History Department
History Department

HIS 301F • Premodern World

39180 • Talbot, Cynthia
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.112
(also listed as AHC 310)
show description

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. It introduces students to the main political, social, and cultural trends in a variety of societies while at the same time stressing the global perspective. Considerable emphasis is thus paid to comparative history and the study of cross-cultural encounters. This entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, impart a basic grasp of the premodern past, and  stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis.

Texts (provisional):

-- Robert W. Strayer, Ways of the World, A Brief Global History with Sources
                                                                        Vol.1: To 1500, Bedford/ St. Martins.

-- Neil MacGregor, A History of the World in 100 Objects, Viking Press.

-- numerous essays and book chapters provided on course website

Grading:

Exams (3 x 25% each) = 75%; reading worksheets (4 x 5% each) = 20%; attendance & participation = 5%.


HIS 302C • Introduction To China

39185 • Lai, Chiu
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 1.106
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This course will provide an introduction to essential concepts and ideas from Chinese cultural traditions (such as from art, history, literature, and thought) to construct a course dialogue toward understanding Chinese culture and society.

Required Text:

Paul S. Ropp, China in World History (Oxford, 2010)

Recommended:

Rana Mitter, Modern China: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2016)


HIS 306K • Mid East: Rel/Cul/Hist Fnd

39190 • Spellberg, Denise
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as MES 301K)
show description

This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the end of the fifteenth century. Students will be introduced to basic aspects of the political, social, and cultural dimensions of Islamic civilization.


HIS 306N • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Stds

39215 • Hilchey, Christian
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 136
(also listed as REE 301)
show description

 

 


HIS 306N • Introduction To Islam

39220 • Aghaie, Kamran
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.104
(also listed as ISL 310)
show description

 

 


HIS 306N • Jewish Civ: Begin To 1492

39225 • Schofer, Jonathan
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 304
(also listed as J S 304M, MES 310, R S 313M)
show description

This course is a survey of Jewish civilization from the origins of Ancient Israel to 1500 C.E.  All materials are in English translation. The course is taught primarily from the standpoint of Religious Studies and Jewish Studies, in the sense that the course will address both the history of Jews during this long period, and the most influential writings produced during that time.  There will be some focus on the persons and writings that have been most influential for Jewish Civilization over time, including into the modern world.  This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence, and another course taught regularly in Spring semester addresses Jewish Civilization from 1492 to the present. 

The course will be organized according to an overarching thematic image of “Crisis and Response.”  Jewish Civilization over the time period we study, from origins in the later part of the second millennium B.C.E., to the end of the 15th century C.E., encountered key crises including a memory of enslavement in its sacred sources, the need for sovereignty, the loss of sovereignty and a state of exile, and then continued existence only within larger empires for over two millennia.  Responses to these crises were varied. 

In early legends, centuries of slavery were followed by liberation as The Exodus and the establishment of covenantal law (addressed in Unit 1). 

Later, the need for sovereignty brought the establishment of monarchy and centralized worship at a temple by the kings David and Solomon, and then a continuous period of sovereignty for over four centuries.  This sovereignty ended in 587 B.C.E. and initiated the need for continued existence in exile as well as in Persian and Hellenistic polities (addressed in Unit 2). 

The first century C.E. brought a new crisis with the end of Temple worship due to Roman conquest, and then the most enduring and productive response for Jewish Civilization was the legal and other innovations of Classical Rabbinic Judaism (addressed in Unit 3).  

In the Middle Ages, the rise of Christian and Muslim empires brought new contexts for Jewish communities, but also new degrees of persecution, and these crises were intimately connected with responses in intellectual and religious life, including the development of philosophy and the mysticism of Kabbalah (addressed in Unit 4).  

 

Grading:

  • Three short papers, 2 pages each; each 15% of the course grade (45% total)
  • Midterm exam, closed-book, in-class (20%)
  • Final Exam, closed book, in-class (20%)
  • Class Participation (15%)

 

Required Books: (available at the University Co-Op Bookstore):

  • Alexander, ed., Textual Sources for the Study of Judaism
  • Jewish Publication Society (JTS), TaNaKh: The Holy Scriptures
  • Robert Seltzer, Jewish People, Jewish Thought

 


HIS 306N • Key Ideas & Iss In Lat Amer

39210 • Zazueta, Maria
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 201
show description

 

 


HIS 306N • Latin America And The US

39195 • Frens-String, Joshua
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.120
show description

 

 


HIS 306N • Luther's World

39200 • Hess, Peter
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 306, GSD 310, R S 315)
show description

Description:

In Fall 2017 we will observe the quincentennial of the beginning of the Protestant Reform initiated by Martin Luther’s (1483-1546) 95 theses. Luther was one of the seminal figures of the second millennium whose impact is felt today. We will examine his writings and his activities, the conditions that lead to his rise, and the impact he had on the world after him. Just as importantly, we will study the historical, cultural, and social context in which he lived and whose product he was.

In a broader sense, this course focuses on the transformation of European culture (with special emphasis on Germany) from the late Middle Ages to the early modern age (1450-1600), roughly during Luther’s life time. Humanism and the Protestant Reformation will be the main focus of this course, but we will also discuss political, social, economic, scientific, and philosophical developments as well as architecture, art, music, and literature of the time period. At the end, students will have a good understanding of German and European culture at this particular crossroads.

We will break down the course into the following themes:

*          What is Humanism? Renaissance?

*          The printing press and the first information revolution

*          A new urban culture (literature, architecture, music)

*          Political power and social order

*          Heliocentrism and discoveries: America, Cape of Good Hope

*          Trade networks: the first age of Globalization

*          The Catholic church and monastic life before Luther

*          Luther’s life

*          Luther’s theology: his writings

*          The Protestant Reform: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and others

*          Catholic responses

*          Social and political impact of the Reformation

*          How Luther changed the world

 

Readings:

*          Scott H. Hendrix. Martin Luther: A Very Short Introduction.

*          John Dillenberger (ed.). Martin Luther: Selections From His Writing.

*          R.C. Sproul and Stephen J. Nichols (eds.). The Legacy of Luther.

*          Jerry Brotton. The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction.

*          Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation: A History

*          other materials on Canvas

  

Grading:

Attendance, Participation                             10%

Quizzes                                                           10%

Oral presentation                                          10%

Two short writing assignments                   20%

Two examinations                                         50%


HIS 306N • Magic And Power In Prague

39230 • Roberts, Jason
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 1.108
(also listed as R S 306, REE 302)
show description

In this lower division, undergraduate course we examine authentic historical texts from four different “magical” traditions (witchcraft, alchemy, Kabbalah, nigromancy) to find the truth behind the fiction and the historical events that sometimes permitted and sometimes persecuted the religious, philosophical, and scientific ideas we have come to refer to collectively as “magic.” The site of our study is post-Reformation Bohemia during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II where we concern ourselves with how the practice of magic affected politics and religion as well as with how politics and religion affected the practice of magic. In the process of disambiguating four very different mystical and religious traditions, which are too often misleadingly grouped together under the undifferentiated term “magic,” students will also expand their knowledge of the history of Bohemia and the city of Prague. For more, see: https://www.facebook.com/MAGICandPOWERinPRAGUE

 

Required texts

(1)             Title: The Magic Circle of Rudolph II: Alchemy and Astrology in Renaisance Prague

                  Author: Peter Marshall

                  ISBN: 978-0802715517 

 

(2)             Title: Malleus Maleficarum: The Original Guide to the Catching and Burning of Witches

                  Author: Mike Rosen

                  ISBN: 978-1593622138

 

(3)             Title: The Golem and the Wondrous Deeds of the Maharal of Prague

                  Author: Yudl Rosenberg     

                  ISBN: 0300143206

 

Grading

A.               5 take-home essay tests = 75% 

B.               Homework and class assignments = 25%  


HIS 306N • Medieval Material Culture

39205 • Kaufman, Cheryl
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 2.112
(also listed as AHC 310)
show description

 

 


HIS 309L • Western Civ In Mod Times-Pl II

39235 • Coffin, Judith
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.132
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Course Overview: In this course, we examine the central cultural characteristics of the Western heritage after the Reformation and discuss their transformation up to the present. A chronological narrative of the history in question will be provided by the lecturer and the textbook, but the most significant portion of our time together will be devoted to the examination of a number of central questions within western society since the Reformation. We will attempt to formulate an understanding of “western civilization” and its central concerns and transformations, with a particular attention paid to economy and politics in their relationships to culture and freedom. We will discuss such issues as the construction of political authority and its relationship to emerging conceptions of political liberty, revolution, popular sovereignty, and political economy. We will examine and explain the emergence of the central characteristics of modern Western society, including mass society, democracy, colonialism, secularism, political sovereignty, and the nation-state. Focus in the course is away from memorization of factual information about European history and toward reading, discussion, interpretation and criticism of texts that exemplify certain moments in the western tradition. By reading, discussing, analyzing and criticizing these sources, students will receive an introduction to the tasks involved in “thinking like a historian.”

 

Prerequisites:  Students taking this course are assumed to be capable of an informed, critical stance toward the claims of the lecturer. No previous knowledge of the subject matter is assumed.

 

Possible Texts:

 

Mark Kishlansky et al., Civilization in the West, vol. 2

Jean Calvin, Golden Book of the True Christian Life

John Locke, Second Treatise of Government

Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (selections)

Émile Zola, The Ladies’ Paradise

Ernst Jünger, Storm of Steel

J. M. Keynes, The End of Laissez-Faire / Economic Consequences of the Peace (selections)

Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom (selections)

Additional readings will be distributed in class or are available on the Internet

 

Assignments & Grading:

 

Compliance with syllabus policy 0%

Compliance with attendance policy 0%

Paper 1 @ 15%

Paper 2 @ 25%

Final paper @ 30%

Average of regular quizzes @ 30% each (I will drop your two lowest scores)

 


HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In US

39250 • Zamora, Emilio
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 212
(also listed as MAS 316)
show description

This an introduction to the many ways Mexican Americans are a central part of American history. 


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39270 • Olwell, Robert
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WCH 1.120
show description

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

 


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39275 • Brands, H
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 2.112A
show description

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

 


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39265 • Kamil, Neil
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 2.112A
show description

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

 


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39385 • Stoff, Michael
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A121A
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39280 • Restad, Penne
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.110
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39285-39330 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM UTC 2.102A
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39335-39380 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM UTC 2.102A
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 


HIS 317L • Colonial America

39390 • Tully, Alan
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 3.116
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 317L • Est America, 1565-1815

39415 • Tully, Alan
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 317L • Intro To Asian American Hist

39395 • Hsu, Madeline
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.218
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 317L • Rights In Modern America

39410 • Green, Laurie
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.110
(also listed as AFR 317D)
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 317L • The Black Power Movement

39405 • Moore, Leonard
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 2.112A
(also listed as AFR 317D)
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 317L • The United States And Africa

39400 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as AFR 317C)
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 317N • Thinking Like A Historian

39420 • Hardwick, Julie
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 1.134
show description

Topics in History.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework.

 

 


HIS 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

39425-39440
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 201
(also listed as AHC 319, C C 319D)
show description

Survey of the ancient Mediterranean from ca. 3000 BC to AD 476. Focus on

the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds

and on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of

the broader region that shaped Greek and Roman history and cultural

 identity.


HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39445
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM JGB 2.218
(also listed as MAS 374)
show description

The course will survey change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history. Special attention will be given to politics and social relationships (class, race and gender relations) between 1900 and 1950. We will also examine themes such as socio-economic change, labor, transborder relations and electoral politics. Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 321M • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

39450-39465 • Riggsby, Andrew
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as AHC 325)
show description

A survey of Roman history from the founding of Rome to the death of Julius Caesar.


HIS 329P • History Of The Atomic Bomb

39470 • Hunt, Bruce
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.128
show description

This course will focus on the development of nuclear weapons from the discovery of fission in 1938 to the Oppenheimer security hearings of 1954, with a brief look at later events. We will examine the scientific background behind the development of the first atomic bombs, the organization of the Manhattan Project, the American decision to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities, and the post-war debates over arms control and the development of the H-bomb.

This course carries both a writing flag and an ethics and leadership flag. 

 

 

Texts:

Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb,

 

Michael Stoff, et al., eds., The Manhattan Project,

 

John Hersey, Hiroshima,

 

Michael J. Hogan, ed., Hiroshima in History and Memory,

 

Herbert York, The Advisors: Oppenheimer, Teller, and the Superbomb,

 

Richard Polenberg, ed., In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer,

 

plus a collection of supplementary readings to be posted on Canvas.

 

Grading:

Course grades will be +/- and will be based will be based on a quiz (10%), a 12-14 page paper (50%), a 4 page paper (15%), an essay exam (15%), and class participation (10%).


HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

39480 • Martinez, Alberto
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAI 4.18
show description

Course Description

Perspectives on Science and Math explores the intellectual, social, and cultural history of science and math from the Renaissance to the present. It is designed for students in UTeach Natural Sciences. The course has four interlocking goals: to give you an overview of the history of science and mathematics, for your general education and to help you reflect on your own reasons and goals for teaching science or math; to enable you to put this broader history and context to work in science and mathematics pedagogy; to improve your writing skills to competence or mastery; and likewise to improve you research and information analysis skills to competence of mastery. This is a writing flag class

 

The readings and lessons explore the why, how, and what of the history of science and math. We will attempt to identify and analyze the goals of natural philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians—why did they think the knowledge they made was important? We will investigate the practices by which people have established thecredibility or authority of knowledge—how did people agree on what was true? And we will study the content of theories—what did people know? While exploring these historical questions, we will pay especially close attention to the changing roles of science and math education. “We” is not a figure of speech here. This is a team taught class, and you are on the team. Nearly a third of the lessons will be developed and led by students. These lessons will focus especially on answering the last question; that is, what did people know?

 

There is a weekly discussion section connected to this course which students are required to attend.

 

Readings are posted on the course’s blackboard site. 

 

Grading Policies

 

Unless an extension is granted well in advance, the grade will drop a full letter for each day an assignment is late. “Sundry assignments” will not be accepted late. Plus/minus grades will be assigned. 

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities: 471-6259.

 

University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced. 

 

 

 

Assignments

 

Participation: 15%

Attendance will be taken and factored into your grade. One unexcused absence is allowed. In addition, active and insightful engagement in the lessons will be rewarded—everyone is expected to participate in discussions. Attendance and participation in sections are included here.

 

Sundry Assignments: 10%

These are ungraded or plus-check-minus assignments completed in class or at home. Most are connected to a reading and are designed to improve comprehension and assure that students have completed the reading. They may include unannounced quizzes. 

 

Short Research Paper: 10%

This paper is closely linked to the 5E Lesson Plan (see below). Before preparing the 5E Lesson Plan with a partner, each student will research and write a three to four page essay exploring the subject of his/her lesson. 

 

5E Lesson Plan: 25%

Working in pairs, students will prepare, present, and revise one 5E Lesson Plan integrating a historical topic into a science or math lesson. These lessons are considered part of the class, and should focus on an interesting or important historical idea or method. The 5E Lesson Plans will be critical for providing the intellectual (as opposed to the social and cultural) history component of the course. Handouts, examples, rubrics, etc. will explain the assignment and establish clear expectations. 

 

Peer Review: 5%

Students will provide feedback to peers on 5E Lesson Plans and selected writing assignments.

 

Unit Reflections: 15% (5% each)

Two to four page written reflections on the readings, lectures, and discussions for each of the first three units. Due the Monday after the end of the unit.

 

Midterm Exam: 10%

The midterm will consist of identifications and short answer questions

 

Final Exam: 10%

The final exam will consist of identifications and short answer questions.

 


HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

39475 • Martinez, Alberto
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAI 4.18
show description

Course Description

Perspectives on Science and Math explores the intellectual, social, and cultural history of science and math from the Renaissance to the present. It is designed for students in UTeach Natural Sciences. The course has four interlocking goals: to give you an overview of the history of science and mathematics, for your general education and to help you reflect on your own reasons and goals for teaching science or math; to enable you to put this broader history and context to work in science and mathematics pedagogy; to improve your writing skills to competence or mastery; and likewise to improve you research and information analysis skills to competence of mastery. This is a writing flag class

 

The readings and lessons explore the why, how, and what of the history of science and math. We will attempt to identify and analyze the goals of natural philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians—why did they think the knowledge they made was important? We will investigate the practices by which people have established thecredibility or authority of knowledge—how did people agree on what was true? And we will study the content of theories—what did people know? While exploring these historical questions, we will pay especially close attention to the changing roles of science and math education. “We” is not a figure of speech here. This is a team taught class, and you are on the team. Nearly a third of the lessons will be developed and led by students. These lessons will focus especially on answering the last question; that is, what did people know?

 

There is a weekly discussion section connected to this course which students are required to attend.

 

Readings are posted on the course’s blackboard site. 

 

Grading Policies

 

Unless an extension is granted well in advance, the grade will drop a full letter for each day an assignment is late. “Sundry assignments” will not be accepted late. Plus/minus grades will be assigned. 

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities: 471-6259.

 

University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced. 

 

 

 

Assignments

 

Participation: 15%

Attendance will be taken and factored into your grade. One unexcused absence is allowed. In addition, active and insightful engagement in the lessons will be rewarded—everyone is expected to participate in discussions. Attendance and participation in sections are included here.

 

Sundry Assignments: 10%

These are ungraded or plus-check-minus assignments completed in class or at home. Most are connected to a reading and are designed to improve comprehension and assure that students have completed the reading. They may include unannounced quizzes. 

 

Short Research Paper: 10%

This paper is closely linked to the 5E Lesson Plan (see below). Before preparing the 5E Lesson Plan with a partner, each student will research and write a three to four page essay exploring the subject of his/her lesson. 

 

5E Lesson Plan: 25%

Working in pairs, students will prepare, present, and revise one 5E Lesson Plan integrating a historical topic into a science or math lesson. These lessons are considered part of the class, and should focus on an interesting or important historical idea or method. The 5E Lesson Plans will be critical for providing the intellectual (as opposed to the social and cultural) history component of the course. Handouts, examples, rubrics, etc. will explain the assignment and establish clear expectations. 

 

Peer Review: 5%

Students will provide feedback to peers on 5E Lesson Plans and selected writing assignments.

 

Unit Reflections: 15% (5% each)

Two to four page written reflections on the readings, lectures, and discussions for each of the first three units. Due the Monday after the end of the unit.

 

Midterm Exam: 10%

The midterm will consist of identifications and short answer questions

 

Final Exam: 10%

The final exam will consist of identifications and short answer questions.

 


HIS 337N • Germany In The 20th Cen-Honors

39490 • Crew, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as REE 335)
show description

Description: Despite the many calamities it caused and experienced in the twentieth century, the German state has persisted into our present as a leader in European politics, economy and society and an important international actor. To understand why this would be the case, this course treats the history of Germany in the “long” twentieth century, that is, from the intermediate background of WWI and the establishment of a unified German Empire (1871) to the present. Class time will alternate between lecture and discussion of primary source readings. Topics to be covered include: German economy, geography, and demography; national unification; German colonialism; Wilhelmine society and culture; the social and political status of German Jewry; the background, causes, and experience of WWI; the failed Communist Revolution of 1919; the emergence and decline of the Weimar state; the economic crisis of the interwar years; Weimar culture; National Socialism and the Third Reich; the experience and effects of WWII; the Holocaust; the constitution of East and West German states, societies, and cultures; the “economic miracle”; the Cold War in Germany; 1968 and its social effects; the revolutions of 1989; reunification; the experience of non-Germans in Germany since 1945; and Germany in the European Union. Where possible we will consider these themes in global context. Throughout, emphasis will fall on the reading and interpretation of primary sources in English translation, including text, film, photographs, and music.

Possible readings (selections – please consult the instructor for the final reading list before purchasing any items):

Stefan Zweig, The World of Yesterday; Ernst Jünger, Storms of Steel; Erich Maria Remarque, The Road Back; Fritz Stern, Five Germanys I Have Known; Kaes et al., The Weimar Republic Sourcebook (selections); Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf; Peter Fritzsche, Germans into Nazis; Arthur Koestler, The God that Failed; J.M. Keynes, The Economic Consequences of the Peace; Filip Müller, Eyewitness Auschwitz; Jana Hensel, After the Wall.

Probable grading scheme:

Map quiz=5%; Midterm 25%; Final exam 25%; Short paper 30%; other quizzes 15%.


HIS 340S • Chinese In The United States

39495 • Hsu, Madeline
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 2.112
show description

This class examines U.S. history from the perspective of Chinese who were the first targets of racially defined immigration restrictions. As such, Chinese have played key roles in the evolution of U.S. immigration restrictions, their enforcement, limits regarding citizenship; permanent residency, and the underlying racial ideologies and conceptions of national belonging.

This course offers an overview of the history of Chinese in America with an emphasis on Chinese American identity and community formations under the shadow of the Yellow Peril. Using primary documents and secondary literature, we will examine structures of work, family, immigration law, racism, class, and gender in order to understand the changing roles and perceptions of Chinese Americans in the United States from 1847 to the present.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Texts

Kwong and Miscevic, Chinese America; excerpts from _Island_, _Chinese American Voices_, _Longtime Californ'_,

Grading

Midterms on lectures and assigned texts. Research paper on Chinese American history.


HIS 343G • Ital Renaissance, 1350-1550

39500 • Frazier, Alison
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS 346)
show description

Description. This upper-division course combines lecture and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a range of primary source readings, we will analyze continuity and change in many realms of human experience. Emphasis will be placed upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, technology, and art.

 

The aim of this course is to help you become more thoughtful about historical analysis of continuity and change in such contentious fields as politics, gender, and religion. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period, and will be able to put them in historical context and explain why they remain compelling today.

 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron

            Alberti, On Painting

            Machiavelli, Discourses

            Nogarola, Letters

            Castiglione, The Courtier

            Aretino, Master of the Horse

 

Assignments include:

            Map quiz

            Reading worksheets

            Two essay exams

 


HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

39505 • Neuberger, Joan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JGB 2.216
(also listed as REE 335)
show description

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%


HIS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

39510 • Icenhauer-Ramirez, Robert
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 214
show description

TOVERVIEW.  This course investigates the political, military, constitutional, diplomatic, and social aspects of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.  The emphasis will be on the military and political facets of the war while also focusing on how the war resulted in the destruction of slavery.  The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the major events and leaders of the war and its aftermath.  The end of slavery will be examined with an eye toward the actions of the free African-Americans and slaves themselves in moving emancipation to the forefront of the debate about the war’s objectives.  The history of Reconstruction will be considered during the last several class sessions.
 
BOOKS. The following books should be purchased:
 
The Confederate War, by Gary W. Gallagher
The War that Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters, by James McPherson
A Short History of Reconstruction: Updated Edition, by Eric Foner
The American War by Gary W. Gallagher & Joan Waugh

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING.  There will be two exams – on Thursday, September 29, and Thursday, December 1, during the scheduled class period.  Each of the tests will count 30% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at both of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.  There will be a paper of 6-8 pages in length that will count 30% of the course grade.  Quizzes will count 10%.


HIS 346L • Modern Latin America

39520 • Del Castillo, Lina
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the period of the Wars for Independence in the early nineteenth century until the present. While the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the region as a whole, due to time constraints it will focus primarily on the histories of select countries, including Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, and Colombia. Drawing upon primary documents, audio/visual materials, and works produced by historians, the class will explore the racial, class, and gender hierarchies that emerged out of the region’s colonial and precolonial past and their impact on the lives of Latin American people. We will explore the struggle to create “nations” and the emergence of a neocolonial order in the nineteenth century. We will also examine the ways that popular mobilization against neocolonial social hierarchies led to the refashioning of the “nation” throughout the twentieth century. The course will conclude with an examination of the ways Latin Americans are navigating the increasingly transnational world of the early twenty-first century. Thus, the arc of the class prompts students to think about the history of the Americas as a history of transnational processes. 

Course Objectives:

(1) Enable students to develop a working knowledge of the key social, political, economic, and cultural developments in Latin American history since the Wars for Independence.

(2) Expose students to the complex relationship between local level developments and transnational processes across time and space.

(3) Encourage students to interrogate nationalism as a historical phenomenon, rather than a transhistorical given that stands outside of history

 

Required Readings:

John Chasteen, Born in Blood and Fire

José Vasconcelos, La Raza Cósmica/The Cosmic Race

C. Peter Ripley, Conversations with Cuba

Coursepack Readings

 

Grading

The breakdown of your grade is as follows: 

First two tests at 25% each 50%

Final Exam 30%

Active Class participation 20%

 


HIS 346N • Indian Subcontinent, 1750-1950

39525 • Chatterjee, Indrani
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A305A
show description

This course will deal with the history, culture, and politics of India during the period of British rule, the nationalist movement, and independence.  We will pay special attention to cultural ideas, the interaction of religion and politics, and the careers of a number of nationalist leaders, including Mahatma Gandhi.  Recent developments in India and Pakistan will be covered, as far as possible, at the end of the course.

Texts (subject to change):

Thomas and Barbara Metcalf, A Concise History of India

Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia

Stephen Hay, ed. Sources of Indian Tradition (vol. 2)

Zareer Masani, Indian Tales of the Raj

A selection of novels for the book reports

Grading

Requirements for the course include map assignments, 2 book reports, a mid-term exam and a final.  Percentages of the grade: papers 25% each, exams 25% each.


HIS 350L • Cold War In Five Continents

39535 • Brown, Jonathan
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 1.134
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • History Of The Caribbean

39565 • Twinam, Ann
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • Latin America In The 19th-Cen

39540 • Del Castillo, Lina
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM JES A216A
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • Mughal India In Hist/Memory

39570 • Talbot, Cynthia
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM GAR 3.116
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • Struggle For Asian Democrcy

39545 • Guha, Sumit
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 112
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • The Galileo Affair

39560 • Hunt, Bruce
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM GAR 0.132
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • Urban Slavery In The Americas

39550 • Canizares, Jorge
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as AFR 374E, LAS 366)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • When Christ Was King

39555 • Butler, Matthew
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 0.132
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350R • Amer Cul Hist Alchl/Drugs

39585 • Smith, Mark
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM BUR 436A
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Animals/American Culture

39595 • Davis, Janet
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 436A
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Black Women In America

39605 • Berry, Daina
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM JES A215A
(also listed as AFR 374D)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Coastal Commun In Early Amer

39575 • Kamil, Neil
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 1.134
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Debating Amer Revolution

39615 • Olwell, Robert
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM BUR 228
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Hist Black Entrepren In US

39600 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as AFR 374D)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Myth/Construc Of Amer Ident

39580 • Restad, Penne
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 310
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Refugees In 20th-Century US

39620 • Vong, Sam
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 1.134
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Women In Postwar America

39590 • Green, Laurie
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 0.128
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Women In Sickness & Health

39610 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 0.120
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 355S • US Constitutional History

39650 • Icenhauer-Ramirez, Robert
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JGB 2.202
show description

A lecture and discussion course dealing with the history of the development of the American constitutional tradition from colonial times to the present.  Particular attention will be paid to the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, the rise of the Supreme Court and the doctrines of judicial review and judicial supremacy, and the expansion of the meaning of liberty in twentieth century applications of the Fourteenth Amendment to civil rights, civil liberties and other modern constitutional issues.  The course will always keep a sharp focus on the historical context in which these questions arose.

Texts/Readings

Most readings will be in primary materials, especially opinions of the U. S. Supreme Court from Marbury v. Madison to recent decisions.

Examinations and Grading

Two midterm examinations, each worth 25% of the course grade, and a final examination worth 50% of the course grade.  Exams will be essay format.

Prerequisites

Upper-division standing required.

Partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history.


HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

39655 • Smith, Mark
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 370
show description

Description: This is a lecture course on postwar American culture and society with special emphasis on the 1950s and 1960s. Issues to be discussed include the domestic impact of the Cold War, the effects of McCarthyism on politics and the entertainment world, the problems of affluence in the 1950s, the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s, the cultural relationships between the United States and the rest of the world, as well as conflicts between blacks and whites, the middle class and blue-collar workers, men and women, parents and children. The lectures will deal primarily with cultural and intellectual history, while the reading draws heavily on novels, journalism and social criticism.  Therefore, no one should enroll in this course who has not already taken at least one, preferably upper-division, course in 20th century American history.  Nor should anyone take the course if they are unfamiliar with trends in modern American literature, art, music, and movies.  In addition, since students will be asked to write two 10-15 page papers (there are no exams) based on the reading, you should not register for the course if you are unaccustomed to writing in-depth analytical essays, especially about novels.

Texts: Partial List, All Required:   

  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
  • John Updike, Rabbit Run
  • Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem
  • Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique
  • Norman Mailer, The Armies of the Night
  • Richard Pells, Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated, and Transformed American Culture Since World War II

Grading:

Two 10-15 page papers, each counting 50% of the course grade.  Each paper will analyze two books on the reading list, one of which must be a novel.  The first paper will deal with the culture of the 1940s and 1950s; the second, with American culture from the 1960s to the present.



HIS 357C • African American Hist To 1860

39660 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.126
show description

This upper division course examines the history of Blacks in the United States from the West African Heritage to the Civil War and provides a critical examination on central issues under scholarly debate in the reconstruction of the Black experience in America. The course thus engages the debate on the evolution of African-American slavery as a social, economic and political institution, with a special focus on antebellum slavery, including plantation slavery, industrial slavery, and urban slavery in addition to slave culture.

Also, the course assesses the institutional development of the free black community, during the age of slavery, with emphasis on free black protest activities, organizations, and leaders. Equally important, information is provided on the business and entrepreneurial activities of both slave and free blacks before the Civil War to underscore the long historic tradition of black economic self-help. Invariably, those slaves who purchased their freedom were slaves involved in various business enterprises. Also emphasized in the course are the various ways in which slave and free black women responded to slavery and racism before the Civil War, giving consideration to gender issues within the intersection of the dynamics of race, class, and sex.

The course format is primarily lecture, with informal class discussion, utilizing in part the Socratic method of teaching/pedagogy (especially useful for students who are pre-law), as we examine topics that broaden historical consciousness and critical thinking skills, such as: the role Africans played in the Atlantic slave trade; the historical forces that contributed to the origin of racism in Colonial America; the anomaly of black plantation slave owners in a race-based slave society; how white economic disparities and hegemonic masculinities were played out in class subordination and racial oppression; why race takes precedence over class in assessing the black historical experience; the extent to which judicial cases provide a pragmatic assessment of the realities of slave life; the extent to which American law supported the racial subordination of slave and free blacks; whether or not the economic and political imperatives that prompted antebellum African American settlement in West Africa can be considered colonialist in design and intent.

These and other questions will bring to the forefront the central issue of the agency of African Americans in their attempts to survive racism and slavery in attempts forge their own political and economic liberation. This course, consequently, emphasizes both the deconstruction of prevailing assessments and interpretations of the African American experience as well as provides information for a new reconstruction of the Black Experience from slavery to freedom. In each instance, emphasis will be on exploring different historical interpretations of the Black Experience.

African American slaves did not lead a monolithic slave experience. They shared life-time, hereditary, involuntary servitude, racial oppression and subordination. But many manipulated the institution and slave codes in attempts to mitigate that oppression. Others, such as Nat Turner and Dred Scott used other means to bring about an end to their servitude, while free blacks also fought to end slavery as well as improve their economic, societal and legal status.

The primary purposes of this course, then, are 1) to develop an understanding of the nature of historical inquiry and 2). to heighten historical consciousness 3), encourage critical thinking and analysis of historical material and 4) to recognizing the difference between what might have happened and what actually happened to blacks, both slave and free blacks during the age of slavery to the Civil War.

Texts:

Franklin, John Hope and Higginbotham, E. From Slavery to Freedom: 9th edition, paper

Holt, Thomas, Barkely-Brown, E. and Patterson, T.   Major Problems in African American History, Vol 1

Owens, Leslie, This Species of Property: Slave Life and Culture in the Old South

Smithers, Gregory D., Slave Breeding: Sex, Violence, and Memory in African American History

Tyler, Ron and Lawrence R. Murphy: The Slave Narratives of Texas

Walker, Juliet E. K., The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship, Vol 1

Grading:

MID-TERM EXAM                             35%

RESEARCH PAPER                                   30%

EXAM 2 (TAKE-HOME)                    35%


HIS 362G • Rebels/Rvolutn Rus Hist/Lit

39685 • Alexandrova, Marina
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GEA 127
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325)
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

  • Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)
  • Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*
  • Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)
  • Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869)(excerpts)*
  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)
  • Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*
  • Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)
  • Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)
  • Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

  

Grade Evaluations: 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.


HIS 362G • Rise Of The West: 1492-1815

39670 • Vaughn, James
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.102
show description

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


HIS 362G • Sacred/Sec In Mod Euro Thought

39675 • Matysik, Tracie
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM JES A209A
(also listed as EUS 346)
show description

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


HIS 362G • The Church And The Jews

39680 • Bodian, Marion
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 2.112
(also listed as EUS 346)
show description

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


HIS 363K • Life/Politics Contemp Mexico

39690 • Zazueta, Maria
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 


HIS 364G • Big Asian Histories

39695 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 210
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topic titles vary.


HIS 364G • Histories African Liberatn

39710 • Chery, Tshepo
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as AFR 372G)
show description

Is Africa free from all forms of colonialism? This course engages this question by examining the historical moment of African independence. It focuses on a variety of texts, both primary and secondary, from across the continent and beyond that embody the romantic visions, realistic compromises, and some of the tragic aftermaths of independence on the African continent. The course will explore themes that include an examination of the anti-colonial movement, the role of Pan-Africanism within nationalistic dialogues, the strengths and weakness of African nationalism after independence, as well as the challenges of nationalism in contemporary Africa.


HIS 364G • History Of Pilgrimage To Mecca

39700 • Brower, Benjamin
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 206
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topic titles vary.


HIS 364G • Qing China: Hist/Fict/Fant

39705 • Eisenman, Iris
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.120
(also listed as ANS 372)
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topic titles vary.


HIS 366N • British Hist, Lit, & Polit-Hon

39715 • Louis, William
Meets F 3:00PM-6:30PM HRC 3.204
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.