Institute of Mental Research
Institute of Mental Research

Bharath Chandrasekaran


Ph.D., Purdue University

Assistant Professor
Bharath Chandrasekaran

Contact

Interests


Sensory and cognitive processes that underlie speech and music perception in normal and clinical populations using functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological methods.

Biography


Bharath Chandrasekaran, Ph.D., joined the Communication and Sciences Disorders faculty in Fall 2010. He received his bachelor's degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences from Sri Ramachandra University, and his master’s degree in Speech Sciences from Purdue University. He completed his Ph.D. in Integrative Neuroscience from Purdue University in 2008 and a postdoctoral fellowship at Northwestern University in the Communication Neural Systems Research Group and the Auditory Neurosciences Lab. His research interests uses functional neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques to examine neural bases of speech perception, neural plasticity, and learning. He is also interested in how normative processes can go awry in clinical disorders, such as depression. He teaches a course on Language and the Brain (CSD 350, LING 350). Bharath has published articles in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Neuron, Brain and Language, Ear and Hearing, Journal of Acoustical Society of America, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, among others. He has presented his work at National and International meetings and his research work has been featured in various print and television media.

Courses


CSD 350 • Language And The Brain

06825 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 2.306
(also listed as LIN 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of the human brain structure and function relevant to the speech and language function. You will become familiar with methods used to probe the neural bases of the speech and language function. By understanding how the brain processes speech and language, you will gain insight into neurological disorders that affect the speech/language function.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40085 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 201

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

41500 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM BUR 208

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40980 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CMA A2.320

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40815 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CPE 2.214

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

41140 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CPE 2.214

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

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