Institute of Mental Research
Institute of Mental Research

Timothy J. Loving


Ph.D., Purdue University

Associate Professor
Timothy J. Loving

Contact

Interests


Interests: Adolescence and young adulthood; interpersonal relationships and its relation to mental health; open science and research transparency.

Biography


The primary focus of The Loving Lab is to illuminate how non-marital romantic transitions affect mental and physical health. We make use of experimental, observational, longitudinal, and physiological methodologies to study these and related topics, and we give special attention to the social context in which relationships are embedded.

Courses


WGS 301 • Family Relationships

47685 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 105
(also listed as HDF 304)

This course will be oriented around your gaining an understanding of family relationships across the

(relationship) life span, but with a particular focus on relationship development, maintenance, and parenting. As

an introductory course, we will not spend much time on any particular topic, but rather will touch on many of the

major areas of the field. Each of these topic areas could easily take entire summer sessions to cover in depth; my

goal is for you to leave the class with a broad understanding of the field as well as an appreciation for the theories

and research that guide our understanding of the topic. Throughout the course, I will stress the importance of

utilizing sound research in the quest for understanding the development, maintenance, and dissolution of family

relationships. You will be expected to learn numerous new concepts and be able to apply them to unique

situations.

WGS S345 • Relationships In Film

88997 • Summer 2013
Meets MW 1:00PM-3:30PM JGB 2.216

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

WGS 301 • Family Relationships

47225 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 105
(also listed as HDF 304)

This course will be oriented around your gaining an understanding of family relationships across the (relationship) life span, but with a particular focus on relationship development, maintenance, and parenting. As an introductory course, we will not spend much time on any particular topic, but rather will touch on many of the major areas of the field. Each of these topic areas could easily take entire summer sessions to cover in depth; my goal is for you to leave the class with a broad understanding of the field as well as an appreciation for the theories and research that guide our understanding of the topic. Throughout the course, I will stress the importance of utilizing sound research in the quest for understanding the development, maintenance, and dissolution of family relationships. You will be expected to learn numerous new concepts and be able to apply them to unique situations.

WGS S301 • Family Relationships

89445 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CPE 2.216
(also listed as HDF S304)

This course will be oriented around your gaining an understanding of family relationships across the(relationship) life span, but with a particular focus on relationship development, maintenance, and parenting. Asan introductory course, we will not spend much time on any particular topic, but rather will touch on many of themajor areas of the field. Each of these topic areas could easily take entire summer sessions to cover in depth; mygoal is for you to leave the class with a broad understanding of the field as well as an appreciation for the theoriesand research that guide our understanding of the topic. Throughout the course, I will stress the importance ofutilizing sound research in the quest for understanding the development, maintenance, and dissolution of familyrelationships. You will be expected to learn numerous new concepts and be able to apply them to uniquesituations.

WGS 301 • Family Relationships

47560 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 105
(also listed as HDF 304)

COURSE PLAN:


This course will be oriented around your gaining an understanding of family relationships across the
(relationship) life span, but with a particular focus on relationship development, maintenance, and parenting. As
an introductory course, we will not spend much time on any particular topic, but rather will touch on many of the
major areas of the field. Each of these topic areas could easily take entire summer sessions to cover in depth; my
goal is for you to leave the class with a broad understanding of the field as well as an appreciation for the theories
and research that guide our understanding of the topic. Throughout the course, I will stress the importance of
utilizing sound research in the quest for understanding the development, maintenance, and dissolution of family
relationships. You will be expected to learn numerous new concepts and be able to apply them to unique
situations.

Curriculum Vitae


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