The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV 310L • American Government

38330 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.102
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This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38340-38345 • Shaw, Daron
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38325 • Prindle, David
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM ART 1.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38315 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A121A
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38333 • McIver, John
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 1.402
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38310 • Kelly, Kristin
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM NOA 1.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38305 • Branham, James
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

38334 • Brock, Clare-Lieb
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ B0.306
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government-Honors

38335 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.106
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GOV 310 (Honors) (38335)

Fall 2016

TTH 3:30-5:00pm, BEN 1.106

 

Introduction to American Politics

 

This honors seminar offers an introduction to American politics that emphasizes the confluence of ideas, mores, institutions, and interests, in the constitutional system. This course covers more theory, and the readings are more demanding, than other versions of GOV 310. 

 

One of the main objectives of the course is to deepen your understanding of the practical aspects of contemporary public affairs by developing your ability to understand the theoretical foundations of American politics.  Although we cover the nuts and bolts of politics there is much more theory in this version of GOV 310. If you have registered for this section mainly because 310 is a legislative requirement that you need to fulfill, this is not the right version for you.  There is a substantial workload in this class.

 

Regular attendance, thorough and timely preparation, and active participation are all necessary to do well.

 

Course requirements:

 

  1. Four essays (approximately 1000 words each).  Three of these will be assigned analytic essay topics. The last will be a book review of a title chosen by the student from a long list of provided possibilities.   (15% each essay, 60% of total course grade)

 

  1. Two in-class tests. These will count 15% each, 30% of total course grade.

 

  1. Class participation. (10% of course grade).  Both informed participation and occasional leadership of the seminar will be graded.

 

No make-up exams or late papers, except for documented medical or other emergencies.

 

Texts: (tentative)

Mark Landy and Sidney M. Milkis, American Government: Enduring Principles, Critical Choices, Third Edition

Mary Nichols and David Nichols, Readings in American Government, Ninth Edition

Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein, Its Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism

Bruce Ackerman,Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38380 • Theriault, Sean
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38385 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.306
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The University of Texas at Austin                                                              GOV 312L

Professor Jim Enelow, BAT 3.102                                                              Spring 2016

Office Hrs: M,W,F 930-1030AM                                                                 TTH 330-5PM

E-mail jenelow@austin.utexas.edu                                                            MEZ 1.306

                     Unique 37775

 

     ISSUES & POLICIES IN AMERICAN GOVT: TEXAS POLITICAL HISTORY

 

Required Reading

 

Randolph B. Campbell, Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, 2012 (paperback)

 

Description

 

This course will examine the major events and personalities in Texas political history from 16th century Spanish Texas up to the present. We will adopt a narrative approach, stressing the issues and concerns that motivated the major actors who helped shape the history of this state and also seeing events in Texas in the larger context of European, Mexican, and American history.

 

Exams and Grades

 

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 questions on all three exams.  The raw scores on the three exams are added with each question worth one point and the total raw scores are then used to determine your final grade. 100-87 = A, 86-85 = A-, 84-83 = B+, 82-77 = B, 76-75 = B-, 74-73 = C+, 72-66 = C, 65-64 = C-, 63-54 = D, 53-0 = F. There is no extra credit. A make-up exam (IDs and short answer questions) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. Each exam covers only material since the exam just before it.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38350-38355 • Moser, Robert
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38360 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM MEZ B0.306
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Issues and Polices in American Government: Race, Media, and Politics

GOV 312L

 

Description

 

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

Prerequisites

 

Twenty-four semester hours of college coursework, including Government 310L, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required text books for this course. Both books are available at the University Co-op.

 

Wilson II, Clint C., Felix Gutierrez, and Lena M. Chao.  2012.  Racism, Sexism and the Media: The Rise of Class Communication in Multicultural America, 4th Ed.  Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

 

Graber, Doris A and Johanna Dunaway.  2014.  Mass Media and American Politics, 9nd Ed.  Washington, DC: CQ Press.

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                                            25%

Exam 2                                                            25%

Exam 3                                                            25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments                      25% 


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38365 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.306
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312L Spring 2016

Dana Stauffer

 

This course examines American political life and development primarily through the lens of one book: Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America. This classic of political science, written in the 1830s, takes up questions and themes that continue to resonate almost two centuries later. As a French aristocrat trying to understand and adapt to the rise of democracy, Tocqueville examined American life from all sides. In particular, he was interested in understanding what made American democracy work, and what it main drawbacks were. We will read as much of his two-volume work as possible, focusing particular attention on its main themes: the relationship of religion to American political life, the vitality of local government, the love of material goods, and the dangers of majority tyranny. Along the way, we will also read primary texts from the American colonial period and the American Founding, and reflect on Tocqueville’s view that the former was at least as important as the latter in shaping the polity that developed. We will also discuss his wide-ranging observations on American intellectual life, family life, and the relations between the sexes. We will consider such questions as: What are the sources—intellectual, cultural, and social—of American’s political outlook? What are the strengths and weaknesses of American democracy? What legislators and citizens do to ensure that American polity remains vital, and American citizens active and engaged? In the last third of the course, we will read authors who challenge Tocqueville’s key arguments, or take his assertions in a new direction, and we will consider how well his predictions have been borne out.

 

This course fulfills the second half of the legislative requirement for government.

 

Requirements: A mid-term exam, an optional paper, a final exam, quizzes, and attendance.

 

Texts:

Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Volumes I and II, Vintage Classics edition

 

A Course Reader


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38370 • Altamirano, Giorleny
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.128
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38375 • Lewallen, Jonathan
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38389 • Bullock, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 100
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This is a lower-division lecture course. We study Americans' views on political issues and the extent to which their views influence, and are influenced by, elected officials. Special attention to opinion polarization, the roles of partisanship, and the effects of public opinion on legislators. Online datasets help to answer questions about politics and public opinion. We will be discussing the 2016 elections. See http://johnbullock.org/teaching for the syllabus.

REQUIRED COURSE BOOK
Fiorina, Culture War?, 3rd ed. 

Journal articles and book chapters from other sources will also be required. They will be made available to students through Canvas. (There will not be a printed course reader.)


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38396 • Ives, Anthony
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CLA 1.102
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Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

38400 • Siddiqi, Ahmed
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.134
(also listed as CTI 302)
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This course explores the changing role of human psychology in the history of political thought through the study of classic texts in philosophy and psychology. In roughly chronological order, we will examine several key philosophers’ accounts of the deepest human concerns—justice, happiness, and love—and the potential political life has to fulfill those yearnings. In the final part of the course, we will study Darwin’s evolutionary theory of human mental faculties in The Descent of Man, Freud’s theory of unconscious psychological drives, and current theories of evolutionary psychology. We will discuss how these different views of human nature suggest different approaches to politics and ethics.

We will read selections from the following works:

  • Plato The Republic, The Symposium 
  • St. Augustine: The Confessions, City of God 
  • Hobbes The Leviathan 
  • Rousseau Discourse on the Origin of Inequality
  • Nietzsche Beyond Good and Evil
  • Darwin The Descent of Man 
  • Freud Civilization and its Discontents

And selected articles on evolutionary psychology

Grading: Your grade will consist of two medium lengths papers (25% each), a final exam (30%), and class participation and reading quizzes (20%). Attendance is mandatory.


GOV 321M • Politics In Japan

38405 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as ANS 321M)
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Politics in Japan: GOV 321M (#38405)/ ANS 321M (#31635)

Patricia L. Maclachlan

Fall 2016

 

This upper division course surveys key themes in the domestic politics and political economy of postwar Japan.  After briefly exploring the politics and institutions of the pre-war era, we will examine the impact of the American Occupation (1945-52) on the Japanese political economy, the secrets of Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) dominance in postwar elections, voting trends, legislative and policymaking processes, gender politics, and interest group and social movement politics. We will devote our final weeks to the analysis of developments in contemporary Japan, including the movement toward political-economic reform—particularly in the public sector, defense and agriculture.  These and related topics will be examined from a comparative perspective and with reference to relevant political science theories.

 

 Grading Criteria:

 

            1.  Quizzes on readings:                                                        15%

            2.  First midterm exam:                                                        20%

            3.  Second midterm exam or short research paper:                 25%

            4.  Final examination:                                                           40%

 

 Texts:

  1. David Pilling, Bending Adversity: Japan and the Art of Survival.  Penguin Books, 2015.
  2. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of Japan’s Postwar Political Machine. Sanford University Press, 1999.
  3. Ethan Scheiner, Democracy Without Competition in Japan: Opposition Failure in a One-Party State. Cambridge University Press, 2005.
  4. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife. University of California Press, 1999.

 

            Additional readings will be provided to students at the beginning of the semester via Canvas.


GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38410 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.106
(also listed as EUS 350)
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Course concept

This course is a comparative study of select advanced industrialized countries (AICs) and newly emerging democracies of Europe. This seminar will emphasize what we as students of political science can gather from the examination of the political regimes of other states. It will challenge you to reconceptualize your views of American politics and international relations based on the knowledge you gain from the study of other states’ political systems, and will seek to highlight the similarities as well as the differences between state actions in international relations.

We will begin the course with a brief introduction to the study of comparative politics, followed by an examination of the United Kingdom, the first ‘modern’ state and arguably the world’s oldest democracy. From there, the course moves to an examination of France, the Continent’s oldest democracy and one with a particularly interesting history. Next is a study of Germany, one of the most dynamic states in Europe since its founding as a modern nation state in the late 1800s. We then look at Italy, a bifurcated state with a strongly developed North and a less-developed South, and Sweden, a Nordic social democracy with a strong economy and deep tradition of citizen participation. We then examine Russia and Poland as examples of newly democratizing (and potentially newly authoritarian) Europe, and conclude the course with a two-part brief look at the European Union.

 

Required readings:

The required text for this course is Hancock et al., Politics in Europe (6th ed.), CQ Press, 2014 [hereafter Hancock]. There will also be a considerable number of supplementary journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Average reading load will be around 60 pages/week, with some lighter weeks and some heavier.

Finally, as part of the student participation grade, students will be required to find one contemporary online news article on the country we are studying at the time and post a short summary (and link) on the Canvas course site. Readings will not be vetted or approved by the instructor, but students are expected to use reputable and impartial news sources as the basis for the articles submitted and summarized.

 

Course requirements:

This course has two in-class mid-term exams and a take-home final exam. Each midterm exam will be worth 25% of your overall grade. The final will be worth 30% of your overall grade.

Class discussion in a an upper-level seminar is more than expected; it is a given. Everyone has his or her own style of discussion, and I do not expect to turn those who prefer not to speak often in class into debate champions. Nevertheless, I do expect that each of you to post one discussion question per week in the online discussion forum. Participation grades will be given on a five-point basis (100, 95, 90…) and will be determined on the last class day. Coming to class every day but never participating will earn you a grade no higher than an 80. The discussion posting will count for 15% of your grade and in-class participation will comprise 5% of your course grade.

So that we can discuss points raised in the online postings in Thursday’s class, discussion questions for the week on which I am lecturing will be due by 5:00 pm every Wednesday (unless directed otherwise). They should be drawn from the readings or current news events and should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors. They most definitely will help you get the most from the class. I will prepare the first set of discussion questions as a template for future assignments.

The total number of discussion postings will be counted at the end of the semester, and also will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit. 

  • 12-15 postings: Full credit

  • 8-11 postings: 70% credit

  • 5-7 postings: 50% credit

  • Less than 5 postings: No credit

 A word on late or missed assignments. Over the course of the semester, it is inevitable that some event will cause a time management issue, which might lead to a missed assignment deadline. Though normally handled on a case-by-case basis, there are some baseline penalties for missed or delayed assignments, detailed here:

  • Missed exams will receive a 5% deduction per day until made up.
  • Discussion postings will not be counted on an individual-post basis, but will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

In addition to the books above, this course will utilize scholarly articles, “applied academic” pieces from think tanks and policy research organizations, and relevant information from IO websites to provide a broad and wide-ranging set of readings.  The majority of readings for the course will be taken from scholarly articles related to the theory and practice of international organizations. Most of these will be available online from the PCL. Those that are not accessible due to PCL holding limitations will be made available as PDFs on Canvas. Befitting an upper-level class, the reading load is somewhat larger than you may be used to. I will make every effort to address the main points of the readings in class, but do not expect a synopsis or a replay of the readings. It is up to you to bring up questions you may have had while doing the readings.

 

Recommended Readings:

  • Strunk, William and E.B. White (2000). Elements of Style, 4th edition. (Pearson Allyn & Bacon)

Suggested news sources:

Grading standards:

I will use the following grade standards. All grades will be converted to a 100-point scale.

  • 93 and higher: A

  • 90-92: A-

  • 87-89: B+

  • 80-86: B

  • 77-79 B-

  • 75-76 C+

  • 70-74 C

  • 67-69 C-

  • 60-66 D

  • lower than 60: F


GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

38415 • Madrid, Raul
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 201
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

GOV 328L

Introduction to Latin American Government and Politics

Course Description Fall 2016

 

Course Description:

 

This course will provide a broad introduction to the changing politics of the region.  We will explore the causes and consequences of the political and economic changes that have swept Latin America during the last century. The course will examine why Latin American countries have shifted from free market policies to widespread state intervention and then back again. It will analyze the cycles of democratic and authoritarian rule in the region and their implications for the welfare of Latin American citizens. And it will discuss some of the most important contemporary economic, social and political challenges facing countries of the region.  The course will focus on trends affecting Latin America as a whole, but some lectures and readings will examine how these trends played out in specific countries of the region.

 

Prerequisites:

 

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government

 

Grading:

 

1st examination: 30%

2nd examination: 30%

3rd examination: 15%

Short (5-6 page) research paper: 15%

Pop quizzes: 10%

 

Texts:

 

Hillman, Richard S. and Thomas D’Agostino, ed. Understanding Contemporary Latin America. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2011.  4th Edition.

 

Smith, Peter H. Democracy in Latin America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. 2nd Edition.

 

Winn, Peter. Americas: The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean. Berkeley, CA: Univ. of California Press, 2006. 3rd Edition.

 

A course packet of additional readings


GOV 330K • The American President

38420 • Buchanan, Bruce
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420
show description

 

 

Government 330K

The American President

 

Unique: 38420

Closing limit: 75

TTH 12:30-2pm, WAG 420

 

Professor Bruce Buchanan                                                

Fall, 2016

 

Course Purpose

 

This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

 

Course Organization   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

 

  1. Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential History

 

B.  Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?   

 

 

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

 

  1. Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

                                                           Student Responsibilities

 

  1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
  2. Combination take-home final/mini-term paper (40% of grade)
  3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade—five points--per subsequent absence).

            Note:  Pluses and Minuses will not be used for final course grades.

 

 

                                                               Required Readings

 

 

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.


GOV 335M • Hegel: Formatn Mod Eur Iden

38425 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 3.116
(also listed as CTI 335, EUS 348)
show description

A core element of European identity is the notion of freedom in two forms that developed in the modern era: freedom as (a) the individual’s self-determination within his or her private sphere and personal life and (b) the community’s self-determination as a public achievement of private citizens come together to deliberate and decide matters of the res publica. In theory and history, the realization of such freedom has always been fraught with difficulty. Hegel’s Philosophy of Right offers one of the most compelling diagnoses of the ills of modern Western political community with respect to these two freedoms. It also develops some of the most influential standards by which to judge the civil society that undergirds modern European political community and its claims to provide these two freedoms.

Required Texts

G.W.F. Hegel, Philosophy of Right, trans. T.M. Knox (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967; ISBN 978-0195002768) ▪ Or in the original language: Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts oder Naturrecht und Staatswissenschaft im Grundrisse (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1986)

Axel Honneth, The Pathologies of Individual Freedom: Hegel’s Social Theory (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010) ▪ Or in the original language: Leiden an Unbestimmtheit. Eine Reaktualisierung der Hegelschen Rechtsphilosophie (Ditzingen: Reclam, 2001)


GOV 335M • Women Hist Polit Thought

38430 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122
(also listed as CTI 335, WGS 345)
show description

Course Description: Women in the History of Political Thought

 

This course will examine the themes of women, the family, and the private sphere in the history of political theory. We will analyze and interpret works of political theory in which women have a central role, and we will seek to understand the relationship between political thinkers’ views about women and the family and their larger political theories. We will begin in classical Greece with political theory and drama. Then we will move through history, considering the critiques of paternalism launched by Hobbes and Locke and the portrait of the ideal woman advanced by Rousseau in Book V of the Emile. In the second half of the course, we will consider the development of early feminism in the writings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Henrik Ibsen, John Stuart Mill, and Simone de Beauvoir. Some of the questions we will pursue are the following: What does justice demand in the realm of the relations between the sexes, and what kinds of social and political arrangements are best for women? How do our answers to these questions intersect with broader questions about human nature, identity, political community, and justice?

  Required Texts

 

A Course Reader

 

De Beauvoir, Simone. The Second Sex. (Vintage)

 

Euripides II. (Complete Greek Tragedies, Chicago)

 

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. Herland. (Penguin Classics)

 

Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll’s House and Other Plays. (Penguin Classics)

 

Mill, John Stuart. The Subjection of Women. Edited by Susan M. Okin (Hackett)

 

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Emile, or On Education. Translated by Allan Bloom. (Basic Books)

 

Wollstonecraft, Mary. A Vindication of the Rights of Women. (Prometheus)

 

Course Requirements and Grading

 

First Exam: 30%

Second Exam: 30%

Paper: 30%

Class Participation (including pop quizzes): 10%


GOV 335N • Southern Political History

38435 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 220
show description

The University of Texas at Austin                                                     GOV 335N

Professor Jim Enelow                                                                      Spring 2016

BAT 3.102, jenelow@austin.utexas.edu                                            T, TH 2-330PM

Office Hrs: 3.102 BAT: M,W,F 930-1030AM                                        PAR 201

                                                                                                     Unique 37880

 

                           SOUTHERN POLITICAL HISTORY

 

Required Reading

 

Steve Bickerstaff, Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and  the Downfall of Tom DeLay, University of Texas, 2007.

Earl Black and Merle Black, The Rise of Southern Republicans, Harvard University

 Press, 2002.

William J. Cooper, Jr. and Thomas E. Terrill, The American South: A History, Volumes I and II, Fourth Edition, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009   Description

 

The course will review the political history of the American South from the 1780s to the present. In the first part of the course, we review the events which transformed the South from a region of progressive nationalism from the 1780s to the 1810s to a region of defensive sectionalism from the 1820s to the 1860s. Touching briefly on the Civil War, we then take up Reconstruction, “Redemption,” and the agrarian movement of the late 19th century, followed by the period of the “Solid South” in the first half of the 20th century. Next we examine the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, followed by the rise of southern Republicans in the late 20th century. Lastly, we examine Texas’s congressional redistricting in 2003.

 

Exams and Grades

 

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. The exams are not cumulative. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 points on all three exams. The raw scores on the three exams are added and the total raw scores are then curved to determine your final grade, approximating the following distribution: 30% A’s, 35% B’s, 20% C’s, 10% D’s, and 5% F’s. Plus and minus grades will be given for total raw scores falling above or below the boundary lines between grades. There is no extra credit. A make-up exam (not multiple-choice) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. 


GOV 339L • Research Methods In Government

38443 • Greene, Kenneth
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 201
show description

This course provides an introduction to the methods used in political science research, most of which are common to research in all social science disciplines.  After learning about the building blocks of causal analysis, we will examine three empirical research strategies: experiments, “large N” or quantitative studies (AKA statistics), and “small N” studies that mainly use qualitative data and alternative forms of causal reasoning.  We will also look at the basics of formal modeling and game theory that provide one way to generate theory.  The goal of the course is to provide students with the analytic tools to critically evaluate social science research and causal arguments found in everyday life, as well as to improve students’ ability to pose and answer research questions on their own.

 

Grading. The course grade will be based on one in-class midterm, a comprehensive final examination given during the exam period, several homework assignments (see below), and in-class participation.  We will use plus/minus grading for the final grade.  The final grade will be determined as follows:

 

Midterm                                   30%

Final Exam                               30%

Homework                                30%

Quizzes                                     5%

In-class verbal participation        5%

 

Homework assignments: Graded homework assignments will be handed out in lecture without prior notice and will be due one week later.  The number of homework assignments will be determined by student progress but will likely fall between five and seven.  No matter the number of assignments, homework will count as 30% of the final grade.  The lowest homework grade will be dropped from the calculation.

 

Quizzes. In-class quizzes will occur every once in a while at the start of lecture and will last only a few minutes.  As a result, you must arrive on time, every time.  There are no make-ups.  The number of quizzes will be determined by student progress in the course.  The lowest quiz grade will be dropped from the calculation.

 

Participation: The class is lecture-style but I ask for student participation and feedback multiple times during each session.  Participating is key, voicing the correct answer is not.  I want to underscore the importance of participation.  On a daily basis, it is one of the few ways (other than body language, snoring, etc.) that I can gauge whether you understand the material.

 

Exam and Homework Policies: Early final exams will not be given.  Medical or family emergency and religious holidays that are not on UT’s calendar are the only reasons that a homework assignment or the midterm can be postponed.  It is my strong preference that you notify me ahead of time (a must for religious holidays), unless you are unconscious.  All assignments must be completed before graded assignments are returned to the class (typically within one week).  After that, a make-up will not be possible.  There is no provision for a make-up final exam due to time constraints for final grade reporting imposed by university policy.  During exams, the following are not allowed: calculators that can calculate statistics (even if you do not know how to use these functions), cell phones, computers, and other communication devices.  Cheating earns an F in the course and referral to the Dean of Students with my recommendation for expulsion from the university.  For more information on scholastic dishonesty, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.

Readings: All readings are in a two-volume course packet that is available for purchase at Austin Textbooks 2116 Guadalupe St., Austin TX 78705 (512) 472-7986 and will be on reserve at the PCL (although processing usually takes them quite a while). The amount of reading is light but the content is dense. I encourage you to budget enough time to read each selection twice. Read as you would read a math book, not as you would a novel.  Note that end matter includes a glossary of useful terms compiled by David Collier andand Z tables.

 


GOV 341M • Decision Theory

38445 • Enelow, James
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 301
show description

The University of Texas at Austin                                                     GOV 341M

Professor Jim Enelow                                                                      Spring 2016

BAT 3.102, jenelow@austin.utexas.edu                                            MW 3-430PM

Office hours, M, W, F 930-1030AM                                                   WAG 214

                                                                   

Unique 37890

 

DECISION THEORY

Survey of game theory, a mathematical theory of strategic interaction. Also, a logical analysis of different methods of election.

 

Required Reading

 

Joel Watson, STRATEGY: An Introduction to Game Theory. 2nd edition. W.W. Norton, 2008.

 

Below each reading are a chapter number and a list of exercises, which can be found at the end of the chapter. It is strongly recommended that these exercises be attempted before they are done in class. Parts of the Appendix (App) are also assigned. If you bought the 3rd edition of Watson, see me for the assignments.

 

There is no T.A. for this class, so I am available outside of my office hours. You can e-mail me and request an appointment or you can simply stop by my office anytime.

 

This is an applied math course and carries the Quantitative Reasoning flag. It is assumed that you are able to do simple calculations with fractions or decimals, solve linear equations in one or two variables, solve quadratic equations, and understand sets, functions, probability, expected value, and infinite series. If you are unfamiliar with any or all of these topics, please seek my help outside of class.

 

In addition, this course is supported by Peer-Led Undergraduate Studying. PLUS study groups provide an opportunity to collaboratively practice skills and knowledge you need for success in this course. Feel free to attend any study group at any point in the semester; more information on times and locations will be available through Canvas or announced in class. Go to wikis.utexas.edu/display/PLUS or Facebook to find out more about PLUS.

 

Exams

 

There will be three in-class multiple-choice exams covering material from each of the three sections of the course. Each exam is of the problem-solving type, similar to the SAT math exam. There is no final exam. A make-up exam (not multiple-choice) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. There will also be three announced quizzes. There are no make-up quizzes.

 

Grades

 

The first two exams will have about 16 to 20 questions, the third 14 to 16 questions. Each quiz will have 2 or 3 questions. Each question is worth one point. The points you receive on the three exams and your highest-scoring quiz are added together to determine your total score. These scores will be curved to determine your final grade, approximating the following distribution: 30% A’s, 35% B’s, 20% C’s, 10% D’s and 5% F’s. Plus and minus grades will be given for total scores falling just above or below the boundary lines between grades. After the boundary lines have been determined, the score a student receives on his second-highest quiz will be added to his total score as extra credit to determine his final grade. Extra credit can raise a student’s grade at most to the next highest grade level (e.g. from a B+ to an A-).


GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

38450 • Lin, Tse-Min
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PHR 2.114
show description

Semester Fall 2016

GOV 350K – Statistical Analysis in Political Science

 

Quantitative Reasoning Flag

 

Unique           Days   Time                                       Bldg/Room     Instructor

38450              MWF  2:00-3:00pm                           PHR 2.114      LIN

 

Course Description

 

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Unlike the typical elementary statistical courses you may have taken, the emphasis here will be on applications in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding political science literatures based on the scientific approach, as well as to prepare interested students for more advanced methods courses.

 

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, and other statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use SPSS to analyze data from Gallup Survey, General Social Survey, and National Election Study in homework assignments. In particular, you will be asked to replicate results reported in journal articles and book chapters. You are also encouraged to develop and work out your own research problems.

 

Prerequisites

 

None

 

Grading Policy

 

Homework Assignments (6-7 sets): 30%

In-Class Midterm Exam: 30%

In-Class Final Exam: 30%

Instructor Discretion (Attendance, Participation, etc.): 10%

 

Required Texts

 

* T. H. Wonnacott and R. J. Wannacott. 1990. Introductory Statistics, 5th Ed. Wiley. (Or 4th Ed., Introductory Statistics for Buisness and Economics, 1990, which is the same as the 5th Ed.)

 

Optional Texts

 

* S. B. Green and N. J. Salkind, 2013. Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh: Analyzing and Understanding Data, 7th  Ed. Prentice Hall.


GOV 351C • Classical Quest For Justice

38455 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as CTI 320)
show description

 

 

GOV 351C (and CTI 320)

 

The Classical Quest for Justice

 

Devin Stauffer

 

 

Course Description 

 

What is justice?  What are its demands as a virtue of individuals?  What is its status as a guiding principle of domestic politics and as a restraint in times of war?  What are the strengths and weaknesses of different kinds of political orders in their quest for justice?  What is the relationship between political life and philosophic reflection?  In this course we will consider these fundamental and enduring questions of political philosophy primarily through a careful study of two of the masterpieces of classical antiquity:  Plato’s Republic and Thucydides’ The Peloponnesian War.  We will preface our study of these two great texts with a look at another work, Plato’s Apology of Socrates; but our focus will be on reading and discussing the Republic and The Peloponnesian War.  These works will be approached, not just as crucial documents for our understanding of a distant age, but as works that still speak directly and profoundly to permanent questions of moral and political life.   

 

Prerequisite

 

Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework.

 

Texts 

 

Plato and Aristophanes, Four Texts on Socrates, trans. by T. West and G. West (Cornell) 

Plato, The Republic of Plato, trans. by Allan Bloom (Basic Books)

Thucydides, The Landmark Thucydides, ed. By Robert Strassler (The Free Press) 

 

Requirements and Grading 

 

Paper: 20%  

First exam: 25%

Second exam: 25% 

Attendance: 10% 

Participation: 10%

Quizzes: 10%

 

(Note:  These percentages are approximate, and the paper may be made optional.)


GOV 351D • Theor Foundtns Modern Politics

38457 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as CTI 321)
show description

Theoretical Foundations of Modern Politics

 

This class explores the philosophic basis of modern politics. We will look at how modern political philosophy broke with both classical and traditional Christian thought, in the new understanding of human nature that it proposed and the new approach to politics that it defended on that basis.

 

Our focus for the first part of the class will be on the works of Niccolo Machiavelli. We will read The Prince and a substantial part of the Discourses on Livy, and will use selected passages from ancient political philosophers and from the Christian tradition, including readings from the Bible, as points of comparison.

 

In the second part of the course, we will look at some of Machiavelli’s heirs and how they appropriated and modified his thought, eventually laying the foundations of liberal democracy. Our readings will include Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. We will end by looking briefly at one of the great critics of modern political life, Friederich Nietzsche.

 

Texts:

  • Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince and Discourse on Livy (Mansfield translation)
  • Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan
  • John Locke, Second Treatise of Government
  • Friederich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

 

Course Requirements:

  • Short paper (25%)
  • Midterm Exam (25%)
  • Final Exam (35%)
  • Attendance and Frequent Quizzes (15%)

 


GOV 355M • Environmental Politics

38465 • Rivera, Michael
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SZB 330
show description

 

Rivera Course Description

 

Course number:  GOV 355M (Unique: 38465)

Course Title:  Environmental Politics

 

Description:

This course examines U.S. environmental policies. Students will learn the basic tools of policy analysis and will apply them to a variety of issues and proposed policy solutions.  Some of the topics we will cover include air quality, water quality, oil drilling, and U.S. energy policy.  We will cover the incentives and behaviors of relevant policy actors such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Congress, and the courts.  While this course focuses on U.S. politics, we will discuss the international logic of environmental policy.  This course will also address health issues that may arise because of environmental factors. 

 

Texts:

Eugene Bardach, A Practical Guide to Policy Analysis (CQ Press), 4th ed. Strongly recommended.

Additional readings will be posted on canvas.

 

Assignments and grading:

2 exams (40% of grade)

3 written assignment (50% of grade)

In-class participation (10% of grade)

 

Prerequisites: 6 semester hours of lower division coursework in Government

 

Flags: Writing 


GOV 355M • World War I In Real Time

38470 • Wolford, Michael
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.216
show description

GOV 355M World War I in Real Time

 

Prerequisites:

None

 

Course description:

This course follows events in the opening months of the First World War, which broke out in August 1914, exactly one hundred years after the outbreak of war. Each week, we will follow events as they happened a century before, beginning with the causes of the war in the July Crisis of 1914, the initial campaigns on the Western and Eastern Fronts, the disaster at Gallipoli, and the expansion of the war around the world through 1915. We will engage modern, cutting edge theories and evidence about the origins and conduct of war to shed new light on why "the seminal tragedy of modern times" occurred when it did and on what we can learn from it in the present.

 

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on three exams, occasional quizzes and impromptu writing assignments, as well as a brief analysis paper.

 

Texts:

-    Hastings, Max. 2013. Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War. Knopf.

-    Philpott, William. 2014. War of Attrition: Fighting the First World War. Overlook.

 

GOV 388L.7 Theory & International Relations

 

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing in Government; Introduction to Formal Political Analysis

 

Course description:

This is an applied formal theory course focused specifically on theories of international relations. Students will engage both foundational and cutting edge formal models in the areas of international security, international political economy, and international institutions. Key components of the course include reading and deconstructing models, solving and interpreting one’s own models (developed in the course), and establishing linkages between theoretical and empirical models.

 

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on the basis of several replications of individual models and a final paper based on a fully-solved and interpreted theoretical model.

 

Texts:

-    Wolford, Scott. 2015. The Politics of Military Coalitions. Cambridge University Press.

-    Morrow, James D. 2014. Order Within Anarchy. Cambridge University Press.


GOV 355P • Political Sociology

38474 • Charrad, Mounira
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as SOC 320K)
show description

Course Description:

This course surveys classical theories and major contemporary debates in political sociology.  It is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the different theoretical perspectives on the study of power and politics. The empirical focus of the course includes the US and other countries and the approach is comparative-historical.  We consider issues such as state building, nations, civil society, political parties, elites, social movements, protest, and democracy.  We discuss recent developments both in the US and internationally. Students use major theories and concepts in Political Sociology to make analyze these events.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  This is a Writing Flag course that involves writing papers, revising them, and giving comments to your peers on their writing.  Course requirements include one position paper and 2 papers, a team presentation and participation in class discussions. Grading is as follows: Position Paper (500 words): 10%; Paper no. 1 (750 words):  20%; Paper no. 2 (1200 words):  40%; Team presentation: 10%; Class participation: 10 %; Peer review of papers: 10%.  

Papers are evaluated in terms of quality of research, depth of thought, strength of argument, and clarity of expression (i.e., writing style).  Presentations are done in teams.

Text/Readings:

Karl Marx, Communist Manifesto, On line at UT Library

Tocqueville, Democracy in America.  On line at UT Library. Author’s Introduction, chs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8. 

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.  One Line at UT library.  Preface, Intro, chs 1, 2, 4 a.  TO CHECK AND CONSIDER SHORTENING READING.

Dan Smith, The State of the World Atlas.  8th ed. Penguin. 2008 (Atlas).

Daniel Chirot, Contentious Identities:  Ethnic, Religious and Nationalist Conflicts in Today’s World. Routledge. 2011.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

M. M. Charrad, “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State-building in Kin-based Societies.” In Patrimonial Power in the Modern World.  Annals, Vol 636, July 2011. On Line at UT Library.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course. They are used to cover current events.  

 

 

 


GOV 357M • Civil Liberties

38480 • Abramson, Jeffrey
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM GAR 0.128
show description

Course Listing

Government 357: Law and Liberty in America

Professor Jeffrey Abramson

Wednesdays 4-7

 

Course Description:  

In this seminar, we will attempt to bring together the study of public law, American Government and political theory by exploring the legal and philosophical principles underlying court decisions on civil liberties.  For 2016, topics to be covered include: (1) the role of religion in public life; (2) freedom of speech and national security; (3) privacy and reputation, especially in regard to social media; (4) sexual orientation; (5) racial and sex discrimination; and (6) affirmative action.

 

Books for Purchase:

1.   Sullivan and Gunther, Constitutional Law (18 ed.)

2.   Sullivan and Gunther, 2016 Supplement to Constitutional Law (optional)

3.   Eisgruber and Sager, Religious Freedom and the Constitution

4.   Mill, John Stuart, On Liberty

5.   Rawls, A Theory of Justice

 

Prerequisites:

Upper-division standing required.  Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Grading Policy

This course will be graded on the plus or minus system. 

Attendance and Participation:  25% of grade

Seminar term paper: first draft due November 5:  35% of grade

Seminar term paper: final draft due December 3:  40% of grade 


GOV 357M • Constitutional Interpretatn

38485 • Perry, H
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 3.122
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Constitutnl Struct Of Power

38490 • Jacobsohn, Gary
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Gov 357M - CONSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURES OF POWER

 

The focus of this course is on one of the most vital aspects of politics: interpreting and applying the nation's fundamental rules. This interpretive activity is critical in regard to the Constitution for the simple reason that the document defines us as a people.  Constitutional law is thus best viewed as an extended commentary on the meaning of America.  As such it lies at the heart of a liberal arts education. More specifically, we examine constitutional structures of power by exploring contests over authority from John Marshall and Thomas Jefferson to Barack Obama and the Tea Party. Some of the topics to be considered include: the powers of the federal and state governments, the executive's emergency powers, and the Supreme Court's authority to nullify the acts of other branches. Under these general headings are to be found such issues as the power to regulate firearms, the power to establish a national health care system, the power to overturn a judicial decision through congressional action, the power to deprive citizens of rights during wartime, the power to define the terms of impeachment, and the power to decide the outcome of a presidential election. A recurring question is the role of judicial review in a constitutional democracy, how one justifies the possession of this extraordinary power by an essentially undemocratic institution in a regime committed to accountability in policy-making. Much of the reading is of Supreme Court opinions that highlight the politics of constitutional development. 

 

Grading policy:

 

Two written exercises (30% each) and a final exam (40%).

 

Texts:

 

Donald P. Kommers , John E. Finn, and Gary J. Jacobsohn, American Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Democracy (Vol. 1, 3rd ed.)

 

Robert G. McCloskey, The American Supreme Court (5th ed.)


GOV 357M • Law Of Politics

38495 • Sager, Alan
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CLA 1.106
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Global Governance

38520 • Chapman, Terrence
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420
show description

GOV 360N  Global Governance

 

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states design and agree to international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  Part of the course will be theoretical/conceptual, introducing students to the latest academic approaches to understanding the role of international law and organizations.  A second component will be applied — examining international agreements, international law, and international organizations in contemporary international life — ranging from IMF interventions in Greece and beyond to the Iranian nuclear accord to international tribunals and the international criminal court.  

 

Readings:

 

Jeffery Freiden, David Lake, and Ken Schultz. 2015. World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions. Third addition.   W.W. Norton and Norton & Co. 

Other readings made available electronically through the library’s subscriptions to news and academic periodicals.

 

Grading:

 

25% expert discussion leading/reaction paper

25% class participation

25% exam 1

25% exam 2


GOV 360N • International Organizations

38505 • Mosser, Michael
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SZB 296
show description

GOV 360N: The Theory and Practice of International Organizations

Fall 2016

Department of Government

The University of Texas at Austin

Unique ID: 38505

 

Dr. Michael W. Mosser

                          Course location: SZB 296

Office:  Mezes 3.222

Course time: TTh 2:00 pm-3:30 pm

Phone: 512.232.7280

Office hours: W 1000 – 1100

Email: mosserm@austin.utexas.edu

(and by appointment)

 

Course concept

 

This advanced undergraduate course is designed to give the student an in-depth introduction to the theory and practice of international organizations. During the semester, students will learn the history of international organizations from early examples such as the League of Nations to contemporary instances such as the United Nations and the institutions essential to global trade and development. Students will also learn how these organizations are structured, the challenges they face, and their prospects for the future. Finally, students will learn how non-governmental organizations (NGOs) develop, and how they relate both to nation-states and to other international organizations.

Structure of the course:

The course is divided into four sections. Part One of the course will be a combination of the theory of international organization (i.e., why international organizations matter), and the early history of their creation and maintenance. Students will learn why international organizations matter to international relations and how international organizations can help to shape decisions made by all actors involved.

 

Part Two of the course will examine four specific international organizations: the United Nations (UN), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization (WTO). The UN portion of Part Two will show the UN as the only example of a global security international organization. The IMF, World Bank, and WTO portion will highlight these institutions as prominent examples of global economic organizations.

 

Part Three will discuss international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). It will principally cover the following questions: How do INGOs differ from more traditional IOs? Why have they become the focus of so much recent attention in international relations scholarship, as well as the general news media? What makes INGOs act the way they do? This section of the course is illuminated with case studies of Amnesty International, Greenpeace, and Doctors without Borders (MSF). We also look briefly at the cases of the Earth Liberation Front (ELF), Sea Shepherd and WikiLeaks, to determine whether or not they might be considered to be NGOs.

 

Finally, Part Four looks at the future of international organizations and their continued relevance to international relations in the face of strong unilateralist tendencies on the part of the major powers of the international system.

Course requirements:

This course has two in-class mid-term exams and a take-home final exam. Each midterm exam will be worth 25% of your overall grade. The final will be worth 30% of your overall grade.

 

Class discussion in a an upper-level seminar is more than expected; it is a given. Everyone has his or her own style of discussion, and I do not expect to turn those who prefer not to speak often in class into debate champions. Nevertheless, I do expect that each of you to post one discussion question per week in the online discussion forum. Participation grades will be given on a five-point basis (100, 95, 90…) and will be determined on the last class day. Coming to class every day but never participating will earn you a grade no higher than an 80. The discussion posting will count for 15% of your grade and in-class participation will comprise 5% of your course grade.

 

So that we can discuss points raised in the online postings in Thursday’s class, discussion questions for the week on which I am lecturing will be due by 5:00 pm every Wednesday (unless directed otherwise). They should be drawn from the readings or current news events and should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors. They most definitely will help you get the most from the class. I will prepare the first set of discussion questions as a template for future assignments.

 

The total number of discussion postings will be counted at the end of the semester, and also will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

 

  • 12-15 postings: Full credit
  • 8-11 postings: 70% credit
  • 5-7 postings: 50% credit
  • Less than 5 postings: No credit

 

A word on late or missed assignments. Over the course of the semester, it is inevitable that some event will cause a time management issue, which might lead to a missed assignment deadline. Though normally handled on a case-by-case basis, there are some baseline penalties for missed or delayed assignments, detailed here:

o   Missed exams will receive a 5% deduction per day until made up.

o   Discussion postings will not be counted on an individual-post basis, but will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

Required Readings:

This course will use the following books as primary texts:

 

1      Thomas Weiss and Rorden Wilkinson, 2013. International Organization and Global Governance. Routledge. ISBN: 978-0415627603

2      Linda Fasulo, 2015. An Insider’s Guide to the UN (Third Edition). Yale University Press. ISBN: 978-0300203653

3      Ngaire Woods, 2007. The Globalizers: The IMF, the World Bank, and Their Borrowers. Cornell University Press. ISBN: 978-0801474200

4      Amrita Narlikar, 2005. The World Trade Organization: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 978-0192806086

 

In addition to the books above, this course will utilize scholarly articles, “applied academic” pieces from think tanks and policy research organizations, and relevant information from IO websites to provide a broad and wide-ranging set of readings.  The majority of readings for the course will be taken from scholarly articles related to the theory and practice of international organizations. Most of these will be available online from the PCL. Those that are not accessible due to PCL holding limitations will be made available as PDFs on Canvas. Befitting an upper-level class, the reading load is somewhat larger than you may be used to. I will make every effort to address the main points of the readings in class, but do not expect a synopsis or a replay of the readings. It is up to you to bring up questions you may have had while doing the readings.

 

Recommended Readings:

 

  • Strunk, William and E.B. White (2000). Elements of Style, 4th edition. (Pearson Allyn & Bacon)

Suggested news sources:

Grading standards:

I will use the following grade standards. All grades will be converted to a 100-point scale.

 

  • 93 and higher: A
  • 90-92: A-
  • 87-89: B+
  • 80-86: B
  • 77-79 B-
  • 75-76 C+
  • 70-74 C
  • 67-69 C-
  • 60-66 D
  • lower than 60: F

 

Other important information

 

Plagiarism / academic misconduct:

 

Don’t do it. Minimum penalties for cheating are zeroes on quizzes or exams where the cheating takes place, and a grade of F on a paper that has been plagiarized. Questions about what constitutes academic misconduct should be brought to my attention.

 

Undergraduate Writing Center: 

 

The Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: (http://www.uwc.utexas.edu/) offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

 

University of Texas Honor Code:

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.  Any student found guilty of scholastic dishonesty may receive an “F” in the course and be remanded to the appropriate University of Texas authorities for disciplinary action.  For more information, view Student Judicial Services at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.

Religious Holidays:

According to UT-Austin policy, students must notify the instructor of an impending absence at least 14 days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If a student must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, the student will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Student Privacy: 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) requires that student privacy be preserved.  Thus the posting of grades, even by the last four digits of the social security number, is forbidden.  All communication will remain between the instructor and the student, and the instructor will not be able to share details of the student’s performance with parents, spouses, or any others.

Documented Disability Statement:

The University of Texas will make reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

Emergency Evacuation Policy:

In the event of a fire or other emergency, it may be necessary to evacuate a building rapidly.  Upon the activation of a fire alarm or the announcement of an emergency in a university building, all occupants of the building are required to evacuate and assemble outside.  Once evacuated, no one may re-enter the building without instruction to do so from the Austin Fire Department, University of Texas at Austin Police Department, or Fire Prevention Services office.  Students should familiarize themselves with all the exit doors of each room and building they occupy at the university, and should remember that the nearest exit routes may not be the same as the way they typically enter buildings.  Students requiring assistance in evacuation shall inform their instructors in writing during the first week of class.  Information regarding emergency evacuation routes and emergency procedures can be found at http://www.utexas.edu/emergency


GOV 360N • International Security

38517 • Miller, Paul
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 278
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Internatl Busn & Politics

38510 • Jensen, Nathan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.302
show description

Professor

Nate Jensen

Professor of Government

Office: Office hours TBA.

Email: natemjensen@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @NateMJensen

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In this class we will explore the literature in political science, management, and economics on the relationship between multinational enterprises and governments.  The four main themes of the course are: 1) defining and understanding multinational enterprises, 2) governments attracting and competing for multinationals, 3) the impact of multinationals on economic development and groups within society, and 4) attempts to regulate multinationals both domestically and internationally. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course students will be able to analyze business and government relations from the perspectives of firms, governments, and societal actors. The specific objectives include:

ü  Understand how politics affects the investment decisions of multinational firms

ü  Identify the ways in which politics affects the operations of firms

ü  Articulate how “political institutions” shape the business environment for firms.

ü  Explain the types of strategies firms use to mitigate “political risk” or influence politics.

ü  Be able to support and defend arguments on if the overall impact of multinational enterprises on society is positive or negative. In what ways do they have a positive impact on development? What are the costs?

ü  List the different contemporary policy debates on the role of multinational corporations in society and the numerous government policies uses to attract investment.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

Participation (10%)

 

In-class Midterm Exam (25%): 

The midterm exam will consist of a number of short answer and essay questions.  Students are expected to know the basic arguments from all readings and have the ability to synthesize these works in broad essays (e.g. summarize the impact of FDI on development).

 

Take-home Final Exam (25%)

The final exam is a take-home exam handed out on the last day of class (April 23rd).  This cumulative exam will consist of broad essay questions.  You will select two of the four questions and hand in your answers on the day of the assigned final.

 

Entrepreneurship Assignment (40%)

 

One major requirement in this course is an entrepreneurship assignment where students combine a research project with creative solutions to a substantive problem in the global economy.  You are to pick one of the four options below.  The final paper project should be 10-12 pages, 12 point font, double spaced.  The assignment should be issue centered, where you’re not citing sources for the sake of showing you read a lot of stuff, but with the goal of introducing a problem and forwarding an innovative solution as clearly as possible.  On the final day of class all of the students are expected to present their work in the form of a poster.  The entrepreneurship assignment is worth 50% of your final grade with the following grade breakdown.

Three Page Research Paper Proposal - 5%

Literature Review - 5%

Poster Presentation - 10%

Final Paper - 20%                                                                                                                                           

100%

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Class Schedule

Class 1:  Introductions

Class 2:  Overview:  What are Multinational Corporations?

  • Jensen et al. 2012. Politics and Foreign Investment.  Chapter 1.
  • IBM Global Location Trends. 2013.
  • Pankaj Ghemawat.  2007. Why the World Isn’t Flat. Foreign Policy 159: 54-60.
  • Marcus Alexander and Harry Korine.  2006.  When You Shouldn’t Go Global.  Havard Business Review.

Class 3: Why do firms become multinational?  The OLI Framework.

  • James Markusen.  1995.  The Boundaries of Multinational Enterprises and the Theory of International Trade.  Journal of Economic Perspectives9 (2): 169-189.
    • Note: Focus on the OLI framework and understand the basics of the “knowledge capital model” of FDI
  • John Dunning. 1995.  Reappraising the Eclectic Paradigm in an Age of Alliance Capitalism.  Journal of International Business 26 (3): 461-491.
  • Eden, Lorraine. 2003. A Critical Reflection and Some Conclusions on OLI. In John Cantwell and Rajneesh Narula (eds.) International Business and the Eclectic Paradigm: Developing the OLI Framework. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Collis, D., Montgomery, C. 2008. Competing on Resources. Harvard Business Review.

Class 4:  Liability of Foreignness and Political Risk

  • MIGA. 2013.  World Investment and Political Risk.  Chapter 1.
  • Ravi Ramamurti.  2001.  The Obsolescing Bargaining Model.  Journal of International Business Studies 32 (1): 23-39.
  • Thomas Brewer.  1993.  Government Policies, Market Imperfection, and Foreign Direct Investment.  Journal of International Business Studies 24 (1): 101-120.
  • Sandy Walker.  2012.  A New Economic Nationalism? Lessons from the PotashCorp Decision in Canada.  FDI Perspectives.
  • Sophie Meunier et al.  2012.  Economic Patriotism: Dealing with Chinese Direct Investment in the United States.  FDI Perspectives.

Class 5:  Institutions and Risk

  • Jensen et al. 2012. Politics and Foreign Investment.  Chapter 2.
    • Rachael Wellhausen.  Forthcoming.  Investor-State Disputes: When Can Governments Break Contracts? Journal of Conflict Resolution.   
    • Witold Henisz. 2000.  The Institutional Environment for Multinational Investment. 

Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization 16 (2): 334-64.

  • Karl P. Sauvant.  2012.  The Times They are A-Changin’ -- Again -- in the Relationships between Governments and Multinational Enterprises: From Control, to Liberalization to Rebalancing.  FDI Perspectives.

Class 6: Political Influence and Corruption and the Developing World

  • Andrei Schleifer and Robert W. Vishney.  1993. Corruption. Quarterly Journal Economics 108 (3): 599-617.
  • Mara Faccio.  2006. Politically Connected Firms. American Economic Review 96 (1): 369-386.
  • Peter Rodriguez, Don Siegel, Amy Hillman and Lorraine Eden. 2006. Three Lenses on the MNE: Politics, Corruption and Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of International Business Studies 37 (6): 733–746.
  • Yadong Luo.  2001.  Toward a Cooperative View of MNC-Host Government Relations: Building Blocks and Performance Implications.  Journal of International Business Studies 32 (3): 401-419.
  • New York Times.  JPMorgan Tracked Business Linked to China Hiring. Dec 7, 2013.

Class 7:  Efforts to Attract Investment/Midterm Review (Guest Speaker)

  • Readings to be announced

Class 8:  Midterm Exam

Class 9: Firms and Influence in Developed Countries

  • Stephen Ansolabehere, John M. de Figueiredo, and James M. Snyder. Why is There So Little Money in U.S. Politics?  Journal of Economic Perspectives 17 (1): 105-130.
  • Wendy L. Hanson and Neil J, Mitchell.  2000.  Disaggregating and Explaining Corporate Political Activity: Domestic and Foreign Corporations in National Politics.  American Political Science Review 94 (4): 891-903.
  • Sandy Gordon and Catherine Hafer.  2005.  Flexing Muscle: Corporate Political Expenditures as Signals to the Bureaucracy.  American Political Science Review 99 (2): 245-261.
  • Doris Fuchs. 2007. Business Power in Global Governance, pages 43-70
  • Check out your representative: http://www.opensecrets.org/

Class 10: The Impact of FDI on Development I

  • Theodore Moran. 1998. Direct Investment and Development, pages 1-84
  • Beata Smarzynska Javorcik and Mariana Sparareanu.  2005. Disentangling FDI Spillover Effects: What Do Firm Perceptions Tell Us? In TH Moran, EEM Graham, and M Blomstrom (eds.) Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development. Washington DC: Peterson Institute.
  • Saurav Pathak, André Laplume and Emanuel Xavier-Oliveira.  2012. Inward Foreign Direct Investment: Does it Enable or Constrain Domestic Technology Entrepreneurship?  FDI Perspectives.

Class 11:  Impact of FDI on Development II

  • Theodore Moran.  Beyond Sweatshops.  Chapters 1-3
  • Ann Harrison and Jason Scorse. 2008. Multinationals and Anti-Sweatshop Activism. American Economic Review 100 (1): 247-273.
  • Layna Mosley and Saika Uno.  2007.  Racing to the Bottom or Climbing to the Top? Economic Globalization and Collective Labor Rights.  Comparative Political Studies 40 (8): 923-948.   

Class 12: Policy Issues: Outsoucing, Tax Havens, and Financial Incentives for Investment

  • Daniel W. Drezner.  2004. The Outsourcing Bogey.  Foreign Affairs.
  • James Hines Jr. Treasure Islands. Journal of Economic Perspectives 24 (4): 103-124.
  • Kenneth P. Thomas. 2011.  Investment Incentives and the Global Competition for Capital.  FDI Perspectives.
  • Nathan M. Jensen and Edmund J. Malesky. 2010. FDI Incentives Pay—Politically.  FDI Perspectives.
  • George Kahale, III. 2011.  The New Dutch Sandwich: The Issue of Treaty Abuse.  FDI Perspectives. 

Class 13: Special Topics: Public Policy

  • Readings to be announced

Class 14: Class wrap-up, Presentations of Projects


GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38515 • Wellhausen, Rachel
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 100
show description

GOV 360N • International Political Economy

Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of international political economy. Its primary focus will be the role of politics and government decision-making in international economic relations. To this end, we will examine three core areas of IPE: the politics around international trade, the international monetary system, and investment by multinational corporations. The course begins with a discussion of analytical approaches to IPE. We will use these approaches to address topics as diverse as financial crisis, trade and investment treaties, development policies, exchange rates, and the history of international monetary relations. While no prerequisites are required, students will benefit from a familiarity with macroeconomics.

 

Grading Policy:

Attendance, participation, quizzes   20%

Exam 1                                        20%

Exam 2                                        30%

Final Exam                                   30%

 

Texts:

Frieden, Jeffry, David Lake, and J. Lawrence Broz. 2010. International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth. 5th edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

Oatley, Thomas. 2011. International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy. 5th edition. Pearson Longman.


GOV 362L • Government Research Internship

38525 • Amick, Joseph
Meets F 3:00PM-6:00PM CLA 1.102
show description

Government Research Internship

 

No prerequisites

 

This course is the first semester of a year long program to introduce undergraduate students to the research process in the social sciences. In this program, students will get hands on experience by engaging in research projects in the areas of peace and development. Students will also have the opportunity to develop and present their own research ideas in the form of a research proposal. Throughout the course, we will discuss issues encountered when conducting applied social science research. Students are required to take both semesters of this year long research course. 

 

Students will be graded based on contributing to the overall team research as well as on individual research projects.

 

Texts: Kellstedt, Paul, and Guy Whitten. The Fundamentals of Political Science Research. Cambridge University Press, 2013.


GOV 365L • Governments/Politics Se Asia

38535 • Liu, Amy
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Unique: 38535/31675

GOV 365L/ANS 361: Governments/Politics SE Asia

Closing limit: 30

Flag: GC

TTH 8:00am-9:30am, MEZ 1.102

 

 

Prerequisites

Students wishing to enroll in this class must have taken a foundational course in government or Asian studies. The course also assumes basic knowledge of world history and geography.

 

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the politics of Southeast Asia. The course is divided into three parts. In the first part, we will study the democracies in the region – post-Suharto Indonesia, pre-National Front Malaysia, and post-Marcos Philippines – and how they compare to the United States. In the second part, we will learn about the different institutions employed by dictators to stay in power, whether it is the royal family (Brunei), the military (Suharto Indonesia), the party structure (National Front Malaysia), or personal charm (Sukarno Indonesia and Marcos Philippines). In the final part, we will examine whether democracies or dictatorships are better at facilitating economic development.

 

Grading Policy

Your final grade is composed of the following four parts:

  1. Weekly quizzes: 25%
  2. Midterm examination: 25%
  3. Final examination: 25%
  4. Short writing assignment or coding project: 25%

 

Texts

D.R. SarDesai. 2012. Southeast Asia: Past and Present. 7th Edition. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Note: Student Economy 7th Edition (2015) acceptable.

 

 


GOV 365L • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

38544 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

International Relations of East and Southeast Asia

GOV 365L-3 (#38544)/ANS 361 (#31687)

Global Cultures Flag

 

Fall 2016

 

Prof. Patricia L. Maclachlan

TTH 2:00-3:30, CLA 0.112

 

Prerequisites:

 

6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description:

 

This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the major themes and topics in the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia: “Great Power” (China, Japan, and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the impact of nationalism and historical memory on intra-regional affairs.  Along the way, we will explore the ongoing North Korean nuclear threat, tensions between China and Taiwan, and the United States’ so-called Asia Pivot, as well as basic theoretical approaches to the study of international relations.

 

Grading Policy:

 

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts:

 

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    Victor Cha, The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future (2012)

         3.    Daniel Chirot, Gi-Wook Shin, and Daniel Sneider, eds., Confronting

                 Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies (2014)

 

 Additional readings will be provided to students via Canvas at the beginning of the semester.


GOV 365L • State Build In China/Taiwan

38540 • Lu, Xiaobo
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM SZB 524
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

GOV 365L/ANS 361: State Building in China and Taiwan

 

Course Description:

 

This course compares and contrasts the state building process in mainland China and Taiwan from 1950 to today. While both regimes were under the authoritarian rule at the beginning of the 1950s, why did Taiwan democratize but not China? Meanwhile, does the democratic politics in Taiwan generate any implications for the democratic future of China? By comparing the state building process under the Chinese

Communist Party (CCP) and Kuomingtang (KMT), students will gain a better understanding of the theories and implications of the interaction between political development and economic development. This course aims to provide students a deeper understanding of theories of state building with regional knowledge of greater China.

 

Prerequisite:

 

None

 

Grading Policy

 

Course attendance   20%

In-class debate        25%

Midterm exam         25%

Final exam              30%

 

Flags: Global Cultures.


GOV 365N • Australian Society & Polit

38565 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.120
show description

Rhonda Evans

GOV 365N Australian Society and Politics

38565

TTH 2:00-3:30 PM

GAR 0.120

Description: Australia is the principal democratic, economic, and military power in the Southwest Pacific.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples inhabited the continent and its surrounding islands for some 50,000 years before Europeans arrived.  In 1788, British colonization began with establishment a penal colony near present-day Sydney.  Six distinct colonies federated voluntarily in 1901 to form the Commonwealth of Australia. Today, the country boasts a multi-ethnic population of 22 million, dispersed unevenly across a landmass nearly the size of the lower 48 US states.  It has served as a key US ally since World War II. While Australia retains special ties to Britain and the US, it has become an important economic and political actor in the Asia Pacific region, with strong trading links to China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea, the Philippines, and, increasingly, India. This course will (1) provide a succinct overview of Australia’s history and constitutional development; (2) examine the country’s political institutions and party politics; and (3) consider distinct opportunities and challenges that Australia faces across a range of domestic and foreign policy areas, including energy, trade, immigration, welfare, and issues concerning its Indigenous population. Throughout the course, Australia will be compared and contrasted with Texas, the US, and the other Anglo-American democracies – Britain, Canada, and New Zealand.  

Requirements: (1) Three exams, each worth 25% of the final grade.  The last of these will be cumulative and administered during the final examination period.  All exams will include a combination of essay, short-answer, multiple-choice, and true-or-false questions.  (2) A research project that involves data analysis and visual presentation of data plus a written assignment will be worth 25% of the final grade. Students who anticipate missing more than two or three classes are advised not to enroll as are students who are unwilling to read two relatively compact books and a collection of articles.

Required Reading Materials:  (1) Stuart Macintyre, A Concise History of Australia, 4th ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2016); (2) Ian Ward and Randal G. Stewart, Politics One,4th ed. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012); additional readings will be made available on Canvas or in a course packet.


GOV 365N • Comparative Legal Systems

38575 • Brinks, Daniel
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Germany And Immigration

38547 • Laubenthal, Barbara
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 337
(also listed as EUS 348, GSD 360)
show description

A massive influx of refugees, conflicts about cultural diversity and religion, debates on the lack of highly-skilled workers - immigration currently is at the top of the German public agenda. However, discussions on immigration are taking place in a political climate much different from twenty years ago. Until the year 2000, despite being a major destination for international migration, Germany defined itself as a non-immigration country and aimed at preventing permanent immigration. However, for some years now, the integration of migrants has become a central aim and in some fields the country even pursues a pro-active immigration policy. What factors have encouraged this change, and how has immigration changed German society and culture? These are the questions that the course will address. Applying a historical perspective and using central theories and concepts of contemporary migration research, we will analyze recent changes in the fields of labor migration, asylum and undocumented migration and the integration of migrants. We will ask how the changes that have taken place are reflected on a cultural level, looking at the (contested) incorporation of Islam in German society, the reflection of immigration in contemporary art, movies and novels, and regional and civil society initiatives to preserve the memory of immigration.

The course aims at providing students with a profound knowledge of the main characteristics of Germany as an immigration country and on the current central empirical research topics on immigration in Germany. It also aims at enabling students to understand and apply central theories and concepts of contemporary migration studies beyond the case of Germany. At the end of the course, students should also be able to understand and assess Germany’s profile as an immigration country in comparison to other immigration countries such as the United States.

Texts

  • Borkert, Maren/Bosswick, Wolfgang (2011): The Case of Germany, in: Zincone, Giovanna/Penninx, Rinus/Borkert Maren (eds.): Migration Policymaking in Europe. The Dynamics of Actors and Contexts in Past and Present, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 95-128.
  • Bretell, Caroline/Hollifield, James F. (2006): Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines (2nd edition). London: Routledge.
  • Göktürk, Deniz/Gramling, David/Kaes, Anton (eds.) (2007): Germany in Transit. Nation and Migration, 1955-2005, Berkeley, CA: California University Press.
  • Green, Simon (2013): “Germany. A changing country of immigration,” German Politics, 22 (3), 333-351

Grading

  • 2 Writing Assignments (3 pages)   20 %
  • Participation and Homework          20 %
  • Oral Presentation                          20 %
  • Final Paper                                   40 %

GOV 365N • Global Evol Spec Op Forces

38550 • Pedahzur, Ami
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ 1.120
show description

Course Description:

 

The course will focus on the global rise of special operations forces since the dawn of the 20th century. We will explore the different explanations regarding the circumstances that facilitated their proliferation. In particular, we will explore four overlapping vectors. The rise of asymmetrical wars, continuous leaps in military technologies, increasing sensitivity to military casualties, and the professionalization of armed forces worldwide. We will draw on case studies from every major global conflict over the last 120 years.

 

Textbook:

 

We will rely mostly on articles.

 

Assignments:

 

Two take home exams each consists of three questions (each 40%).

Active participation in class (20%).


GOV 365N • Intl Dev And Global Justice

38553 • Gerring, John
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.120
show description

 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & GLOBAL JUSTICE

 

GOV 365N

 

John Gerring

 

This course examines the question of global justice.  Key questions are as follows:

1. What is global justice? How could/should this concept be defined and measured? If we take the view that wellbeing (aka human development) is a key element of justice, what indicators of wellbeing should we choose? What does it mean to be lacking in basic resources? What is the lived experience of poverty? What non-material elements of wellbeing deserve to be considered?

2. What patterns of wellbeing can be discerned across countries, within countries, and through time? Does global inequality go hand-in-hand with intra-country inequality? Does income go hand-in-hand with other aspects of human development and with happiness?

3. What explains human development? Is it (a) geography and infrastructure, (b) colonialism and slavery, (c) macroeconomic policy and international political economy, (d) agricultural policy (e) demography, (f) health policy, (g) human capital and education policy, (h) political institutions, (i) culture, or (j) some admixture of the above?

 

Course Requirements:

 

Grades will be based on the following components, equally weighted (25% each): (a) class attendance and participation; (b) midterm exam; (c) final exam, and (d) research paper.

 

Textbooks:

 

Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 1992. Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. Berkeley: University of California Press.

 

Banerjee, Abhijit; Roland Benabou; Dilip Mookherjee (eds). 2006. Understanding Poverty. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

download syllabus


GOV 365N • Iss Third-World Development

38570 • Elkins, Zachary
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 214
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Politics Of Devel Policies

38555 • Lu, Xiaobo
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.210
show description

GOV 365N : Politics of Development Policies

 

Course Description:

 

Why do some development policies succeed but others fail? What are the political processes behind these policies in developing countries, particularly those countries with weak political institutions? How can understanding the political aspects of decision-making and implementation improve policy design and sustainability?

 

By examining these questions, this course analyzes the political economy of policies for economic and social development in developing countries. This course will first discuss the building blocks of political economy analysis by studying several key factors determining the policy making and implementation process. For example, what are the dominant cleavages in different societies, and how do different cleavages shape the policymaking process? What are the formal and informal institutions that aggregate these interests into policy-making? How do domestic actors and international players affect the design and implementation of development policies? Finally, we will discuss the effects of local elite capture and corruption, which are prevalent problems in many developing countries.

 

After laying down the foundation of political economy analysis, this course then turns to various specific issues related to development policies around the world. Specifically, we will spend time evaluating the successes and failures of a number of policies, such as privatization, foreign aid, education policies, and poverty alleviation programs.

 

 

Prerequisite: Although I don’t have a formal prerequisite for this course, familiarity with microeconomics and macroeconomics as well as quantitative methods would enhance your learning in this course. This course is only open to juniors and seniors. If you are a freshman or sophomore, you need my approval before you can enroll in this course.

 

Grading Policy

 

Course attendance    15%

Policy debate                         25%

Weekly Reading Presentation 25%

Class Project              35%


GOV 370K • African American Politics

38595 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as AFR 374D)
show description

African-American Politics

GOV 370K/AFR 374D

 

 

Description

 

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

Prerequisites

 

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required text books for this course, which are available at the University Co-op:

 

Walton, Hanes, Jr. and Robert C. Smith. 2014.  American Politics and the African American Quest for Universal Freedom.  7th  Edition. New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

 

Philpot, Tasha S., and Ismail K. White, eds. 2010. African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                              20%

3 Critical Essays                                 45%

Exam 2                                             20%

Quizzes and in-class assignments       15% 


GOV 370K • Frm Ferguson To The Favelas

38580 • Hooker, Juliet
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 214
(also listed as AFR 374E, LAS 337M)
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Description:

This course will explore the range of black political mobilization in the Americas. It will begin by comparing the different racial orders developed in the U.S. and Latin America, and analyze the way in which black populations throughout the Americas have mobilized to escape slavery, to gain rights from the state, and to protect black life and resist various forms of dehumanization. In particular the course will focus on how blacks have responded to moments of racial terror, including lynching in the U.S. in the twentieth century, current protests against police violence that have crystallized in the Black Lives Matter movement, and analogous mobilization against “black genocide” in Brazil and other parts of Latin America. The course will also pay special attention to gender and sexuality, and to how black women and queer black folks have historically participated in and shaped black political movements even as they faced stigma as a result of misogyny and homophobia. 

 

 Readings:

  • Marx, Anthony W. Making Race and Nation: A Comparison of South Africa, the United States, and Brazil. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
  • Angela Davis, Women, Race, and Class.
  • James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time
  • The Black Panther Party, “Ten Point Program,” “The Correct Handling of a Revolution,” “Fear and Doubt,” “The Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements,” “Prisons,” in To Die for the People: Huey Newton (City Lights Books, 2009), p. 3-6, 14-19, 77-156, 221-224.
  • Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider
  • Andrews, George Reid. Afro-Latin America, 1800–2000. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • Wade, Peter. Race and Ethnicity in Latin America. London: Pluto Press, 1997.
  • Abdias do Nascimento, “Quilombismo: An Afro-Brazilian Political Alternative,” Journal of Black Studies, 11(2), 141-178.
  • Abdias do Nascimento, “Genocide: the Social Lynching of Africans and their Descendants in Brazil,” in Brazil: Mixture or Massacre? Essays in the Genocide of a Black People (Majority Press, 1989), p. 59-93.
  • PBS documentary, Black in Latin America

 

Grading:

  • 2 short reflection essays: 15% each
  • Final paper: 35%
  • In-class group presentation: 15%
  • Participation: 20%

GOV 370K • Latino Politics

38590 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM GAR 0.102
(also listed as LAS 337M, MAS 374)
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Course Description:

This course will introduce you to the political experiences of the United States Latino populations in the present and historically.  The course begins with a discussion of political identity: what does it mean to be Latino, Hispanic, or Chicano, and what are the politically relevant commonalities and differences in Latino communities.  We then discuss Latino political history, starting with the Spanish empire but focusing particularly on the 19th and 20th centuries in Texas and the southwest.  In doing so, we will study Latino political movements, organizations, and important individuals.  Moving to recent decades, the class examines Latino inputs into the American political system – particularly public opinion, voting, and the role of gender in politics.  The class also discusses the two largest non-Mexican national-origin groups in the U.S.: Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans.  We then explore the growing voice of Latinos in political institutions, such as the U.S. Congress and state legislatures.  Lastly, the class covers key policy issues for Latino communities, particularly education and immigration.   

Grading Policy:

Midterm: 30% 

Final: 40% 

Writing assignment: 20% 

Class participation and engagement: 10%   

Texts:

Garcia, F. Chris, and Gabriel Sanchez. 2007. Hispanics and the U.S. Political System: Moving Into the Mainstream. New York: Prentice Hall.  ?

Gutierrez, David. 1995. Walls and Mirrors: Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the Politics of Identity. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Coursepack 

Flag: Cultural Diversity


GOV 370L • Congressional Elections

38615 • Theriault, Sean
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 101
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Election Campaigns

38605 • Luskin, Robert
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SZB 416
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American Election Campaigns (GOV 370L)

 

            This course comes in four intermingled parts.  The bulk of our meetings will be as a seminar, meaning that we, not I, shall discuss the readings (see below).  The next largest share will be devoted to a computer simulation of a U.S. Senate election.  Your candidate may make personal appearances, produce and air campaign commercials, make appeals by direct mail, fund-raise, conduct polls, and so on, and the outcome will depend on the choices you and your opponents make.  One or more other sessions are usually given over to guest speakers who have been involved in election campaigns in one capacity or another.  And, finally, since this is a Writing Flag course, several sessions will be devoted to discussions of writing and written assignments.

 

            Past semesters’ speakers have included Tom Craddick, a Texas State Representative and formerly Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives; U.S. Representative Henry Cuellar; Justice Bob Gammage, late of the Texas Supreme Court and before that a U.S. Congressman; Bernard Rapoport, a longtime Democratic activist and fundraiser (and former Chair of the UT Board of Regents); Royal Masset, Political Director of the Republican Party of Texas; Dave MacNeely, a journalist covering state and national politics for the Austin-American Statesman; William P. Hobby, the former Lieutenant Governor; Susan Hendrix of H & C Media, a Democratic media consultant; Dean Rindy and Cynthia Miller of Rindy Miller Garcia Media, also Democratic media consultants; David Weeks and Suzanne Erickson of Media Southwest, a Republican media consultant who has worked for Rick Perry and Kay Bailey Hutchinson, among others; Blaine Bull of Public Strategies, Inc., a major consulting firm; Matthew Dowd, once of Public Strategies, Inc., more recently of the Bush 2000 and 2004 campaigns and Bush administration, and now a prominent national political commentator; Mark MacKinnon, also of Public Strategies, Inc., the principal media advisor to George W. Bush’s 2000 and 2004 campaigns and to John McCain’s 2008 nomination campaign, and now a prominent national political commentator and founder of the No Labels movement; Bill Emery and Peck Young of Emery and Young, a Democratic consulting firm; Dan Bartlett, an alumnus of this course who served as a spokesman for Governor Bush and the Bush 2000 campaign and later as Communications Director in the Bush White House; and Karl Rove, formerly of Karl Rove & Company, a Republican consulting firm, later the chief political strategist for the Bush 2000 and 2004 campaigns and Counselor to President Bush), and now (does anyone not know all this?) a prominent national political commentator and principal of American Crossroads, a major Republican super-PAC.   

 

            There are no formal prerequisites beyond eligibility to take upper division Government courses.  The goal is for students to learn and think about contemporary American election campaigns—about both how they work and the ways in which that may be desirable or undesirable.  There will be no exams, but a heavy reading load and two papers drawing on the readings.  You will also be asked to provide written feedback on another student’s paper.  The papers, feedback, and contributions in class discussion will be the means of assessing how far individual students have met the course goal.

 

            Your grade will be based on your class participation and the two papers.  Class participation—including attendance, participation in class discussion, effort in the simulations, and your feedback on another student’s first-draft first paper—will count for 25%.  The papers—graded 55% on the basis of substance and 45% on the basis of writing—will count for 75%.  The course grades will include pluses and minuses, as merited. The substance grade rests heavily on your making generous, appropriate, and sensible use of the assigned readings.  Attendance is required, and there is a penalty (in the participation grade) for every unexcused absence beyond a quota of two.

 

            The reading load is unusually heavy, and I do sometimes ask students about their reactions to the readings.  So, even though the two papers are the only written assignments, and there are no exams, this is not a course for the faint-hearted.  Be warned! 

 

Likely Texts

            I may revise the syllabus and readings over the summer, but neither is likely to change radically.  I expect to assign:

 

Herbert B. Asher.  2010.  Polling and the Public: What Every Citizen Should Know (8th ed.).          Washington, DC:  CQ Press.

 Robert S. Erikson and Kent L. Tedin.  2014.  American Public Opinion (9th ed., updated).  New York, NY:  Longman.

William H. Flanigan, Nancy H. Zingale, Elizabeth A. Theiss-Morse, and Michael W. Wagner.       2014.  Political Behavior of the American Electorate (13th ed.).  Washington, DC:  CQ    Press. 

Paul S. Herrnson.  2011.  Congressional Elections: Campaigning at Home and in Washington       (6th ed.).  Washington, DC:  CQ Press.

Sasha Issenberg.  2013.  The Victory Lab: The Secret Science of Winning Campaigns.  New           York, NY:  Broadway Books.

 Daniel M. Shea, Will Miller, and Michael John Burton.  2015.  Campaign Craft:  The       Strategies, Tactics, and Art of Political Campaign Management (5th ed.).  Westport, CT:        Praeger.

John Sides, Daron Shaw, Matt Grossman, and Keena Lipsitz.  2013.  Campaigns and Elections: Rules, Reality, Strategy, Choice (2012 Election Update ed.).  New York, NY:  W.W.                     Norton. 

James A. Thurber and Candice J. Nelson (eds.).  2013.  Campaigns and Elections American Style (4th ed.)  Boulder, CO: Westview.

Darrell M. West.  2013.  Air Wars:  Television Advertising and Social Media in Election    Campaigns 1952-2012 (6th ed.).  Washington, DC:  CQ Press.

William Strunk, Jr., and E.B. White.  1995.  The Elements of Style (3rd ed.).  New York:  Allyn     and Bacon.

 

Robert’s Rules (a guide to writing), to be posted online.

Course packet, consisting of On the Campaign Trail (a manual to the simulation that also contains a great deal of information about real-world campaigns), to be available from Paradigm, and a supplementary set of instructions, to be posted online.


GOV 370L • Leader/Follower In Am Polit

38620 • Buchanan, Bruce
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.102
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GOV 370L

Leaders and Followers in American Politics

Fall 2016 topic:  Presidential Power and Accountability

 

Course Description

 

 

Unique: 38620

Closing limit: 24

Flags: Wr

TTH 9:30-11am, MEZ 2.102

 

 

Professor Bruce Buchanan

 

 

Course Content and Objectives

 

            Presidential Power and Accountability is a discussion course (with occasional lectures) whose fall 2016 topic is the uses and abuses of presidential power during the Bush and Obama Administrations.  Its goals are to increase your understanding of the topic while sharpening your thinking, research, writing and speaking skills. All course requirements are aimed at helping you to achieve these goals.

 

Responsibilities

 

                                                            Preconditions

 

  1. 1.    Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by 1/2 letter grade per subsequent absence).
  2. 2.    Daily reading of relevant stories in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal or Washington Post
  3. 3.    Timely completion of news and text reading assignments

           

           

                                                            Graded categories

 

  1. 1.    Mid-Term and Take-Home Final Examinations on common readings, relevant presidential news and instructor presentations (40%)
  2. 2.    Research Project Formal presentation  (25%
  3. 3.    Research Project rough draft and12 page final report (25%)
  4. 4.    Regular participation in discussions (10%)

 

Required Readings  

 

Savage, Charlie. 2015. Power Wars. Little, Brown

Readings Packet and Canvas articles TBA.


GOV 370L • Political Psychology

38624 • Bullock, John
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 1.134
show description

Examination of mental processes that underpin political judgments. Conformity and social pressure, the influence of political parties and other groups, reactions to political news, common decision-making heuristics and biases, and causes and effects of political ignorance. Emphasis on the political thinking of ordinary citizens, with some attention to political elites.


REQUIRED COURSE BOOK
Milgram, Obedience to Authority.

Journal articles and book chapters from other sources will also be required. They will be made available to students through Canvas. (There will not be a printed course reader.)


GOV 370L • Politics Of Food In America

38625 • Sparrow, Bartholomew
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM PAR 206
show description

The Politics of Food in America       

Government 370L, Fall 2016

The University of Texas at Austin

 

MW: 4:30-6:00 pm, SZB 370

Professor Bartholomew Sparrow                            

Office: Batts Hall 3.142                    

Telephone: 512.232.7207                                       

Email: bhs@austin.utexas.edu

 

I. Course Description

“The Politics of Food in America” examines the fundamentally political nature of food.  What is grown, harvested, produced, distributed, bought, served, and consumed are in large part the consequences of political decisions and government actions.  They are the result of public policy. 

The course addresses the political economy of agricultural practices and food consumption in the United States.  The first section of the course considers dimensions of the current reality of food in America.  The second section looks at the role of interest groups and other stakeholders in food policy.  The third section examines several food policies, such as crop subsidies, food stamps and school lunch programs, the genetic modification of plants and animals for food purposes, and foreign trade.  The last section of the course addresses the future of food.

Food policy encompasses the whole of the political system: from the individual behavior of farmers and ranchers, to the group actions of companies, trade associations, commercial scientists, and food industry lobbyists, to the three institutions of government—the US Congress, the executive branch (presidential leadership as well as the USDA, FDA, FTC, etc.), and the courts—to the global system of trade, energy, pollution, and climate change, and to restaurants, cafeterias, institutional food services, and consumers in their kitchens.

Lectures, readings, and class discussion will be supplemented group exercises: students will be assigned into five- or six-person teams and be responsible for one class day each.  Students will also have two individual activities: a review of a movie about food and a journal and analysis of what they ate over 48-hr. period and where it came from.

 

II. Materials

Required texts (all paperback):

            • Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

• Timothy Pachirat, Every Twelve Seconds, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011.

• George Franklin, Raisin Bran and other Cereal Wars: 30 Years of Lobbying for the Most Famous Tiger in the World.  iUniverse, 2014.

• Other readings (“P” in the course schedule) will be available in a course packet at Jenns Copy, 2200 Guadalupe (lower level), 512-473-866

III.  Grades:

 

A. Quizzes (5 out of 6 total)                                                                             35%

 

B.  Take-home final                                                                                           20%

 

C. Team Exercises                                                                                            20%

 

D. Food Log and Analysis Paper                                                                    15%

 

E.  Film review                                                                                                     5%

 

F.  Class Participation, Attendance and Extra Credit                                        5%


GOV 370L • Public Opinion/Representation

38600 • Wlezien, Christopher
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 1
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Public Opinion and Representation

Department of Government

University of Texas at Austin

Christopher Wlezien

Wlezien@austin.utexas.edu

Course Description

This course examines the relationship between the public and elected officials in representative democracy.  It builds on democratic political theory but focuses mostly on empirical practice, particularly in the United States (US).  Special attention is paid to the representation of public opinion in the composition of elected bodies, the positions politicians take, and government policy actions themselves.  Along the way, we consider the roles played by characteristics of issues, electoral competition, political institutions, and political inequality, among other things.  By the end of the course, students should have a good sense for how well and why elected officials represent the public in the US. 

Course Format

The course will consist of lectures and discussion.  Thus, while the course is not a seminar, class participation is essential.  Student will need to keep up with the substantial reading and then be prepared to participate.  To encourage this, students will receive extra credit based on the quality—not just quantity—of their contributions to class discussion.  (See the description of “Grades” for details.)

Grades (tentative)

The main graded components for this class are the midterm and final examinations. Performance in the class will be assessed as follows:

  40%         General class performance

  60%         Final examination

+0-5 %      Participation

NOTE: A short “think” paper may be required in lieu of a final examination, in which case the final examination would be replaced by a 2nd midterm examination worth 40% of the final grade and the paper would be worth 20%. 

Readings

The course readings will include numerous articles and books, including the following:

 

Brunell, Thomas. 2008.  Redistricting and Representation: Why Competitive Elections are Bad for America.  Routledge.

Mezey, Michael L. 2008.  Representative Democracy: Legislators and their Constituents.  Rowman and Littlefield.

Erikson, Robert S., Gerald C. Wright, and John P. McIver. 1993.  Statehouse Democracy: Public Opinion and Policy in the American States. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Soroka, Stuart and Christopher Wlezien. 2010.  Degrees of Democracy: Politics, Public Opinion and Policy.  New York: Cambridge University Press.


GOV 370L • Urban Politics

38610 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 379S • Money In Amer Politics

38650 • Roberts, Brian
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350, LAH 350)
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This course explores the nature and consequences of money in American politics and why, at this point in history, we find ourselves embroiled in the most significant debate over campaign finance reform in over thirty years. The debate goes to the heart of the U.S. Constitution, pitting the First Amendment rights of speech and assembly against the perceived fairness and efficacy of a republican government awash, some claim, in increasingly unaccountable money.

     Campaign finance issues lie at the crossroads of a bewildering number of analytical perspectives.  We (must) examine the work of historians, social scientists, legal scholars, and interested parties on all sides of the debate in an effort not only to assess current policy debates but also to understand how we got here.  During the course we confront and seek answers to a host of questions, including, but by no means limited to,

   - How will corporations respond to the Supreme Court’s recent decision permitting unlimited political advertising?

   - Why did most 2008 presidential candidates abandon the system of public financing for presidential elections? -Why

     does the public believe that corporations play such a large role in funding federal election campaigns?    

    -Why does the Supreme Court allow public perceptions to determine the constitutionality of campaign finance laws?

    -Why do U.S. Senators refuse to report their campaign finance activity electronically to the Federal Election

      Commission?  

    -How and why is the Internet treated differently than other means of political communication by campaign finance 

      laws?

     -What are the consequences of unlimited individual contributions to state election candidates in Texas?

Texts and Works:

Corrado, Anthony, et al. The New Campaign Finance Sourcebook. 2004. Washington D.C.: Brooking Institution; Corrado, Anthony and David Magleby Financing the 2008 Election. 2010. Washington D.C.: Brooking Institution; McChesney, Fred. Money For Nothing: Politicians, Rent Extraction, and Political Extortion.  1997. Cambridge: Harvard University Press; Urofsky, Melvin., Money & Free Speech: Campaign Finance Reform and the Courts. 2005. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press. Other readings as assigned.

Grading Policy:

     In addition to a midterm exam and meeting expectations of strong class participation, students engage in two significant projects over the course of the semester, first in the role of campaign finance consultants advising either a candidate or a political action committee, and second as members of a legal team preparing for a (marginally fictitious) Supreme Court case confronting the constitutional challenges posed by campaign finance laws.


GOV 662L • Government Rsch Internship-Dc

38530
show description

Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites and/or other Restrictions:

Acceptance into the University of Texas, Archer Fellowship Program

Course Description: This course will focus on the role of media, the Congress, the

President and other governmental and non-governmental actors in the policy-making

process. Through a variety of sources (academic texts, newspaper and journal articles,

websites, blogs, advocacy papers) we will look at (and hopefully reconcile) the textbook

and “real world” versions of how policy is made in Washington, D.C.

This course is divided into four phases where we will use a variety of techniques

(lectures/discussion, in-class presentations and guest speakers) to gain a better

understanding of the policy-making process. In Phase I, we will discuss how policy is

defined: where ideas come from and who plays a role in defining what we consider to be

important policy problems. In Phase II, we will look at how policy is made and how the

structures of our unique form of government affect the policy-making process. In Phase

III we will meet with policy-makers to hear their first hand accounts of the policy-making

process and finally, in Phase IV we will try to understand the policy-making process

through a legislative simulation and class discussions/debates of some of the important

issues of the day.


GOV 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

38645 • McIver, John
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 112
show description

GOV 679HA Course Description/McIver

 

Description

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence designed to help a select group of motivated students complete a Senior Honors thesis.   Students develop an initial research question, hypothesize an answer and propose a research strategy to test that hypothesis.  The research question is the student’s own as is the choice of advisor.  In most cases, students develop a question and then seek advice as to which member of the department faculty might be aide them in answering their question. 

The primary product of the fall semester is “Chapter 1”, a 20-25 page summary of the project to be completed during the spring semester.  This paper includes a research question or hypothesis to be considered, a review of the existing literature on the topic, a research design, a plan for the completion of the project and an extended bibliography of relevant documents. 

Throughout the fall semester writing assignments build on the students’ research interests as well as attempt to engage the student more broadly in the craft of writing.  Students develop bibliographies of prior research, writing and re-write literature reviews, provide proposed research designs, develop a preliminary/short version of Chapter 1 prior to a final chapter 1 of 20-25 pages plus figures, tables and references.

Classwork also engages practical issues underlying research.  A representative of the Office of Research Support regularly attends to describe the process of studying (and protecting) Human Subjects.  The School of Undergraduate Studies/Office of Undergraduate Research provides assistance in training class members in the creation of research posters.  

Requirements

Admission is restricted to applicants who apply during the prior spring semester. Applicants must show ability to sustain a 3.5 GPA in Government and to be accepted for mentoring by a faculty advisor.

 

Textbooks

As needed for individual projects.

 

Grading

 

Preliminary writing exercises

Term paper

Attendance and Participation



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121