLUS study groups provide an opportunity to collaboratively practice skills and knowledge you need for success in this course. Feel free to attend any study group at any point in the semester; more information on times and locations will be available through Canvas or announced in class. Go to wikis.utexas.edu/display/PLUS or Facebook to find out more about PLUS.

 

Grades

 

The first two exams will have about 16 to 20 questions, the third 14 to 16 questions. Each quiz will have 2 or 3 questions. Each question is worth one point. The points you receive on the three exams and your highest-scoring quiz are added together to determine your total score. These scores will be curved to determine your final grade, approximating the following distribution: 30% A’s, 35% B’s, 20% C’s, 10% D’s and 5% F’s. Plus and minus grades will be given for total scores falling just above or below the boundary lines between grades. After the boundary lines have been determined, the score a student receives on his second-highest quiz will be added to his total score as extra credit to determine his final grade. Extra credit can raise a student’s grade at most to the next highest grade level (e.g. from a B+ to an A-).


GOV 342N • Public Choice

38665 • Roberts, Brian
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 214
show description

Public Choice 

GOV 342N 

Instructor Information 

Name: Professor Brian Roberts 

Office: BAT 4.156 

Phone: 232-7243 

Email: roberts@utexas.edu 

 

Course Description 

Public Choice describes a way of thinking about politics. It starts with the silly assumption that people are rational – people generally know what they want and make choices accordingly – and explores its implications for the likely decisions of such political actors as voters, politicians, bureaucrats, lobbyists, etc.. These decisions include everything from whether to vote in an election to how to design a constitution. One of the main objectives of the course is to assess the degree to which what we actually observe about politics is consistent with the assumption that people are rational. 

Because we explore how & why people make decisions, part of the course is devoted to developing some of the tools needed to understand decision making. Central to the required toolset are the concepts and mechanics of Game Theory – the theory of how people make decisions when they take into account the likely responses of others to those decisions, which is pretty much always the case when it comes to politics. So, be prepared for a lot of clear thinking and a little bit of algebra. 

The goals of the course are to equip you with some critical ideas and tools for understanding the decisions of political actors. If you want to change the way politics works then it is essential that you understand at the most fundamental level how it works. Nothing is more fundamental to politics than the choices people make. If you believe that politics is largely driven by cold, heartless, self-serving decisions then this course offers essential insight. 

Required Books 

 Heckelman. 2004. Readings in Public Choice Economics 

 Leeson. 2009. The Invisible Hook 

 North. 1981. Structure and Change in Economic History 

 Reksulak et al. 2013. The Elgar Companion to Public Choice 

 

Additional Readings 

Additional readings will be either be posted on the course Canvas site or made available through Electronic Reserves at the General Library. 

 

Grading 

 Midterm Exam 30% 

 Final Exam 50% 

 Homework 20% 

 


GOV 347K • Gov And Politics Of South Asia

38670 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 426
(also listed as ANS 347K)
show description

Course  Description

GOV 347K, Unique 38670

Spring 2017

*********************************************************

 

Instructor: Xuecheng Liu

Bldg / Room: SZB 426

Days & Time: TTH 9:30-11:00

Office:            Tel. 512-471-5121

Office Hours: Tue. 14:00-17:00 or by appointment

Email: xcliu_ut@yahoo.com

 

Government and Politics of South Asia ( GC)

 

South Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean and on land by West Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. This sub-region comprises eight developing countries—Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. South Asia is home to well over one fifth of the world's population, making it the most populous geographical region in the world.

 

Since the end of the Cold War, South Asia has become a focal point of growing international attention and concern by nuclear proliferation, the rise of Islamic militancy and the anti-terror war, the emergence of India as a global power, and regional effort for cooperation. South Asian nations have also been experiencing a profound political evolution of democratization.

 

This course provides students with a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the comparative political study of the eight nations of South Asia. Organized in parallel fashion to facilitate cross-national comparison, the course sections on each nation address several topical areas of inquiry: political culture and heritage, government structure and institutions, political parties and leaders, and social conflict and resolution. India, the preeminent power of the subcontinent, will receive more attention. In terms of the international relations of the region, this course will address several predominant region-wide issues: the India–Pakistan conflict, the rise of Islamic militancy and the AfPak war, and regional cooperation under the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC).

 

Prerequisites:

Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

 

Grading Policy:

Two mid-term exams (60%). 

One short term paper of 6-7 pages (30%, first draft 15% and final draft 15%)

Overall class participation/attendance may be reflected in a plus or minus up to l0 points in determining the course grade.

 

There will be no makeup exams for the mid-term exams. Any student missing a mid-term exam with a verified medical excuse or for an official university event with a letter from the responsible university authority may choose to do an alternative assignment.

 

We will adopt UT's new "plus & minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage scores will not be noted on your transcript.

 

Letter grade                                                    GPA                                                     Percentage Score

 

A                                                                                  4.00                                                     94-100 %

A-                                                                                3.67                                                     90-93

B+                                                                                3.33                                                     87-89

B                                                                                  3.00                                                     84-86

B-                                                                                2.67                                                     80-83

C+                                                                                2.33                                                     77-79

C                                                                                  2.00                                                     74-76

C-                                                                                 1.67                                                     70-73

D+                                                                                1.33                                                     67-69

D                                                                                  1.00                                                     64-66

D-                                                                                0.67                                                     60-63

F                                                                                  0.00                                                     59 & below

===================================================

 

Textbooks:

 

The textbooks are all electronic resources and students can read them online or download them by purchase. We will just choose several chapters from each book as reading assignments.

 

  1. Robert C. Oberst, et al, Government and Politics in South Asia, 7th Edition

New York: Westview Press, 2013. (Electronic Resource) [GPSA]

  1. T.V. Paul ed., South Asia’s Weak States, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford Security Studies, 2010. (Electronic Resource) [SAWS]
  2. Lawrence Saez, The South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC),

Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012. (Electronic Resource)

  1. During the course of the semester, additional latest articles on South Asia may be added and distributed as required readings in class.

 

References:

  1. Paul R. Brass ed., Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal (Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2010).

GOV 351G • Critics Of Modern Liberalism

38675 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.122
(also listed as CTI 322)
show description

GOV 351G; CTI 322

Unique # 33950; 38675

 

CRITICS OF MODERN LIBERALISM

 

Devin Stauffer

 

Spring 2017

 

Course Description

 

This course examines the writings of a wide range of thinkers who have reflected deeply on the strengths and weaknesses of the most powerful political doctrine in the world today: liberal democracy.  We will begin by studying the original case for modern liberalism as it was presented by John Locke, the great architect of the modern liberal form of government and the modern liberal way of life.  After studying Locke, we will look at the Declaration of Independence and The Federalist Papers to consider the ways in which Lockean principles informed the American Founding.  After this introduction, we will look at a set of thinkers who range from friends of liberal democracy who have worries about its dangers to hostile critics of liberal democracy who argue for its destruction.  The “friendly critics” will include authors such as Mill and Tocqueville.  The hostile critics will span the political spectrum, from Marx on the Left to Nietzsche on the Right.  These authors raise far-reaching questions about liberalism: Do the principles of freedom and equality promote an isolating individualism that dissolves communal bonds?  Is liberalism tied to an oppressive capitalist economic system?  Has the rise of liberal democracy fostered mediocrity and complacency?  Finally, we will conclude by reflecting on the health of liberal democracy today.

 

Prerequisite

 

Completion of at least thirty hours of coursework.

 

Texts

 

Locke, Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration (Yale)

Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, The Federalist Papers (Signet)

Mill, On Liberty (Penguin)

Tocqueville, Democracy in America (Chicago)

Marx and Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader (Norton)

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil (Vintage)

Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Penguin) 

Course Supplement (available at Jenn’s Copying, 2518 Guadalupe)

 

Grading

 

Grades will be calculated by one of these two methods:

 

With the optional paper                                   Without the optional paper

 

Paper: 25%                                                   First Exam: 30%

First exam: 20%                                            Final Exam: 45%

Final exam: 30%                                           Attendance and Participation: 15%

Attendance and Participation: 15%                  Quizzes: 10%  

Quizzes: 10%                                               


GOV 351L • Morality And Politics

38680 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 214
(also listed as CTI 325)
show description

MORALITY AND POLITICS SPRING 2016

 

Do the ends justify the means? If they don’t, what does? When the moral and the expedient conflict, which one should you choose? Is revenge just? Is it a good idea? What, if any, are legitimate grounds for starting a war? Is it always better that the truth come out in politics? Should politicians keep their promises? Is loyalty to our friends and family more important than the common good? What is the relationship between moral virtue and both political success and personal happiness? We will examine the ways in which great thinkers both ancient and modern have grappled with these questions. About half of the course will be devoted to examining the arguments that political philosophers—Aristotle, Cicero, and Machiavelli—make about the role of morality in politics. We will spend the other half of the course examining moral dilemmas, and how various characters resolve them, in plays and novels by authors such as Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Addison, and Ibsen.

 

This course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations.

 

 Required Texts:

 

1. Euripides II. By Euripides. Complete Greek Tragedies Series. University of Chicago.

 

2. Euripides IV. By Euripides. Complete Greek Tragedies Series. University of Chicago.

 

3. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. By Aristotle. Translated by Robert C. Bartlett and Susan Collins. University of Chicago.

 

4. The Prince. By Niccolo Machiavelli. Translated by Harvey C. Mansfield. University of Chicago Press.

 

5. The Theban Plays. By Sophocles. Translated by Peter Ahrensdorf and Thomas L. Pangle. Agora.

 

6. Cato: A Tragedy and Selected Essays. By Joseph Addison. Edited by Christine Dunn Henderson and Mark E. Yellin. Liberty Fund.

 

7. Politics. By Aristotle. Translated by Ernest Barker. Oxford University Press.

 

8. Julius Caesar. By William Shakespeare. Bantam Classics.

 

9. Darkness at Noon. By Arthur Koestler. Bantam Books.

 

10. Ibsen: Four Major Plays, Volume II. By Henrik Ibsen. Signet Classics.

 

11. On Duties. By Marcus Tullius Cicero. Edited by M. T. Griffin and E. M. Atkins. Cambridge Texts.

 

Grading and Requirements:

 

First Exam: 30%

Second Exam:  30%

Paper: 30%

Class Participation, Including Pop Quizzes: 10%

 

Attendance is required.


GOV 355M • Human Behav As Rational Actn

38685 • Lin, Tse
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 286
show description

Semester Spring 2017

GOV 355M – Title: Human Behavior as Rational Action

 

Writing Flag & Quantitative Reasoning Flag

 

Unique           Days   Time                                       Bldg/Room     Instructor

38685              TTH    11:00-12:30pm                        BEN 1.126      LIN

 

Course Description

 

The term “rational action” as used in the economic approach is generally equated with maximizing behavior. Individual human agents are assumed to have consistent and stable preferences over alternatives each of which is assigned some “utility.” Maximization entails choosing the course of action that yields the highest expected utility. One is rational to the extent one uses the best means to achieve one’s goals.

 

In this course we will learn a variety of social and political models based on such a notion of individual rationality and to investigate the collective consequences that can be logically inferred from its assumptions. In particular, we will find through the “Prisoner’s Dilemma,” the “Tragedy of the Commons,” and the “Free-Rider Problem” a contrast between rational man and irrational society. Self-serving behavior of individuals does not usually lead to collectively satisfactory results.

 

So this course is about the stories of the Prisoners, the Herdsmen, and the Free-Riders. As a matter of fact, we will show that the Dilemma, the Tragedy, and the Problem share essentially the same mathematical structure, and hence they are essentially the same story - a story about human destiny. We will also introduce the various approaches that have been proposed for the escape from such a destiny.

 

Prerequisites

 

Upper-division standing required.

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Grading Policy

 

1. First Paper (6-8 pages): 25%                      2. Second Paper (7-9 pages): 25%

3. Third Paper (8-10 pages): 30%                   4. Presentation: 10%

5. Attendance: 10%

 

Texts

 

1. Thomas C. Schelling (1978), Micromotives and Macrobehavior (Norton).

2. Robert Axelrod (1984), The Evolution of Cooperation (Basic Books).

3. Dennis Chong (1991), Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement (Chicago).

4. Elinor Ostrom (1990), Governing the Commons (Cambridge).

5. Howard Rheingold (2002), Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution (Basic Books).


GOV 357M • Civil Liberties

38700 • Perry, H
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.112
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Structure Of Indiv Liberties

38705 • Jacobsohn, Gary
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.130
(also listed as CTI 326)
show description

Gov 357 M – The Structure of Individual Liberties

 

The focus of this course is on the ways in which the Constitution protects individual rights as it accommodates the often competing claims of groups, communities, and the state. While the emphasis is on the United States Supreme Court, the class will also look at how other constitutional polities address similar issues.  We examine rights under the Constitution as they have evolved and been defined through judicial interpretation during periods of crisis and normalcy.  Some of the topics to be considered include: equal protection under law, substantive and procedural due process, freedoms of speech and religion, and privacy. Under these rubrics are to be found such issues as affirmative action, capital punishment, hate speech, property rights, abortion, and gender discrimination. Much of the reading is of Supreme Court opinions that highlight the politics of constitutional development.

 

1)    No prerequisites

2)    Hour Exam (30%), paper (30%), final exam (40%)

            

Texts:

Donald P. Kommers, John E. Finn, and Gary J. Jacobsohn. eds., AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: LIBERTY, COMMUNITY, AND THE BILL OF RIGHTS (Vol. 2, 3rd ed.)

Michael Dorf., ed., CONSTITUTIONAL LAW STORIES

 

 

 

 

 


GOV 357M • Supreme Court And Public Pol

38696-38699 • Powe, Lucas
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM TNH 2.114
show description

The course will discuss the major decisions of the Supreme Court beginning with Brown v. Board of Education (1954) and ending with the cases decided in the Spring of  2017.  The discussion will focus on how the Court and its Justices interact with American politics and American culture, with emphasis on the former.  Finally the course will discuss the individuals who are fortunate enough to be Justices and how their backgrounds influence decisions. 


GOV 358 • Introduction To Public Policy

38710 • Rivera, Michael
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.102
show description

Rivera, spring 2017

Course number:  GOV   358  

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY

 

Description:

This course examines contemporary public policy issues from the perspective of a policy analyst. Students will learn the basic tools of policy analysis and apply them to a variety of issues and proposed policy solutions.  The course has two objectives: (1) To train students how to produce objective policy analysis, and; (2) To help students understand why public policy decisions often diverge from the recommendations made by policy analysts.  In other words, this is a course about both policy analysis and the politics behind policymaking.

 

Students will learn that policies often have unintended consequences.  Students will also learn about the challenges policy analysts face when they attempt to use objective public policy metrics to analyze policies that often have moral or symbolic frames.

 

Assignments and grading: 3 exams; 3 written assignment; in-class participation (this is subject to change slightly)

 

Texts:

-Wilson, Carter A. (2013) Public Policy: Continuity and Change  2nd Edition, Waveland Press

-Eugene Bardach, A Practical Guide to Policy Analysis (CQ Press), 4th ed. recommended.    

-Additional readings accessible via Canvas.

 

 

Prerequisites: 6 semester hours of lower division coursework in Government

 

Flags: WRITCRSE; INDPINQY


GOV 360N • America As A Global Power

38714 • Popescu, Ionut
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 105
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Causes Of War

38720 • Wolford, Michael
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 201
(also listed as REE 335)
show description

Prerequisites:

Upper-division standing and 6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government

Course description:

This course explores cutting-edge research on the political origins of war, adopting a scientific approach to argumentation and evidence.

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on three exams (60%) and a combination of quizzes and short writing assignments throughout the semester (40%).

Texts:

Stueck, William. 2004. Rethinking the Korean War Princeton University Press.

Keegan, John. 2004. The Iraq War Vintage.


GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38712 • Dorn, Edwin
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Global Governance

38725 • Chapman, Terrence
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420
show description

GOV 360N  Global Governance

 

Description:

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states design and agree to international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.

Readings:

Jeffery Freiden, David Lake, and Ken Schultz. 2015. World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions. W.W. Norton and Norton & Co., Inc.  Third Edition.

Other readings made available electronically through the library’s subscriptions to news and academic periodicals.

Grading:

25% expert discussion leading/reaction paper

25% class participation

25% exam 1

25% exam 2

Prerequisites: upper division standing


GOV 360N • Terrorism/Counterterrorism

38730 • Findley, Michael
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

No prerequisites

 

 

This course introduces the topic of terrorism and addresses the core ideas in studies of terror-

ism. We examine in detail the primary causes of terrorist acts committed both by opposition

and government forces as well as counterterrorist measures taken by states and international

organizations. We also focus on common misunderstandings of terrorism, such as the idea that

terrorism is a group ideology or group characteristic rather than a political act. Further, we

move beyond a narrow focus on Islamic terrorism, which seems to dominate the public discourse,

and consider many varieties of terrorism over time and throughout the world.

 

Readings emails, two assignments, and two exams

 

 Understanding Terrorism

Challenges, Perspectives, and Issues (5th edition)


GOV 360N • The Two Koreas And The US

38715 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.118
(also listed as AAS 325, ANS 361, ANT 324L, HIS 364G)
show description

Description:

This course will examine the production, distribution, and consumption of East Asian popular culture. Specific topics include Hong Kong cinema, Japanese animation, Japanese trendy dramas, Korean television dramas, and K-pop music. Noting the “globalization” phenomenon, this course will address what has caused the increasing visibility of East Asian cultural products outside of the region. The growing recognition of East Asian pop culture around the globe, however, has also accompanied by more vibrant circulations of the cultural products and interactions among recipients within the region. Therefore, this course will take the globalization of popular culture as an analytical lens through which to reflect modernity, tensions of (trans)nationalism, urbanization, gender politics, and identity formations in East Asia.


GOV 365L • Asian Rgnlism/Multilat Coop

38755 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Course Description

GOV 365L, Unique 38755

Spring 2017

***********************************************

 

Instructor: Xuecheng Liu

Bldg / Room: PAR 101

Days & Time: TTH 12:30-14:00

Office      Office Phone: 512-471-5121

Email: xcliu_ut@yahoo.com

 

PREREQUISITE: 6 SEMESTER HOURS OF LOWER-DIVISION COURSEWORK IN GOVERNMENT, INCLUDES CROSS-CULTURAL CONTENT.

 

     Asian Regionalism and Multilateral Cooperation

                   (GC and WR)

 

 

Asia’s rise as a region will shape the future world order. Asian regionalism as a vitally important dimension of Asia’s rise has attracted critical attention of Asia experts and policy makers. This course first addresses the nature, functional principles, leadership, and policy making process of contemporary Asian regionalism in comparison with the experiences of European integration. We also explore the linkage between the momentum of Asian integration and contemporary Asian nationalism. Then we will introduce and assess the origins and its developments of leading regional cooperation mechanisms: ASEAN, Six-Party Talks (Northeast Asian Security Cooperation Architecture), SAARC, and SCO. Finally, in terms of engaging with the Asian multilateral cooperation we will discuss polices and strategies of major powers, particularly, the United States and China.

 

This course contains four main parts:

1, Comparison between Asian Regionalism and European Experiences: Concept, principles, leadership, and policy making process;

2. Asian Regionalism and Asian Nationalism: explore the linkage between the emerging Asian cooperation and contemporary Asian nationalism, focusing on Chinese nationalism, Indian nationalism, and Japanese nationalism;

3. Introduce four most important cooperation mechanisms: Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Southeast Asia; Six-Party talks (Northeast Asian Security Cooperation Architecture) in Northeast Asia; South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) in South Asia; and Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) in Central Asia;

4. Major Powers' Responses to Asian Cooperation: Focus on American and Chinese Strategies for engaging with Asian Integration and multilateral cooperation.

 

Grading Policy:

 

  1. Two take-home essays (6-7 pages) 40%
  2. One 12-page term paper, 50%

   Note: Writing of the term paper includes the paper proposal, the first draft

(15 points), and the second (revised) draft (25 points), and the final draft

(10 points).

  1. Class participation, 10%

 

Textbooks:

 

1. Frost, Ellen L., Asia’s New Regionalism ANR

  (Boulder. Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publications, 2008)

  ISBN 978-1-58826-579-1 [Selected chapters distributed by email]

2. Shambaugh, David, Power Shift: China and Asia’s New DynamicsPS

  (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006) [Electronic bk.]

3. Aggarwal, Vind K.,Asia’s New Institutional Architecture ANIA

Dordrecht: Springer, 2007. [Electronic bk.]

  1. Saez, Lawrence, The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation

(SAARC): An emerging collaboration Architecture, Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012. [Electronic resource]

5. Pempel, T. J., Regionalism, Economic Integration and Security in Asia (REISA),

  Northamptom, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing Inc., 2011. [Electronic Resource]

6. Mahbubani, Kishore, The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East (NAH),New York: PublicAffairs, 2009. [Electronic resource]

7. Webber, Douglas, Regional Integration in East Asia and Europe. Hoboken: Taylor & Francis Ltd., 2004. [Electronic resource].

8. Ikenberry, G. John, Regional Integration and Institutionalization: Comparing Asia and Europe (RII), Shoukadoh: Research Institute, Aoyama Gakuin University, 2012. [Selected Chapters distributed by email]

9. Selected chapters of the recently published books and journal articles distributed by

  email.


GOV 365L • Ethnic Polit In Taiwan/Asia

38745 • Liu, Amy
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 201
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Ethnic Politics in Taiwan and Asia

Amy Liu, Department of Government

GOV 365L

 

 

Prerequisites

Students must have taken a foundational course in government or Asian studies. The course also assumes basic knowledge of world history.

 

 

Course Description

This course is primarily about ethnic politics in Taiwan. We begin with a study of different theories of ethnic politics. Then we will draw on these theories to understand how the Taiwanese state transitioned from being an authoritarian regime – where an ethnic minority repressed the majority – to one that is democratic and accommodating of even the most marginalized minorities. We will conclude by situating the Taiwanese experience against those of its neighbors.

 

 

Grading Criteria

25%     Weekly Quiz

25%     Midterm Examination

25%     Final Examination

25%     Data-Based Paper

 

Books

  • Brown, Michael E. and Sumit Ganguly. 2003. Fighting Words: Language Policy and Ethnic Relations in Asia. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. ISBN-13: 978-0262025355
  • Fell, Dafydd. 2012. Government and Politics in Taiwan. New York, NY: Routledge. ISBN-13: 978-0415575423

GOV 365L • Political Economy Of Asia

38750 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.208
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Spring 2017

Political Economy of Asia

GOV 365L/ANS 361 (Writing Flag)

Patricia Maclachlan

TTH: 2:00-3:30 (MEZ 1.208)

 

 

 

This intensive reading and writing course explores key topics in the political-economic development of modern Japan, China and South Korea: the sources of the region’s “miraculous” economic growth rates; the theory of the “Developmental State” and the impact of industrial policy on development; the sources and significance of East Asia’s distinctive corporations (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the impact of globalization on the region and the processes of economic reform; and the social consequences of East Asian growth models.  We examine these and related topics with reference to both other regions in the world and relevant political science theories.  

 

In keeping with the “writing flag,” the course will prioritize the development of advanced research and writing skills.

 

Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

 

Grading Policy 

1.  Quizzes on readings (approximately 6):  15%

2.  Two take-home essay assignments (4-5 pages each):  20%

3.  Research paper (approx. 10 pages) in 2 drafts:  40%

4.  Final exam:  25%

 

Texts

There are no required texts for this course. All readings will be posted on Canvas.


GOV 365N • Authoritarianism

38760 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.216
(also listed as MES 341)
show description

Authoritarianism (GOV and MES) - upper division with writing flag and independent inquiry flags

 

Description:

This upper-division course is designed for students in Government, Middle Eastern Studies, and other fields who want to learn about the phenomenon of modern authoritarianism and how scholars study it. Authoritarianism is often defined, minimally, as any form of government short of electoral democracy. Some specialists and laypersons, however, consider authoritarianism not as the absence of democracy but as a system that violates individual liberty in the pursuit of some competing political goal. This course will address various forms of authoritarianism, from labor repression in the Appalachian Valley of the United States of America to the absolutist monarchies of the Middle East. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge of current theories and debates about authoritarianism, especially in political science.

 

Grades:

4 short quizzes (20%); 4  writing assignments (60%); End of semester presentation (20%)

 

Texts:

Course packet with significant articles and book sections on authoritarianism.


GOV 365N • Eur Union/Regional Integrtn

38789 • Somer-Topcu, Zeynep
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 301
(also listed as EUS 348)
show description

GOV365N: European Union/ Regional Integration

Spring 2017

PAR 301

T-Th 12:30-2:00pm

 

Professor: Zeynep Somer-Topcu, PhD

zsomer@utexas.edu

 

Office: BAT 3.124

Office hours: T-Th 2:30pm-4pm, or by appointment

 

Introduction

 

From the European Coal and Steel Community of six countries, the European Union has grown to be composed of 27 member states. It is governed by an ever-growing and strengthening set of political institutions. Member states share common economic and social policies, a common foreign and security policy, and (for some member states at least) a common currency, the Euro. They are also together suffering through the current economic recession.

 

This course provides students with a general introduction to the politics, history, governing structure, and policies of the European Union. The course begins with an overview of the theories and the evolution of European integration. We will then look at how the EU is governed, and where the power lies. Finally, we will survey important European-level policies and issues, and conclude with a discussion on the future of the EU.

 

By the end of the semester, students should be familiar with:

 

a)     The history of the European Union starting with the early history after the World War II and the developments throughout the years from the European Community of six countries to the European Union of twenty-seven.

 

b)    The main theories and conceptual approaches used to explain and make sense of the European integration process.

 

c)     The composition, structures, and functioning of the main EU institutions (the European Commission, the Councils, the European Parliament, and the European Court of Justice)

 

d)    The European elections to the European Parliament and the democratic deficit problem

 

e)     The European Union policies and its areas of regulation from agriculture to monetary policies and foreign policies of the European Union.

 

Course Requirements:

 

Class participation:                  5%

In-class quizzes x2                  10% each

In-class midterm exam            25%

In-class debate                       20%

Final exam                              30% 

 

Attendance

 

Attendance is NOT required. However, the exams will heavily rely on what we will discuss in class. I make the power-point slides available after class (on Canvas). However, there are more details beyond the slides we will discuss in class, and you will be responsible of those details in the exam. Therefore, I strongly encourage you to come to class.

 

While attendance is NOT required, I would like to strongly emphasize the following two points:

-       Given that some of you may be on the other side of the campus for an earlier class, you can be a few minutes late to the class. However, you should not be late to class for more than a few minutes (unless there is a exceptional circumstance like an exam, which should be notified in advance). Please do not be late and disturb the class.

-       You are NOT allowed to leave the class early. If you must leave early this can happen only once or twice during the semester. You must let me know in advance and can only leave within the last 10 minutes of the class.

 

Class Participation (5%)

 

Class participation is different from attendance. Throughout the course students are encouraged to raise questions and relevant discussion topics in class, and expected to contribute to class discussions. Students are expected to do the assigned readings before we discuss the topic in class, and arrive at class ready to discuss the readings.

 

Note that I make a distinction between attendance and participation. Attending every class, without ever speaking up or turning these assignments, does not constitute participation. If you do so, you will receive 60 points (D-) for this part of the class. To receive more credit for participation, students are required to ask questions, raise issues, express opinions, etc. regarding the topics covered.

 

I reserve the right to occasionally call your name to discuss a topic or answer a question.

 

Two Short-Quizzes (10% each)

 

This is a course with a lot of factual information on European politics and the European Union. There will be two in-class short quizzes that will check your facts. These quizzes will NOT be cumulative. Each quiz will be composed of multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, and bullet point questions, and last about 30-45 minutes (at most) at the beginning of the assigned class period.

 

If you are late to the class you will NOT be given extra time to complete the quiz. Make-up quizzes will not be offered except in extremely rare circumstances. These extremely rare circumstances require a doctor’s note or a note from the Dean’s office. If you have an unanticipated emergency that causes you to miss the exam, contact me as soon as possible.

 

Midterm exam (25%)

 

The exam will have two parts: the first half of the exam will be like the first quiz and test your facts since the first quiz (multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, bullet point questions). The second part of the exam will be composed of one-page essays and will cover all the material since the beginning of the class. The exam date is listed in the schedule below. If you foresee problems with the exam date, see me after class, during office hours, or contact me by e-mail before the assigned dates.

 

Make-up exam will not be offered except in extremely rare circumstances. These extremely rare circumstances require a doctor’s note or a note from the Dean’s office. If you have an unanticipated emergency that causes you to miss the exam, contact me as soon as possible.

 

In-Class Debates (20%):

 

Each student, as a member of a team, will be responsible for debating one of the topics from the list below. A sign-up sheet for the debate teams will be made available in the second week of the classes. If you do not sign up you will be randomly assigned to a group.

 

Debates are of the form “yes/no”, where one side supports an initiative or idea and the other side does not. There will be three students in each debate team. After you sign-up for a topic, I will randomly assign you to the “yes” or “no” side of the debate.

 

You are expected to do the background preparation necessary to be informed about your topic and to address questions from the debate moderator and audience. Each team will receive a grade given the group’s debate performance. In addition, each student will receive a grade based on his/her solo presentation performance. Your final debate grade will be calculated using these two separate grades.

 

Final exam (30%)

 

The details of the final exam will be made available later in the semester.

 

Required Text:

 

The following book is available for purchase at the bookstore:

 

Cini, Michelle, Nieves Perez-Solorzano Borragan. European Union Politics. Oxford University Press. 5th edition (2016). ISBN : 9780198708933

 

There will be additional required articles/chapters for some classes. These readings are denoted with an asterisk (**) in the syllabus, and will be available on Canvas in advance. 


GOV 365N • Europe Environmntl Politics

38780 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A209A
(also listed as EUS 348)
show description

Course concept

Environmental politics is one area where Europe arguably leads the world. Europe has, at both the national and European-Union level, committed itself to achieving reductions in carbon emissions far greater than anywhere else in the world.

This course will examine the history of environmental politics in both the member states of the European Union and the EU itself. Beginning with a conceptual treatment of general environmental politics and policies, the course moves to a history of European environmentalism, before shifting to a discussion on the institutional responses at important ‘traditional’ Member States (Germany, France, Italy and the UK) as well as ‘new‘ Member States (Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary). The final section of the course examines EU environmental policies themselves, such as the EU Emissions Trading System and its institutional commitment to meeting Kyoto Protocol goals.

Assignments and grading

Your course grade will consist of a midterm exam grade, a take-home final exam grade, a short paper grade and a discussion/participation grade. All assignments will be converted to a 100-point scale with no curve. All grades, including final grades, will use the plus (+) and minus (-) system. Grade standards for all assignments are as follows:

93 >     A

90-92   A-

87-89   B+

80-86   B

77-79   B-

75-76   C+

70-74   C

67-69   C-

60-66   D

<60 F

Assignment grade percentages are as follows:

Exams: 50%

As this class is an upper-division course, a major portion of the grade for the course will consist of exams, consisting of a midterm exam and a take-home final exam. Both the midterm and the take-home final exam will be worth 25% of your course grade.

Paper: 30%

The paper for this class will be a short (2000 word) exploratory paper on one of the five topics chosen by the instructor. Such a paper should be a reasonably thorough treatment of the topic chosen, including a clear thesis statement, logical consistency in the arguments used to show the validity of the thesis, and a clear and concise conclusion that effectively summarizes your argument. The paper should be no more than 2000 words in length. Soon after the beginning of the semester, I will meet with each of you individually to discuss your choice of paper topic and your approach chosen to address it. The paper will comprise 30% of your total grade for the course. The paper grade itself will be divided into four sections:

     Topic choice: due 31 January . Worth 10% of paper grade (3% of course grade).

     Topic outline and list of references: due 14 February. Worth 20% of paper grade (6% of course grade).

     First draft of paper:  due 18 March.  Worth 20% of paper grade (6% of course grade).

     Final draft of paper: due 2 May.  Worth 50% of paper grade (15% of course grade).

Participation / Discussion Questions: 20%

Class discussion in a an upper-level seminar is more than expected; it is a given. Everyone has his or her own style of discussion, and I do not expect to turn those who prefer not to speak often in class into debate champions. Participation will be divided into two sections:  Discussion questions and in-class participation. Since not everyone enjoys speaking in class, discussion questions will count for more than in-class participation. Discussion questions will count for 15% of your course grade, while in-class participation will count for 5% of your course grade.

So that we can discuss points raised in the online postings in Thursday’s class, discussion questions for the week on which I am lecturing will be due by 5:00 pm every Wednesday (unless directed otherwise). They should be drawn from the readings and should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors. They most definitely will help you get the most from the class. I will prepare the first set of discussion questions as a template for future assignments.

The total number of discussion postings will be counted at the end of the semester, and also will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

 

         12-15 postings: Full credit

         8-11 postings: 70% credit

         5-7 postings: 50% credit

         Less than 5 postings: No credit

 

A word on late or missed assignments. Over the course of the semester, it is inevitable that some event will cause a time management issue, which might lead to a missed assignment deadline. Though normally handled on a case-by-case basis, there are some baseline penalties for missed or delayed assignments, detailed here:

     Late topic choices will receive a 1% deduction per day before grading.

     Late topic outline and list of references will receive a 2% deduction per day before grading.

     Late paper drafts will receive a 5% deduction per day before grading.

     Missed exams will receive a 5% deduction per day until made up.


GOV 365N • Human Rights & World Politics

38785 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 201
(also listed as WGS 340)
show description

Course Description:  GOV 365N Human Rights and World Politics

Spring 2017

Rhonda L. Evans

 

Course Description

 

Human rights feature prominently in contemporary world politics. The decades since World War II have witnessed the construction of a large and complex international human rights regime that consists of the United Nations and several regionally based human rights systems. This course, focusing primarily on the UN, introduces you to the legal, political, and policy dimensions of international human rights. In so doing, it: (1) explores the philosophical and moral foundations of these rights; (2) surveys the legal and institutional infrastructure and processes that exist at domestic and international levels for the promotion of human rights; (3) examines the main actors involved in human rights advocacy, including states, international organizations, tribunals, activists, nongovernmental organizations, and national human rights institutions; and (4) emphasizes the role of law and quasi-judicial institutions in international human rights advocacy. The following questions animate this course. What exactly are international human rights?  How do they matter, if at all?  In other words, do human rights work? And if so, under what conditions do they work? These are very important questions considering the significant resources and efforts that are devoted to international human rights institutions and advocacy each year. And yet, you may be surprised to learn that we actually know relatively little about the efficacy of international human rights. In exploring why this is so, we will consider the various challenges to studying international human rights from an empirical (as opposed to a normative) perspective. This will require us to cover the basic mechanics of political science research. Students should emerge from this course with an enhanced understanding of the mechanics of human rights advocacy and an improved ability to evaluate its effectiveness. 

 

Grading Policy

 

The final course grade will be based on a student’s performance on three exams, a five-page paper, and an assigned research project.

 

Texts

We will only use a course packet.  No textbooks are required.


GOV 365N • Immigration And Compar Polit

38775 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Prerequisites

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government. 

 

Course Description

 

This course addresses key topics in the study of migration policy and immigration politics in the United States and the world. The class begins with a discussion of the contemporary phenomenon of migration in the context of a global “age of migration.” We continue with a political history of immigration in America from the colonial era to the 21st century. We examine laws and politics, changes in sending nations, migrant demographics, and varying immigrant receptions.  Since immigration is intertwined with the history of religion, race, and ethnicity in America, these topics will also be discussed.  We then compare the United States with three contrasting cases: the United Kingdom, Canada, and Japan.  The course then turns to classic yet contemporary issues, including immigrant integration, public opinion about immigration, the immigration-security nexus, the economics of migration, the religious dynamic of migration, refugees and asylum seekers, and enforcement and deportation policies. We also consider the effects of migration, remittances, and enforcement on sending nations.

 

Grading Policy

 

First exam: 20%

Second exam: 30%

Third exam: 30%

Book review: 20%

 

Texts

 

Daniel J. Tichenor. 2002. Dividing Lines: The Politics of Immigration Control in America. Princeton University Press.

 

Stephen Castles, Hein de Haas, and Mark J. Miller. 2013. The Age of Migration, Fifth Edition: International Population Movements in the Modern World. Guilford Press/Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Khalid Hoser. 2007. International Migration: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.

 

Course pack


GOV 370K • African American Politics

38795 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as AFR 374D)
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African-American Politics

GOV 370K/AFR 374D

 

 

Description

 

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

Prerequisites

 

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required text books for this course, which are available at the University Co-op:

 

Walton, Hanes, Jr. and Robert C. Smith. 2014.  American Politics and the African American Quest for Universal Freedom.  7th  Edition. New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

 

Philpot, Tasha S., and Ismail K. White, eds. 2010. African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. (This book is available electronically through the library website for free.)

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                             20%

3 Critical Essays                                45%

Exam 2                                            20%

Quizzes and in-class assignments       15% 


GOV 370K • Latina Politics

38790 • Defrancesco, Victoria
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.120
(also listed as MAS 374, WGS 340)
show description

DESCRIPTION:

This course will analyze the participation of Latinas in American political life.  The course will give an overview of women and how they have participated in American politics – as activists, voters, and politicians.  In particular, we will consider how the intersection of gender, race, and class influence women’s political participation and activism.  The first half of the course will examine women’s participation in politics and the second half will focus on women’s behavior, influence, and policy agendas as officials within governing institutions.

 

TEXT:

Bejarano, C. 2014. The Latino Gender Gap in U.S. Politics, Routledge Press.

Bejarano, C. E. 2013. The Latina Advantage: Gender, Race, and PoliticalSuccess, University of Texas Press.

Carroll, Susan J. and Richard L. Fox.  2013  Gender and Elections:  Shaping the Future of American Politics. Cambridge.  

Hardy-Fanta, Carol.  1993.  Latina Politics, Latino Politics: Gender, Culture, and Political Participation in Boston.  Temple University Press. 

 

Reading packet of relevant current journal and news articles.

           

GRADING:

In order to tangibly illustrate the theoretical course material each student in the course will conduct an independent inquiry project – a portfolio – to be turned in at the end of the semester.  The portfolio will make up half of the student’s grade and for this project each student will choose a Latina elected or appointed official to research and interview.  A mid-term, current events weekly article diary, and a policy memo will make up the remainder of the student’s grade. 


GOV 370L • Amer Pub Pol In Retrospect

38800 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 100
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Course Description

 

Course Number and Title:  Gov. 370L,  American Public Policy in Retrospect”

Semester and Year:  Spring, 2017

Instructor’s Name and Academic Rank:  David Prindle, Professor

Prerequisites:  Upper-division standing in Government

 

Description

 

            The course will combine several approaches to the study of American politics, so that it could accurately be described as fitting into the Public Policy, Political Philosophy, or American Political Development subfields. 

 

            My intention is, first, to introduce the students to the analysis and evaluation of arguments---teaching them to search for unstated assumptions, become sensitive to good and bad reasoning, and understand how to judge the appropriateness of the use of evidence.  Second, I plan to have them confront, in my lectures and the assigned reading, important arguments about public policy in United States history.  We will examine 19th century arguments about banking, slavery, and free trade, 20th century arguments about petroleum regulation, censorship of motion pictures, and the containment of Communism, and 21st century arguments about taxation, health care, and teaching evolution in public schools.

Grading Policy

 

            The course will be divided into three sections, the first featuring an introductory sub-section, plus policy arguments from the 19th century, the second featuring policy arguments from the 20th century, and the third featuring policy arguments from the 21st century.  The students have a choice:  they may write two essays and take one test on the material in the lectures, or they may take two tests and write one essay.  In each essay they must analyze and evaluate one of the public-policy arguments from one of the sections.  In each test they must demonstrate that they understand how various concepts from the lectures are part of the arguments I make in the lectures. It will be up to the students to decide their semester ratio of tests and essays. Each assignment will, formally, provide a third of their final grade, although I may make some small informal adjustments in the final grade to reward class participation.

 

List of Proposed Texts

 

            This class is unusual: there is no universally-applicable list of assigned reading.  Instead, students will be expected to master material from the recommended list of readings that is pertinent to the policy dispute on which they will write their essay or essays. Because all the reading is recommended only, I am not ordering any list of books for the Co-op.  Students will be expected to acquire the relevant reading on their own.  (I will, of course, be available to help them acquire that reading).

 

            The list of recommended reading is mostly covered by the following list.  Readers may notice that I have authored several of the books.  This fact should not be a surprise.  In this class I am covering policy controversies in which I have done research during my own scholarly career:  petroleum regulation, politics-and-economics-in-American-thought, the censorship of motion pictures, and the teaching of evolution in public schools.  I have not made any of my own books mandatory, and the students will be free to choose other topics than the ones I have written about (for example, the Cold War, taxes, and health care).

 

Jeremy Atack and Peter Passell, A New Economic View of American History, 2nd ed.

Ann Coulter, Godless: The Church of Liberalism

Sue Davis, ed., American Political Thought

Ezekial J. Emanuel, Reinventing American Health Care

George Fitzhugh, Cannibals All! 

John Lewis Gaddis, We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History

Jeremy Geltzer, Dirty Words and Filthy Pictures: Film and the First Amendment

George Gilder   Wealth and Poverty (2nd ed.)

Bryan Jones and Walter Williams  The Politics of Bad Ideas: The Great Tax Cut

            Delusion and the Decline of Good Government in America

Isaac Kramnick and Theodore Lowi eds., American Political Thought

Robert J. Pennock, ed., Intelligent Design Creationism and Its Critics

David Prindle,   Petroleum Politics and the Texas Railroad Commission 

David Prindle,   Risky Business: The Political Economy of Hollywood 

David Prindle,   The Paradox of Democratic Capitalism:  Politics and Economics in

            American Thought 

David Prindle, The Politics of Evolution

William Appleman Williams, The Tragedy of American Diplomacy

Carter Wilson   Public Policy: Continuity and Change

Daniel Yergin, The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power


GOV 370L • Congress And The Presidency

38820 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WEL 3.502
show description

 

Course Description

 

Gov. 370L.10, “Congress and the Presidency”

Spring, 2017

David Prindle, Professor, Government Department

Class prerequisite:  Upper-division standing in Government.

 

DESCRIPTION:

 

            The first third of this class is about Congress as an institution, the second third is about the Presidency as an institution, and the final third is about individual Presidents.

            The purposes of this class are to help students become better scholars and citizens by helping them to understand how to apply the concepts of political science to an understanding of the functioning of the American political system, and by showing them how to compare the normative concepts of the public interest and democratic theory to the actual functioning of national institutions. 

 

GRADING POLICY:

 

            In general, each of the three tests in this class will be counted equally; that is, each will count one‑third toward the final grade.  At the end of the semester, the three numerical scores will be averaged, and final grades will be assigned on the basis of the conventional scale: 92.3 and above will receive an “A” in the course, 90 to 92 will receive an "A minus," 88 to 89.7 will receive a "B plus," 82.3 to 87.7 will receive a “B,” 80 to 82 will receive a "B minus," 78 to 79.7 will receive a "C plus," 72.3 to 77.7 will receive a “C,” 70 to 72 will receive a "C minus," 68 to 69.7 will receive a "D plus," 62.3 to 67.7 will receive a “D,” 60 to 62 will receive a "D-minus, and below 60 will receive an “F.”  Anyone missing a grade (that is, anyone failing to take a test or turn in an essay) will also receive an “F.”  I may make some small adjustments in these averages to reflect the quality of contribution to class discussion.

 

TEXTS:

 

  • Lawrence Dodd and Bruce Oppenheimer (eds.) Congress Reconsidered tenth edition  (CQ Press, 2013; see note below)
  • Michael Nelson (ed.) The Presidency and the Political System tenth edition (CQ Press, 2014; see note below)
  • Roger Davidson, Walter Oleszek, and Frances Lee, Congress and Its Members, 14th edition  (CQ Press, 2014; see note below)
  • Steven E. Schier, ed., Debating the Obama Presidency (Rowman and Littlefield, 2016)
  • Some news articles, to be distributed in class

 

NOTE:  Instead of making students purchase the three CQ Press books, and then assigning them to read only some of the chapters, I will choose relevant chapters from each and put them into an electronic textbook, which students can access through the CQ Website.  The cost to download all the chapters will be considerably less than the cost of the three paper books.  However, students must buy or otherwise acquire a copy of the Steven Schier book, which is not published by CQ Press.


GOV 370L • Election Campaigns

38815 • Luskin, Robert
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CBA 4.342
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Political Psychology

38825 • Albertson, Bethany
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 526
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Politics And Film

38805 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

GOV 370 38805

Politics and Film

Course Description

Motion pictures were first invented in the 1890s.  Thus, the entirety of the 20th century was captured on film.  Many of us watch movies simply as a way to entertain ourselves and pass time.  However, motion pictures are much more than just entertainment.  Political life has been captured on film almost since the beginning of motion pictures.  This class explores the relationship between politics and film.  Films function as a time machine for culture.  Film from a period can inform us about the culture and priorities of a time.  Film looking back onto a period (a film made in 2016 looking at 1980) tells us about how current culture views the past.  Films looking into the future tell us about how some may view the direction a culture is changing.

This class will require a considerable amount of work outside the classroom.  The time inside the classroom will focus on explaining book material, discussing ideas and chapters.  We will show clips of movies/shorts/video/visual material in class, but not full films.  However, students will be expected to watch full films outside of class and write short (4 page) papers on a regular basis.  They will also be expected to write end of term papers exploring a thematic topic (of their choice) looking at how its representation in film has changed over time (for example: watch 4-5 films from the 1940s-now and write a paper on how the depiction of war/racial issues/women/elections/presidency/foreign countries/etc has transformed) as well as 3 tests spaced throughout the semester.

Required Readings

There is ONE Book:

Projecting Politics, 2015, 2nd edition, Elizabeth Haas, Terry Christensen, Peter J. Haas, Publisher: Taylor and Francis

ISBN-10:0765635976  ISBN-13:978-0765635976

 

You will also be expected to locate films for the class via Netflix, Amazon Prime, Youtube, Google Play, Itunes, library, etc.  The Fine Arts Library has an extensive collection of films

 

Grades:

Grades will based on the following:

Test 1                                                                                           20%

Test 2                                                                                           25%

Test 3                                                                                         25%

Paper Assignments (5 papers, 3% each)                                  15%

Final Paper                                                                                   15%

 

I do use plus/minus grading.


GOV 370L • Pres In Constitutional Ord

38840 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM GDC 2.402
show description

GOV 370   Seminar: The Presidency in the Constitutional Order

Spring 2017  Unique # 38840

MW  2:30 to 4pm  GDC 2.402

 

Jeffrey K. Tulis

 

 

            In this Seminar we will discuss a series of constitutional problems including: the problem of  executive energy in the American Constitution; presidential selection and the problem of political legitimacy; separation of powers; delegation of powers, the constitutional status of war and foreign affairs,  administration and bureaucracy and  the meaning of leadership in the constitutional order.

 

            Seminar will meet twice a week and regular attendance and thorough preparation for discussion is expected.  Unexcused absence from more than three classes will result in failure of the participation component of the course. There will also be pop quizzes on the reading that will count as part of your participation grade. In addition to class participation, course requirements include  four short analytic essays, and one in-class test. The course grade will be calculated as follows:

 

                        Seminar participation: 20%

                        In-class test: 20%

                        Three analytic essays 60%  (20% each)

 

            Class participation is especially important. Preparation for seminar and for your in-class test will be enhanced by careful note taking on the readings.  If students appear to be unprepared, pop quizzes will be given and the grades on them will affect the participation component of your course grade.

 

           

 

Texts:   (tentative)

            Joseph M. Bessette and Jeffrey K. Tulis, The Constitutional Presidency

            Michael Nelson, The Presidency in the Political System (tenth edition)

            Richard Ellis and Michael Nelson, Debating the Presidency (third edition)

            The Federalist (any edition, or online)


GOV 370L • The Politics Of Health Care

38835 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 214
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Health care is currently one of the most hotly debated topics in American politics. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the issues and controversies that surround healthcare policy and the American healthcare system. The course will facilitate this by first establishing a theoretical and substantive framework regarding various aspects of policymaking and the American healthcare system. Upon the establishment of this framework, the course will then delve into the examination of a number of specific health problems and the controversies surrounding them. Students should leave this class with a working knowledge of the American policy making process, substantial knowledge of the American healthcare system and an understanding of the roots of current debates in American healthcare policy. 

 

Grading Policy

Quizzes                       100

Exam 2                       100

Policy Paper                 100

Policy Paper 2              100

Exam 2                       100

Total                           500 points

 

Text 

Wolff, Jonathan.  2012.  The Human Right to Health.  1st ed, Amnesty International Global Ethics Series.  New York: W.W. Norton AND Co.

 

Prerequisites

GOV 310 and 312


GOV 374N • Political Internship

38850 • Henson, James
Meets TH 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ 2.124
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The Government Department internship program provides students an opportunity to combine work experience in government and politics with academic coursework. This course emphasizes guiding students through the design and execution of a carefully defined small-scale research project, and an analysis of their research that can be communicated intelligibly to a public audience. The coursework is designed to sharpen students’ ability to use basic academic research skills as tools in a professional environment, and to convey the results of their research in ways that contribute to public discourse about politics, policy, and government.

Most of students’ time and energy will be directed toward performing the duties of their internships in a manner that reflects positively on them and on The University of Texas at Austin. A solid performance as an intern provides a rich learning experience, the possibility of future intellectual and professional opportunities, and also reflects well on the program, paving the way for future students to have the same opportunities current interns enjoy.

However, interns should be clear about the nature of this course. Students are not receiving credit from the Government Department primarily for fulfilling their internships. Students receive grades and credit for completing the internships in conjunction with guided course work. Supervisor evaluations are taken into account in assigning grades per the grading criteria below, but 75% of your course grade is based on assessment of academic work completed for the course.


GOV 379S • Complex Emergen Human Act

38860 • Newberg, Paula
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.338
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Climate change.  Conflicts.  Coups d’etat.  Displacement.  Ethnic cleansing. Floods.  Genocide.  Pandemics.  Refugees.  Rights violations.  War crimes.

When these phenomena occur together, in varying combinations, they comprise complex emergencies –- overlapping, intersecting processes that can overwhelm a government and possibly an entire country, create and deepen humanitarian disasters, interrupt economic development, and lead to foreign policy crises.  (Think, for example, of the crisis in Syria today, Ebola in west Africa, or Nepal’s most recent earthquake.)  The causes of these crises are many, ranging from political extremism, poverty, resource scarcity and weak states to inadequate governance and diplomatic failures. 

We will spend the semester investigating complex emergencies and the ways that states, societies and international humanitarian actors respond to them.  Along the way, we will explore competing philosophies of humanitarian response (including neutrality and impartiality), international humanitarian law, thorny problems that arise when humanitarians meet difficult political actors, efforts to use international human rights law to resolve seemingly intractable problems, and ways the international community responds to (and sometimes does not) - and tries to solve (and often does not) -- these emergencies. 

We will study several recent and contemporary cases (from different regions), and seminar members will also explore specific elements of emergencies in their essays.

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GOV 379S • Regime Persp Amer Poltc-Honors

38865 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM PAR 305
(also listed as CTI 335, LAH 350)
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This is a seminar on American politics and culture.   Two purposes govern the selection of texts for the course and guide our discussion of them.  All of our texts attempt to look at American politics as a whole.  Most books and courses on America look at only a part, such as the Presidency, or elections, or popular culture.  Here we attempt to think about how the parts of America fit together.  Even when these texts speak about a part, for example an institution such as the presidency or the Congress, they present the topic from a vantage point on the whole polity.   To see the polity as a whole also means that we will have to revisit and rethink aspects of our political life that we take for granted – that we don’t examine because those parts have become so natural or familiar to us.  Seeing the polity whole enables us to render the familiar unfamiliar, to make what we take for granted strange and new.

To see the polity as a whole requires that we get some distance from our subject, much as to see the planet earth as a whole requires one to look at it from outer space.  Just as it is difficult to get visual perspective on a place living within it, it is difficult to understand the promise or pathologies of a regime from within.  To get critical distance from our politics, we will closely study three sets of texts that look at American politics from a distance.   The first part of the course will recover the perspective of the founding debate between Federalists and Anti-federalists.   This fundamental debate reveals what is a stake in the basic architecture of the American regime.  The second part of the course is a close study of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America.  Regarded by many as the best book ever written on democracy and the best book written on America, Tocqueville sees our polity whole because he looks at it from the vantage point of Europe, in general, and France, in particular.  In the third part of the seminar we think about American politics from the perspective of thoughtful commentators who feel only nominally included in the polity.   Half in and half out, these extraordinary black American writers reveal fissures and fault lines in the American regime.  We end the class with a discussion of America’s place in the world today – examining a speech by a writer who articulately raises challenges to our self-understanding that are inarticulately expressed today in rage and ranting from enemies of the United States.

Requirements:

Three take home analytic essays, chosen from a list of topics I provide, each weighted 25% of the course grade.  Late essays will not be accepted, except with a doctor’s excuse or a Dean’s excuse for family emergency.

OR as an option: you may write the two short essays (both together weighted 25%) and do a longer 15 page paper on a topic of your choice in consultation with me (weighted 50% of your course grade).   Government honors students who are thinking of doing an honors thesis next year may prefer this option to begin to develop research and writing skills for longer work.  Students who prefer this option will need to designate their preferred third short essay and have discussed with me a topic for their long paper by March 30. 

Texts:

The Federalist

Selected Anti-Federalist writings

Tocqueville, Democracy in America

Essays, speeches and articles by Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dubois, Booker T. Washington, James Baldwin and Ralph Ellison


GOV 662L • Government Rsch Internship-Dc

38740 • Swerdlow, Joel
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Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites and/or other Restrictions:

Acceptance into the University of Texas, Archer Fellowship Program

Course Description: This course will focus on the role of media, the Congress, the

President and other governmental and non-governmental actors in the policy-making

process. Through a variety of sources (academic texts, newspaper and journal articles,

websites, blogs, advocacy papers) we will look at (and hopefully reconcile) the textbook

and “real world” versions of how policy is made in Washington, D.C.

This course is divided into four phases where we will use a variety of techniques

(lectures/discussion, in-class presentations and guest speakers) to gain a better

understanding of the policy-making process. In Phase I, we will discuss how policy is

defined: where ideas come from and who plays a role in defining what we consider to be

important policy problems. In Phase II, we will look at how policy is made and how the

structures of our unique form of government affect the policy-making process. In Phase

III we will meet with policy-makers to hear their first hand accounts of the policy-making

process and finally, in Phase IV we will try to understand the policy-making process

through a legislative simulation and class discussions/debates of some of the important

issues of the day.


GOV 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

38855 • McIver, John
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM MEZ B0.302
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GOV 679HB Course Description/McIver

 

Description

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence designed to help a select group of motivated students complete a Senior Honors thesis.   Students develop an initial research question, hypothesize an answer and propose a research strategy to test that hypothesis.  The research question is the student’s own as is the choice of advisor.  In most cases, students develop a question and then seek advice as to which member of the department faculty might be aide them in answering their question. 

The primary product of the fall semester is “Chapter 1”, a 20-25 page summary of the project to be completed during the spring semester.  This paper includes a research question or hypothesis to be considered, a review of the existing literature on the topic, a research design, a plan for the completion of the project and an extended bibliography of relevant documents. 

Throughout the spring semester writing assignments build on the students’ research to develop a fully formed thesis by semester’s end.  Typically Chapters 2-4 are written in draft, reviewed and revised.  Students prepare power point presentations to defend their thesis projects during Research Week.  Drafts then undergo final revisions before submission at the end of the semester.

Classwork also engages practical issues underlying research.  The School of Undergraduate Studies/Office of Undergraduate Research provides assistance in training class members in the creation of research posters for Research Week.  

Requirements

Admission is restricted to applicants who complete the fall semester seminar.   Applicants must show ability to sustain a 3.5 GPA in Government and be approved by the Honors Program Instructor and a faculty thesis advisor.

Textbooks

As needed for individual projects.

Grading

 

Writing exercises

Attendance and Participation

Research Poster

Final Thesis

Oral Defense



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121