The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV F310L • American Government-Wb

83010 • Shaw, Daron
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This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV F312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

83015
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV F312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

83020 • McDonald, Patrick
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GOV 312L:  US Foreign Policy

Since its founding, the United States has played a central role in shaping the larger international political order.  American victories in World War I, World War II, and the Cold War coupled with its support for democracy and open global markets stand at the heart of this legacy.  At the same time, external pressures in the form of war, globalization, and the spread of transnational ideological movements have stressed American institutions and shaped an evolving American national identity.  This course explores this mutually interactive relationship by examining the making of American foreign policy over the past two centuries more broadly.  It explores such topics as American entry into World Wars I and II, the role of Congress in foreign policy making, the construction of the national security state in the twentieth century, competing partisan conceptions of America’s national interest, the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and proliferation, territorial expansion, trade liberalization, nation building, humanitarian intervention, and more recent challenges like terrorism.  As part of this broad overview, the course will also explore the moral and ethical dilemmas of many foreign policy challenges faced by the United States. Should the United States ever use torture when combatting its enemies?  Does the U.S. have an interest or even an obligation to promote democracy abroad?  When is military intervention justified?  What is our moral obligation to address global warming?

This course fulfills the second half of legislative requirement for government and may be counted toward the ethics and leadership flag requirement. May be taken for credit only once.  

Course meets ONLINE delivered through MODULES, which are short pre-recorded lecture segments and associated activities delivered through Canvas.  Modules are completed ON-DEMAND by students when their schedule allows.  However, students are REQUIRED to complete a pre-set number of modules and their associated activities by pre-determined deadlines multiple times each week.  Students will complete two exams and write one essay with due dates spread out over the summer term.   

Students are encouraged to visit http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/  to test their computer and network connection and learn about the course structure.

 

Grading Policy:

Module quizzes/exercises:            15%

Exam 1:                                     35%

Exam 2:                                     35%

Participation:                              15%

 

Required Textbook:

  • None, readings will be drawn from articles that are accessible through the UT library’s website

GOV F344L • Intro To Comparative Politics

83025 • Mosser, Michael
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 214
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GOV344L: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Summer 2017

Unique ID 83025

Department of Government

The University of Texas at Austin

 

Instructor: Dr. Michael Mosser

Course location: WAG 216

Office:  Mezes 3.232

Course time: M-F 1130-1300

Phone: TBD

Office hours: MW 0900 – 1115

Email: mosserm@austin.utexas.edu

(and by appointment)

 

 

 

 

Course concept:

The political world is highly complex, and yet we interact with it on a daily basis. At the international level, leaders gather to discuss issues that affect them individually and collectively, while the impact of their decisions on the people of their country depends enormously on the style of government and its representativeness. This course serves as the introduction to the sub-discipline of political science known as comparative politics. The course introduces the student to key concepts in the comparative study of political systems, including these key questions: why do we compare and how do we compare?

Required readings:

There are two required texts for this course: Comparative Politics by David J. Samuels (Pearson, 2013) and Case Studies in Comparative Politics also by David J. Samuels (Pearson, 2013). They are available as a set from the Co-Op using ISBN number 020588783X. There will also be various supplementary academic journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Average reading load will be around 40 pages/class, with some lighter and some heavier classes.

 

Assignments and grading:

This class will have two midterm exams and a final exam. Each exam will be worth 25% of your overall grade. 


GOV F360N • Internatl Political Economy

83030 • Wang, Di
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM SZB 278
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International Political Economy

 

Instructor: Dr.Di Wang

 

Prerequisites

While no prerequisites are required, a familiarity with macroeconomics is strongly recommended for success in this course. 

 

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of international political economy (IPE), an interdisciplinary field related to international politics and international economics. It examines how domestic and international politics influence the economic relations between countries. Why do governments promote or oppose globalization? Why do countries cooperate economically in some situations but not others? Why do countries adopt bad economic policies? We will address these questions and others with a focus on the policies of international trade (the flow of goods), foreign direct investment (the flow and location of production), and financial and exchange rate policies (the flow of capital).

 

Grading Policies

Grade component

Percent

Class attendance/participation

15

Policy debate

25

Midterm exam

30

Final exam

30

Total

100

 

Required Textbook

The following book is required for this course and available from the University Coop Bookstore. All other readings will be made available to students through Canvas.

 

Oatley, T. H. (2012). International political economy. Boston: Longman.


GOV F365N • Politics Of New Democracies

83040 • Goodnow, Regina
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 420
(also listed as LAS F337M, REE F335)
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Course Description

The fall of the Berlin Wall, the implosion of the Soviet Union, the end of apartheid in South Africa, the “Arab Spring” uprisings, and the Maidan Revolution in Ukraine—all represent moments of regime transition. Some occur through violent means and others through peaceful negotiation; some result in democracy and other do not. These differences are at the heart of one of the biggest questions in the political science subfield of comparative politics: Why do some countries attain (and also sustain) democracy, while others do not? The course introduces the key debates in the literature, including theories pertaining to political culture, institutional design, civil society, and the international context. The course will evaluate the different arguments on the basis of concrete examples worldwide, including post-communist Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.

 

Grading Policy

Take-home Essay 30%

First Midterm Exam 30%

Second Midterm Exam 30%

Participation Quizes 10%

 

Texts

1. Christian W. Haerpfer, et al., Democratization, Oxford University Press, 2009.

2. A course packet with a selection of book chapters and articles.


GOV F365N • Suicide Terrorism

83045 • Martin, Nancy
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CLA 0.128
(also listed as MES F341)
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N. Susanne Martin

Suicide Terrorism F365N

Summer 2017

University of Texas at Austin

Course Description:

Suicide attacks as a tactic of terrorism and warfare have captured widespread attention in recent years.  This attention follows in large part from the devastating ways in which suicide attacks have been employed, the lethality of these types of attacks, and concerns over how to counter their use.  In this course, students explore some of the most important questions in the study of suicide terrorism:  What is (and is not) suicide terrorism?  Where do these tactics originate?  Why and under what conditions do individuals and groups resort to suicide attacks?  How might these types of attacks be deterred?   Answers to each of these questions are the topics of debates in the study of suicide terrorism.  During this course, students will study historical and contemporary examples of the uses of suicide tactics and learn about the groups and individuals that have used them.  Drawing on discussions of the above questions and case studies, students will evaluate explanations for the uses of suicide tactics and explore issues associated with how to counter suicide terrorism.  Throughout the course, students will learn about the types of research being conducted in the study of suicide terrorism and the types of resources that are available to conduct this research.  Course objectives will be assessed through assignments, quizzes, and exams.  

Grading:

Assignments 15%

Quizzes 30%

Midterm exam 25%

Final exam 30%

Texts:

Assigned readings include online sources, primarily journal articles and book chapters available through the University of Texas Libraries, along with references to online resources, such as the U.S. State Department, descriptions of groups and attacks, and databases.  Most assigned texts will be available for download from the University of Texas Libraries website and/or Canvas.


GOV F370L • Congress And The Presidency

83050 • Prindle, David
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM CLA 0.102
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Gov. 370L.10, “Congress and the Presidency”

Summer, 2017

David Prindle, Professor, Government Department

 

Class prerequisite:  Upper-division standing in Government.

 

DESCRIPTION:

The first third of this class is about Congress as an institution, the second third is about the Presidency as an institution, and the final third is about individual Presidents.

The purposes of this class are to help students become better scholars and citizens by helping them to understand how to apply the concepts of political science to an understanding of the functioning of the American political system, and by showing them how to compare the normative concepts of the public interest and democratic theory to the actual functioning of national institutions. 

 

GRADING POLICY:

In general, each of the three tests in this class will be counted equally; that is, each will count one‑third toward the final grade.  At the end of the semester, the three numerical scores will be averaged, and final grades will be assigned on the basis of the conventional scale: 92.3 and above will receive an “A” in the course, 90 to 92 will receive an "A minus," 88 to 89.7 will receive a "B plus," 82.3 to 87.7 will receive a “B,” 80 to 82 will receive a "B minus," 78 to 79.7 will receive a "C plus," 72.3 to 77.7 will receive a “C,” 70 to 72 will receive a "C minus," 68 to 69.7 will receive a "D plus," 62.3 to 67.7 will receive a “D,” 60 to 62 will receive a "D-minus, and below 60 will receive an “F.”  Anyone missing a grade (that is, anyone failing to take a test or turn in an essay) will also receive an “F.”  I may make some small adjustments in these averages to reflect the quality of contribution to class discussion.

 

TEXTS:

  • Lawrence Dodd and Bruce Oppenheimer (eds.) Congress Reconsidered 11th edition  (CQ Press, 2017; see note below)
  • Michael Nelson (ed.) The Presidency and the Political System 10th edition (CQ Press, 2014; see note below)
  • Roger Davidson, Walter Oleszek, and Frances Lee, Congress and Its Members, 15th edition  (CQ Press, 2016; see note below)
  • Steven E. Schier, ed., Debating the Obama Presidency (Rowman and Littlefield, 2016)
  • Some news articles, to be distributed in class

 

NOTE:  Instead of making students purchase the three CQ Press books, and then assigning them to read only some of the chapters, I will choose relevant chapters from each and put them into an electronic textbook, which students can access through the CQ Website.  The cost to download all the chapters will be considerably less than the cost of the three paper books.  However, students must buy or otherwise acquire a copy of the Steven Schier book, which is not published by CQ Press.


GOV S310L • American Government-Wb

83110 • McDaniel, Eric
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This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV S312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

83120 • Moser, Robert
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GOV 312L:  US Foreign Policy

Since its founding, the United States has played a central role in shaping the larger international political order.  American victories in World War I, World War II, and the Cold War coupled with its support for democracy and open global markets stand at the heart of this legacy.  At the same time, external pressures in the form of war, globalization, and the spread of transnational ideological movements have stressed American institutions and shaped an evolving American national identity.  This course explores this mutually interactive relationship by examining the making of American foreign policy over the past two centuries more broadly.  It explores such topics as American entry into World Wars I and II, the role of Congress in foreign policy making, the construction of the national security state in the twentieth century, competing partisan conceptions of America’s national interest, the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and proliferation, territorial expansion, trade liberalization, nation building, humanitarian intervention, and more recent challenges like terrorism.  As part of this broad overview, the course will also explore the moral and ethical dilemmas of many foreign policy challenges faced by the United States. Should the United States ever use torture when combatting its enemies?  Does the U.S. have an interest or even an obligation to promote democracy abroad?  When is military intervention justified?  What is our moral obligation to address global warming?

This course fulfills the second half of legislative requirement for government and may be counted toward the ethics and leadership flag requirement. May be taken for credit only once.  

Course meets ONLINE delivered through MODULES, which are short pre-recorded lecture segments and associated activities delivered through Canvas.  Modules are completed ON-DEMAND by students when their schedule allows.  However, students are REQUIRED to complete a pre-set number of modules and their associated activities by pre-determined deadlines multiple times each week.  Students will complete two exams and write one essay with due dates spread out over the summer term.   

Students are encouraged to visit http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/  to test their computer and network connection and learn about the course structure.

 

Grading Policy:

Module quizzes/exercises:            15%

Exam 1:                                     35%

Exam 2:                                     35%

Participation:                              15%

 

Required Textbook:

  • None, readings will be drawn from articles that are accessible through the UT library’s website

GOV S312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

83115
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV S314 • Intro M East: Adj/Chg Mod Tm

83125
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as HIS S306N, MES S301L)
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The responses of the societies of the Middle East and North Africa (Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Israel, and the Arab world) to Western cultural and political challenges, primarily since about 1800.     


GOV S335N • Southern Political History

83130 • Enelow, James
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM CBA 4.332
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SOUTHERN POLITICAL HISTORY

Summer 2017

 

Required Reading

Steve Bickerstaff, Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom DeLay, University of Texas, 2007.

Earl Black and Merle Black, The Rise of Southern Republicans, Harvard University Press, 2002.

William J. Cooper, Jr. and Thomas E. Terrill, The American South: A History, Volumes I and II, Fourth Edition, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009

 

Description

The course will review the political history of the American South from the 1780s to the present. In the first part of the course, we review the events which transformed the South from a region of progressive nationalism from the 1780s to the 1810s to a region of defensive sectionalism from the 1820s to the 1860s. Touching briefly on the Civil War, we then take up Reconstruction, “Redemption,” and the agrarian movement of the late 19th century, followed by the period of the “Solid South” in the first half of the 20th century. Next we examine the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, followed by the rise of southern Republicans in the late 20th century. Lastly, we examine Texas’s congressional redistricting in 2003.

 

Exams and Grades

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. The exams are not cumulative. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 points on all three exams. The raw scores on the three exams are added and the total raw scores are then curved to determine your final grade, approximating the following distribution: 30% A’s, 35% B’s, 20% C’s, 10% D’s, and 5% F’s. Plus and minus grades will be given for total raw scores falling above or below the boundary lines between grades. There is no extra credit. A make-up exam (not multiple-choice) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. 



  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121