The Department of Government
The Department of Government

Al Martinich


Affiliated FacultyPhD, University of California at San Diego

Roy Allison Vaughan Centennial Professor in Philosophy
Al Martinich

Contact

  • Phone: 512-484-8186
  • Office: WAG 416A
  • Office Hours: TH 10:30-11:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: C3500

Biography


A specialist in the history of modern philosophy and the philosophy of language, his books include Communication and Reference (1984), The Two Gods of Leviathan (Cambridge, 1992), A Hobbes Dictionary (Blackwell, 1995), and Thomas Hobbes (St. Martin's, 1997). His book, Hobbes: A Biography (Cambridge, 1999) won the Robert W. Hamilton Faculty Book Award for 2000. He has also translated Hobbes' Computatio sive logica: Part One of De Corpore (1981), is co-editor with David Sosa of the leading anthology on The Philosophy of Language (sixth edition, Oxford, 2013), and also co-editor with David Sosa of Analytic Philosophy: An Anthology (second edition, Wiley, 2012) and A Companion to Analytic Philosophy (Blackwell, 2001). He is Vice-President of the Board of Directors of The Journal of the History of Philosophy, and has twice held NEH Fellowships. He has lectuerd extensively in Chine and has published articles in which he applies analytic philosophy to Chinese philosophy.

Courses


PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

41540 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 214
(also listed as R S 305)

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will. Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or not rational about the views expressed in each.

PHL 327 • Interpretation And Meaning

41690 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A218A

Communication consists of two aspects: what the speaker means by her utterance and what the audience understands by it. While most philosophers of language have concentrated on the speaker's side, there is increasing interest in the audience's side. This seminar focuses on understanding or interpretation, especially on the interpretation of texts. Since interpretation is the attempted identification of meaning, the nature of meaning will also be discussed.

Our main goal will be to figure out what interpretation is and what properties a good interpretation has. This goal requires that we understand what people bring to texts and what means they have to understand them. 

Our views about meaning and interpretation will be tested against various texts, some simple and some complex, in various genres: literary, religious, historical, political, legal, and philosophical. Principles of interpretation will be evaluated according to how useful they are in understanding these texts.

Readings include works by Donald Davidson, H. P. Grice, W. V. Quine, and John Searle. 

 

CTI 335 • Origins Of Liberalism

33090 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 210
(also listed as EUS 346, PHL 354)

Liberal democracy is the theory that individual persons are free and equal and thus have certain rights that must be respected by governments. The theory behind liberalism developed from or competed with several traditions such as democracy, republicanism, and absolute sovereignty. The theory was influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It will cover such political and religious events as The Gunpowder Plot, Charles I’s Personal Rule, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War and the execution of King Charles I, the Commonwealth, the Restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution. Some crucial works in political philosophy by some great political philosophers, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed along with lesser but still significant theorists such as John Milton. The political relevance of some literary works, such as John Dryden’s Absalom and Achitophel, will also be discussed.

Key concepts to be discussed include liberty, democracy, the social contract, and the nature of authority and obligation.

PHL 381 • Political Phil: Hobbes/Locke

41725 • Fall 2015
Meets M 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two of the greatest political philosophers of all time. This seminar will focus on their political philosophies, which include discussions of the original condition of human beings (the state of nature), the origin of government, the scope and limits of sovereignty (government), the justification of revolution, and the nature and place of religion within a society. The final week will be devoted to David Hume’s political philosophy.

Grading

Class participation: 30%

Final Essay 70% (14-20 pages; 4000-6000 words; due on the last day.)

Texts

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, (edited by either Edwin Curley, J. C. A. Gaskin, A. P. Martinich, or Richard Tuck).

John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (Cambridge UP)

A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 4th  ed. (Wiley-Blackwell) 

 

 

This seminar satisfies the History requirement.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

41705-41730 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.130
(also listed as CTI 310, R S 305)

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will. Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or not rational about the views expressed in each.

PHL 327 • Interpretation And Meaning

41945 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 308

Communication consists of two aspects: what the speaker means by her utterance and what the audience understands by it. While most philosophers of language have concentrated on the speaker's side, there is increasing interest in the audience's side. This seminar focuses on understanding or interpretation, especially on the interpretation of texts. Meaning will be discussed as necessary.

Our main goal will be to figure out what interpretation is and what properties a good interpretation has. This goal requires that we understand what a person brings to a text and what means she has to understand it.

Our views about meaning and interpretation will be tested against important and controversial texts in various genres: literary, religious, historical, political, legal, and philosophical. Principles of interpretation will be evaluated according to how useful they are in understanding these texts.

Readings include works by Donald Davidson, H. P. Grice, W. V. Quine, John Searle, 

CTI 335 • Origins Of Liberalism

34200 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 308
(also listed as PHL 354)

Description (one to three paragraph description of course content):

Liberal democracy is the theory that individual persons have certain rights that must be respected by governments and cannot be violated merely to improve the condition of the state. Key concepts to be discussed include liberty, democracy, the social contract, and the nature of authority and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from or competed with several traditions such as democracy, republicanism and absolute sovereignty, which were influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It will cover such political and religious events as The Gunpowder Plot, Charles I’s Personal Rule, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War and the execution of King Charles I, the Commonwealth, the Restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution. Some crucial works in political philosophy by some great political philosophers, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed along with lesser but still significant theorists such as John Milton. The political relevance of some literary works, such as John Dryden’s Absalom and Achitophel will also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as dictated by the topic and student interest.

 

List of Proposed Texts /Readings:

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan revised edition (edited by Martinich and Battiste) (Broadview)

John Locke, Two Treatises of Government

Robert Buchholz and Newton Key, Early Modern England, 1485-1714

A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell)

 

Proposed Grading Policy:

Class Participation and Assignments: 20%

In term tests: 30%

First Essay: 1,000-2,500 words: 10%

Research Essay: 4,000-7,000 words: 40%

T C 302 • Uses And Abuses Of The Bible

43380 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.122

TC 302: Uses and Abuses of the Bible

Room: CRD007B                   Time: 2:00-3:30

Fall, 2014

Office hours: to be determined. at Einstein Bros. Bagels on the Drag, and by appointment.

Professor A. Martinich, WAG 416A, martinich@mail.utexas.edu

 

Description: The Bible has influenced political, literary, and philosophical works for two thousand years. In addition to reading and discussing large part of the Bible, parts of the Qur'an, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan, will be among the major works read and discussed. The Bible both prescribes standards of ethical conduct and challenges some. Some of the most compelling stories in the Bible are about the nature of human beings and how they should behave.

We begin by reading Genesis, Exodus, parts of the books of Samuel and Kings, Job, the Gospel  according to Matthew and the one according to Mark. We want to understand what the authors of these books meant; and we want to look at some ways that they were used and understood by later ages. This includes some ancient works about related events that were not included in the Bible.

Mohammed believed that Moses and Jesus were prophets, but some of the Qur’an’s stories conflict with those in the Bible. Thomas Hobbes tried to reconcile the Bible with modern scientific theory; and John Milton used the Bible to create the greatest epic poem in English. Students may explore related topics or authors, according to their interests.

This course contains a substantial writing component.

 

Texts/Readings

Genesis (New Oxford Study Bible); Exodus 1-24;  Job (cc. 1-3; 38-42); Gospels According to Mark and Matthew, and of John (cc. 1, 8, 21-22); 1 Corintians 15; selections from the Apocrypha; Qur’an (suras 1-5, 7, 10-14, 19-20, 37, 101-114),Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (cc. 31-39, and 44), John Milton, Paradise Lost (books 1, 3-5, 9, 12), and A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd edition.

 

Assignments

Essay assignment 1: due Sep 4: 5%

Essay 2: due Oct 2 (in two versions: 100-200 words and 500-700 words): 10%

Essay 3: due Nov 4 (in two versions: 200-300 words and 1,200-2,000 words: 20%

Essay 4: due Dec. 5 2,000-3,300: 35% (The final essay must be a revision of essay 2 or 3 and must be 1000-2000 words longer than the original essay.)

Class discussion: 20%

Final examination: 10 %

 

A. P. Martinich, Roy Allison Vaughan Centennial Professor in Philosophy, Professor of History and Government, is the author or editor of more than fifteen books. His book Hobbes: A Biography (Cambridge University Press) won the Roy Hamilton Best Book Award in 2000. His book The Philosophy of Language 5th edition (Oxford University Press) has been the standard text in the field for twenty-five years. He is currently editing The Oxford Handbook of Hobbes. He is vice-president of the Board of Directors of The Journal of the History of Philosophy.He received the Chet Oliver Teaching Award in 2008.  

 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

43145-43170 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM ART 1.102

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

43500 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Graduate standing and consent of graduate advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

 Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two of the greatest political philosophers of all time. This seminar will focus on their political philosophies, which include discussions of the original condition of human beings (the state of nature), the origin of government, the scope and limits of sovereignty (government), the justification of revolution, and the nature and place of religion within a society.

The first class meeting will provide the context of seventeenth century philosophy as a preparation for a close reading of Hobbes and Locke. We will also discuss Introduction” of Leviathan, “Preface” of Two Treatises of Government, and chapter 1 of Book I of On the Social Contract during the first class.

Grading

Class participation: 30%

Final Essay: 70% (10-15 pages; 2500-4000 words; due on the last class day.)

Texts

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, (edited by either Edwin Curley, J. C. A. Gaskin, C. B. Macpherson, A. P. Martinich, or Richard Tuck).

John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (edited either by Ian Shapiro (Yale UP or by

Peter Laslett, Cambridge UP).

A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd ed. (Blackwell).

Recommended: A. P. Martinich, Hobbes (Routledge)

 

This course satisfies the History requirement

CTI 310 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

34185-34195 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM WAG 420
(also listed as PHL 305, R S 305)

This course investigates four attitudes of beliefs that have been held about the relations of humans to God. The first is an ancient view, according to which God's existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will. Second is a medieval view, according to which the existence of God and his various attributes are suitable subjects for proof and arguments. Third is a modern view that God exists but that little is known about Him and that, in any case, humans must attend to their own affairs. Fourth is a contemporary view that God is assumed not to exist, and it is questioned whether any events have any value at all and whether human life has meaning.

 

Grading:

1st test: 20%2nd test 30%Final examination: 40%Class participation: 10%

 

Texts:

The Bible (preferred: Harper Collins Study Bible, Student Edition. Also acceptable: The Access Bible; Oxford Study Bible; Catholic Study Bible; New English Bible (Study Edition), or New American Bible) (The NIV translation is fine; but some commentaries are misleading for the purposes of this course.)The Major Works, Anselm of Canterbury (Oxford UP)Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes (edited by either Curley, Gaskin, Martinich, or Tuck)Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ, Friedrich Nietzsche (ed. Tanner)Philosophical Writing 3rd ed., A. P. Martinich

CTI 335 • Origins Of Liberalism

34225 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 208
(also listed as EUS 346, PHL 354)

Liberal democracy is roughly the theory that individual persons are free and equal and must be respected by governments. Freedom and equality are typically connected with the rights of individuals. Key concepts to be discussed include liberty, democracy, the social contract, and the nature of authority and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from or competed with several traditions such as democracy, republicanism and absolute sovereignty. These traditions were influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century (Stuart) England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It will cover such political and religious events as the Gunpowder Plot, Charles I’s Personal Rule, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War and the execution of King Charles I, the Commonwealth, the Restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution. Some classic works in political philosophy such as Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan and John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government will be discussed, along with those by lesser but still significant theorists such as John Milton. The political relevance of some literary works, such as Milton’s, “On the New Forcers of Conscience under the Long Parliament,” and John Dryden’s Absalom and Achitophel may also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as dictated by the topic and student interest.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42545-42555 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 101

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 327 • Interpretation And Meaning

42720 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM WAG 302

We will examine recent work in philosophy that is written from a Christian point of view or that examines philosophical questions that arise within the framework of the Christian faith. The issues to be covered include the relationship between faith and reason, the possibility of demonstrating the existence of God, the problem of evil, the problem of reconciling divine foreknowledge and sovereignty with human responsibility, and the relation of God to time.  Special emphasis will be placed on the relevance of Christian philosophy to foundational questions concerning reality, knowledge and ethics. 

Prerequisites: no prior work in philosophy is expected.  Non-majors are encouraged.

Texts:

G. K. Chesterton, St. Thomas Aquinas

C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

Josef Pieper, Leisure: The Basis of Culture

Francis A. Schaeffer, He is There and He is not Silent

Kelly J. Clark, Return to Reason

Phl 327 Supplemental Readings, available at UT Library electronic reserves. 

Evaluation:

• Three in-class exams (combination of essay and multiple choice): 25% each (including an in-class test on Dec. 7).  There will be an optional, comprehensive final that can be counted for 25% of the course grade, permitting a student to drop the lowest in-class test grade.

• Short papers (eight 2-page responses to the readings): 10%. Short papers are to be turned in at the beginning of class on Monday, responding to the coming week's reading.

• Class and section participation: 15%

• Optional term paper: due the last day of class.  2500-3000 words on a topic pre-approved by the instructor.  The term paper may be used to drop a low midterm grade, or in place of the third in-class exam, at the student's discretion.

 

Instructor: Prof. Rob Koons.  Phone: 471-5530.  koons@mail.utexas.edu

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42420-42430 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WEL 2.304

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 354 • Origins Of Liberalism

42650 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:30AM CBA 4.324

While North Americans and Europeans believe that liberal democracy is the best form of government, this was not always true. (Many people throughout the world today do not think it is true.) Liberal democracy is the theory that the individual person has certain rights, not dependent on the existence of government. Key concepts of liberalism include liberty, democracy, contract, and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from several traditions (republicanism, democracy, and limited sovereignty) influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs and values, over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It begins with the religious and political history of the seventeenth century (which includes the Gunpowder Plot, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War, the Rump Parliament, the execution of King Charles I, the establishment of the Commonwealth, the restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution.) Then some crucial works in political philosophy by some of the greatest political philosophers in history, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed. Parts of two books written by John Milton, no political slouch, will be read, one in defense of the beheading of the king. The political relevance of some literary works will also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as the topic and student interest dictates.

CTI 310 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

33785-33795 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM CPE 2.212
(also listed as PHL 305, R S 305)

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will. Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or not rational about the views expressed in each.

Note: This is not a course in world religions.

Books:

The Bible (preferred: New Oxford Annotated Bible, with Apocrypha, Student Edition or Harper Collins Study Bible. Also acceptable: The Access Bible, Catholic Study Bible; New English Bible (Study Edition), or New American Bible) (The NIV translation is fine; but most accompanying commentaries are misleading for the purposes of this course.)

The Major Works, Anselm of Canterbury (Oxford UP)

Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes (edited by either Curley, Gaskin, Martinich, or Tuck)

Twilight of the Idols and the Anti-Christ by Friedrich. Nietzsche (ed. Tanner)

Philosophical Writing 3rd ed., A. P. Martinich

 

Requirements and Grading:

1st test:                                    20%

2nd test                                    35%

3rd test:                                    40%

Class participation:            10% (+ 2)

PHL 381 • Descartes, Locke, And Hobbes

42595 • Fall 2011
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM WAG 312

Foundations of Early Modern Philosophy

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

 Course Description

The metaphysical and epistemological views of Descartes, Hobbes, and Locke. Topics include the proper foundation for a philosophical system, the nature of knowledge, emotions, (free) will, personal identity (and religious toleration). 

Grading

Class participation: 20% (A class presentation will constitute part of this grade.)

Major Essay:  80% (3,500-6,000 words; due on the last day of lectures.)

Texts

Descartes’s Meditations on First Philosophy, with Objections and Replies,

Descartes, Principles of Philosophy, Part I

Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding (selections, mostly from Book II)

Locke, A Letter on Toleration

Hobbes, The Elements of Law Natural and Politic (selections from the part on natural philosophy and epistemology.

 

This seminar satisfies the History requirement

CTI 335 • Origins Of Liberalism

34185 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 308
(also listed as PHL 354)

Description: While North Americans and Europeans believe that liberal democracy is the best form of government, this was not always true. (Many people throughout the world today do not think it is true.) Liberal democracy is the theory that the individual person has certain rights, not dependent on the existence of government. Key concepts of liberalism include liberty, democratic foundations, contractualism, and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from several traditions (republicanism, democracy, and limited sovereignty) influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs and values, over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It begins with the religious and political history of the seventeenth century (which includes the Gunpowder Plot, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War, the Rump Parliament, the execution of King Charles I, the establishment of the Commonwealth, the restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, the Rye House Plot, and the Glorious Revolution.) Then some crucial works in political philosophy by some of the greatest political philosophers in history, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed. John Milton was also no political slouch, and two of his books, one in defense of the beheading of the king, will be read. The political relevance of some literary works will also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as the topic and student interest dictates.

 

Books:            Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan

            John Locke, Two Treatises of Government

John Locke, On Toleration

            John Milton, Philosophical Writings

David Wootton, ed., Divine Right and Democracy

            A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing

Other Materials: Handouts containing excerpts from John Dryden and Andrew Marvell, and others

 

Requirements:

Class Participation and Assignments: 15%

Midterm Exam: 15%

First Essay: 1,000-3,500 words: 10%

Research Essay: 4,000-7,000 words: 50%

Final Exam: 10%

PHL 305 • Intro Philos Of Religion-Hon

42885-42910 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM WAG 101

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

42560 • Fall 2010
Meets W 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

This course satisfies the History requirement.

Course Description:

Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are the two greatest English political philosophers and two of the greatest philosophers of any age. This seminar will focus on their political philosophies, which include discussions of the original condition of human beings (the state of nature), the origin and justification of government, the scope and limits of (government), the justification of revolution, and the nature and place of religion within a society.

The first class meeting will provide the context of seventeenth century philosophy as a preparation for a close reading of the texts. For that week we will discuss "Introduction" of Leviathan and “Preface” of Two Treatises of Government.

Grading Policy:

Class participation: 30%; Midterm Essay: 20% (3-5 pages; 500-1500 words); Final Essay: 50% (10-15 pages; 2500-4000 words) This essay may be a revision and expansion of the midterm essay.

Class Participation includes submitting five questions or comments (50-150 words each) on the readings

Texts:
Books: Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, (edited by either Edwin Curley, J. C. A. Gaskin, C. B. Macpherson, A. P. Martinich, or Richard Tuck).
John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (Cambridge UP)
A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd ed. (Blackwell)

 

T C 302 • Uses And Abuses Of The Bible

42790 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007A

This course has a writing flag.

Description: 

We will study some representative cases of the ways the Bible has been used, and sometimes abused, through the centuries. We begin with Genesis, Exodus, parts of the books of Samuel and Kings, Job, the gospel of Mark, and parts of the gospel of John in order to understand what the original authors meant by their works. Because popular books, like The Da Vinci Code and Adam, Eve and the Serpent, have renewed interest in ancient writings that did not get included in the Bible, we will read a selection of these, including The Life of Adam and Eve, The Gospel of Thomas, and the Infancy Gospel of Thomas. These will be followed by selections from the Qur’an, which contains variations on the biblical stories. We will then read two seventeenth century authors, Thomas Hobbes and John Milton, who used biblical themes and problems in their philosophy, literature, and politics. We will end with a selection of other uses/abuses of the Bible, possibly feminist, Native American, or anti-slavery interpretations.

 

Texts/Readings:

Genesis                          

Selections from the Apocrypha

Exodus 1-24                          

Koran

Renita Weems, “The Hebrew Women Are not Like the Egyptian Women: The Ideology of Race, Gender and Sexual Reproduction in Exodus 1” handout

1 Samuel 17-1 Kings 2        

John Milton, Paradise Lost

Job (cc. 1-3; 38-42)                 

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan cc. 33-38, and 44

Esther

Ecclesiastes

Gospel of Mark

Gospel of John 8, 21-22

 

Assignments:

Essay: Feb. 13 (in two versions: 100-200 words and 300-700 words) - 15%

Essay: (in two versions: 150-300 words, and 1,200-2,000 words) - 20%

Essay: 1,200-3,300 words (The final essay must be a revision of essay 2 or 3 and must be 1000-2000 words longer than the revised essay.) - 35%

Class discussion: 20%                                    

Final examination: 10%

 

About the Professor

A. P. Martinich, Roy Allison Vaughan Centennial Professor of Philosophy and Professor of History and Government, is the author or editor of fifteen books and many articles, most of which concern language, religion, politics, or the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.  His book, Hobbes: a Biography was awarded the Robert Hamilton Faculty Book Award (2000). He was awarded the Plan II Honors Chet Oliver Teaching Award, in 2008 He was a Faculty Fellow for many years and was twice named Faculty Fellow of the Year.

PHL 305 • Intro Philos Of Religion-Hon

42965-42990 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM ETC 2.108

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 387 • Law And Justice

43345 • Spring 2010
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM WAG 210

Past topics include contemporary ethical theory; theories of justice; philosophy of law; social contract theories; political philosophy. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

43155-43180 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 101

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 375M • Hobbes, Locke, And Rousseau-W

43458 • Fall 2009
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 302

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 305 • Intro Philos Of Religion-Hon

42150-42175 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM ETC 2.108

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 375M • Interpretation And Meaning-W

42512 • Spring 2009
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 210

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

43535 • Fall 2008
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

43050-43075 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 387 • Law And Justice

43448 • Spring 2008
Meets W 6:30PM-9:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include contemporary ethical theory; theories of justice; philosophy of law; social contract theories; political philosophy. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

44045-44080 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM CPE 2.214

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

43095 • Spring 2007
Meets M 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

41750-41785 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 101

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 380 • Interpretation And Meaning

42360 • Spring 2006
Meets W 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include pragmatism; postmodernism; contemporary Marxism; critical theory. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

41820-41855 • Fall 2005
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM SZB 104

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

40355-40390 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.306

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

40835 • Spring 2005
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

41410-41425 • Fall 2004
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM CBA 4.328

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

38895-38910 • Spring 2004
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 356 • Philosophy Of Religion

39290 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 420

This course surveys the origins of yogic practices in early Indian civilization and traces the development of Yoga philosophies through the Upanishads, BHAGAVAD GITA, YOGA-SUTRA, Buddhist, Jaina, and tantric texts, as well as works of neo-Vedanta. We shall try to identify a set of claims common to all classical advocates of yoga. We shall look at both classical and modern defenses and criticisms, especially of alleged metaphysical and psychological underpinnings of the practices. No previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous course work in philosophy or in psychology should contact the instructor.

PHL 381 • Philosophy Of History

40315 • Fall 2003
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

39560 • Spring 2003
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 380 • Interpretation And Meaning

39460 • Spring 2002
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include pragmatism; postmodernism; contemporary Marxism; critical theory. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

39910-39945 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM CAL 100

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

38645-38660 • Spring 2001
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 216

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

39250 • Spring 2001
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

39525-39560 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM TAY 2.006

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 375M • Meaning And Interpretation-W

40165 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 210

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
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