Linguistics Department

Harvey M. Sussman


ProfessorPh.D., University of Wisconsin (Madison)

R. P. Doherty, Sr. Centennial Professorship in Communication
Harvey M. Sussman

Contact

Courses


LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

40797 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BMC 1.202
(also listed as CSD 350)

Language and the Brain delves into the neuroanatomical and functional operations of the major brain structures that underlie speech/language.  Topics include hemispheric dominance for language, neurological and language breakdowns in aphasia, and brain imaging methods and studies of language representation.

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

40170 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as CSD 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of human brain structure and function relevant to speech and language processing. You will be provided with a complete review of neuroanatomy (structure) and neurophysiology (function), as well as how neurons 'talk' to each other across synapses. In addition, you will become familiar with the following: (1) current methods used to probe the neural bases of speech and language function: (2) the neuropathology of speech-language disturbance following brain injury, i.e., aphasia; and (3) left-right hemispheric specializations.  No prior background is assumed. The format is informal lecture-style with class participation encouraged. Course packet is used and essential.

Grading Policy: Grading is based on four objective (scantron) exams. No term paper.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40200 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM CMB 2.102

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40030 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

40118 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 210

Neurolinguistics provides (1) a thorough treatment of the structure (anatomy) & function (physiology) of the human brain, with emphasis on the sensory, motor, & cognitive underpinnings of speech/language; (2) an historical perspective on the ‘evolution’ of brain-based theories and models of language;  (3) methodological techniques to study brain function: ERPs, CT-scans, rCBF/PET, fMRI; MVPA methods; and 4) a neuroethological approach in service of neurophonetics.

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

40065 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BMC 2.106
(also listed as CSD 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of human brain structure and functionrelevant to speech and language processing. You will be provided with a complete review ofneuroanatomy (structure) and neurophysiology (function), as well as how neurons 'talk' to eachother across synapses. In addition, you will become familiar with the following: (1) current methods used to probe the neural bases of speech and language function: (2) the neuropathology of speech-language disturbance following brain injury, i.e., aphasia; and (3) left-right hemispheric specializations.  No prior background is assumed. The format is informal lecture-style with class participation encouraged. Course packet is used and essential.

Grading Policy: Grading is based on four objective (scantron) exams. No term paper.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

41105 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as CSD 358S)

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.TextsNone. A course packet will be used.

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

41220 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.124

Neurolinguistics is a survey-type course exploring selected subject areas within the broad field of cognitive neuroscience. The course begins with a comprehensive review of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology, emphasizing motor and sensory systems dealing with speech/language. The second topic area provides a historical perspective on the classic neurological debates and theories related to localizationist and holist views on the nature of language representation in the brain. Subsequent topics include representative studies incorporating various techniques to uncover and understand language mechanisms in brain tissue: in vivo brain stimulation; event-related evoked potentials, and brain imaging via PET and fMRI. The third major topic area is Aphasiology, emphasizing Broca's, Wernickes, and Conduction aphasia. Aphasia studies exploring syntactic and semantic processing as well as polyglot aphasia will be discussed. The final topic area is hemispheric specialization for language. Split brain studies and left versus right hemisphere abilities will be evaluated, as well as evidence for left hemisphere specialization in lower mammals and other primates.

Required texts:  Outside reading list (optional) and note packet (required).

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

41480 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BMC 2.106
(also listed as CSD 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of human brain structure and functionrelevant to speech and language processing. You will be provided with a complete review ofneuroanatomy (structure) and neurophysiology (function), as well as how neurons 'talk' to eachother across synapses. In addition, you will become familiar with the following: (1) current methods used to probe the neural bases of speech and language function: (2) the neuropathology of speech-language disturbance following brain injury, i.e., aphasia; and (3) left-right hemispheric specializations.  No prior background is assumed. The format is informal lecture-style with class participation encouraged. Course packet is used and essential.

Grading Policy: Grading is based on four objective (scantron) exams. No term paper.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

41340 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

41429 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 305

Neurolinguistics is a survey-type course exploring selected subject areas within the broad field of cognitive neuroscience. The course begins with a comprehensive review of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology, emphasizing motor and sensory systems dealing with speech/language. The second topic area provides a historical perspective on the classic neurological debates and theories related to localizationist and holist views on the nature of language representation in the brain. Subsequent topics include representative studies incorporating various techniques to uncover and understand language mechanisms in brain tissue: in vivo brain stimulation; event-related evoked potentials, and brain imaging via PET and fMRI. The third major topic area is Aphasiology, emphasizing Broca's, Wernickes, and Conduction aphasia. Aphasia studies exploring syntactic and semantic processing as well as polyglot aphasia will be discussed. The final topic area is hemispheric specialization for language. Split brain studies and left versus right hemisphere abilities will be evaluated, as well as evidence for left hemisphere specialization in lower mammals and other primates.

Required texts:  Outside reading list (optional) and note packet (required).

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

40950 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GSB 2.124
(also listed as CSD 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of human brain structure and functionrelevant to speech and language processing. You will be provided with a complete review ofneuroanatomy (structure) and neurophysiology (function), as well as how neurons 'talk' to eachother across synapses. In addition, you will become familiar with the following: (1) current methods used to probe the neural bases of speech and language function: (2) the neuropathology of speech-language disturbance following brain injury, i.e., aphasia; and (3) left-right hemispheric specializations.  No prior background is assumed. The format is informal lecture-style with class participation encouraged. Course packet is used and essential.

Grading Policy: Grading is based on four objective (scantron) exams. No term paper.

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

41060 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.124

Neurolinguistics is a survey-type course exploring selected subject areas within the broad field of cognitive neuroscience. The course begins with a comprehensive review of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology, emphasizing motor and sensory systems dealing with speech/language. The second topic area provides a historical perspective on the classic neurological debates and theories related to localizationist and holist views on the nature of language representation in the brain. Subsequent topics include representative studies incorporating various techniques to uncover and understand language mechanisms in brain tissue: in vivo brain stimulation; event-related evoked potentials, and brain imaging via PET and fMRI. The third major topic area is Aphasiology, emphasizing Broca's, Wernickes, and Conduction aphasia. Aphasia studies exploring syntactic and semantic processing as well as polyglot aphasia will be discussed. The final topic area is hemispheric specialization for language. Split brain studies and left versus right hemisphere abilities will be evaluated, as well as evidence for left hemisphere specialization in lower mammals and other primates.

Required texts:  Outside reading list (optional) and note packet (required).

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40785 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BMC 2.106

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

40800 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GSB 2.124
(also listed as CSD 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of human brain structure and functionrelevant to speech and language processing.  You will be provided with a complete review ofneuroanatomy (structure) and neurophysiology (function), as well as how neurons 'talk' to eachother across synapses.  In addition, you will become familiar with the following: (1) current methods used to probe the neural  bases of speech and language function: (2) the neuropathology of speech-language disturbance following brain injury, i.e., aphasia; and (3) left-right hemispheric specializations.  No prior background is assumed.  The format is informal lecture-style with class participation encouraged. Course packet is used and essential.Grading Policy: Grading is based on four objective (scantron) exams. No term paper.

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

40920 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 310

Neurolinguistics is a survey-type course exploring selected subject areas within the broad field of cognitive neuroscience. The course begins with a comprehensive review of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology, emphasizing motor and sensory systems dealing with speech/language. The second topic area provides a historical perspective on the classic neurological debates and theories related to localizationist and holist views on the nature of language representation in the brain. Subsequent topics include representative studies incorporating various techniques to uncover and understand language mechanisms in brain tissue: in vivo brain stimulation; event-related evoked potentials, and brain imaging via PET and fMRI. The third major topic area is Aphasiology, emphasizing Broca's, Wernickes, and Conduction aphasia. Aphasia studies exploring syntactic and semantic processing as well as polyglot aphasia will be discussed. The final topic area is hemispheric specialization for language. Split brain studies and left versus right hemisphere abilities will be evaluated, as well as evidence for left hemisphere specialization in lower mammals and other primates.Texts:Outside reading list (optional) and note packet (required).

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40715 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 214

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

41120 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 100
(also listed as CSD 350)

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of human brain structure and function
relevant to speech and language processing.  You will be provided with a complete review of
neuroanatomy (structure) and neurophysiology (function), as well as how neurons 'talk' to each
other across synapses.  In addition, you will become familiar with the following: (1) current methods
used to probe the neural  bases of speech and language function: (2) the neuropathology of speech-
language disturbance following brain injury, i.e., aphasia; and (3) left-right hemispheric specializations.  

No prior background is assumed.  

The format is informal lecture-style with class participation encouraged. Course packet is used and essential.

Grading Policy:
Grading is based on four objective (scantron) exams. No term paper.

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

41255 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 101

Neurolinguistics is a survey-type course exploring selected subject areas within the broad field of cognitive neuroscience. The course begins with a comprehensive review of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology, emphasizing motor and sensory systems dealing with speech/language. The second topic area provides a historical perspective on the classic neurological debates and theories related to localizationist and holist views on the nature of language representation in the brain. Subsequent topics include representative studies incorporating various techniques to uncover and understand language mechanisms in brain tissue: in vivo brain stimulation; event-related evoked potentials, and brain imaging via PET and fMRI. The third major topic area is Aphasiology, emphasizing Broca's, Wernickes, and Conduction aphasia. Aphasia studies exploring syntactic and semantic processing as well as polyglot aphasia will be discussed. The final topic area is hemispheric specialization for language. Split brain studies and left versus right hemisphere abilities will be evaluated, as well as evidence for left hemisphere specialization in lower mammals and other primates.

 

Texts:
Outside reading list (optional) and note packet (required).

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

40730 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as CSD 358S)

Course Description

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 350 • Language And The Brain

41145 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 100
(also listed as CSD 350)

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

 

LIN 393 • Neurolinguistics

41275 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 101

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

41500 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 216

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 358S • Fundamentals Of Speech Science

41710 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GSB 2.124

Speech Science is the study of the acoustic, aerodynamic, neuromotor, articulatory, and perceptual basis of both producing and perceiving a speech signal. The course assumes no prior background. Speech production is first described by discussing the (1) respiratory system; (2) the laryngeal system; and the (3) vocal tract articulatory system. The acoustic shaping of the 'laryngeal buzz' into a speech sound is extensively discussed, with examples illustrating spectral analysis of speech. A thorough grounding in speech motor control introduces the student to the competing theoretical positions that seek to understand this conversion of linguistic representations to sound. Speech perception is studied by examining the (1) acoustic correlates/cues of phonemes; (2) perceptual abilities of infants; and (3) the possible role of neural feature detectors in decoding the speech signal. This course fulfills the Alternative Natural Science requirement.
Texts

None. A course packet will be used.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

41695 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 101

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

41100 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

40315 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

38775 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN W698B • Thesis

86180 • Summer 2004

Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in linguistics and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Linguistics 698A.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LIN W398R • Master's Report

86185 • Summer 2004

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in linguistics and consent of the graduate adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LIN 395 • Conf Course In Linguistics

38110 • Fall 2001

Supervised research.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the linguistics graduate adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. May be repeated for credit.

LIN 395 • Conf Course In Linguistics

36995 • Spring 2001

Supervised research.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the linguistics graduate adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. May be repeated for credit.

LIN 395 • Conf Course In Linguistics

37685 • Fall 2000

Supervised research.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the linguistics graduate adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. May be repeated for credit.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages