Linguistics Department

Franky L Ramont


Senior LecturerMA, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Franky L Ramont

Contact

Courses


ASL 610D • American Sign Language II: Beg

40650 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM CLA 0.104

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-Low to Intermediate-Mid proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. The course covers more complex grammatical structures (e.g., use of classifier constructions and grammatical non-manual signals such as referential shift) and vocabulary items (e.g., the ASL numbering system including numeral incorporation and lexicalized fingerspelling). Students develop skills for engaging in conversations and discussions in ASL, and much focus is placed on interactive activities with peers on topics such as family and occupations, describing routines and activities, and making requests. Students continue to learn about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community (e.g., historical events and important figures in the community).

ASL 311D • Amer Sign Lang III: Intermed

40655 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 1.406

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-High to Advanced-Low proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. This course covers additional grammatical topics (e.g., rhetorical questions and conditionals, use of the signing space for indicating grammatical relationships, and strategies for negating propositions). Vocabulary building focuses on learning multiple signs that could correspond with single words in English. As such, comparisons between ASL and English will figure more prominently in this course, in order to emphasize differences across the two languages while also pointing out areas of English influence on ASL. Complex issues within Deaf Culture (e.g., cochlear implants and eugenics ) are dicussed.

ASL 311D • Amer Sign Lang III: Intermed

40660 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.104

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-High to Advanced-Low proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. This course covers additional grammatical topics (e.g., rhetorical questions and conditionals, use of the signing space for indicating grammatical relationships, and strategies for negating propositions). Vocabulary building focuses on learning multiple signs that could correspond with single words in English. As such, comparisons between ASL and English will figure more prominently in this course, in order to emphasize differences across the two languages while also pointing out areas of English influence on ASL. Complex issues within Deaf Culture (e.g., cochlear implants and eugenics ) are dicussed.

ASL 601D • American Sign Language I: Beg

39990 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM CLA 0.104

This course focuses on developing comprehension and production skills in order to achieve Novice-High proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines*. Students work on developing perceptual, attentional, manual, and non-manual skills necessary to learn ASL. The course introduces the student to vocabulary and grammar for elementary interactions, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings, giving directions, and describing various activities. Elementary concepts concerning Deaf culture (e.g., values and social norms) are also introduced.

ASL 350 • American Sign Language Lit

40025 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SZB 296

The course is designed to expand conversational skills using the ASL Literature in ASL to ASL approach. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling specifically the use of role-shifts and classifiers, stories on current events and strategic interactions. ASL Literature will include ASL literature genre, ASL poetry, Fictional, Non-Fiction, Video - group discussion, Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as Culture (Deaf vs. Hearing), Perspective (ASL, Sign Contact, Literature genres) and History (Deaf President Now, Tent City, Past and Present history).  We will cover some genres that our Deaf community value and use often in their daily lives throughout the past several decades!  This means the class will focus mostly on visual ASL literature in contrast to English literature, which is a heavily textually based literature.

Requirements:Over the course of the semester students will complete: ASL Literature video-analysis assignments and group discussion, video projects of Genres of ASL Literature (Poetry, Storytelling, Fictional, Non-fiction) and Deaf Studies Presentation. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community.

No Textbook.

ASL 601D • American Sign Language I: Beg

39825 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM CLA 0.104

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-Low to Intermediate-Mid proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. The course covers more complex grammatical structures (e.g., use of classifier constructions and grammatical non-manual signals such as referential shift) and vocabulary items (e.g., the ASL numbering system including numeral incorporation and lexicalized fingerspelling). Students develop skills for engaging in conversations and discussions in ASL, and much focus is placed on interactive activities with peers on topics such as family and occupations, describing routines and activities, and making requests. Students continue to learn about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community (e.g., historical events and important figures in the community).

ASL 601D • American Sign Language I: Beg

39840 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-12:00PM CBA 4.332

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-Low to Intermediate-Mid proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. The course covers more complex grammatical structures (e.g., use of classifier constructions and grammatical non-manual signals such as referential shift) and vocabulary items (e.g., the ASL numbering system including numeral incorporation and lexicalized fingerspelling). Students develop skills for engaging in conversations and discussions in ASL, and much focus is placed on interactive activities with peers on topics such as family and occupations, describing routines and activities, and making requests. Students continue to learn about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community (e.g., historical events and important figures in the community).

ASL 610D • American Sign Language II: Beg

39905 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.104

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-Low to Intermediate-Mid proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. The course covers more complex grammatical structures (e.g., use of classifier constructions and grammatical non-manual signals such as referential shift) and vocabulary items (e.g., the ASL numbering system including numeral incorporation and lexicalized fingerspelling). Students develop skills for engaging in conversations and discussions in ASL, and much focus is placed on interactive activities with peers on topics such as family and occupations, describing routines and activities, and making requests. Students continue to learn about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community (e.g., historical events and important figures in the community).

ASL 601D • American Sign Language I: Beg

40920 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105

This course focuses on developing comprehension and production skills in order to achieve Novice-High proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines*. Students work on developing perceptual, attentional, manual, and non-manual skills necessary to learn ASL. The course introduces the student to vocabulary and grammar for elementary interactions, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings, giving directions, and describing various activities. Elementary concepts concerning Deaf culture (e.g., values and social norms) are also introduced.

ASL 601D • American Sign Language I: Beg

40930 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 10:00AM-12:00PM CLA 4.222

This course focuses on developing comprehension and production skills in order to achieve Novice-High proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines*. Students work on developing perceptual, attentional, manual, and non-manual skills necessary to learn ASL. The course introduces the student to vocabulary and grammar for elementary interactions, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings, giving directions, and describing various activities. Elementary concepts concerning Deaf culture (e.g., values and social norms) are also introduced.

ASL 610D • American Sign Language II: Beg

41295 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM CLA 1.102

This course focuses on developing Intermediate-Low to Intermediate-Mid proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines. The course covers more complex grammatical structures (e.g., use of classifier constructions and grammatical non-manual signals such as referential shift) and vocabulary items (e.g., the ASL numbering system including numeral incorporation and lexicalized fingerspelling). Students develop skills for engaging in conversations and discussions in ASL, and much focus is placed on interactive activities with peers on topics such as family and occupations, describing routines and activities, and making requests. Students continue to learn about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community (e.g., historical events and important figures in the community).

ASL 350 • American Sign Lang Literature

41345 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A303A

The course is designed to expand conversational skills using the ASL Literature series. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling specifically the use of role-shifts and classifiers, stories on current events and strategic interactions. ASL Literature will include ASL literature genre, ASL poetry, Fictional, Non-Fiction, Video – group discussion, Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as Culture (Deaf vs. Hearing), Perspective (ASL, Sign Contact, Literature genres) and History (Deaf President Now, Tent City, Past and Present history).  We will cover some genres that our Deaf community value and use often in their daily lives throughout the the past several decades!  This means the class will focus mostly on visual ASL literature in contrast to English literature, which is a heavily textually based literature.

Requirements:Over the course of the semester students will complete: ASL Literature video-analysis assignments and group discussion, video projects ofGenres of ASL Literature (Poetry, Storytelling, Fictional, Non-fiction) and Deaf Studies Presentation. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community.

No Textbook.

ASL 601D • American Sign Language I: Beg

41165 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.128

This course focuses on developing comprehension and production skills in order to achieve Novice-High proficiency following ACTFL speaking guidelines*. Students work on developing perceptual, attentional, manual, and non-manual skills necessary to learn ASL. The course introduces the student to vocabulary and grammar for elementary interactions, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings, giving directions, and describing various activities. Elementary concepts concerning Deaf culture (e.g., values and social norms) are also introduced.

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41195 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 1.126

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41200 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.104

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41205 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.104

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40800 • Spring 2013
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 3.116

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40810 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 3.116

This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

Required Texts:

1.  SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT.  Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.

2.  COURSE PACKET

3.  Triumph of the Spirit: The DPN Chronicle, by Dr. Angel Ramos

ASL 350 • American Sign Lang Literature

40835 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 3.116

The course is designed to expand conversational skills using the ASL Literature series. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling specifically the use of role-shifts and classifiers, stories on current events and strategic interactions. ASL Literature will include ASL literature genre, ASL poetry, Fictional, Non-Fiction, Video – group discussion, Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as Culture (Deaf vs. Hearing), Perspective (ASL, Sign Contact, Literature genres) and History (Deaf President Now, Tent City, Past and Present history).  We will cover some genres that our Deaf community value and use often in their daily lives throughout the the past several decades!  This means the class will focus mostly on visual ASL literature in contrast to English literature, which is a heavily textually based literature.

Requirements:Over the course of the semester students will complete: ASL Literature video-analysis assignments and group discussion, video projects ofGenres of ASL Literature (Poetry, Storytelling, Fictional, Non-fiction) and Deaf Studies Presentation. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community.

No Textbook.

ASL 611C • Accel Second-Yr Amer Sign Lang

40640 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM PAR 303

Prerequisites: ASL 507 or equivalent with a grade of C (70%) or higher.Course Description: ASL 611C combines content from two previously offered second-year courses (ASL 312K & 312L) to form a single 6-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines athttp://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details). Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 6 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Topics that will be covered include: • Complex grammatical features of ASL • Use of the signing space for grammatical purposes, classifier descriptions, and appropriate role shifting demonstrations • Use of non-manual signals that serve to modify signs and phrases • Exposure to a varied and specialized vocabulary including numbers in ASL, idiomatic signs, and conceptually-accurate signs • Narrative techniques in ASL • Sociolinguistic variation in ASL

Requirements: Over the course of the semester students will complete: four exams, several quizzes, various video-analysis assignments, and a volunteer activity project. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community. For the volunteer activity project, students will be expected to attend Deaf events in the community (in some cases there will also exist volunteer opportunities at these events) to encourage interaction with daily users of ASL, and those experiences will be documented in an ASL narrative created by each student.

REQUIRED TEXTs AND MATERIALS:

1) SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL II and III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.

2) COURSE PACKET at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140

3) For Hearing People Only, Authors: Matthew S. Moore & Linda Levitan, 3rd Edition

4) Triumph of the Spirit: The DPN Chronicle, by Dr. Angel Ramos

5) Use Dropbox.com for your video storage

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

40645 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 206

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

40650 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 208

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL S312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

86235 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTH 8:30AM-10:30AM WEL 3.402

This course will examine the expository and narrative conceptual aspects of American Sign Language. It is an intermediate ASL course that will include the following themes: 1) conversational skills; 2) translating written text into ASL; 3) conceptual presentation; 4) retelling/analyzing ASL stories; 5) grammatical aspects; 6) conceptually accurate signs including definitions & semantic signs; and 7) Deaf Culturenorms and values. Regarding the production part, the students will provide a video project for each unit that presents narratives with ASL aspects. ASL 312L forms single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines athttp://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

Prerequisites: ASL 312K with at least a C (70%) or above; or completed ASL 4, specifically using Signing Naturally 1 & 2 from other colleges oruniversities.

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:

1. SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.

2. COURSE PACKET: ASL 312L at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140

3. Triumph of the Spirit: The DPN Chronicle, by Dr. Angel Ramos

4. Internet access to UT Blackboard and Dropbox.com (MANDATORY)

5. One 8 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40650 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 101


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40655 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 306


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 350 • American Sign Lang Literature

40680 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A305A

Prererequisites: This course is for students who have completed ASL 320, or are currently taking ASL 312L, (or who have completed ASL 5 at other colleges) and equivalent with a grade of C (70%) or higher. It involves extensive exposure to body language and American Sign Language allowing the development of advanced communication skills used with Deaf people.

ASL 350 forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf> for further details).The course is designed to expand conversational skills using the ASL Literature series. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling specifically the use of role-shifts & classifiers, stories on current events and strategic interactions. ASL Literature will include ASL literature genres, ASL poetry, fiction, non-fiction, videos, and group discussions. Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as Culture (Deaf vs. Hearing), Perspectives (ASL, Sign Contact, Literature genres) and History (Deaf President Now, Tent City, past and present history). We will cover some genres that our Deaf community values and has used often in their daily lives throughout the decades! This means the class will focus mostly on visual ASL literature in contrast to English literature, which is a heavily textually based literature.COURSE RATIONALE: American Sign Language is the language of a sizable minority, estimates range from 500,000 to two million speakers in the U.S. alone. In addition, many Deaf Canadians use ASL. For more information, you can look at this website: http://library.gallaudet.edu/Library/Deaf_Research_Help/Frequently_Asked_Questions_(FAQs)/Sign_Language/ASL_Ranking_and_Number_of_Speakers.html <http://library.gallaudet.edu/Library/Deaf_Research_Help/Frequently_Asked_Questions_(FAQs)/Sign_Language/ASL_Ranking_and_Number_of_Speakers.html>

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Topics that will be covered include:· Complex grammatical features of ASL including use of the signing space for grammatical purposes, classifier descriptions, and appropriate role shifting demonstrations, use of non-manual signals that serve to modify signs and phrases· Narrative techniques in ASL· Sociolinguistic variation in ASLRequirements:Over the course of the semester students will complete: ASL Literature video-analysis assignments and group discussion, video projects of Genres of ASL Literature (Poetry, Storytelling, Fictional, Non-fiction), and Research/Final Presentation, various video-analysis assignments, and a volunteer activity project. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community. For the volunteer activity project, students will be expected to attend Deaf events in the community (in some cases there will also exist volunteer opportunities at these events) to encourage interaction with daily users of ASL, and those experiences will be documented in an ASL narrative created by each student.

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:

1. American Sign Language: Literature Series - Bird of a Different Feather & For a Decent Living. (1994) Supalla, S. & Bahan, B.

2. COURSE PACKET: ASL 350 at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 1403. One 8 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ASL 611C • Accel Second-Yr Amer Sign Lang

40570 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM PAR 303

Prerequisites: ASL 507 or equivalent with a grade of C (70%) or higher.

Course Description:
ASL 611C combines content from two previously offered second-year courses (ASL 312K & 312L) to form a single 6-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines  at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).  Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work.  Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 6 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Topics that will be covered include:
•    Complex grammatical features of ASL
•    Use of the signing space for grammatical purposes, classifier descriptions, and appropriate role shifting demonstrations
•    Use of non-manual signals that serve to modify signs and phrases
•    Exposure to a varied and specialized vocabulary including numbers in ASL,  idiomatic signs, and conceptually-accurate signs
•    Narrative techniques in ASL
•    Sociolinguistic variation in ASL

Requirements:
Over the course of the semester students will complete: four exams, several quizzes, various video-analysis assignments, and a volunteer activity project.  The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community.  For the volunteer activity project, students will be expected to attend Deaf events in the community (in some cases there will also exist volunteer opportunities at these events) to encourage interaction with daily users of ASL, and those experiences will be documented in an ASL narrative created by each student.
 
REQUIRED TEXTs AND MATERIALS:
 
1)    SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL II and III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.

2)    COURSE PACKET at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
3)    For Hearing People Only, Authors: Matthew S. Moore & Linda Levitan, 3rd Edition

4)    Triumph of the Spirit: The DPN Chronicle, by Dr. Angel Ramos
5)    One 2 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

40580 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.124

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details). Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks: Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and SmithFor Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet at from Speedway Copying

ASL 320 • Adv Amer Sign Lang Conversatn

40595 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.120

This course is for students who have completed ASL 312L (or who have completed ASL 1 - 4 at other colleges). It involves extensive exposure to body language and American Sign Language allowing the development of advanced communication skills used with Deaf people.  

 

The course is designed to expand conversational skills. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling, specifically the use of role-shifting & classifiers, stories about current events, strategic interactions, and Deaf films and literature. Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as ASL versus Signed English.  Volunteer assignments are required.Course Rationale:  American Sign Language is the language of a sizable minority, estimates range from 500,000 to two million speakers in the U.S. alone.  In addition, Deaf Canadians use ASL.   For more information, you can look at the website: http://library.gallaudet.edu/dr/faq-asl-rank.html.

Materials and Textbooks:

Deaf Tend Your: Non-Manual Signals in ASL (textbook/VHS) by Byron Bridges and Melanie Metzger.

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40975 • Spring 2011
Meets M 10:00AM-11:00AM SZB 380


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40990 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 0.132


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 350 • American Sign Lang Literature

41005 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SZB 380

Prerequisites: This course is for students who have completed ASL 320, or are currently taking ASL 312L, (or who have completed ASL 5 at other colleges) and equivalent with a grade of C (70%) or higher. It involves extensive exposure to body language and American Sign Language allowing the development of advanced communication skills used with Deaf people.

ASL 350 forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf> for further details).

The course is designed to expand conversational skills using the ASL Literature series. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling specifically the use of role-shifts & classifiers, stories on current events and strategic interactions. ASL Literature will include ASL literature genres, ASL poetry, fiction, non-fiction, videos, and group discussions. Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as Culture (Deaf vs. Hearing), Perspectives (ASL, Sign Contact, Literature genres) and History (Deaf President Now, Tent City, past and present history). We will cover some genres that our Deaf community values and has used often in their daily lives throughout the decades! This means the class will focus mostly on visual ASL literature in contrast to English literature, which is a heavily textually based literature.

COURSE RATIONALE: American Sign Language is the language of a sizable minority, estimates range from 500,000 to two million speakers in the U.S. alone. In addition, many Deaf Canadians use ASL. For more information, you can look at this website: http://library.gallaudet.edu/Library/Deaf_Research_Help/Frequently_Asked_Questions_(FAQs)/Sign_Language/ASL_Ranking_and_Number_of_Speakers.html <http://library.gallaudet.edu/Library/Deaf_Research_Help/Frequently_Asked_Questions_(FAQs)/Sign_Language/ASL_Ranking_and_Number_of_Speakers.html>

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Topics that will be covered include:
· Complex grammatical features of ASL including use of the signing space for grammatical purposes, classifier descriptions, and appropriate role shifting demonstrations, use of non-manual signals that serve to modify signs and phrases

· Narrative techniques in ASL

· Sociolinguistic variation in ASL

Requirements:
Over the course of the semester students will complete: ASL Literature video-analysis assignments and group discussion, video projects of Genres of ASL Literature (Poetry, Storytelling, Fictional, Non-fiction), and Research/Final Presentation, various video-analysis assignments, and a volunteer activity project. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community. For the volunteer activity project, students will be expected to attend Deaf events in the community (in some cases there will also exist volunteer opportunities at these events) to encourage interaction with daily users of ASL, and those experiences will be documented in an ASL narrative created by each student.

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:

1. American Sign Language: Literature Series - Bird of a Different Feather & For a Decent Living. (1994) Supalla, S. & Bahan, B.
2. COURSE PACKET: ASL 350 at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
3. One 8 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive
Franky Ramont

ASL 611C • Accel Second-Yr Amer Sign Lang

40553 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 9:00AM-11:00AM PAR 303

Prerequisites: ASL 507 or equivalent with a grade of C (70%) or higher.

Course Description:
ASL 611C combines content from two previously offered second-year courses (ASL 312K & 312L) to form a single 6-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines  at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).  Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work.  Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 6 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Topics that will be covered include:
•    Complex grammatical features of ASL
•    Use of the signing space for grammatical purposes, classifier descriptions, and appropriate role shifting demonstrations
•    Use of non-manual signals that serve to modify signs and phrases
•    Exposure to a varied and specialized vocabulary including numbers in ASL,  idiomatic signs, and conceptually-accurate signs
•    Narrative techniques in ASL
•    Sociolinguistic variation in ASL

Requirements:
Over the course of the semester students will complete: four exams, several quizzes, various video-analysis assignments, and a volunteer activity project.  The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community.  For the volunteer activity project, students will be expected to attend Deaf events in the community (in some cases there will also exist volunteer opportunities at these events) to encourage interaction with daily users of ASL, and those experiences will be documented in an ASL narrative created by each student.
 
REQUIRED TEXTs AND MATERIALS:
 
1)    SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL II and III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
2)    COURSE PACKET at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
3)    For Hearing People Only, Authors: Matthew S. Moore & Linda Levitan, 3rd Edition
4)    One 2 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

40560 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.124

Course Description

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.

Integrates and refines expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language (ASL), including recognition of sociolinguistic variation. A practice oriented approach to language acquisition with demonstration of more sophisticated grammatical features of American Sign Language (ASL). Increases fluency and accuracy in finger spelling and numbers. Provides opportunities for interaction within the deaf community. Course requires significant time outside of class.

Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally. These activities will include interactive activities such as locating things around the house, complaining, making suggestions and requests, exchanging personal information: life events, describing and identifying things, and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance of Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
Grading Policy

This course is offered on a letter grade basis only.
Texts

Cassell and McCaffrey, 1995. ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translation. Padden and Humphries, 1990. Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture. Supplemental photocopied materials

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

40575 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 306

Course Description

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.

Integrates and refines expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language (ASL), including recognition of sociolinguistic variation. A practice oriented approach to language acquisition with demonstration of more sophisticated grammatical features of American Sign Language (ASL). Increases fluency and accuracy in finger spelling and numbers. Provides opportunities for interaction within the deaf community. Course requires significant time outside of class.

Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally. These activities will include interactive activities such as locating things around the house, complaining, making suggestions and requests, exchanging personal information: life events, describing and identifying things, and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance of Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
Grading Policy

This course is offered on a letter grade basis only.
Texts

Cassell and McCaffrey, 1995. ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translation. Padden and Humphries, 1990. Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture. Supplemental photocopied materials

ASL F312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

85645 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTH 8:00AM-10:00AM PAR 308

Course Description

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.

Integrates and refines expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language (ASL), including recognition of sociolinguistic variation. A practice oriented approach to language acquisition with demonstration of more sophisticated grammatical features of American Sign Language (ASL). Increases fluency and accuracy in finger spelling and numbers. Provides opportunities for interaction within the deaf community. Course requires significant time outside of class.

Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally. These activities will include interactive activities such as locating things around the house, complaining, making suggestions and requests, exchanging personal information: life events, describing and identifying things, and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance of Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
Grading Policy

This course is offered on a letter grade basis only.
Texts

Cassell and McCaffrey, 1995. ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translation. Padden and Humphries, 1990. Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture. Supplemental photocopied materials

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40920 • Spring 2010
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 215

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40960 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 310

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41265 • Fall 2009
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 215

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations n the Deaf Community.  The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.

 

COURSE GOALS:

A)   Communication

1. Grammatical Features

a.     Students will demonstrate mastery of target, content-specific commands, questions, and statements in ASL,  both non-manual behaviors and manual signs.

b.     Students will be able to sign and comprehend short dialogues/complete short sentences in ASL as directed by  the instructor.

2. Vocabulary Development

 a.    Given a set of targeted vocabulary items derived from Units 1-7, of Signing Naturally. and  videos, students will show mastery of vocabulary items through class activities  and  assessment.

3. Conversational Skills

a.     Students will demonstrate comprehension and conversation facilitating behaviors.

b.     Students will demonstrate comprehension and production of regulating behaviors (i.e. attention getting  techniques, turn taking signals, and others)

c.     Students will demonstrate comprehension of short narratives and stories in ASL told by the instructor.

B)    Cultural Awareness

1.     Students will gain an understanding of American Sign Language as indigenous to Deaf culture through the use  of print resources and videos.

2.     Students will observe, identify, discuss, and use simple patterns of behavior for interacting in various settings,  such as classroom activities, videotexts, the use of resources, etc.

3.     Students will observe, identify, discuss, and use appropriate communication strategies for greeting and leave- taking, attention getting, and use of names (i.e., name signs) in classroom activities.

4.     Students will observe and discuss the historical and current role of technology in the Deaf culture. (See the  Connections)

C)  Connections

1. Students will understand the use of technology to access and exchange information with and within the Deaf  community.

D)  Comparisons

1.     Students will recognize differences and similarities between spoken languages and the visual/conceptual structure of American Sign Language, including inflections, questions, negatives, statements, etc.

E)  Community

1.     Students will attend social functions/events in which members of the Deaf community are present and write  report.

 

COURSE RATIONALE: American Sign Language (ASL) is the fourth most commonly used language in the United States.  Estimates range from 500,000 to 2 million speakers in the U.S. alone.  In addition, Deaf Canadians are using ASL. 

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41305 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 213

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41315 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RAS 218

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40320 • Spring 2009
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM RAS 215

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40350 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 310


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 350 • American Sign Lang Literature

40375 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RAS 213

The course is designed to expand conversational skills using the ASL Literature in ASL to ASL approach. The goals are to further refine competence in and performance of all grammatical features. Language activities and cross-cultural discussions may be part of the course. Further activities may include, but are not limited to, linguistic aspects of ASL, storytelling specifically the use of role-shifts and classifiers, stories on current events and strategic interactions. ASL Literature will include ASL literature genre, ASL poetry, Fictional, Non-Fiction, Video - group discussion, Open discussions may be encouraged to explore issues and how best to conduct oneself in given situations. Panel discussions may be administered on given topics, such as Culture (Deaf vs. Hearing), Perspective (ASL, Sign Contact, Literature genres) and History (Deaf President Now, Tent City, Past and Present history).  We will cover some genres that our Deaf community value and use often in their daily lives throughout the past several decades!  This means the class will focus mostly on visual ASL literature in contrast to English literature, which is a heavily textually based literature.

Requirements:Over the course of the semester students will complete: ASL Literature video-analysis assignments and group discussion, video projects of Genres of ASL Literature (Poetry, Storytelling, Fictional, Non-fiction) and Deaf Studies Presentation. The video analysis assignments will require the viewing and analysis of films that represent ASL literature, and this aspect of the course is designed to support the acquisition of in-depth knowledge about ASL, Deaf culture, and the Deaf community.

No Textbook.

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41465 • Fall 2008
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 218

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41510 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RAS 218

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41520 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 218

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL S312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

86810 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTH 8:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.102

This course will examine the expository and narrative conceptual aspects of American Sign Language. It is an intermediate ASL course that will include the following themes: 1) conversational skills; 2) translating written text into ASL; 3) conceptual presentation; 4) retelling/analyzing ASL stories; 5) grammatical aspects; 6) conceptually accurate signs including definitions & semantic signs; and 7) Deaf Culturenorms and values. Regarding the production part, the students will provide a video project for each unit that presents narratives with ASL aspects. ASL 312L forms single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines athttp://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

Prerequisites: ASL 312K with at least a C (70%) or above; or completed ASL 4, specifically using Signing Naturally 1 & 2 from other colleges oruniversities.

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:

1. SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.

2. COURSE PACKET: ASL 312L at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140

3. Triumph of the Spirit: The DPN Chronicle, by Dr. Angel Ramos

4. Internet access to UT Blackboard and Dropbox.com (MANDATORY)

5. One 8 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

41405 • Spring 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM RAS 215

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

41418 • Spring 2008
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:00PM RAS 218

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

41440 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 213


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

42005 • Fall 2007
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 218

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

42045 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 218

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40800 • Spring 2007
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A207A

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40810 • Spring 2007
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.122

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40850 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 284


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41695 • Fall 2006
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 218

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

41702 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 308

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL S507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

86700 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:00AM PAR 204

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher
 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).
 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
 
COURSE GOALS:

A)   Communication
1.  Grammatical Features
a.     Students will demonstrate mastery of target content-specific commands, questions, and statements in ASL, both nonmanual behaviors and manual signs.
b.   Students will be able to sign and comprehend short dialogues/complete short sentences in ASL as directed by the instructor.

2. Vocabulary Development
a.     Given a set of targeted vocabulary items derived from Units 8-12 & 17, of Signing Naturally, and videos, students will show mastery of vocabulary items through class activities and assessments.
 

3. Conversational Skills
a. Students will demonstrate comprehension and conversation facilitating behaviors.
b. Students will demonstrate comprehension and production of regulating behaviors (i.e. attention getting techniques, turn taking signals, and others).
c. Students will demonstrate comprehension of short narratives and stories in ASL told by the instructor.

B)   Cultural Awareness
1.     Students will gain an understanding of American Sign Language as indigenous to Deaf culture through the use of print resources and videos.
2.     Students will observe, identify, discuss, and use simple patterns of behavior for interacting in various settings, such as classroom activities and through the use of videotexts.
3.     Students will observe, identify, discuss, and use appropriate communication strategies for greeting and leave-taking, attention getting, and the use of names (i.e., name signs) in classroom activities.
4.     Students will observe and discuss the historical and current role of technology in the Deaf culture. (See the Connections)

C) Connections
1. Students will understand the use of technology to access and exchange information with and within the Deaf community.

D) Comparisons
1.     Students will recognize differences and similarities between spoken languages and the visual/conceptual structure of American Sign Language, including inflections, questions, negatives, statements, etc.

E) Community
1.     Students will attend social functions/events in which members of the Deaf community are present and write reports about their experiences.

COURSE RATIONALE: American Sign Language (ASL) is the language of a sizable minority.  Approximately one-half million Deaf people in the U.S. and Canada now uses American Sign Language. ASL is the third most used minority language in the U.S.

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:
 
1) Level One (1) Signing Naturally, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.  

2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan

3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, White, & Garberoglio – it can be purchased at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140.

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40025 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A307A

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40030 • Spring 2006
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.122

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

40065 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.118


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

39770 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A209A

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

39800 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 306

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

39805 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.118

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL S312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

86210 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM PAR 206

This course will examine the expository and narrative conceptual aspects of American Sign Language. It is an intermediate ASL course that will include the following themes: 1) conversational skills; 2) translating written text into ASL; 3) conceptual presentation; 4) retelling/analyzing ASL stories; 5) grammatical aspects; 6) conceptually accurate signs including definitions & semantic signs; and 7) Deaf Culturenorms and values. Regarding the production part, the students will provide a video project for each unit that presents narratives with ASL aspects. ASL 312L forms single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines athttp://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

Prerequisites: ASL 312K with at least a C (70%) or above; or completed ASL 4, specifically using Signing Naturally 1 & 2 from other colleges oruniversities.

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:

1. SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL III, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.

2. COURSE PACKET: ASL 312L at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140

3. Triumph of the Spirit: The DPN Chronicle, by Dr. Angel Ramos

4. Internet access to UT Blackboard and Dropbox.com (MANDATORY)

5. One 8 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

38460 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A203A

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

38465 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.122

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

38500 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.118


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

39480 • Fall 2004
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM BEN 1.108

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

39490 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CBA 4.340

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

39535 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.120

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL F312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

86075 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 206

Prerequisite: ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36920 • Spring 2004
Meets MTWTHF 8:00AM-9:00AM JES A207A

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36940 • Spring 2004
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM SZB 526

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36950 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM SZB 380


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37750 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 303

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37770 • Fall 2003
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM GRG 424

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37785 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 1

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL F506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

86125 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:30AM GAR 5

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.


Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos. (2008) ISBN: 978-1581212105
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36885 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36895 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 306

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37395 • Fall 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM BAT 102

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37405 • Fall 2002
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM BAT 302

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37415 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 303

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL S507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

86315 • Summer 2002
Meets MWF 8:30AM-11:30AM PAR 203

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher
 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).
 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.
 
COURSE GOALS:

A)   Communication
1.  Grammatical Features
a.     Students will demonstrate mastery of target content-specific commands, questions, and statements in ASL, both nonmanual behaviors and manual signs.
b.   Students will be able to sign and comprehend short dialogues/complete short sentences in ASL as directed by the instructor.

2. Vocabulary Development
a.     Given a set of targeted vocabulary items derived from Units 8-12 & 17, of Signing Naturally, and videos, students will show mastery of vocabulary items through class activities and assessments.
 

3. Conversational Skills
a. Students will demonstrate comprehension and conversation facilitating behaviors.
b. Students will demonstrate comprehension and production of regulating behaviors (i.e. attention getting techniques, turn taking signals, and others).
c. Students will demonstrate comprehension of short narratives and stories in ASL told by the instructor.

B)   Cultural Awareness
1.     Students will gain an understanding of American Sign Language as indigenous to Deaf culture through the use of print resources and videos.
2.     Students will observe, identify, discuss, and use simple patterns of behavior for interacting in various settings, such as classroom activities and through the use of videotexts.
3.     Students will observe, identify, discuss, and use appropriate communication strategies for greeting and leave-taking, attention getting, and the use of names (i.e., name signs) in classroom activities.
4.     Students will observe and discuss the historical and current role of technology in the Deaf culture. (See the Connections)

C) Connections
1. Students will understand the use of technology to access and exchange information with and within the Deaf community.

D) Comparisons
1.     Students will recognize differences and similarities between spoken languages and the visual/conceptual structure of American Sign Language, including inflections, questions, negatives, statements, etc.

E) Community
1.     Students will attend social functions/events in which members of the Deaf community are present and write reports about their experiences.

COURSE RATIONALE: American Sign Language (ASL) is the language of a sizable minority.  Approximately one-half million Deaf people in the U.S. and Canada now uses American Sign Language. ASL is the third most used minority language in the U.S.

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:
 
1) Level One (1) Signing Naturally, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.  

2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan

3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, White, & Garberoglio – it can be purchased at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140.

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36710 • Spring 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM GRG 424

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36725 • Spring 2002
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:00PM GEA 114

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 312L • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36735 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BAT 215


This course will compare two languages: American Sign Language and English and will study their use. In this course, we will introduce you to grammatical aspects of American Sign Language, written English and contact signing. Contact sign derives from the interaction of the two languages and is an important source of language variation in sign. The course will assist students in seeing different grammatical structures by showing these structures on videotape in class. Students will demonstrate signing in ASL in ten grammatical topic areas: topic/comment structure, yes/no question formats; wh-question formats; rhetorical question formats; directionality; use of space; negation; classifiers; conditionals; and time sequencing ordering. There will be homework video assignments. Additionally, the course will examine selected words that have multiple meanings. Students will choose appropriate signs to reflect accurate conceptual meanings. This course is appropriate for students who completed ASL 312K or ASL 4 (specifically Signing Naturally Level I and Level II) from other colleges. The course is designed to support a student's development of advanced low proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).


Required Texts:


1. "Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture" by Padden and Humphries,

2. “Course 2001: Instructional Guide ASL Grammatical Aspects: Comparative Translations” by Cassell and McCaffrey

3. Course packet

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37755 • Fall 2001
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:00PM CAL 200

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37760 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BEN 202

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 312K • Second-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37805 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BEN 302

ASL 507 or equivalent with  a grade of C- (70%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history. It forms a single 3-hour course that is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-high language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf <http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf>  for further details).
 
Learning formats will include instructor lectures, a significant amount of student interaction and hands-on practice, and group-oriented work. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Deaf culture, including its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  Additionally, students will be encouraged to interact with members of Deaf community in order to support their language development. Consistent with the fact that you will receive 3 hours of credit, this course requires a significant time commitment outside of class for assignments and activities.

Required textbooks:

Signing Naturally, Level 2 workbook and DVD, by Lentz, Mikos, and Smith

For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore and Levitan

Course Packet

ASL F506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

85710 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:30AM BEN 132

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.


Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos. (2008) ISBN: 978-1581212105
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

ASL 507 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang II

36660 • Spring 2001
Meets MTWTHF 4:00PM-5:00PM SZB 240

Prerequisites: ASL 506 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher

 
ASL 507 is a second-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language fluency but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.  The course is geared to develop a minimum of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid language proficiency (see the ACTFL Guidelines [American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages] at http://www.actfl.org/files/public/Guidelinesspeak.pdf for further details).

 
Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally Level 1, Units 8-12 and 17. These activities will include interactive activities such as describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines and talking about weekend activities. Supporting studies include attendance at Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:

 
1)  Signing Naturally Units 7-12, A Student Workbook and Videotext by Smith, Lentz and Mikos


2) For Hearing People Only, 3rd Edition, by Moore & Levitan


3) One Course Packet for ASL 507, Seeger, Connolly, White, & Wynne

ASL 506 • First-Year Amer Sign Lang I

37388 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:15PM PAR 303

Course Description

In this course we will examine the sign lexicon and basic concepts about the structure and use of American Sign Language. We will stress grammatical features along with syntax and structure. The course will examine Deaf culture, history, values, social norms and how they play an important role in the Deaf community. To appreciate and respect Deaf culture, you must understand the signed language. Students will learn appropriate cultural behaviors such as directing and maintaining attention, and a way of talking that keeps others informed. This course is appropriate for students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf Community. The course of study will focus on vocabulary and sentences for introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about surroundings/giving directions, telling where you live, talking about your family, and telling about activities.
Texts

LEVEL ONE SIGNING NATURALLY, Units 1-6, A STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT by Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
COURSE PACKET, (ASL 506), at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
Deaf Culture, Our Way, by R. Holcomb, S. Holcomb and T. Holcomb

Curriculum Vitae


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