Linguistics Department

Robert T Harms


Professor EmeritusPh.D., University of Chicago

Robert T Harms

Contact

Courses


LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

39975 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 1

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

40185 • Fall 2005
Meets MF 1:30PM-3:00PM CBA 4.346

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

39695 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 1

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

39905 • Fall 2004
Meets MF 1:30PM-3:00PM CBA 4.346

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 345 • Lang Change And Lang Variation

37135 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 201


Course Description

An introduction to the study of how languages change and to the
principles developed by linguists to account for these changes. The
course will investigate the social and linguistic motivations for
change and learn about change in sound systems, word structure, word
meaning, and grammar. Students will also learn the methods linguists
have developed for reconstructing the vocabularies and grammars of  the
prehistoric parent languages of languages which exist today, or  which
have been preserved in writing.

Requirements:
Classes will be a mix of lectures, discussion, and problem solving
using data from a wide range of languages. Grade is based on homework
assignments (60%), two in-class examinations (40%).

Textbook:
"An Introduction to Historical Linguistics" by Terry Crowley and
Claire Bowern (ISBN: 9780195365542), and supplementary readings.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

38165 • Fall 2003
Meets MF 1:30PM-3:00PM CBA 4.346

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

37805 • Fall 2002
Meets WF 1:30PM-3:00PM PAR 8B

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 345 • Lang Change And Lang Variation

36925 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 201


Course Description

An introduction to the study of how languages change and to the
principles developed by linguists to account for these changes. The
course will investigate the social and linguistic motivations for
change and learn about change in sound systems, word structure, word
meaning, and grammar. Students will also learn the methods linguists
have developed for reconstructing the vocabularies and grammars of  the
prehistoric parent languages of languages which exist today, or  which
have been preserved in writing.

Requirements:
Classes will be a mix of lectures, discussion, and problem solving
using data from a wide range of languages. Grade is based on homework
assignments (60%), two in-class examinations (40%).

Textbook:
"An Introduction to Historical Linguistics" by Terry Crowley and
Claire Bowern (ISBN: 9780195365542), and supplementary readings.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

37950 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 301

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

38130 • Fall 2001
Meets MF 1:30PM-3:00PM PAR 8A

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 345 • Lang Change And Lang Variation

36825 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 201


Course Description

An introduction to the study of how languages change and to the
principles developed by linguists to account for these changes. The
course will investigate the social and linguistic motivations for
change and learn about change in sound systems, word structure, word
meaning, and grammar. Students will also learn the methods linguists
have developed for reconstructing the vocabularies and grammars of  the
prehistoric parent languages of languages which exist today, or  which
have been preserved in writing.

Requirements:
Classes will be a mix of lectures, discussion, and problem solving
using data from a wide range of languages. Grade is based on homework
assignments (60%), two in-class examinations (40%).

Textbook:
"An Introduction to Historical Linguistics" by Terry Crowley and
Claire Bowern (ISBN: 9780195365542), and supplementary readings.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

37465 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 206

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

37705 • Fall 2000
Meets MF 1:30PM-3:00PM PAR 8A

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

36395 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 134

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

Curriculum Vitae


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