History Department
History Department

James R. Denbow


ProfessorPh.D., University of Indiana

James R. Denbow

Contact

Courses


AFR 322 • Intro To African Prehistory

30125 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L)

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in Africa. The roots of humankind go back almost 6 million years on the continent. The earliest materials will be discussed briefly so that we can focus on the last 200,000 years when modern humans developed and diversified in the modern communities of today. This is still an enormous task when one considers that human history in the New world only began around 17,000 years ago and that the African continent is more than three times the size of the continental United States! Today there are more than a thousand different languages spoken in Africa and cultural, as well as ecological, diversity is great. Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia, the Swahili coast and North Africa, however, written sources only document the last few centuries of this long history, and most were written from non-African perspectives.

Because Africa is so large and diverse, and much of it only cursorily explored from an archaeological perspective, the main archaeological text for the course will focus on Africa south of the Kunene/Okavango/Zambezi watershed where the most extensive archaeological work has so far been conducted. The lectures will expand on this background to bring material up to date and include discussion of other areas of East, Central, West and North Africa when pertinent. Students are encouraged to raise questions during the lectures in order to ensure that topics of interest to you are discussed—it is your class after all. No prior knowledge of Africa or of archaeology is assumed.

The course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. Therefore a substantial portion of your grade will come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of non-U.S. cultural groups, past and present. 

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31450 • Fall 2016
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.124

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

AFR 372G • Archaeol Of African Thought

29470 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L, ANT 380K)

This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period. The course will discuss the historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African societies south of the Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa. The intention is to develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of African societies and traditions, and their transformations through time. This provides an interpretive framework from which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the Atlantic slave trade and the cultural foundations of the Diaspora in the New World.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30275-30290 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.112

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

AFR 322 • Intro To African Prehistory

29595 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L)

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in

Africa. The roots of humankind go back almost 6 million years on the continent. The

earliest materials will be discussed briefly so that we can focus on the last 200,000 years

when modern humans developed and diversified in the modern communities of today.

This is still an enormous task when one considers that human history in the New world

only began around 17,000 years ago and that the African continent is more than three

times the size of the continental United States! Today there are more than a thousand

different languages spoken in Africa and cultural, as well as ecological, diversity is great.

Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia, the Swahili coast and North Africa, however, written sources

only document the last few centuries of this long history, and most were written from

non-African perspectives.

Because Africa is so large and diverse, and much of it only cursorily explored

from an archaeological perspective, the main archaeological text for the course will focus

on Africa south of the Kunene/Okavango/Zambezi watershed where the most extensive

archaeological work has so far been conducted. The lectures will expand on this

background to bring material up to date and include discussion of other areas of East,

Central, West and North Africa when pertinent. Students are encouraged to raise

questions during the lectures in order to ensure that topics of interest to you are

discussed—it is your class after all. No prior knowledge of Africa or of archaeology is

assumed.

The course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed

to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. Therefore a

substantial portion of your grade will come from assignments covering the practices,

beliefs, and histories of non-U.S. cultural groups, past and present.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

30680 • Fall 2015
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.124

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30535-30550 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.112

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

30650 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174

This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the

development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the

slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period. The course will discuss the

historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African societies south of the

Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa. The intention is to

develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of African societies and traditions,

and their transformations through time. This provides an interpretive framework from

which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the Atlantic slave trade and

the cultural foundations of the Diaspora in the New World.

AFR 322 • Intro To African Prehistory

30490 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L)

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in Africa.

While the roots of humankind go back almost 6 million years on the continent, the earlier

materials will only be briefly discussed as the course will focus on the last 200,000

years–the period when modern humans developed and diversified.

The African continent is over three times the size of the United States and today

there are more than a thousand different languages spoken in Africa; ethnic and

ecological diversity is great. Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia, the Swahili coast and North

Africa, however, written sources only document the last few centuries and most were

written from non-African perspectives. In this class, archaeological data will be used to

expand upon anthropological and historical accounts to provide a longer and less

"Eurocentric" view of the continent and its historical development. No prior knowledge

of Africa or of archaeology is assumed.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed

to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should

therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering

the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31695 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.124

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

31485-31510 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM BEL 328

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

31690 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174

This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the

development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the

slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period. The course will discuss the

historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African societies south of the

Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa. The intention is to

develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of African societies and traditions,

and their transformations through time. This provides an interpretive framework from

which to then examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the Atlantic slave

trade and its impact on the Diaspora in the New World.

AFR 322 • Intro To African Prehistory

30325 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L)

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in Africa.

While the roots of humankind go back almost 6 million years on the continent, the earlier

materials will only be briefly discussed as the course will focus on the last 200,000 years

as modern humans developed and diversified. The African continent is over three times

the size of the United States and today there are more than a thousand different languages

spoken in Africa; ethnic and ecological diversity are great. Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia,

the Swahili coast and North Africa, however, written sources only document the last few

centuries most from non-African perspectives. In this class, archaeological data will be

used to expand upon anthropological and historical accounts in order to provide a less

"Eurocentric" view of the continent and its historical development. No prior knowledge

of Africa or of archaeology is assumed.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31615 • Fall 2013
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

31135-31160 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM GAR 0.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

31275 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 380K)

This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period.  The course will discuss the historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African socieities south of the Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa.  The intention is to develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of Bantu societies and traditions, and their transformations through time.  This provides an interpretive framework from which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the slave trade and its impact on the development of new traditions in the New World.  

AFR 322 • Intro To African Prehistory

30256 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L)

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in Africa from approximately 6 million years ago to the colonial period.  The African continent is over three times the size of the United States and current evidence indicates that the ancestors of all humankind evolved there.  Today there are more than a thousand different languages spoken in Africa; ethnic and ecological diversity are great. Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia and North Africa, however, written sources only document the last two centuries or less – and most of these have been from non-African perspectives.  In this class, archaeological data will be used to expand upon anthropological and historical accounts in order to provide a less "Eurocentric" or outsider view of the continent and its historical development.  No prior knowledge of Africa or of archaeology is assumed.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31380 • Fall 2012
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM SAC 5.118

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

31195-31230 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM BEL 328

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31510 • Spring 2012
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM SAC 5.118

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

31205-31220 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM JGB 2.216

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 380K • Grant And Prospectus Writing

31430 • Spring 2011
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM SAC 5.118

ANT 324L • Intro To African Prehistory

30145 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM EPS 2.136
(also listed as AFR 322, ANT 380K)

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in Africa from approximately 4 million years ago to the colonial period.  The African continent is over three times the size of the United States and current evidence indicates that the ancestors of all humankind evolved there around 4 million years ago.  Today there are more than a thousand different languages, belonging to 4 major language families, spoken in Africa; ethnic and ecological diversity are great.  For later time periods, data from archaeological excavations will be examined in order to expand upon anthropological and historical accounts to provide a less "Eurocentric" view of the continent and its historical development.  No prior knowledge of Africa or of archaeology is assumed.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

30355 • Fall 2010
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

AFR 374C • Archaeol Of Afr Thought-W

35455 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM EPS 2.136

Please check back for updates.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30170-30175 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM RAS 215

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

30695 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

Anthropology 392k      

     History and Theory in Archaeology

 

James Denbow

Office: 1.118 Schock, Ph. 417-8512

Hours:  TH:2:00-3:30 and by appointment.

E-mail: jdenbow@mail.utexas.edu

 

This course provides a developmental and historical overview of theoretical and methodological issues in Archaeology.  The course emphasizes readings related to how we think about archaeology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history, anthropology, and related fields. 

 

Weekly Assignments: Each week we will discuss both theoretical essays and data- driven studies on processual, postprocessual, and other modern perspectives. Each week two to three people will be chosen as 'volunteers' to present a 5-10 minute summary of the weeks readings, and to lead class discussions with questions and issues raised in them.  These students are responsible for writing a short critique (about 5 pages) that should be a balanced and critical evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the readings (including your reactions to them as well as, perhaps, where you didn't follow or agree with them). Both positive and negative appraisals of the ideas are to be included in the discussion; at the bottom of each critique, weekly presenters should provide two questions they wish to discuss in class. These papers (or summaries, powerpoints or notes covering the readings) should be prepared as handouts for other students to use as a reference. Critiques will be graded for balanced content, clarity, and style. 

 

Because 2 to 3 students will act as presenters each week, it is good for you to coordinate your presentations and questions in order to lead the discussion effectively. All students must come to class each week having done the readings and prepared to participate in a critical examination and discussion of them. The professor will act as a facilitator of the discussions, but students must be prepared to contribute to discussions each week .

 

Peer Topics: Selected Readings and Discussions: During the last weeks of class (See schedule below) groups of 2 -3 students will be responsible for choosing a selection of  readings from those provided, and develop a discussion around a topic or topics of their choice..

 

Class Requirements: Your grade will be based in equal amounts on your class presentations, class preparation and participation, and a short (10-15 page) paper tied to your research interests due at the end of the semester. 

 

Books and Readings (Books can be purchased online at amazon.com, etc.)

 

1) Class Reader available from Abel’s Copies, 715D West 234d Street

 

2) Walter W. Taylor. 1983 (reprint). A study of Archeology.  S. Illinois

Press.  ISBN 0881040096.

 

3) Lewis Binford. 2002. In Pursuit of the Past: decoding the archaeological record. U. California press. ISBN 0520233395.

 

4) )  Ian Hodder.  2003. Reading the Past: current approaches to interpretation in archaeology.  Cambridge University Press. ISBN0521528844.

 

5)  Matthew Johnson. 1999.  Archaeological Theory.  Blackwell.  ISBN

063120296x.

 

6) Kelley Hays-Gilpin and David Whitley. 1998. Reader in Gender Archaeology. Routledge. ISBN 0415173604.

 

7) Bruce Trigger. 2006. A history of Archaeological Thought. Cambridge. 2nd edition. ISBN-10: 0521600499; ISBN-13: 978-0521600491. [Note: be sure to get the new 2nd edition.]

 

8) R. McGuire.  2002 (reprint). Marxist Archeology.  Percheron Press. ISBN 0-9712427-4-7; ISBN-13: 978-0971242746

 

9) Tilley and Shanks. 1993. Reconstructing Archaeology.  ISBN 0-415-08870-4; ISBN-13: 978-0415088701

 

10) Marcia-Anne Dobres and John Robb. 2000. Agency in Archaeology. Routledge. ISBN 0415207614.

 

Reading Schedule

 

Note: items marked with an * are found in a reader available from Abel's copies.  Other documents marked as .pdf can be downloaded from the course blackboard web site. Some of these papers are included in case you have a particular interest in one of these topics and would like more information.

 

Week 1: Introduction (Varieties of writing)

 

In Press  James Denbow, Morongwa Mosothwane, Nonofho Mathibidi.  Finding Bosutswe: archaeological encounters with the past. History in Africa. [pdf]

 

2008            James Denbow, Jeanette Smith, Kirsten Atwood, Duncan Miller.  Archaeological excavations at Bosutswe: cultural chronology, paleo-ecology and economy. Journal of Archaeological Science 35: 459-480. [pdf]

 

White, Hayden. 1980. The value of Narrativity in the representation of reality.  Critical Inquiry 7 (1): 5-27. [.pdf document]

 

Week 2: Paradigms, Politics, Evolution, and Representations of the past

 

*Fabian, J. 1983.  Chapter 2, Our Time, Their time, No Time: coevalness denied.  In Time and the Other, pp. 37-69.  Chapter 3, Time and Writing About the Other, pp. 70-104.

 

Lucas, Gavin. 2005.  The Archaeology of Time. Routledge, London.  Chapter 1, Beyond Chronology & Chapter 5: Conclusions. [.pdf document].

 

*Dubow, Saul (1995): Scientific Racism in modern South Africa.  Chapters 1-3, pp. 1-128.

 

Week 3: Introduction: Archaeology’s past

 

Trigger, Bruce. 1995.  A History of Archaeological Thought. Chapters 1-4,  pp. 1-164.

 

*Kluckhohn, Clyde.  1939.  The Place of Theory in Anthropological studies.  Philosophy of Science 6(3):328-344.

 

*Patterson, Thomas. 1986.  The last Sixty Years: Toward a Social History of Americanist Archaeology in the United States.  American Anthropologist 88: 7-26.

 

*Kehoe, Alice (1992): The paradigmatic vision of archaeology: archaeology as a bourgeois science.  In J. Reyman, ed. Rediscovering our Past.

 

Week 4: Conjunctive Archaeology and culture. "New" perspectives.

 

All of Walter Taylor. 1948. A Study of Archaeology.

 

Week 5 :  Early archaeological approaches to "scientific" archaeology.

 

Trigger, Chapter 5, 6, 7 (pp. 165-385).

 

*Clark, Grahame.  1953.  The Economic Approach to Prehistory.  Proceedings of the British Academy, 39: 215-38.

 

*Julian Steward.  1955.  Ecological approaches to the concept and method of cultural ecology.  In Theory of Cultural Change, pp. 30-42.

 

Week 6:  "New" Archaeology

 

Trigger, Chapter 8 (pp. 386-483)

 

Johnson, M. 1999.  Archaeology Theory.  Chapters 1, 2, 3; pp.1-47.

 

*Binford: “Archaeology as Anthropology.”  American Antiquity 28, 2, pp. 217-225 (1962).

 

*Binford, L. Archaeological systematics and the study of Culture Process, In New Perspectives in Archaeology,  ed. by Sally and Lewis Binford, Aldine: Chicago, pp. 195-205 (1968).

 

*Hill, J.  Broken K pueblo: patterns of form and function.  In New Perspectives in Archaeology,  ed. by Sally and Lewis Binford, Aldine: Chicago, pp. 103-140. (1968).

 

*Binford, L. “Smudge pits and hide smoking: the use of analogy in archaeological reasoning.”  American antiquity 32(1): 1-12 (1967).

 

*Munson, Patrick, 1969, Comments on Binford’s “Smudge pits and hide smoking: the use of analogy in archaeological reasoning.”  American Antiquity 34: 83-85 (1969).

 

*Stahl. Ann. 1993.  Concepts of Time and Approaches to Analogical Reasoning in Historical Perspective.  American Antiquity 58(2): 235-260.

 

Week 7: New Archaeology II. Middle Range Theory, Ethno-archaeology

 

Tr;igger, Chapter 9 (pp. 484-528)

 

*Binford, L. 1983.  In Pursuit of the Past: Decoding the Archaeological Record.  Chapters 1, 6, 7, 8, 9. Thames and Hudson: New York.

 

Johnson, M. 1999.  Archaeological Theory.  Chapters 4,5,6; pp. 48-97.

 

Week 8: Responses to New Archaeology: varieties of post-processual archaeology

 

Shanks, Michael and Tilley, Christopher. 1987.  Reconstructing Archaeology: Theory and Practice.

 

Asad, Talal. 1979. Anthropology and the Analysis of Ideology. Man 14 (4): 607-627. [.pdf document]

 

Week 9: Marxism & Archaeology

 

Randal McGuire.  Marxist Archaeology,  Chapters 1-6. Academic Press: San  Diego.

 

*Thomas, B.  1998.  Power and Community:  The Archaeology of Slavery at the Hermitage Plantation.  American Antiquity 63(4): 531-551.

Buchli, Victor, 2000. An Archaeology of Socialism.  Berg, Oxford. Chapters 2 & 3. [.pdf document]

Week 10: Hermenutics, Structure, History, and Memory

 

Trigger, Chapter 10, pp. 529-548)

 

Ian Hodder.  2003. Reading the Past: current approaches to interpretation in archaeology.  Cambridge University Press. ISBN0521528844..

 

*Comaroff, John and Jean.  Introductory sections from vols. 1 and 2, Of Revelation and Revolution: the Dialectics of Modernity on a South African Frontier. Vol1, pp. 7-32; Vol 2, pp. 1-53.

 

Week 11: Gender and Archaeology

 

Kelley Hays-Gilpin and David Whitley. 1998. Reader in Gender Archaeology. Routledge. ISBN 0415173604.

 

*Franklin, Maria.  2001.  A Black feminist-inspired archaeology?  Journal of Social Archaeology 1(1):108-125.

 

Wylie, Alison. 2003. Why Standpoint Matters.  In Rigueroa, R. and Harding, S., eds., Science and Other Cultures. Routledge, London. [.pdf document]

 

Wylie, Alison. 2004. What’s Feminist about Gender Archaeology?  [.pdf document]

 

Week 12: Agency and Archaeology

 

Marcia-Anne Dobres and John Robb. 2000. Agency in Archaeology. Routledge. ISBN 0415207614.

 

Enrique Rodriguez-Alegria. 2005. Eating like an Indian: negotiating social relations in the Spanish colonies. Current Anthropology 46: 551-573.

 

Week 13: Politics of the Past

 

Johnson, M. 1991. Archaeological Theory.  Chapters 11 and 12.

 

McGuire, R. Critical Archaeology – Archaeology and the Vanishing American.  In Marxist Archaeology, Chapter 8, pp. 213-246.

 

*Deloria, V.  1992.  Indians, archaeologists and the future.  American Antiquity 57: 595-598.

 

*Trigger, B. 1980.  Archaeology and the image of the American Indian.  American Antiquity 45: 662-676.

 

Whylie, A. 2001.  Thinking from Things.  Part 5: Issues of Accountability

 

Bart Moore-Gilbert. 2000.  Spivak and Bhabha. In Postcolonial Studies. Henry Schwartz and Sangeeta Ray, eds. Blackwell. [.pdf document]

 

Some additional readings & perspectives that might interest you (pdfs on class blackboard.

 

Jennifer Dornan. 2002. Agency and Archaeology: past, present and future directions. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 9 (4): 303-329. [.pdf document]

 

Alfred Gell,  1998. Art and Agency: an Anthropological Theory. Chapters 2-7. [.pdf document]

Chris Fowler. 2004. The individual in the archaeological imagination. In The Archaeology of Personhood: an anthropological approach. Routledge. [.pdf document]

Miller, Daniel. 2002.  Consumption.  In Buchli, Victor, ed. The Material Culture Reader. Berg, Oxford. Chapter 9. [.pdf document]

Miller, Daniel. 1998.  Coca-Cola: a black sweet drink from Trinidad.  In Miller, Daniel, ed., Material Cultures: Why some things matter. University College London Press, London. [.pdf document]

Ingold, Tim. 2000. Building, dwelling, living: How animals and people make themselves at home in the world. In The Perception of the Environment: essays on livelihood, dwelling and skill.  Routledge. [.pdf document]

 

Bill Hillier and Julienne Hanson. 1984. Introduction and Chapter 1. In The Social Logic of Space. Cambridge. [.pdf document]

 

Pierre Bourdieu. 1977. Structures and the habitus. In Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge. [.pdf document]

 

Michel de Certeau.  1988. Selected chapters from The Practice of Everyday Life. University of California Press. [.pdf document]

 

Pierre Lemonnier. Introduction. Elements for an Anthropology of Technology. [.pdf document]

 

 

ANT F304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

81315 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

AFR 374C • Archaeol Of Afr Thought-W

34985 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM EPS 2.136

Please check back for updates.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

29720-29725 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WEL 2.256

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

30850 • Fall 2008
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT F304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82585 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30205-30220 • Spring 2008
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 4.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31170 • Fall 2007
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT S304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82877 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

29800 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.110

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

30730 • Fall 2006
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT F304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82660 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

28990 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.110

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

28835 • Fall 2005
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT F304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82255 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM EPS 2.136

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

27590 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM TAY 2.006

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

28590 • Fall 2004
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT S304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82195 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 201

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

26565 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM ART 1.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

27210 • Fall 2003
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

26440 • Spring 2003
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthropology

26975 • Fall 2002

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

26320 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM ART 1.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

27350 • Fall 2001
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 2.136

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

26610 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM ART 1.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

27465 • Fall 2000
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.

ANT F304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

82065 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WEL 2.256

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

26260 • Spring 2000
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM ART 1.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.