Linguistics Department

Bjorn E Lindblom


Professor EmeritusFil dr (= Ph.D.), Lund University

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Courses


LIN 381M • Phonetics

37220 • Spring 2004
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM PAR 304

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 393P • Experimental Phonetics

37305 • Spring 2004
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 301

This is an advanced phonetics seminar in bilingualism and second language acquisition with a focus on speech production and perception. Students will read and discuss primary literature related to the nature of second language phonological acquisition, the dominant models of bilingualism and language acquisition, effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition, early versus late bilingualism, and the effects of foreign accent on speech perception and spoken language processing by native and non-native listeners. The course is used primarily for discussion of course readings, in which students will be actively involved by giving presentations. Students will also conduct original research related to topics discussed in class.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Phonetics course, or permission of the instructor.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

37235 • Spring 2003
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM PAR 304

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 393P • Experimental Phonetics

37315 • Spring 2003
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 301

This is an advanced phonetics seminar in bilingualism and second language acquisition with a focus on speech production and perception. Students will read and discuss primary literature related to the nature of second language phonological acquisition, the dominant models of bilingualism and language acquisition, effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition, early versus late bilingualism, and the effects of foreign accent on speech perception and spoken language processing by native and non-native listeners. The course is used primarily for discussion of course readings, in which students will be actively involved by giving presentations. Students will also conduct original research related to topics discussed in class.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Phonetics course, or permission of the instructor.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

38060 • Fall 2001
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM CBA 4.326

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 393P • Experimental Phonetics

38090 • Fall 2001
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 302

This is an advanced phonetics seminar in bilingualism and second language acquisition with a focus on speech production and perception. Students will read and discuss primary literature related to the nature of second language phonological acquisition, the dominant models of bilingualism and language acquisition, effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition, early versus late bilingualism, and the effects of foreign accent on speech perception and spoken language processing by native and non-native listeners. The course is used primarily for discussion of course readings, in which students will be actively involved by giving presentations. Students will also conduct original research related to topics discussed in class.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Phonetics course, or permission of the instructor.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

37625 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM CBA 4.326

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 393P • Experimental Phonetics

37670 • Fall 2000
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 302

This is an advanced phonetics seminar in bilingualism and second language acquisition with a focus on speech production and perception. Students will read and discuss primary literature related to the nature of second language phonological acquisition, the dominant models of bilingualism and language acquisition, effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition, early versus late bilingualism, and the effects of foreign accent on speech perception and spoken language processing by native and non-native listeners. The course is used primarily for discussion of course readings, in which students will be actively involved by giving presentations. Students will also conduct original research related to topics discussed in class.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Phonetics course, or permission of the instructor.

Curriculum Vitae


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