Jessica Church-Lang


Ph.D., Washington University at St. Louis

Assistant Professor
Jessica Church-Lang

Contact

Biography


Dr. Church-Lang received her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Washington University in St. Louis in 2008. She has a strong interest in how cognitive processes develop over age, and in how research on atypical development illuminates the vulnerable aspects of cognitive development pathways. Research in the lab currently focuses on the development of executive functions and reading in late childhood and early adolescence. Dr. Church-Lang is head of the Austin neuroimaging site of the Texas Learning Disabilities Research Center project on reading intervention and brain change (texasldcenter.org). We’re particularly focused on how networks of the brain involved in task control relate to academic skill development and skill improvement over time. As part of the reading-intervention project, as well as in our other research efforts in children with attention and learning disorders, we are focusing on brain and behavioral changes over two time periods: over the course of an intervention, and over the course of early puberty. To address these questions, we use behavioral methods such as cognitive tests (where we measure response times, accuracy on tasks, or eye movements), actigraphy (where we measure activity levels during sleep and wake), pubertal hormone assessments, neuropsychological assessments, neuroimaging (fMRI, resting-state fcMRI), and studies of patient populations (e.g. children with Tourette syndrome, ADHD, or dyslexia).

Courses


PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43125 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM NOA 1.126

Adjustment difficulties during childhood and adolescence; causation and treatment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394S • Current Tpcs In Devel Psych

42514 • Fall 2015
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM SEA 1.332

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

PSY 394S • Stding Brain: Findgs Dev

42890 • Spring 2015
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM SEA 5.106

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43700 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM NOA 1.126

Adjustment difficulties during childhood and adolescence; causation and treatment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43895 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM NOA 1.126

General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43745 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM NOA 1.126

Adjustment difficulties during childhood and adolescence; causation and treatment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43250 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM NOA 1.124

This course is designed to introduce the field of Child Psychology and encourage students to think like a developmental psychologist. I think this is valuable for many reasons. First, at least 80% of you will become parents someday, and understanding how a child develops can give you insight and aid in effective parenting. Second, we were all children once, and learning about how a child grows to adulthood teached us about what it is to be human. Third, the media and popular opinion portrayals of parenting and of science are often far off the mark, and learning more about child development helps you to critically evaluate new information and claims. Finally, fourth, you will hopefully be able to apply the information from this course to both everyday life and the policies you endorse as a citizen.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43160 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM NOA 1.124

This course is designed to introduce the field of Child Psychology and encourage students to think like a developmental psychologist. I think this is valuable for many reasons. First, at least 80% of you will become parents someday, and understanding how a child develops can give you insight and aid in effective parenting. Second, we were all children once, and learning about how a child grows to adulthood teached us about what it is to be human. Third, the media and popular opinion portrayals of parenting and of science are often far off the mark, and learning more about child development helps you to critically evaluate new information and claims. Finally, fourth, you will hopefully be able to apply the information from this course to both everyday life and the policies you endorse as a citizen.

Links


Labs and Affiliatations

Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Lab (Church Lab): http://labs.la.utexas.edu/church-lang/

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links