History Department
History Department

Edward J. M. Rhoads


Professor EmeritusPh.D., 1970, Harvard University

Edward J. M. Rhoads

Contact

Biography


Research interests

A history of the bicycle in China; the Chinese Educational Mission to the United States (1872-81)

Courses


HIS 340S • Chinese In The United States-W

35615 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 5

This class examines U.S. history from the perspective of Chinese who were the first targets of racially defined immigration restrictions. As such, Chinese have played key roles in the evolution of U.S. immigration restrictions, their enforcement, limits regarding citizenship; permanent residency, and the underlying racial ideologies and conceptions of national belonging.

This course offers an overview of the history of Chinese in America with an emphasis on Chinese American identity and community formations under the shadow of the Yellow Peril. Using primary documents and secondary literature, we will examine structures of work, family, immigration law, racism, class, and gender in order to understand the changing roles and perceptions of Chinese Americans in the United States from 1847 to the present.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Texts

Kwong and Miscevic, Chinese America; excerpts from _Island_, _Chinese American Voices_, _Longtime Californ'_,

Grading

Midterms on lectures and assigned texts. Research paper on Chinese American history.

HIS 340M • Modern China

36150 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.324

This course surveys the emergence of modern China from the nineteenth century to the present, covering the Qing dynasty, the Republic (1912-49), and the People's Republic (since 1949). Beginning with a review of the intellectual, economic, and sociopolitical trends in imperial China, it examines the rise of nationalism and the challenge of modernization in the midst of dynastic decline and foreign threats in the nineteenth century. Its coverage of the twentieth century emphasizes the struggles between the Nationalists and Communists for the making of a modern state and their experiments of contrasting political schemes. The course further examines recent changes in the post-Mao era, focusing on economic and political reforms as well as China?'s ongoing integration into the global system.

HIS 350L • Americans In China-W

36295 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 107
(also listed as ANS 361)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 340M • Modern China

36590 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 109

This course surveys the emergence of modern China from the nineteenth century to the present, covering the Qing dynasty, the Republic (1912-49), and the People's Republic (since 1949). Beginning with a review of the intellectual, economic, and sociopolitical trends in imperial China, it examines the rise of nationalism and the challenge of modernization in the midst of dynastic decline and foreign threats in the nineteenth century. Its coverage of the twentieth century emphasizes the struggles between the Nationalists and Communists for the making of a modern state and their experiments of contrasting political schemes. The course further examines recent changes in the post-Mao era, focusing on economic and political reforms as well as China?'s ongoing integration into the global system.

HIS 340S • Chinese In The United States-W

36595 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 5

This class examines U.S. history from the perspective of Chinese who were the first targets of racially defined immigration restrictions. As such, Chinese have played key roles in the evolution of U.S. immigration restrictions, their enforcement, limits regarding citizenship; permanent residency, and the underlying racial ideologies and conceptions of national belonging.

This course offers an overview of the history of Chinese in America with an emphasis on Chinese American identity and community formations under the shadow of the Yellow Peril. Using primary documents and secondary literature, we will examine structures of work, family, immigration law, racism, class, and gender in order to understand the changing roles and perceptions of Chinese Americans in the United States from 1847 to the present.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Texts

Kwong and Miscevic, Chinese America; excerpts from _Island_, _Chinese American Voices_, _Longtime Californ'_,

Grading

Midterms on lectures and assigned texts. Research paper on Chinese American history.

HIS 340K • Traditional China

35450 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 109

This course offers a cultural history of traditional China from some of the earliest historical records (about 1200 BCE) up through the late imperial period (about 1800 CE). We will cover the major historical events, developments, and trends -- social, political, economic, military, philosophical, literary, and cultural. The main focus of the course will be on primary sources. We will read (in translation) the most important writings from the Chinese tradition. These include Shang dynasty oracle bone inscriptions (used for divination), early Chinese philosophy (including Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism), religion (Buddhism and popular religions), dynastic histories, historical biographies, novels, satires, poetry, songs, ritual manuals, diaries, scientific treatises, philological studies, and political debates. We will take an interdisciplinary approach, integrating history with literary studies, philosophy, and anthropology, in order to better understand these texts in their historical context. This is a substantial writing component course.

Texts

  • Sources of Chinese Tradition, vol. 1, From Earliest Times to 1600, ed. William Theodore de Bary et al., 2nd ed. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999. ISBN-10: 0231109393. ISBN-13: 978–0231109390).

  • John R. Trimble, Writing with Style: Conversations on the Art of Writing, 2nd ed. (Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2000. ISBN-10: 0130257133. ISBN-13: 978–0130257130).

  • Conrad Schirokauer and Miranda Brown, A Brief History of Chinese Civilization (Wadsworth Publishing, 2005. ISBN-10: 0534643051. ISBN-13: 978–0534643058).

  • ERes Electronic Reserves System. All other readings will be made available through electronic reserves: http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu/coursepage.asp?cid=338 This electronic reserves page is password-protected; please email me if you need the password.

     

Grading

Class attendance is mandatory.

The grade will be based on in-class quizzes and class participation (20%), mid-term and final examinations (30%), and a final paper (50%).

For resources for help with writing, see the web page of the Undergraduate Writing Center. For suggestions on writing the final paper, see "Writing Term Papers."

HIS 340S • Chinese In The United States-W

35460 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 109

This class examines U.S. history from the perspective of Chinese who were the first targets of racially defined immigration restrictions. As such, Chinese have played key roles in the evolution of U.S. immigration restrictions, their enforcement, limits regarding citizenship; permanent residency, and the underlying racial ideologies and conceptions of national belonging.

This course offers an overview of the history of Chinese in America with an emphasis on Chinese American identity and community formations under the shadow of the Yellow Peril. Using primary documents and secondary literature, we will examine structures of work, family, immigration law, racism, class, and gender in order to understand the changing roles and perceptions of Chinese Americans in the United States from 1847 to the present.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Texts

Kwong and Miscevic, Chinese America; excerpts from _Island_, _Chinese American Voices_, _Longtime Californ'_,

Grading

Midterms on lectures and assigned texts. Research paper on Chinese American history.

HIS 305K • History Of East Asia To 1800

35820 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 301
(also listed as ANS 301M)

Overview:

This course offers a cultural history of East Asia from some of the earliest historical records (dating from 1200 B.C.E.) up to 1800 C.E. We will cover the major historical events, developments, and trends -- social, political, economic, military, philosophical, literary, and cultural. The main focus of the course will be on primary sources. We will read (in translation) the most important writings from the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean traditions. These readings include Shang dynasty oracle bone inscriptions (used for divination), early Chinese philosophy (including Daoism and Confucianism), the early Japanese constitution, Japanese religions (Shinto, Buddhism), and Korean documents on the founding of early states, together with selections from dynastic histories, historical biographies, novels, satires, poetry, songs, ritual manuals, diaries, scientific treatises, philological studies, and political debates. We will take an interdisciplinary approach, integrating history with literary studies, philosophy, and anthropology, in order to better understand these texts in their historical context.

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites for this course.

Grading policy:

Class attendance is mandatory.

The final course grade will be based on the following: (1) attendance, in-class quizzes, and class participation (30%); (2) the mid-term examination (15%) and final examination (15%); (3) the term paper (8–10 pages, 40%). Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final course grade.

For help with writing, see the Undergraduate Writing Center. For suggestions on writing the final paper, see "Writing Term Papers."

 

Readings:

Required:

Sources of East Asian Tradition, Volume 1, Premodern Asia, ed. William Theodore de Bary et al. (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008), ISBN 9780231143059.

John R. Trimble, Writing with Style: Conversations on the Art of Writing, 2nd ed. (Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2000), ISBN 0130257133.

Pre-modern East Asia: To 1800: A Cultural, Social, and Political History, ed. Patricia Ebrey, Anne Walthall, and James Palais (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2006), ISBN 0618133860.

 

ERes Electronic Reserves System

All other readings will be made available through electronic reserves:

http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu/coursepage.asp?cid=337&page=01

 

Course website

The website for this course is this page,

http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~rhart/courses/eastasia/index.html

HIS 340M • Modern China

36260 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 109

This course surveys the emergence of modern China from the nineteenth century to the present, covering the Qing dynasty, the Republic (1912-49), and the People's Republic (since 1949). Beginning with a review of the intellectual, economic, and sociopolitical trends in imperial China, it examines the rise of nationalism and the challenge of modernization in the midst of dynastic decline and foreign threats in the nineteenth century. Its coverage of the twentieth century emphasizes the struggles between the Nationalists and Communists for the making of a modern state and their experiments of contrasting political schemes. The course further examines recent changes in the post-Mao era, focusing on economic and political reforms as well as China?'s ongoing integration into the global system.

ANS 301M • Hist Of East Asia Since 1800

26785 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 201

Please check back for updates.

HIS 340K • Traditional China

35075 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 109

This course offers a cultural history of traditional China from some of the earliest historical records (about 1200 BCE) up through the late imperial period (about 1800 CE). We will cover the major historical events, developments, and trends -- social, political, economic, military, philosophical, literary, and cultural. The main focus of the course will be on primary sources. We will read (in translation) the most important writings from the Chinese tradition. These include Shang dynasty oracle bone inscriptions (used for divination), early Chinese philosophy (including Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism), religion (Buddhism and popular religions), dynastic histories, historical biographies, novels, satires, poetry, songs, ritual manuals, diaries, scientific treatises, philological studies, and political debates. We will take an interdisciplinary approach, integrating history with literary studies, philosophy, and anthropology, in order to better understand these texts in their historical context. This is a substantial writing component course.

Texts

  • Sources of Chinese Tradition, vol. 1, From Earliest Times to 1600, ed. William Theodore de Bary et al., 2nd ed. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999. ISBN-10: 0231109393. ISBN-13: 978–0231109390).

  • John R. Trimble, Writing with Style: Conversations on the Art of Writing, 2nd ed. (Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2000. ISBN-10: 0130257133. ISBN-13: 978–0130257130).

  • Conrad Schirokauer and Miranda Brown, A Brief History of Chinese Civilization (Wadsworth Publishing, 2005. ISBN-10: 0534643051. ISBN-13: 978–0534643058).

  • ERes Electronic Reserves System. All other readings will be made available through electronic reserves: http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu/coursepage.asp?cid=338 This electronic reserves page is password-protected; please email me if you need the password.

     

Grading

Class attendance is mandatory.

The grade will be based on in-class quizzes and class participation (20%), mid-term and final examinations (30%), and a final paper (50%).

For resources for help with writing, see the web page of the Undergraduate Writing Center. For suggestions on writing the final paper, see "Writing Term Papers."

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