The Department of Government
The Department of Government

Henry Dietz


Professor EmeritusPh.D., Stanford University

Professor Emeritus, University Distinguished Teaching Professor
Henry Dietz

Contact

Biography


Professor Dietz's major interests focus on Latin American politics. Within that region he is especially concerned with urban poverty and politics, civil- military relations, and parties and party systems. He also has interests in comparative methodology and survey research. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Peru in 1964-1966.

Awards/Honors:
He has won numerous teaching awards and has been inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Teachers at the University of Texas.

Recent Publications:
His most recent books include Urban Elections in Democratic Latin America (1998), co-edited with Gil Shidlo, Urban Poverty, Political Participation and the State: Lima 1970-1990 (1998), and Capital City Politics in Latin America: Democratization and Empowerment (2002), co-edited with David Myers. He has published articles in American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, Social Science Quarterly, and the Journal of Political and Military Sociology, as well as chapters in many books. He has received grants from a variety of sources, including the Tinker Foundation, Social Science Research Council, National Science Foundation, and the Heinz Foundation.

Courses


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37755 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.130

 

Course Description

 

Henry Dietz

Spring 2016

 

 GOV 312L (#37755) – Poverty and Politics

 

Prerequisites

 

None.

 

Course description

 

            This course is divided into three sections.  The first examines the various meanings of poverty and inequality in the US and Texas and how poverty and inequality have been defined for policy purposes.  It also looks at various explanations as to why poverty and inequality exist and persist, again in the US and in Texas.

 

            The second looks at poverty policy in the US and what, how, and why US poverty policy has been so debated over time.  The same topics are also examined for Texas.

 

            The third part of the course is a brief overview of global poverty and inequality and of what approaches have been taken to confronting these issues, especially since the end of World War II.

 

Grading Policy

 

            Grades will be determined on the basis of three in-class essay exams that are part short-answer and part essay.  Each one of these exams counts for a third of the grade.  There is also an optional paper that will count the same as an exam (i.e., one quarter of the semester grade).  The optional paper grade does not replace an exam grade; it is in addition to the three exam grades.

 

Texts (tentative)

 

DiNitto and Johnson, Essentials of Social Welfare

Rodgers, American Poverty in a New Era of Relief

Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed to Death in America

Isbister, Promises Not Kept

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

37860 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M)

GOV 328L/LAS 337M – Introduction to Latin American Politics

 

 

Prerequisites

 

            Government 310L and 312L

 

Course Description

 

            The course is divided into three parts.  The first deals with some basic concepts and background – e.g., what is Latin America?  What are some of the historical features of the region that have had an impact on today’s nations?  And what are some relevant social and economic issues that affect politics?  Readings for this part of the course are largely topical.

 

            Second, since World War II Latin American nations have seen four basic types of rule: democratic, populist, authoritarian, and revolutionary.  The course examines some of the strengths and weaknesses of all four, but especially compares democracy with the other three.  Readings for this part of the course are country case studies.

 

            The third part of the course is an overview of US-Latin American relations.  It covers some of the historical highlights and also examines specific contemporary issues, including immigration and drugs.

 

Grading Policy

 

            Grades will be determined on the basis of three in-class essay exams that are part short-answer and part essay.  Each one of these exams counts for a third of the grade.  There is also an optional paper that will count the same as an exam (i.e., one quarter of the semester grade).  The optional paper grade does not replace an exam grade; it is in addition to the three exam grades.

 

Texts (tentative)

 

            Vanden and Prevost, Politics of Latin America, 5th edition

            Gregory weeks, US and Latin American Relations

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38750 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

GOV 312L – Poverty and Politics

 

Prerequisites – none

 

Description – the course first examines how poverty is defined in the US and elsewhere, and what competing explanations are offered to account for the existence and persistence of poverty in the US and in Texas.  Second, it covers historically what sorts of policies have been tried to deal with poverty, including the Great Depression, the War on Poverty, and current discussions about poverty and inequality, again looking at the US and Texas.  The third part of the course looks at poverty and inequality on a global basis.

 

Grades – grades will be determined in the basis of three in-class exams consisting of short answers and essay question .  Each exam counts on third of the course grade.  Students may also write an optional paper that counts as much as one exam; however, the paper does NOT replace an exam grade.

 

Texts (subject to change)

 

DiNitto and Johnson, Essentials of Social Welfare

Rodgers, American Poverty in a New Era of Reform

Isbister, Promises Not Kept

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

38800 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.308
(also listed as LAS 337M)

GOV 328L/LAS 337M – Latin American Politics

 

Prerequisites – GOV 310L and 312L

 

Description – the course assumes no prior knowledge of Latin America.  It begins with a overall view of the region, including its historical background, geography, economic and social characteristics, and the basic models of governance post-World War II.  It then examines several specific Latin American countries (including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru among others) and how these basic ways of governance have succeeded and/or failed.  The course then examines US-Latin American relations.

 

Grades – grades are determined by three exams (short answer and essay); each counts a third of the final grade.  Students may also write an optional paper that counts a quarter of the final grade.  The optional paper does not replace or count for any of the exams.

 

Texts (subject to change)

 

                Wiarda and Kline, A Concise Introduction to Latin American Politics

                Blake, Latin American Political Development

                Weeks, US and Latin American Relations

 

Flag: Global Cultures

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39095 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

Course Description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Its topic - Poverty and Politics - deals with questions concerning what poverty is and why it exists, with welfare policies in the US and in Texas, and with poverty and politics in the Third World.  The course assumes the basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, but nothing more.

 

Questions concerning the nature and cause of poverty and what to do about it are by definition controversial and subject to much debate.  This course does not presume that either the instructor or the readings has The Answer to such questions.  Rather, our collective goal for the semester is to identify the major schools of debate around such questions and for you to think about them.  If you have already decided how you feel about poverty, the course may provoke you to think again; if you have never given the question any thought, the course may provoke you into thinking about such questions.

 

Given the size and nature of the course, it is taught by lecture.  There will always be time for discussion and participation in class, however.  Attendance can make a clear difference at the end of the semester and failure to attend class can lower your grade.  On the other hand, active participation in class can raise your grade if you are borderline.

 

Grading Policy 

Grades are drawn from three in-class exams; each counts one third of your grade.  These exams are not cumulative.  I shall look for evidence of improvement over the semester and will reward progress as appropriate.  In addition, you may write an optional extra paper that counts the same as one mid-term (the paper is not a substitute for a midterm, however; it is in addition to the required three midterms).  You are strongly encouraged to consult with me about a paper if you want to write one.  See p. 3 of this syllabus.

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate assistance from SSD (471-6259).

 

Grading: final grades will be determined on a +/- basis  

 

Texts

 

Dinitto and Johnson, Essentials of Social Welfare: Politics and Public Policy, 2012

Isbister, Promises Not Kept, 7th edition (2005)

Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed to Death in America (2008)

Rodgers, American Poverty in a New Era of Reform, 2nd ed. (2006)

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

39135 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M, URB 350)

Course Description

Government 328L is an introductory course to the politics of Latin America.  It assumes no prior knowledge of the region, nor does it require any knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.  The only prerequisite is GOV 310-312.  It does expect an open mind about how politics works, since much of the course will not be familiar to those of you whose experiences and knowledge of politics are based on the United States.

 

We begin with some introductory materials dealing first with the geography and history of the region, and then with some economic characteristics.  We then cover the major actors in the political arena, identify four basic models of politics, and then conclude with an examination of US-Latin American relations.

 

328L/337M is an overview course, and cannot cover every topic of interest or of relevance to the region.  In addition, the course does not pretend to investigate any single nation in depth.  The course does move along quickly, and while the quantity of reading material is not great, I will expect you to know the assigned materials thoroughly.  Therefore, it is an excellent idea to keep up with the readings.

 

Grading Policy

There are two mid-terms and a final exam; each is composed of short answers and an essay question.  These each count one third of your total grade and are not comprehensive.  You can also write an extra paper; you are strongly encouraged to see me about a topic.  This paper counts in addition to the three exams; it does not replace one.  I will factor in in-class participation and improvement over the semester.

 

Grading: final grades will be determined on a +/- basis.

 

 

Texts

 

            Blake, Politics in Latin America, second edition (2008)

            Wiarda and Kline, A Concise Introduction to Latin American Politics and Development (2007)

            Weeks, US and Latin American Relations (2008)

            *Reading by Charles Anderson, to be distributed in class

 

GOV 337M • Democ/Democratiz In Lat Amer

38828 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.102
(also listed as LAS 337M)

Course Description

This course deals with a vital aspect of current Latin American politics: the onset since 1980 of the widespread emergence of political parties, elections and procedural democracy throughout the area.  Much of the course will be concerned with what democracy is and how it can be defined; measured/observed, with the differences between democratic transition and democratic consolidation, and with how democracy might (or might not) be sustained in the region.

 The course assumes no prior knowledge of Latin American politics, and for that reason begins with a quick reading of a standard text on the subject.  The idea is to provide everyone with a minimally level playing field.  The course requires no reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese, although anyone who can read either language will find a wealth of materials available.

 

Grading Policy 

The course has as its major requirement a term paper of about 15 pages.  To write such a paper successfully, we shall proceed in stages, each of which you will be graded on.  These stages are as follows:

 -  hand into me no later than 1 March  a proposal, outline and working bibliography of your paper that contains your theoretical argument as well as your case study.  I will grade this assignment on the basis of your clarity of your overall argument, the appropriateness of your case study, and the completeness of your bibliography.  About 20% of your grade.

 -  hand into me no later than 27 March the first draft of your paper.  I will grade this draft for content as well as writing and return it to you.  About 20% of your grade.

-  hand into me your final paper 9 May.  About 40% of your grade.

-  the remaining 20% of your grade will come from your overall class participation and your oral presentation.

 Pluses and minuses will be used for course grades.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate assistance from SSD 471-6259.  There are no exams.

 

Overall Class Involvement and Requirements

 Everyone should come to each session prepared to facilitate discussion of the readings, meaning that you should be prepared to lead discussion if called upon to do so by having some questions ready when you come to class.  I may ask at any time to see such questions.  They can concern clarification (what you don’t understand), disagreement (what strikes you as wrong factually or interpretively), or confusion (an earlier reading said A but this says B).  As we progress, combining the readings on democracy with the case studies will become increasingly important. 

All class members should be prepared to discuss the readings in these ways. 

The readings for the class are of two types.  The first (Dahl) are theoretical or analytical materials that deal with democracy as a means of governing and as a procedure for acquiring power.  The second (Blake and Smith) are readings that deal with specific countries and/or the processes of establishing and maintaining democracy in Latin America.

The main goal of the research paper is to combine these two types of readings by taking some theoretical aspect of democracy and examining it within one or more specific Latin American nation(s).

The course is not a lecture course.  Rather, we shall discuss the materials together, building throughout the semester so that we can begin to see how Latin American nations have tried to devise ways of creating and maintaining democracy, and why some attempts have been more successful than others.

In-class participation is therefore an essential part of the course.  You should attend and involve yourself in what goes on.  If you miss classes, I’ll ask why; if you don’t participate, I’ll ask why and probably see to it that you do.  If you miss without an excuse more than once or twice, your grade could be affected.

You paper can consider any number of topics: conditions favorable to democracy; definitions of democracy; the structure and behavior of political parties; the roles of elites; a specific election and how and why it turned out as it did; the ability of democracy to improve (or not) the welfare of its citizens; the conditions under which democracy is most apt to success or fail.

In the end, the overall success of the seminar and of each student rests on your willingness contribute to the course.

 

Texts:

            Charles Blake, Politics in Latin America

            Robert Dahl, Polyarchy

            Peter Smith, Democracy in Latin America

GOV 384L • Latin Amer Urban Politics

39075 • Spring 2013
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 384L)

Course Description

This course is designed to offer a first glimpse into a huge area with a correspondingly huge literature - Latin American cities and their politics.  The term "politics" is interpreted very broadly so as to include students whose major interests may be sociology, anthropology, history, economics, public affairs, or any other social sciences and humanities.  The focus of the course is politics, but almost anything else is grist for the mill.

The course is designed as a research seminar, and as such concentrates in its readings and class discussions not only on the substantive materials dealing with Latin American cities but also with the question of how this topic can be investigated.  All seminar members will be expected to make an effort to develop a research question that has some theoretical importance as well as empirical interest.  To do this, we will take time to go through some of the basics in social science research.

Weekly topics include early urban theory as developed in the US and then transported to Latin America; macro urban theory and urban structure; rural-urban migration and its repercussions (the informal urban sector, squatter settlements); urban social movements; urban electoral politics; and the move since the 1980's toward municipal autonomy and decentralization.

 

Grading Policy

Two short (4-5 pp. double-spaced) analytic essays over a week's readings: roughly 25%

A major (18-20 pp.) research paper, including the preparation of a proposal: roughly 50%

Class participation, including in-class presentation: roughly 25%

 

The Short Essay

The short essay should be a synthetic and/or analytic summation, examination and comparison of the required readings for a selected week.  Let me make a couple of suggestions as to how to go about this paper.

  1. Do the several authors address a central question, problem, area, concept or concern?  What is it? How are the readings different in their approaches, treatments and conclusions?
  2. What do the readings tell us about a topic?  What do we end up knowing and not knowing?  What new avenues/questions are suggested?
  3. Are there major points of agreement/disagreement either among the authors or with previous weeks’ readings?

Avoid making a summary of the readings.  Instead, integrate them and discuss them in comparison with one another.  Summarize or quote briefly when necessary, but then go ahead and synthesize (“combine or compose parts of elements so as to form a whole”) or analyze (“separate the parts of the whole so as to reveal their relation to it or to one another”).

Feel free to inject your own opinions and evaluations and to provide justification for them.  If there are more than four readings in a week, you are free to limit your comments to four selections.  However, you should make it clear why you have selected the four you did.

For the weeks you select, you will serve as a facilitator of class discussion.  This does not mean that others do not do the readings, or that you have some formal presentation to make.  It does mean that you have some questions prepared to provoke discussion/debate/

argument and to lead that discussion as necessary.  Everyone is expected to be prepared for each week’s discussions.

The short essays are due the week following the assignment so that you can (if you wish) incorporate some of the class discussion into your essay.

 

The Research Paper

The paper is the main task of the semester.  Ideally it will combine two basic elements: first, the identification of a general theoretical or analytical problem, statement, proposition or hypothesis; and second, the examination of a case that is appropriate for the theoretical problem.  As we do the readings, I will try to point out – and to have you all point out as well – the sort of analytical problem I have in mind.  The whole point of such an exercise is to produce a paper that goes beyond being a case study of a particular city or event and becomes a paper of interest to readers who may not know anything about your case study but who may have a strong interest in the global topic you have selected.

For example: let us assume that your case deals with how poor people in Mexico City voted in the 2000 presidential elections.  This is a fine topic for your case study.  But I would expect you to frame this case study in a larger, theoretical statement.  To do so, you might begin by asking in general how low-income voters behave, or even more generally whether there is a correlation between social class and political behavior.  This opening would say nothing about Mexico City, but would have sketched in a topic that might be of interest to people who could care little about Mexico City but a lot about how/when/if social status affects political behavior.

We shall have a good deal more to say about how such research is carried out.  Papers should be about 18-20 pages.  A paper can be a traditional research paper; it can also be a research design or proposal, a bibliographical essay, an in-depth critical analysis of a set of readings, or something else.  If two students wish to write a joint paper, that’s fine.

One last point: you are due to hand in to me on or before 27 February a proposal for your paper.  This proposal should contain three elements: first, a brief (2-3 pages double-spaced) description of your theoretical problem and the case study you intend to use; second, an outline of your paper that shows how you intend to do what you say you want to do in Part I; and third, a working bibliography, which contains 1) items you have read; 2) items you have identified but not read; and 3) areas where you need sources but don’t yet have them.

Prior to handing in your proposal I will expect to meet with each of you during office hours at least a couple of times. If you have a firm idea, let me know; if you have no idea at all, let me know as well.

Class participation

Not much to say here.  The success of any seminar depends on involvement of everyone, and so live your lives accordingly.  I will have things to say throughout the course, but I will expect participation from all.  If after a couple of weeks you are not involved in the class, I will see to it that you are – fair warning! 

 

Texts

Alan Gilbert, The Latin American City (1994)

Packets of duplicated readings from Abel’s Packets (715 D West 23rd Street)

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38625 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

Course Description

An overview of poverty, inequality and welfare issues in the United States, with some attention as well to Texas and to global issues. 

 

Grading Policy

Three exams (short answers and essay); optional extra paper

 

Texts

DiNitto and Johnson, Essentials of Social Welfare

Rodgers, American Poverty in a New Era of Reform

Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed

 Isbister, Promises Not Kept

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

38670 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M, URB 350)

Prerequisites

GOV 310L and GOV 312L

 

Course Description

An introduction to the politics of Latin America that includes a brief historical overview, discussion of social and economic conditions and principle political actors, along with several case studies. It also includes materials on US-Latin American relations.

 

Grading Policy

Three exams (short answer and essay); optional paper

 

Texts

Blake, Politics in Latin America 

Wiarda and Kline, Concise Introduction to Latin American Politics and Development 

Weeks, US and Latin American Relations

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38548 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.110

see syllabus

GOV 337M • Democ/Democratiz In Lat Amer

38670 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as LAS 337M)

This is an upper-division substantial writing component class that has as its major product a research paper (12-15 p). This paper will combine some theoretical materials (Robert Dahl's Polyarchy and other readings) with Latin American materials; the object is to take a logic or argument from Dahl and apply it to a specific case.  The course starts with reading an overview of LA politics, and then goes on to a close reading of Polyarchy.  All students will prepare a research proposal, a first draft of the paper, make an oral presentation of their research in class, and turn in the final paper.  Class involvement and participation are essential.         

Prerequisites -  GOV 310/312 required.  Some background in Latin American studies/politics preferred but not essential.

Grading:

Roughly - proposal, 15%; first draft, 20%; final draft, 30%; oral presentation, 15%; in-class involvement, 20%

Text:  Robert Dahl, Polyarchy; Charles Blake, Latin American political development; a set of duplicated readings

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38620 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Its topic - Poverty and Politics - deals with questions concerning what poverty is and why it exists, with welfare policies in the US and in Texas, and with poverty and politics in the Third World.  The course assumes the basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, but nothing more.

 

Questions concerning the nature and cause of poverty and what to do about it are by definition controversial and subject to much debate.  This course does not presume that either the instructor or the readings has The Answer to such questions.  Rather, our collective goal for the semester is to identify the major schools of debate around such questions and for you to think about them.  If you have already decided how you feel about poverty, the course may provoke you to think again; if you have never given the question any thought, the course may provoke you into thinking about such questions.

 

Given the size and nature of the course, it is taught by lecture.  There will always be time for discussion and participation in class, however.  Attendance can make a clear difference at the end of the semester and failure to attend class can lower your grade.  On the other hand, active participation in class can raise your grade if you are borderline.

 

Grades are drawn from three in-class exams that count a third of your total grade.  These exams are not cumulative.  I shall look for evidence of improvement over the semester and will reward progress as appropriate.  In addition, you may write an optional extra paper that counts the same as one mid-term (the paper is not a substitute for a midterm, however; it is in addition to the required three midterms).  You are strongly encouraged to consult with me about a paper if you want to write one.

 

Books to be purchased:

 

Dinitto, Social Welfare: Politics and Public Policy, 7th edition (2011)

Isbister, Promises Not Kept, 7th edition (2005)

Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed to Death in America (2008)

Rodgers, American Poverty in a New Era of Reform, 2nd ed. (2006)

 

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

38670 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M, URB 350)

                               Government 328L is an introductory course to the politics of Latin America.  It assumes no prior knowledge of the region, nor does it require any knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.  It does expect an open mind about how politics works, since much of the course will not be familiar to those of you whose experiences and knowledge of politics are based on the United States.

 

We begin with some introductory materials dealing first with the geography and history of the region, and then with some economic characteristics.  We then cover the major actors in the political arena, identify four basic models of politics, and then conclude with an examination of US-Latin American relations.

 

328L/337M is an overview course, and cannot cover every topic of interest or of relevance to the region.  In addition, the course does not pretend to investigate any single nation in depth.  The course does move along quickly, and while the quantity of reading material is not great, I will expect you to know the assigned materials thoroughly.  Therefore, it is an excellent idea to keep up with the readings.

There are two mid-terms and a final exam; each is composed of short answers and an essay question.  Each exam counts a third of your grade.  I will factor in in-class participation and improvement over the semester.  In addition, you can write an optional paper (6-8 double-spaced pp.); you are strongly advised to discuss a topic with me.  

 

Any student with disabilities may request appropriate accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities (471-6259).

For purchase:

    Blake, Politics in Latin America, second edition (2008)

    Wiarda and Kline, A Concise Introduction to Latin American Politics and    Development (2007)

    Weeks, US and Latin American Relations (2008)

    Reading by Charles Anderson, to be distributed in class                                

 

 

GOV S328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

85357 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM WEL 2.312
(also listed as LAS S337M)

See syllabus

GOV 384L • Latin Amer Urban Politics

39155 • Spring 2011
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 384L)

This course is designed to offer a first glimpse into a huge area with a correspondinglyhuge literature - Latin American cities and their politics. The term "politics" isinterpreted very broadly so as to include students whose major interests may besociology, anthropology, history, economics, public affairs, or any other social sciencesand humanities. The focus of the course is politics, but almost anything else is grist forthe mill.

The course is designed as a research seminar, and as such concentrates in its readings andclass discussions not only on the substantive materials dealing with Latin American citiesbut also with the question of how this topic can be investigated. All seminar memberswill be expected to make an effort to develop a research question that has sometheoretical importance as well as empirical interest. To do this, we will take time to gothrough some of the basics in social science research.

Weekly topics include early urban theory as developed in the US and then transported toLatin America; macro urban theory and urban structure; rural-urban migration and itsrepercussions (the informal urban sector, squatter settlements); urban social movements;urban electoral politics; and the move since the 1980's toward municipal autonomy anddecentralization.

To be purchasedAlan Gilbert, The Latin American City (1994)Packets of duplicated readings from Abel’s Packets (715 D West 23rd Street)Assignments (see below)Two short (4-5 pp. double-spaced) analytic essays over a week's readings: roughly 25%A major (18-20 pp.) research paper, including the preparation of a proposal: roughly 50%Class participation, including in-class presentation: roughly 25%

T C 357 • Democ/Democratiz In Latin Amer

43440 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CRD 007A

Description:

In 1980 every country in South America except Colombia and Venezuela was under military rule.  By the mid-1980’s all countries in South America were under democratic, civilian rule. Such a massive and rapid change has generated a range of questions about how a country can change from one political system to another and how that change can become permanent. This course focuses on this transition to democracy; it concentrates on reading about on the factors that facilitate the formation and consolidation of democratic governments in Latin America. Much of the coursework will involve a careful reading of theoretical and analytical works on the subject and the development of a framework for understanding a specific case or country. The ultimate goal will be to examine the interchange between theory and case: to what extent do existing theoretical/analytical models help us understand a given case, and to what extent does the examination of a case help us to accept, reject, or modify a model?

            The course does not require a background in Latin American studies, and therefore we will take the first few weeks or so to bring everyone up to speed (more or less). Obviously some understanding of the region and its history or politics will be most useful, as will a reading knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese. Such language facility again is not required, but for research purposes, an ability at least to struggle through social science Spanish will be helpful.

 

Texts/Readings:

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America

Dahl, Polyarchy

 

Assignments:

Course paper:

Outline & bibliography                        20%

First draft                                                30%

Final draft                                                40%

Class participation                                    10%

 

Dr. Dietz has done a great deal of work in Andean South America especially Peru. His areas of interest in Latin America in general include elections civil-military relations urban politics and poverty and political participation.

 

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38420 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

Course Description:

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Its topic - Poverty and Politics - deals with questions concerning what poverty is and why it exists, with welfare policies in the US and in Texas, and with poverty and politics in the Third World.  The course assumes the basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, but nothing more.

Questions concerning the nature and cause of poverty and what to do about it are by definition controversial and subject to much debate.  This course does not presume that either the instructor or the readings has The Answer to such questions.  Rather, our collective goal for the semester is to identify the major schools of debate around such questions and for you to think about them.  If you have already decided how you feel about poverty, the course may provoke you to think again; if you have never given the question any thought, the course may provoke you into thinking about such questions.

Given the size and nature of the course, it is taught by lecture.  There will always be time for discussion and participation in class, however.  Attendance can make a clear difference at the end of the semester and failure to attend class can lower your grade.  On the other hand, active participation in class can raise your grade if you are borderline.

Grading Policy:

Grades are drawn from three in-class exams; the first two count 35% apiece, and the third 30%.  These exams are not cumulative.  I shall look for evidence of improvement over the semester and will reward progress as appropriate.  In addition, you may write an optional extra paper that counts the same as one mid-term (the paper is not be a substitute for a midterm, however).  You are strongly encouraged to consult with me about a paper if you want to write one.

 
Textbooks:

Dinitto, Social Welfare: Politics and Public Policy, 6th edition (2005)
Isbister, Promises Not Kept, 7th edition (2005)
Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed to Death in America (2008)
Rodgers, American Poverty in a New Era of Reform, 2nd ed. (2006)

GOV F328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

84770 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM WEL 2.304
(also listed as LAS F337M)

Course Description:

Government 328L/Latin American Studies 337M is an introductory course to the politics of Latin America. It assumes no prior knowledge of the region, nor does it require any knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.  It does expect an open mind about how politics works, since much of the course will not be familiar to those of you whose experiences and knowledge of politics are based on the United States.
 
We begin with some introductory materials dealing first with the geography and history of the region, and then with some economic characteristics.  We then cover the major actors in the political arena, identify four basic models of politics, and then conclude with an examination of US-Latin American relations.
 
GOV 328L/LAS 337M is an overview course, and cannot cover every topic of interest or of relevance to the region.  In addition, the course does not pretend to investigate any single nation in depth.  The course does move along quickly, and while the quantity of reading material is not great, I will expect you to know the assigned materials thoroughly.  Therefore, it is an excellent idea to keep up with the readings.
 
Grading Policy: There are two mid-terms and a final exam; each is composed of short answers and an essay question.  Each exam counts a third of your grade.  I will factor in in-class participation and improvement over the semester. 

 

Textbooks:

    Blake, Politics in Latin America, second edition (2008)
    
    Wiarda and Kline, A Concise Introduction to Latin American Politics and    Development (2007)

    Weeks, US and Latin American Relations (2008)

    Reading by Charles Anderson, to be distributed in class

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38740 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39080 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

39345 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.102

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 337M • Democ/Democratiz In Lat Amer-W

39320 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.128

Please check back for updates.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

39880 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.306

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

39610 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

37545 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

37215 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

LAS 379 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

36660 • Spring 2004
(also listed as LAS 382)

Supervised individual study of selected problems in Latin American studies.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor and the undergraduate adviser in Latin American studies.

LAS 698B • Thesis

36830 • Spring 2004

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS 999R • Dissertation

36850 • Spring 2004
(also listed as LAS 399W)

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

35620-35635 • Fall 2003
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM GSB 2.126

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

LAS 382 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

37565 • Fall 2003

Individual study to be arranged with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

LAS 698A • Thesis

37650 • Fall 2003

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

37665 • Fall 2003
(also listed as LAS 999W)

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS W698B • Thesis

85995 • Summer 2003

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS W398R • Master's Report

86000 • Summer 2003

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS 379 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

36595 • Spring 2003
(also listed as LAS 382)

Supervised individual study of selected problems in Latin American studies.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor and the undergraduate adviser in Latin American studies.

LAS 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course-W

36605 • Spring 2003

For honors candidates in Latin American studies. Individual reading of selected works for one semester, followed in the second semester by the writing of an honors thesis.

Prerequisite: For Latin American Studies 679HA, Latin American Studies 359H, admission to the Latin American Studies Honors Program, and written consent of the Latin American Studies Honors Program adviser; for 679HB, Latin American Studies 679HA.

LAS 698B • Thesis

36770 • Spring 2003

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS 398R • Master's Report

36775 • Spring 2003

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 999R • Dissertation

36790 • Spring 2003
(also listed as LAS 399W)

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

35195-35220 • Fall 2002
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM GSB 2.126

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

LAS 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

37100 • Fall 2002

For honors candidates in Latin American studies. Individual reading of selected works for one semester, followed in the second semester by the writing of an honors thesis.

Prerequisite: For Latin American Studies 679HA, Latin American Studies 359H, admission to the Latin American Studies Honors Program, and written consent of the Latin American Studies Honors Program adviser; for 679HB, Latin American Studies 679HA.

LAS 698A • Thesis

37270 • Fall 2002
(also listed as LAS 698B)

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

37285 • Fall 2002
(also listed as LAS 399W, LAS 699W)

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS W398R • Master's Report

86185 • Summer 2002

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS S382 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

86250 • Summer 2002

Individual study to be arranged with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. May be repeated for credit.

LAS 382 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

36495 • Spring 2002

Individual study to be arranged with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

LAS 698B • Thesis

36600 • Spring 2002

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS 398R • Master's Report

36605 • Spring 2002

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

35665-35690 • Fall 2001
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM GSB 2.126

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

LAS 382 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

37555 • Fall 2001

Individual study to be arranged with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

LAS 698A • Thesis

37655 • Fall 2001

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 398R • Master's Report

37665 • Fall 2001

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

37670 • Fall 2001
(also listed as LAS 699W)

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS W398R • Master's Report

85595 • Summer 2001

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS 698B • Thesis

36535 • Spring 2001

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAS 999W • Dissertation

36570 • Spring 2001

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

35335-35350 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM GSB 2.126

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

LAS 382 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

37190 • Fall 2000

Individual study to be arranged with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

LAS 397R • Secondary Report

37260 • Fall 2000

Preparation of a report to be counted toward the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 698A • Thesis

37265 • Fall 2000

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser; for 698B, Latin American Studies 698A.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 398R • Master's Report

37275 • Fall 2000

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

37280 • Fall 2000
(also listed as LAS 699W, LAS 999W)

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS W398R • Master's Report

85735 • Summer 2000

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

GOV 337M • Democ/Democratiz In Lat Amer-W

34437 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM ENS 145

Please check back for updates.

LAS 382 • Conf Crs In Latin Amer Studies

36130 • Spring 2000

Individual study to be arranged with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

LAS 398R • Master's Report

36220 • Spring 2000

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Latin American studies and consent of the supervising professor and the graduate adviser.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

LAS 999W • Dissertation

36250 • Spring 2000

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

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  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121