Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Amelia Weinreb


LecturerPh.D., University of Pennsylvania

Lecturer, Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies
Amelia Weinreb

Contact

Interests


Cuba's middle class; Jewish Latin America

Courses


LAS 315 • Intro To Jewish Latin America

40215 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 3.116

Introduction to ancient Mesoamerica from the time of emerging social inequality in the formative period until the Spanish conquest of Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century

ANT 310L • Israel: Space/Place/Landscape

30595 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.120
(also listed as GRG 309, J S 311, MES 310)

This multidisciplinary, interactive workshop is designed to foster dialog, debate and creative projects between lower-division undergraduate students with interests in Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Anthropology, and Geography.

The core component of this class is the final project. Following the introductory unit, teams of students will then propose one site, space, place or landscape in Israel/Palestine to explore in depth, and propose a conceptual framework for doing so. Each team will be responsible for exploring social, cultural, political, phenomenological, aesthetic and affective processes related to the site they have selected. This experimental seminar is for students who want to experience a collaborative learning environment, gain a set of multidisciplinary analytic skills, learn about space in Israel, interact with students who may have different disciplinary and political viewpoints, and want to learn and write about space, spatiality and spatialization.

Hot Middle Eastern breakfast beverages served in class!

LAS 324L • Jewish Cuba

39615 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.120
(also listed as ANT 325L, J S 365, R S 366)

Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?

Note: This course carries a Writing Flag and a Global Cultures Flag.

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31540 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)

Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. The notion of absorption—the social and economic integration of Jewish immigrants—has remained an explicit ideal since the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Yet absorption is also an ideological tool that often runs counter to the contemporary lived experience of citizenship, participation, nation building, minority rights, and the conflicting interests of today’s multicultural publics. Taking these tensions as a starting point, this course explores the complex social fabric that comprises contemporary Israeli society, and that shapes Israeli identity, practice and politics. We will focus on the lived experience of Israel’s increasingly diverse population. This includes populations associated with the majority: veteran Ashkenazim and Mizrahim; more recent Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Latin America and France; religious communities such Haredim and modern-Orthodox. It also includes ethnic and religious minorities such as Arab-Israelis/Palestinians, Bedouins, Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Black Hebrews, as well as laborers from all over the globe who migrate to Israel for work. How fluid are boundaries between these groups? How different are their interests, tastes and desires? How committed are various publics to a coherent nation-building project and to contemporary Zionism? To explore the breadth of multicultural Israel without sacrificing cultural specificity and theoretical depth, the course is organized into three integrated units: a) historical background of Israel and its populations; b) Israel’s citizen-state relationships, identity and belonging, and c) ethnographic case studies of Israel-specific multicultural issues, and general contemporary multicultural theory.

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

LAS 315 • Intro To Jewish Latin America

40531 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.118
(also listed as ANT 310L, HIS 306N, J S 311, R S 313)

What can we learn about Latin American social worlds when we look at the place of Jews within it? Conversely, what we learn about Jewish social worlds when they unfold in Latin America?  This course examines both of these questions. Specifically, we consider the role of Latin America as both a refuge from and a source of antisemitism, a hub of immigration, a site of Zionism, and of Jewish success and philanthropy.  We also address themes of displacement, longing, belonging, marginalization, prejudice, immigration, community, cultural continuity, and memory, while considering Sephardi and Ashkenazi difference, and inter-generational conflict among Jewish Latin Americans. Overall, through reading, writing exercises, independent research and in-class films, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how Jews constructed individual lives and vibrant communities in predominantly Hispanic, Catholic countries of Latin America.

With these themes in mind, the course is divided into four units: 1) Historical literacy is a substantive introductory unit, which provides basic context from 1492 until the post-World War II period; 2) Jewish group identities in Latin American features readings on Jewish life and cultural forms in select national contexts (e.g. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Dominican Republic and others); 3) Memoir and personal narrative engages students in critical reading of creative non-fiction and ethnography that focuses on individual lives; 4) Contemporary realities explores current events, contemporary trends and popular culture in Jewish Latin America. Finally, over the course of the semester, drawing on course motifs, students will produce their own research papers addressing a specific research question in the Latin American national context of their choice.

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

ANT 310L • Israel: Space/Place/Landscape

31595 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM CLA 0.118
(also listed as GRG 309, J S 311, MES 310)

This multidisciplinary, interactive workshop is designed to foster dialog, debate and creative projects between lower-division undergraduate students with interests in Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Anthropology, and Geography.

The core component of this class is the final project. Following the introductory unit, teams of students will then propose one site, space, place or landscape in Israel/Palestine to explore in depth, and propose a conceptual framework for doing so. Each team will be responsible for exploring social, cultural, political, phenomenological, aesthetic and affective processes related to the site they have selected. This experimental seminar is for students who want to experience a collaborative learning environment, gain a set of multidisciplinary analytic skills, learn about space in Israel, interact with students who may have different disciplinary and political viewpoints, and want to learn and write about space, spatiality and spatialization.

Hot Middle Eastern breakfast beverages served in class!

 

LAS 324L • Jewish Cuba

40845 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 2.402
(also listed as ANT 325L, J S 365)

Jewish Cuba  JS, ANT, LAS

9:30am-11:00am TTh  GDC 2.402

Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?

Note: This course carries a Writing Flag and a Global Cultures Flag.

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31410 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 2.502
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)

Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. The notion of absorption—the social and economic integration of Jewish immigrants—has remained an explicit ideal since the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Yet absorption is also an ideological tool that often runs counter to the contemporary lived experience of citizenship, participation, nation building, minority rights, and the conflicting interests of today’s multicultural publics. Taking these tensions as a starting point, this course explores the complex social fabric that comprises contemporary Israeli society, and that shapes Israeli identity, practice and politics. We will focus on the lived experience of Israel’s increasingly diverse population. This includes populations associated with the majority: veteran Ashkenazim and Mizrahim; more recent Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Latin America and France; religious communities such Haredim and modern-Orthodox. It also includes ethnic and religious minorities such as Arab-Israelis/Palestinians, Bedouins, Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Black Hebrews, as well as laborers from all over the globe who migrate to Israel for work. How fluid are boundaries between these groups? How different are their interests, tastes and desires? How committed are various publics to a coherent nation-building project and to contemporary Zionism? To explore the breadth of multicultural Israel without sacrificing cultural specificity and theoretical depth, the course is organized into three integrated units: a) historical background of Israel and its populations; b) Israel’s citizen-state relationships, identity and belonging, and c) ethnographic case studies of Israel-specific multicultural issues, and general contemporary multicultural theory.                   

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present. 

LAS 310 • Intro To Jewish Latin America

40730 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM CLA 0.118
(also listed as ANT 310L, HIS 306N, J S 311)

What can we learn about Latin American social worlds when we look at the place of Jews within it? Conversely, what we learn about Jewish social worlds when they unfold in Latin America?  This course examines both of these questions. Specifically, we consider the role of Latin America as both a refuge from and a source of anti-Semitism, a hub of immigration, a site of Zionism, and of Jewish success and philanthropy.  We also address themes of displacement, longing, belonging, marginalization, prejudice, immigration, community, cultural continuity, and memory, while considering Sephardi and Ashkenazi difference, and inter-generational conflict among Jewish Latin Americans. Overall, through reading, writing exercises, independent research and in-class films, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how Jews constructed individual lives and vibrant communities in predominantly Hispanic, Catholic countries of Latin America.

With these themes in mind, the course is divided into four units:

  1. Historical literacy is a substantive introductory unit, which provides basic context from 1492 until the post-World War II period;
  2. Jewish group identities in Latin American features readings on Jewish life and cultural forms in select national contexts (e.g. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Dominican Republic and others);
  3. Memoir and personal narrative engages students in critical reading of creative non-fiction and quasi-ethnography that focuses on individual lives;
  4. Contemporary realities explores current events, contemporary trends and popular culture in Jewish Latin America.

Finally, over the course of the semester, drawing on course motifs, students will produce their own research papers addressing a specific research question in the Latin American national context of their choice.

*Enjoy Latin American breakfast beverages served in class*

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

31110 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118

This course is an intensive introduction to in cultural anthropology: the comparative, ethnographic study of human social life, culture, and global diversity of the lived experience. Students will be exposed to the fundamental ideas, theories, research methods, and styles of interpretation and analysis used in the discipline. An overarching goal of the course is not only to read and write about the lives of people from other places in the world, but it is also to provide new models for considering why our own lives unfold as they do. Throughout the course, we will also be emphasizing the role of culture change over time, with a particular focus on the relationship between global capital and local practice.

 

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31295 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)

Multicultural Israel

Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. The notion of absorption—the social and economic integration of Jewish immigrants—has remained an explicit ideal since the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Yet absorption is also an ideological tool that often runs counter to the contemporary lived experience of citizenship, participation, nation building, minority rights, and the conflicting interests of today’s multicultural publics. Taking these tensions as a starting point, this course explores the complex social fabric that comprises contemporary Israeli society, and that shapes Israeli identity, practice and politics. We will focus on the lived experience of Israel’s increasingly diverse population. This includes populations associated with the majority: veteran Ashkenazim and Mizrahim; more recent Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Latin America and France; religious communities such Charedim and modern-Orthodox. It also includes ethnic and religious minorities such as Arab Israelis, Bedouins, Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Black Hebrews, as well as laborers from all over the globe who migrate to Israel for work. How fluid are boundaries between these groups? How different are their interests, tastes and desires? How committed are various publics to a coherent nation-building project and to contemporary Zionism? To explore the breadth of multicultural Israel without sacrificing cultural specificity and theoretical depth, the course is organized into three integrated units: a) historical background of Israel and its populations; b) Israel’s citizen-state relationships, identity and belonging, and c) ethnographic case studies of Israel-specific multicultural issues, and general contemporary multicultural theory.

AMS 321 • Urban Anthropology

30658 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as ANT 324L, URB 354)

Over the thirty years in which urban anthropology has developed into an identifiable sub-field, it has moved towards a cohesive paradigm, linking together anthropology's interests in meaning and agency to political and economic models of urban structure. The goal of this course is to look at critically at that paradigm: the ways in which urban anthropologists work--theoretically and methodologically--in order to uncover the interaction between significant structural forces and culturally produced meaning and action on the ground in a variety of cities across the globe.      With that goal in mind, the course is organized around exploring the following: 1) structural frameworks for contextualizing cities; 2) strategies for analysis of cities and urban populations: top-down (looking at the powerful) and bottom-up (looking at the less powerful), considering the role ethnographic fieldwork can play in creating those analysis; 3) current themes of the sub-field including: neighborhoods, space as structured by the state and the market, urban social movements, poverty and class as mapped onto the city; global cities and processes of globalization; theories of place and public space, the circulation of media forms and consumer desire in urban space, and trends in urban planning and architecture as an anthropological concern. The course also enables students to design and conduct an original, small-scale project using the Austin area as an urban field site to illuminate these themes, or explore new ones. To this end, there will be a series of intensive, in-class ethnographic workshops for students to sample specialized methodologies, present their works-in-progress and receive constructive feedback from fellow course-members and the instructor.

Note: This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

LAS 310 • Anthropology Of Latin Amer

40185-40200 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.124
(also listed as ANT 310L)

The goal of this course is to provide an anthropological framework for understanding contemporary Latin America. In particular, we will analyze Latin American history, politics, economics and forms of cultural and social change. We also address the role of colonialism, urbanization, gender, race, social movements, transitions to democracy and market economies, migration, transnational communities, and the impacts of globalization in the Latin American context. This is not a standard survey course, covering the region as a whole, however. Instead, following an introductory unit which provides socio-historical context, students will engage in critical reading of four ethnographies on specific countries on different sub-regions within Latin America in order to explore particular topics and questions in more depth. This year’s country focus is on Nicaragua, Peru, Ecuador, and Cuba. In each of the units of the course, we will supplement ethnographies with textbook readings and news articles that provide further historical and contemporary context.

 

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31346 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as J S 365, MES 325)

Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. The notion of absorption—the social and economic integration of Jewish immigrants—has remained an explicit ideal since the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Yet absorption is also an ideological tool that often runs counter to the contemporary lived experience of citizenship, participation, nation building, minority rights, and the conflicting interests of today’s multicultural publics. Taking these tensions as a starting point, this course explores the complex social fabric that comprises contemporary Israeli society, and thatshapes Israeli identity, practice and politics. We will focus on the lived experience of Israel’s increasingly diverse population. This includes populations associated with the majority: veteran Ashkenazim and Mizrahim; more recent Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Latin America and France; religious communities such Charedim and modern-Orthodox. It also includes ethnic and religious minorities such as Arab Israelis, Bedouins, Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Black Hebrews as well as laborers from all over the globe who migrate to Israel for work. How fluid are boundaries between these groups? How different are their interests, tastes and desires? How committed are various publics to a coherent nation-building project and to contemporary Zionism?

LAS 310 • Anthropol Of Latin America

40165 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JGB 2.216
(also listed as ANT 310L)

The goal of this course is to provide a framework for understanding contemporary life in Latin America. In particular, we will analyze Latin American history, politics, economics and forms of cultural and social change through the critical reading of ethnography. Themes covered throughout the course address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, urbanization, gender, race, social movements, transitions to democracy and market economies, migration, transnational communities, and the impacts of globalization in the Latin American context. In each of the thematic units of the course, we will supplement textbook readings with ethnographies, and discuss how they illuminate each other. Finally, the course includes a final research paper based on either: a) participation local, small-scale, original field work project conducted with members of a Latin American Diaspora community, or b) library-based research synthesizing theory and ethnography of a selected Latin American country.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

30900 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM SAC 4.118

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 324L • Urban Anthropology

31015 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as URB 354)

Over the thirty years in which urban anthropology has developed into an identifiable subfield, it has moved towards a cohesive paradigm, linking together anthropology's interests in meaning and agency to political and economic models of urban structure. The goal of this course is to look at the ways in which urban anthropologists work—theoretically and methodologically—in order to uncover the interaction between significant structural forces and culturally produced meaning and action on the ground in a variety of cities across the globe. With these goals in mind, the course is organized around exploring the following: 1) structural frameworks for contextualizing cities; 2) strategies for analysis of cities and urban populations: top-down (looking at the powerful) and bottom-up (looking at the less powerful), considering the role ethnographic fieldwork can play in revealing this; 3) current themes of the sub-field including: neighborhoods, space as structured by the state and the market, urban social movements, poverty and class as mapped onto the city; global cities and processes of globalization; theories of place and public space, the circulation of media forms in urban space, and trends in urban planning, landscape design and architecture as an anthropological concern. The course also enables students to design and conduct an original, small-scale project using the Austin area as an urban field site to illuminate these themes. To this end, there will be a series of four intensive week-long, in-class ethnographic workshops for students to sample specialized methodologies, present their works-in-progress and receive constructive feedback from course-members and the instructor. 

AMS 321 • Urban Anthropology

30845 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L, URB 354)

Over the thirty years in which urban anthropology has developed into an identifiable subfield, it has moved towards a cohesive paradigm, linking together anthropology's interests in meaning and agency to political and economic models of urban structure. The goal of this course is to look at the ways in which urban anthropologists work—theoretically and methodologically—in order to uncover the interaction between significant structural forces and culturally produced meaning and action on the ground in a variety of cities across the globe. With these goals in mind, the course is organized around exploring the following: 1) structural frameworks for contextualizing cities; 2) strategies for analysis of cities and urban populations: top-down (looking at the powerful) and bottom-up (looking at the less powerful), considering the role ethnographic fieldwork can play in revealing this; 3) current themes of the sub-field including: neighborhoods, space as structured by the state and the market, urban social movements, poverty and class as mapped onto the city; global cities and processes of globalization; theories of place and public space, the circulation of media forms in urban space, and trends in urban planning, landscape design and architecture as an anthropological concern. The course also enables students to design and conduct an original, small-scale project using the Austin area as an urban field site to illuminate these themes. To this end, there will be a series of four intensive week-long, in-class ethnographic workshops for students to sample specialized methodologies, present their works-in-progress and receive constructive feedback from course-members and the instructor. 

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31355 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as J S 365, MES 325)

Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. This course looks at the complex social fabirc that comprises contemporary Israeli society and shapes contemporary Jewish identity, practice and politics.  Using existing ethnographic material and news media and film, we will focus on the lived experience of diverse groups such as immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia, Ashkenazim, Mizrahim, ultra- and modern-Orthodox groups, the numerous religious minorities (e.g. the Black Hebrew Community), among others.  Throughout the course, we will consider theoretical and practical issues of citizenship, participation, fluidity of group boundaries, and ideologies about nation-building as we investigate the common and conflicting interests of multi-cultural publics.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

29970 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM WAG 208

I. Course description: 

This course is an intensive introduction to the fundamental ideas, theories, research methods, and styles of interpretation and analysis in cultural anthropology. An overarching goal of the course is not only to read and write about lives of people who live and view the world differently from us and from each other, but also to provide new models for thinking about why our own lives unfold as they do.  

II. Course components and objectives: 

Components

In introducing the comparative study of human social life, culture, and global diversity of the lived experience, the course is organized around integrating the following four components:

1) Reading foundational and contemporary ethnographies from around the world to anchor our discussions; choosing one ethnography to read and analyze independently for the final paper.

2) Discussing core topics in cultural anthropology, including: ritual, religion and belief systems; language and symbolism; gender roles, kinship and the family; subsistence and economic systems; power, authority and social inequality; definitions of modernization and progress; nationalism, formation of publics and social conflict/violence; and multi-culturalism, transnationalism and globalization.

3) Applying anthropological concepts such as cultural construction, cultural relativism, situated knowledge and creativity and agency to the analysis of ethnography and in the design of basic theoretical frameworks.

4) Each student will also pick several specific analytic concepts from a hat and be “in charge” of mastering those concepts during the semester. Students will do this through learning to recognize the use of their core terms in ethnographic texts, and by being able to provide illustrative examples of the terms in class discussions and in their own writing.

5) Taking part in an in-class methods practicum in order to gain first-hand experience in conducting participant observation, unstructured and semi-structured interviews, taking/organizing field notes, and finally, writing ethnographic descriptions based on these data-collection techniques. 

Summary of Objectives

1) To gain a solid grounding in fundamental concepts in sociocultural anthropology.

2) To explore a wide range of specific ethnographic case studies through reading, discussion and writing assignments.

3) To practice basic research methodologies through first-hand experience.

4) To master core terms and be able to apply them proficiently in writing and analysis.

5) To gain a critical appreciation of the influence of culture and society on human behavior. 
 

III. Format

This course is designed to be a smaller-scale seminar for motivated liberal arts honors students with an active interest in cultural anthropology. It is run as series of lively, fast-paced, interactive meetings in which students are encouraged to articulate and synthesize ideas with clarity, accuracy and sensitivity, and defend positions through evidence based on a common reading list. Discussion leaders, designated weekly, will raise questions, stimulate debate, and integrate ideas from the readings and core topics into our collective analysis. I will be asking for your feedback regularly so there is an open flow of communication and room for improvement during the semester.

IV. Course Requirements and Percentage of Final Grade: 

1. Active intellectually rigorous participation in seminar component: 20%

2. Two 3-5 page papers elaborating core concepts through ethnographic examples: 20%

3. Two take-home quizzes analyzing readings: 20%

4. Two in-class quizzes on anthropological vocabulary, history and theory: 20%
4. A final written assignment, integrating all course components: 20%

LAS 310 • Anthropol Of Latin America

40087-40088 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.132
(also listed as ANT 310L)

The goal of this course is to provide a framework for understanding contemporary concerns in the Latin America. In particular, we will analyze Latin American history, politics, economics and forms of cultural and social change through anthropological theory and ethnography. Students will engage in critical reading of selected ethnographies on countries on different sub-regions within Latin America (México and Central America, the Caribbean, the Andes, and Brazil and the Southern Cone). The course, however, is organized thematically. Some of the themes covered address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, peasants, urbanization, gender, race, social movements and transitions to democracy and market economies as well as migration, transnational communities, and the impacts of globalization in the Latin American context. In each of the thematic units of the course, we will supplement textbook readings with ethnographic selections and theoretical pieces, and discuss how they illuminate each other.  Finally, the course includes the integration of a small-scale original fieldwork component, based in Austin. This course, which will be run in a seminar-style format, is recommended for motivated undergraduate students at any stage who are developing a regional interest in Latin America

AMS 321 • Urban Anthropology-W

29765 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A203A
(also listed as ANT 324L, URB 354)

Urban Anthropology and Ethnography

ANT 324L

Unique 30370

 

Spring 2010

 

JES A203A

M,W, F 11am-12am

 

Instructor: Dr. Amelia Rosenberg Weinreb

EPS 2.112C

232-1560

amy.weinreb@mail.utexas.edu

 

                                    Office hours:            M, W 10am-11am, or by appointment

 

I. Course description: 

Over the thirty years in which urban anthropology has developed into an identifiable subfield, it has moved towards a cohesive paradigm, linking together anthropology's interests in meaning and agency to political and economic models of urban structure. The goal of this course is to look at the ways in which urban anthropologists work--theoretically and methodologically--in order to uncover the interaction between significant structural forces and culturally produced meaning and action on the ground in a variety of cities across the globe. With these goals in mind, the course is organized around exploring the following: 1) structural frameworks for contextualizing cities; 2) strategies for analysis of cities and urban populations: top-down (looking at the powerful) and bottom-up (looking at the less powerful), considering the role ethnographic fieldwork can play in revealing this; 3) current themes of the sub-field including: neighborhoods, space as structured by the state and the market, urban social movements, poverty and class as mapped onto the city; global cities and processes of globalization; theories of place and public space, the circulation of media forms in urban space, and trends in urban planning, landscape design and architecture as an anthropological concern. The course also enables students to design and conduct an original, small-scale project using the Austin area as an urban field site to illuminate these themes. To this end, there will be a series of intensive, in-class ethnographic workshops for students to sample specialized methodologies, present their works-in-progress and receive constructive feedback from fellow course-members and the instructor.

 

 II. Course objectives: 

Upon completion of the course, students will have developed the skills to be able to:

? Articulate central themes of urban anthropology and the structural frameworks that have been used for contextualizing cities

? Place course themes within in a wider context of anthropological theory

? Consider the contribution that anthropology has made to the understanding of urban culture, nationally and internationally

? Converse, with historical and ethnographic sensitivity, about a range of contemporary urban issues

? Develop basic skills to conduct ethnographic research in an urban setting and write ethnographic vignettes

 

III. Course Design and Format

This course, which will be run in a seminar-style format, is recommended for motivated upper-division undergraduate who are developing an intellectual interest cities and urban cultures. While there are writing assignments throughout the semester to encourage students analyze and synthesize information and ideas in a rigorous way, there are no in-class quizzes or tests. The classes are designed to be a series of interactive weekly meetings, generally following this format:

 

Mon- An instructor-led discussion establishes the context and background for the readings and outlines their key data, arguments and ideas in the reading.

Wed- A small team of students, delegated in advance, will facilitate the discussion along with the instructor, raising questions, stimulating debate, and integrating ideas from the readings into the collective analysis.

Fri- Wrap up: a concluding instructor-led conversation summarizing central themes and connecting them to the goals of the course.

 

IV. Course requirements and weighted grading at-a-glance: 

? Attendance, active intellectually rigorous engagement in class discussions and reading response papers (see below): 20%

? Three short (3-5 page) analytic papers related to course readings: 30%

? Two short (1-3 page) methodological workshop papers: 10%

? Final (10-15 page) research paper which integrates readings and local fieldwork component: 40%

 

V. Writing Assignments:

? Reading response papers (ungraded): Each week that we read an ethnography, all members of the class will write a two-page (12 pt. font, double spaced) response to the reading. Each time a student group leads discussion, members of the group will also write response paper. These short writing can be reflections, reactions, critical commentaries or overviews that in some way place in conversation the ethnography and theoretical/methodological pieces we have read in the prior week. The two-page typed responses will be turned in class on Wednesdays. These written assignments are informal, but are required, and are an important part of the participation grade. They will be marked with a √, √+ or √- based on their quality. Note: Reading response papers must be turned in on time cannot be made up at the end of the course.

? 3 short analysis papers: Three short analysis papers 3-5 pages in length, preparing for your final project analyzing our reading in more depth are due at various points in the semester, typed, carefully edited, and including a bibliography. A prompt and rubric will be provided two weeks in advance.

? 2 methodological workshop papers:

1 brief (1-3 page) description of the project and its methodology for feedback and instructor approval

1 brief (1-3 page) "dispatch from the field" progress report in order to get feedback at the midway-point, (Both of these written reports are due to be distributed in advance of the workshop, so all participants have an opportunity to comment on them thoughtfully).

? Final paper: a 10-15 page (12 pt. font, double spaced) ethnographic analysis based on your local fieldwork project that combines theory, analysis and ethnography. Students will be asked to use theoretical materials from the course to think through their research projects for their final papers. A bibliography of literature cited (should have at least 6-10 references total, 3-5 from scholarly sources outside the course, 3-5 from the course).

To receive a grade, all submissions must include at least 10 pages of field notes (typed or hand written, though I recommend typed) upon which the paper was based. 

 

V. Grading Scale

A   95-100%             Excellent grasp of subject matter; explains concepts clearly; provides                                     relevant details and examples; draws clear and interesting connections,                                     exceptionally original, coherent and well-organized; ideas clearly                                                 written/stated, outstanding classroom participation

A-  90-94%    Very good grasp of subject matter; explains concepts clearly;                                                 provides relevant details and examples; draws clear connections; ideas                                     clearly written/stated

B+  86-89%             Good grasp of some elements above, others need work

  83-85%            Satisfactory grasp of some elements above

B-   80-82%            Uneven, spotty grasp of the elements above

C+  76-79 %            Limited grasp of the above

C    73-75%            Poor grasp of the above

C-   70-72%    Very poor grasp of the above

D    60-69%    Little evidence of grasp of material, having done readings, attended class,                                     or completed assignments

F      0-59%    Insignificant evidence of having done readings, attended class, or   

                        completing  assignments

 

VI. Important notes on grading and participation:

Complete written assignments on time: I am committed to returning assignments to you promptly so you can benefit from my feedback while material is fresh in your mind. I do not grade papers or exams until I have the entire printed set in front of me. For these reasons, I do not accept late assignments. Bring a hard copy at the beginning of class on the day it is due. If you anticipate a problem, or have a history of deadline problems, meet with a consultant at the learning or writing center to help you plan ahead.

The UT Learning Center: http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc/

Undergraduate Writing Center:

http://uwc.utexas.edu/

 

Grading policy: I am very happy to discuss how you may improve your work, and will read early drafts, but I will not reconsider grades on papers or quizzes.  I grade all the papers in a set at the same time to ensure that I am applying the same standards, and I make every effort to be fair.

Plagiarism and copying: Although this course is designed for creative, individual work and synthesis of ideas from various sources (it would be hard to cheat in the conventional sense of the word), any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit must be the student's own work. Should copying occur from another student, both the student who copied work and the student who gave material to be copied will both automatically receive a zero for the assignment.

 

Penalty for violation of this Code can also be extended to include failure of the course and University disciplinary action.

Here are University statements about plagiarism and the consequences of plagiarizing:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/faculty/plagiarism/preventing.html

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/learningmodules/plagiarism/

 

Using office hours, getting help: I check email regularly, and will usually reply to emails within 24 hours for basic questions, and no longer than three days for more complicated ones. My door is open from 10am-11am on Mondays and Wednesdays.  Ask for an appointment if you can’t come in during my regular hours.

 

Attendance, contribution, and classroom vibe: Regular attendance is not only the key to your own success as a student in this course, but also for the quality of the course as a dynamic whole. Arriving late and leaving early disrupts class flow, so make every effort to arrive to class on time with your materials prepared and phones and computers, etc. off. This is a low-tech, highly interpersonal seminar. Attendance and the quality of your participation are factored into your final grade.

NOTE:  More than four unexcused absences will automatically lower your final grade by one letter grade.

 

 

VII. University Notices and Policies

University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

In this course, that means we will all work to ensure that the discussion space is shared relatively equally among the participants, and to maintain an atmosphere of respect for each other’s perspectives and arguments, especially when there are strong disagreements.

 

Students with disabilities

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone).  Please contact me as early in the semester as possible to let me know if you need anything to participate fully.

 

Religious Holy Days

By UT Austin policy, students are required to notify me of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will certainly give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

VIII. Required Texts (for purchase at the Co-op Bookstore)

Theorizing the City edited by Setha Low

In Search of Respect by Phillipe Bourgeousie

On the Plaza by Setha Low

The Intimate Economies of Bangkok by Ara Wilson

The Spectacular City by Daniel Goldstein

The Naked City by Sharon Zukin

 

Note: A required course pack is available for purchase at Abel’s Copies, located at University Towers (715D West 23rd St.)

 

IX. Key due dates at-a-glance:

Plan ahead!

F 2/19: Short paper #1

T 2/23: Workshop report #1

F 3/12: Short paper #2

F 3/26 Workshop report #2

F 4/9: Short paper #3

F 5/5: FINAL PAPER

 

X. Tentative Course Schedule: **This syllabus represents current course plans and objectives.  As we go through the semester, those plans may need to change to enhance the class.  Such changes, communicated clearly, are not unusual and should be expected.

 

Date

Main Topic(s)

 

Work to do at home

Readings – to be completed before class

Evaluation

W 1/20

Introduction to the course

 

 

F 1/22

Theorizing the City

Read over syllabus,

“Theorizing the City” in Low pp. 1-37.

type me a note about the syllabus:

 a) what surprises you;

b) what you look forward to; c) what you most dread

M 1/25

Some classic Marxist statements on the city

 

Katznelson Ch. 1. "Marxism and the City?" pp. 1-42; Engels “Working Class Manchester” (579-585)

 

W 1/27

Classic (and refuted) statements,

Student Led

In course pack: Wirth, “Urbanism as a way of life” pp. 97-118; Lewis, Engle Merry, “Urban Danger” Lewis, “The Culture of Poverty” pp; 119-130 with Goode, “How Urban Ethnography Counters myths about the poor”pp.185-201;

Student discussion leaders hand in 2-page reading response, typed and stapled.

F 1/29

Wrap-up classic statements

Eames and Goode Anthropology of the City for further foundational background pp 13-39

 

M 2/1

Ethnography: In Search of Respect

In Search of Respect: Intro-Ch.2  pp. 1-48

 

W 2/3

Student-led discussion In Search of Respect

In Search of Respect Ch. 3-5; pp. 49-174

Due: 2-page reading response paper, typed and stapled

F 2/5

Wrap-up: In Search of Respect

In Search of Respect ch. 6-9 pp. 175-328

 

M 2/8

“Feelings Map” experiment; meet outside the building.

 

 

W 2/10

Urban Planning and Design

Jacobs, Ch. 1-3 pp. 1-73

Student discussion leaders hand in 2-page reading response, typed and stapled.

F 2/12

 

Bosselman, MacDonald and Kronemeyer "Livable Streets Revisited" 168-180 and Owens, "Pedestrian Life and Neighborhood Form" 115-135; “Looking At Cities” 1-83.

 

M 2/15

Urban ethnography research and methodology

In course pack “Anthropological Fieldwork in Cities” pp. 5-18 from The Craft of Research 35-81; “The anthropology of Cities: Some Methodological Issues” 233-247

 

W 2/17

Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes

Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes, Ch 1-4

 

F 2/19

Fieldnotes practicum, meet in Jester Hall lobby

Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes Ch. 3-4

Due: Short Paper #1

M 2/22

Discussing Field notes: Tricks of the Trade; sharing/critiquing vignettes

 

Due: Type up fieldnotes, write brief vignette

T 2/23

*

*

*Workshop report #1 1-3 page description of the project and its methodology

W 2/24

Round 1, discussing student projects for development and improvement

Read all projects descriptions posted on blog, write comments

 

F 2/26

Round 2, discussing student projects for development and improvement

 

 

M 3/1

The Culture of Cities

In course pack:  Zukin Ch. Ch. 1-3

 

W 3/3

Student-led discussion: The Culture of Cities, Con’t

Zukin Ch. 3-6;

Due: 2-page reading response paper, typed and stapled

F

Wrap-up The Culture of Cities

 

 

M 3/7

The Contested City,

On The Plaza

Part II: “The Contested City” p. 111-138 in Low; On The Plaza ch. 1-2;

 

W 3/10

On The Plaza

On The Plaza ch. 3-8

Due: 2-page reading response paper, typed and stapled

 F3/12

On The Plaza

On The Plaza ch. 9-11

Due: Short paper #2, typed and stapled.

M-3/15-

F 3/20

SPRING BREAK

 

 

M 3/22

The Global City; The Intimate Economies of Bangkok: Tomboys, Tycoons, and Avon Ladies in the Global City

 

Part III: The Global City in Low p. 169-201; Intimate Economies Intro-Ch. 2

 

W 3/24

Student-led discussion: Intimate Economies

Intimate Economies Ch. 3-5

Due: 2-page reading response paper, typed and stapled

F 3/26

Intimate Economies

Intimate Economies Ch. 5-Conclusion

1-page progress report on projects due on blog

M 3/29

Workshop student papers,

 round 1

 

 

W 3/31

Workshop student papers,

round 2

 

 

F 4/2

Urban Topics: Suburbs, Exurbs, Urban Decline

Selection from bulk pack

 

M 4/5

The Modernist city, The Spectacular City

Part IV: The Modernist City in Low, 245-277; The Spectacular City Intro, 1-2

 

W 4/7

Student-led discussion The Spectacular City

The Spectacular City Intro, 1-2

Due: 2-page reading response paper, typed and stapled

F 4/9

Wrap-up the Spectacular City

The Spectacular City 6 and conclusion

Due: Short paper #3, typed and stapled

M 4/12

The Postmodern City

 

Part V: “The Postmodern City” in Low pp. 317-377;  Dear and Flusty 61-94;

 

W 4/14

Contemporary urban issues: Suburbs, Exurbs and Urban Decline

Fishman in course pack, Preface and pp. ix, Intro-2; pp. 1-72 and newspaper readings I place on blackboard

 

F 4/16

Cities and urban issues in the News

 

Bring in an article from a major news source to share

M 4/19

The Naked City: The Death and Life of Authentic Urban Places

 The Naked City Intro-ch2

 

W 4/21

Student-led discussion: The Naked City

The Naked City ch. 3-4

Due: 2-page reading response paper, typed and stapled

F 4/23

Wrap-up: The Naked City

The Naked City ch. 5-6

 

M 4/26

Photo shoot in Austin (location to be announced)

 

 

W 4/28

Creating captions and texts relating to our readings, a collective, visual final

 

 

F 4/30

Wrap-up. Final discussion, evaluation about course

 

 

M 5/3

Student presentations, round 1

 

DUE: FINAL PAPER

W 5/5

Student presentations, round 2

 

 

F 5/7

Student presentations, round 3

 

 

 

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

30295 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM EPS 2.136

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology-Honors

ANT 302H

Unique 30295

Fall 2009

 

EPS 2.136

M,W, F 9am-10am

 

Instructor: Dr. Amelia Rosenberg Weinreb

EPS 2.112C

amy.weinreb@mail.ut.edu

232-1560

 

                                    Office Hours: M,W 10am-11am, or by appointment

 

I. Course description: 

This course is an intensive introduction to the fundamental ideas, theories, research methods, and styles of interpretation and analysis in cultural anthropology. An overarching goal of the course is not only to read and write about lives of people who live and view the world differently from us and from each other, but also to provide new models for thinking about why our own lives unfold as they do.

 

II. Course components and objectives: 

Components

In introducing the comparative study of human social life, culture, and global diversity of the lived experience, the course is organized around integrating the following four components:

1) Reading foundational and contemporary ethnographies from around the world to anchor our discussions; choosing one ethnography to read and analyze independently for the final paper.

2) Discussing core topics in cultural anthropology, including: ritual, religion and belief systems; language and symbolism; gender roles, kinship and the family; subsistence and economic systems; power, authority and social inequality; definitions of modernization and progress; nationalism, formation of publics and social conflict/violence; and multi-culturalism, transnationalism and globalization.

3) Applying anthropological concepts such as cultural construction, cultural relativism, situated knowledge and creativity and agency to the analysis of ethnography and in the design of basic theoretical frameworks.

4) Each student will also pick several specific analytic concepts from a hat and be “in charge” of mastering those concepts during the semester. Students will do this through learning to recognize the use of their core terms in ethnographic texts, and by being able to provide illustrative examples of the terms in class discussions and in their own writing.

5) Taking part in an in-class methods practicum in order to gain first-hand experience in conducting participant observation, unstructured and semi-structured interviews, taking/organizing field notes, and finally, writing ethnographic descriptions based on these data-collection techniques.

 

Summary of Objectives

1) To gain a solid grounding in fundamental concepts in sociocultural anthropology.

2) To explore a wide range of specific ethnographic case studies through reading, discussion and writing assignments.

3) To practice basic research methodologies through first-hand experience.

4) To master core terms and be able to apply them proficiently in writing and analysis.

5) To gain a critical appreciation of the influence of culture and society on human behavior.

 

 

III. Format

This course is designed to be a smaller-scale seminar for motivated liberal arts honors students with an active interest in cultural anthropology. It is run as series of lively, fast-paced, interactive meetings in which students are encouraged to articulate and synthesize ideas with clarity, accuracy and sensitivity, and defend positions through evidence based on a common reading list. Discussion leaders, designated weekly, will raise questions, stimulate debate, and integrate ideas from the readings and core topics into our collective analysis. I will be asking for your feedback regularly so there is an open flow of communication and room for improvement during the semester.

IV. Course Requirements: 

1. Active intellectually rigorous participation in seminar component: 20%

2. Active participation in the methods practicum component: 10%

3. Three shorter papers elaborating core concepts through ethnographic examples 20%

4. A final written assignment, integrating all course components: 50%

 

Important dates at-a-glance:

M        8/31     Official add-drop day

M        9/7       Labor day, NO CLASS

F          9/11     Official enrollment taken

F          9/18     Short paper #1 DUE

W        9/23     Last Drop Day

M        10/19   Short paper #2 DUE

M        10/26   Yom Kippur NO CLASS

W        10/28   Short paper #3 DUE

F          10/30   Have individual ethnography selected and approved

F          11/6     Last day of registration for spring courses

F          11/16   Optional: Hand in draft of final assignment for comments/suggestion

F          11/26   Thanksgiving Holiday weekend NO CLASS

M        11/30   FINAL PAPER DUE

W        12/2     Final day of class

F          12/4     AAAs NO CLASS    

 

 

V. Grading

Grades will be based on the following scale:

A         95-100%         Excellent grasp of subject matter; explains concepts clearly; provides                                                relevant details and examples; draws clear and interesting connections,                                              exceptionally original, coherent and well-organized; ideas clearly                                                       written/stated, outstanding classroom participation

A-        90-94%           Very good grasp of subject matter; explains concepts clearly;                                                            provides relevant details and examples; draws clear connections; ideas                                              clearly written/stated

B+       86-89%           Good grasp of some elements above, others need work

B         83-86%           Satisfactory grasp of some elements above

B-        80-82%           Uneven, spotty grasp of the elements above

C+       76-79 %          Limited grasp of the above

C         73-76%           Poor grasp of the above

C-        70-72%           Very poor grasp of the above

D+/-    60-69%           Little evidence of grasp of material, having done readings, attended class,                                         or completed assignments

F          0-59%             No evidence of having done readings, attended class, or completed                                                   assignments

 

 

VI. Important notes on grading and participation:

Complete written assignments on time: I am committed to returning assignments to you promptly so you can benefit from my feedback while material is fresh in your mind. I do not grade papers or exams until I have the entire printed set in front of me. For these reasons, I do not accept late assignments. Bring a hard copy to the beginning of class on the day it is due. If you anticipate a problem, or have a history of deadline problems, meet with me or a consultant at the learning or writing center to help you plan ahead.

The UT Learning Center: http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc/

Undergraduate Writing Center: http://uwc.utexas.edu/

 

Grading policy: I am very happy to discuss how you may improve your work, and will read early drafts, but I will not reconsider grades on papers.  I grade all the papers in a set at the same time to ensure that I am applying the same standards, and I make every effort to be fair.

 

Plagiarism and copying: Although this course is designed for creative, individual work and synthesis of ideas from various sources (it would be hard to cheat in the conventional sense of the word), any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit must be the student's own work. Should copying occur from another student, both the student who copied work and the student who gave material to be copied will both automatically receive a zero for the assignment.

 

Penalty for violation of this Code can also be extended to include failure of the course and University disciplinary action.

Here are University statement about plagiarism and the consequences of plagiarizing.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/faculty/plagiarism/preventing.html

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/learningmodules/plagiarism/

 

Using office hours, getting help: I check email regularly, and will usually reply to emails within 24 hours for basic questions, and no longer than three days for more complicated ones. But don't be shy to stop by! My door is open from 10am-11am on Mondays and Wednesdays.  Ask for an appointment if you can’t come in during my regular hours. I am happy to talk with you about any questions or concerns you have about the course or about anthropology in general

 

Attendance, contribution, and classroom vibe: Regular attendance is not only the key to your own success as a student in this course, but also for the quality of the course as a dynamic whole. Arriving late and leaving early disrupts class flow, so make every effort to arrive to class on time with your materials prepared and phones and computers, etc. off. This is a low-tech, highly interpersonal seminar. Attendance and participation are factored into your final grade.

 

VII. University Notices and Policies

 

University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

In this course, that means we will all work to ensure that the discussion space is shared relatively equally among the participants, and to maintain an atmosphere of respect for each other’s right to voice perspectives and arguments, even at times when  there are strong disagreements.

 

Students with disabilities

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone). 

 

Please contact me as early in the semester as possible to let me know if you need anything in order to participate fully.

 

Religious Holy Days

By UT Austin policy, students are required to notify me of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will certainly give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

 

VIII. Course Schedule: **This working syllabus represents plans and objectives.  As we go through the semester, those plans may need to be change to enhance the class.  Such changes, communicated clearly, are not unusual and should be expected.

 

Unit 1: Introduction—What is Culture, what is Anthropology?

 

Week 1: Intro

Wed. Aug 26: Introduction to this class and its structure; choosing concepts from a hat, and analyzing a an common artifact

 

Fri. Aug 28: How do I learn about Culture? Introduction to the 4 fields, place of cultural anthropology, Read Core Concepts, Chapters 1-2; bring examples of anthropology in the news from the four fields, and start reading about concepts for which you are in charge.

 

Week 2: Classics

Mon. Aug 31: (note: last official add-drop day)—Read selections from Classic Edition: Sources in bulk pack: p. Selection 1-3; 5-6; 11; 23-24.

 

Wed. Sept. 2: Continue Classic Edition: Sources in bulk pack selections 12; 14; 15; 23-24; 27-28.

 

Fri. Sept. 4: In-class classics Trivial Pursuits.

 

Unit 2: Language, Communication and Symbols

Week 3

Mon. Sept: Labor Day, NO CLASS.

 

Wed. Sept. 9: Read Don't Sleep There are Snakes Here, part I for discussion.

 

Fri. Sept. 11: Don’t Sleep, parts 2-3 for discussion.

 

Unit 3: Religion and Belief

Week 4

Mon. Sept. 14: Read Chapter 4-5 in Core Concepts and Guests of the Sheik parts I and II for discussion.

 

Wed. Sept. 16: Continue Guests, read parts III-VI for discussion.

 

Fri. Sept. 18: DUE at the beginning of class: Short paper#1, topic TBA. Kamaran Ali guest speaker on honors program in anthropology.

 

Unit 4: Social Organization (at various scales)

 

Week 5

Mon. Sept. 21: Read Core Concepts chapter 6 and Nisa chapters 1-7 for this week's discussions.

 

Wed. Sept. 23: Nisa chapters 8-15 and epilogue (note: last drop day).

 

Fri. Sept. 25: Culture Shock exercise from Thinking Like an Anthropologist in bulk pack p. 369-371.

 

Unit 5: Politics and Economics

Week 6

 

Mon. Sept. 28: Read Core Concepts chapters 7-8; Cuba in the Shadow of Change, ch. 1-4

 

Wed. Sept. 30: continue Cuba ch. 5-conclusion.

 

Fri. Oct. 2: Economics in Ethnography exercise from Thinking Like an Anthropologist in bulk pack p. 114-115.

 

 

Unit 6: Kinship and Descent; Marriage and Family

Week 7

Mon. Oct. 5: Read Core Concepts chapters 9-10.

 

Wed. Oct. 7: What are Kin Terms Connected to? exercise from Thinking Like an Anthropologist in bulk pack p.122-124.

 

Fri. Oct. 9: Trivial Pursuits on unit terms.

 

Unit 5: Methods Practicum

Week 8

Mon. Oct. 12:  Writing Ethnographic Feildnotes ch. 1-4; Thinking Like an Anthropologist in bulk pack p. 59-72; 80-81; and Appendix in Core Concepts.

 

Wed. Oct. 14: Practicum on taking field notes.

 

Fri. Oct. 16: Ethnographic writing workshop, bring drafts for in-class workshop.

 

Unit 7- Globalization and the Culture of Capitalism

Week 9

Mon. Oct 19: DUE: Short paper #2 at beginning of class: 3-5 page ethnographic writing sample based on methods practicum; Read Core Concepts ch. 11; From Cuenca to Queens ch. 1-4.

 

Wed. Oct. 21: From Cuenca to Queens ch. 5-8 (note: last day to change registration to pass/fail or credit/no credit).

 

Fri. Oct. 23: Globalization, capitalism and migration in the news, bring articles for analysis.

 

Unit 8: The Gebusi and Modernization

Week 10:

Mon. Oct. 26: (note: registration for spring courses open through Nov. 6th)-NO CLASS TODAY (Yom Kippur). For those not observing, a good time to catch up!

 

Wed. Oct. 28: The Gebusi part I, Core Concepts ch. 12; DUE at the beginning of class: Short paper#3, topic TBA

 

Fri. Oct. 30: Small groups for discussing the meaning of progress from Robbins website, chapter 2 in bulk pack, using The Gebusi part II as a case example. (Note: have your final, individual ethnography selected and approved by the instructor no later than by the end of this week).

 

 

Unit 9: Coming of Age in New Jersey and Reflexivity

Week 11

Mon. Nov. 2: Coming of Age ch. 1-4.

 

Wed. Nov 4: Coming of Age 5-7.

 

Fri. Nov. 6: (note: last day of registration for spring courses)—Discussion on situated knowledge, "What is My Perspective?" and related core concepts.

 

Unit 10: Deer Hunting with Jesus and class in America

Week 12

Mon. Nov. 9: Read Deer Hunting ch. 1-4.

 

Wed. Nov. 11: Deer Hunting ch. 5-8.

 

Fri. Nov. 13: bring in newspaper articles discussing class in America for analysis, and think about what ethnography can provide.

 

Unit 11: Ethics, Activism and Applications

Week 13

Mon. Nov. 16: (Note: Option to hand in draft of Final assignment today).

Thinking Like an Anthropologist in bulk pack p. 75-79; 391-400.

 

Wed. Nov. 18: Problem 1 from Robbins in bulk pack: Anthropology in a shopping mall.

 

Fri. Nov. 20: Guest Speaker, TBA.

 

Week 14

Ethnographic Film

 

Mon. Nov. 23: Watch film we choose together.

 

Wed. Nov. 25: Discussion of film.

 

Fri. Nov. 26: Thanksgiving holiday weekend NO CLASS.

 

 

Week 15

Final Student Presentations

 

Mon. Nov 30: FINAL ASSIGNMENT DUE TODAY beginning of class, Round 1 of presentations.

 

Week 16

Wed. Dec. 2: LAST DAY OF CLASS

Round 2 of presentations and those not presenting bring food, and everyone bring "secret Santa" cultural anthro gift.

 

Fri. Dec. 4: AAAS in session NO CLASS. Spring semester resumes Tue. January 19th.

 

Course Texts (listed in order we will read them)

There will also a small bulk pack with required readings available for purchase.

*=Selections

 

Lavenda, Robert and Emily A. Schultz. 2009. Core Concepts in Cultural Anthropology (4th           Edition). New York: McGraw-Hill.

 

Everett, Daniel L. 2008. Don't Sleep, There are Snakes. New York: Random House.

 

*Geertz, Clifford. 1973. The Interpretations of Cultures. New York: Harper Collins (Selections).

 

*Malinowski, Bronislaw. 1922/2008. Argonauts of the Western Pacific.  Malinowski Press.           (Selections).

 

*Emerson, Robert M., Rachel I. Fretz and Linda L. Shaw. 1995. Writing Ethnographic       Fieldnotes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Selections)

 

Shostak, Marjorie. 2000.  Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman.  Cambridge:         Harvard University Press

 

Fernea, Elizabeth Warnock. 1965/1995. Guests of the Sheikh: Ethnography of an Iraqi        Village.  New York: Anchor Books.

 

Weinreb, Amelia Rosenberg. 2009.  Cuba in the Shadow of Change: Daily Life in the Twilight

            of the Revolution. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

 

Miles, Ann. 2004. From Cuenca to Queens: An Anthropological Story of    Transnational             Migration. Austin: University of Texas Press

 

Knauft. Bruce. 2009. The Gebusi: Lives Transformed by a Rainforest World (second         Edition). New York: McGraw-Hill

 

Moffatt, Michael. 1989.  Coming of Age in New Jersey: College and American Culture    Rutgers University Press

 

Begeant, Joe. 2008. Deer Hunting With Jesus: Dispatches from America's Class War. New           York: Three Rivers Press.

 

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  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
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