Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Edgardo M. Latrubesse


ProfessorPh.D., National University of San Luis, Argentina

Professor, Department of Geography and the Environment
Edgardo M. Latrubesse

Contact

Interests


Geomorphology; large rivers; large plain; human impacts; basin management; Quaternary paleoenvironments

Courses


GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

36590 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.402

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 396T • Shaping Earth: Adv Geomorph

36755 • Spring 2016
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CLA 3.710

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

This course examines the processes that shape the Earth landforms with focus on continental environments. Advanced concepts on key topics (theoretical and applied) are discussed.  Students are exposed to relevant concepts in geomorphology, as well as analytical skills for conducting advanced geomorphic analysis. A major goal of the course is for students to understand the practical value of possessing knowledge of geomorphology, especially for understanding landscapes components, functioning and evolution.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

36450 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.402

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 338C • Riv/Landscp: Fluvial Geomorph

37575 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 3.102

GRG 338C RIV/LANDSCP: FLUVIAL GEOMORPH

Drainage basin evolution and channel adjustment, variability of river systems in differing geomorphic regimes, relationships between fluvial systems and other components of physical geography, and the role of humans as geomorphic agents.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401, or the equivalent.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

37580 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.402

GRG 339 PROCESS GEOMORPHOLOGY

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 373K • Fld Meths Lndscp Charactrzatn

37870 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 3.102

The design of research questions and the acquisition of data for the characterization of landscapes. Utilizes geographical and ecological field-based methods.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Geography 301C or the equivalent.

GRG 396T • Shaping Earth: Adv Geomorph

37925 • Spring 2014
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM CLA 4.106

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic description: The framework of the geotectonic and climatic organization of tropical landscapes (mountains, rivers, forests and savannas) and the effect of Quaternary changes and their consequences on biodiversity and biogeographic patterns.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

37825 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.402

This course examines the processes that shape the Earth landforms. We will consider the major components of geomorphology, including fluvial, glacial, periglacial, aeolian, slope, and weathering processes. Students will be exposed to fundamental concepts in geomorphology, as well as analytical skills for conducting geomorphic analysis. Particular attention is given to understanding the variability of geomorphic process and form to anthropogenic and climatic controls. A major goal of the course is for students to understand the practical value of possessing knowledge of geomorphology, especially for understanding environmental change.

LAS 330 • Envir Chng/Mgmt Of Large River

40790 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.108
(also listed as GRG 356T)

Large rivers are essential to global environments and require an interdisciplinary analysis. This course provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the physical processes and of large rivers. Because many of the largest rivers are located in the tropics, the course will emphasize large tropical rivers, particularly in South America.  The course will stress the importance of considering geologic and human controls on fluvial systems and the challenges for management. The course exposes students to both theoretical and applied fluvial geomorphology, and students will gain exposure to basic skills used to analyze fluvial systems through reading discussions and laboratory assignments. Specific topics to include land degradation, deforestation, river engineering, flood processes, sedimentology; floodplains management, ecohydrology, Quaternary fluvial geomorphology and paleohydrology. 

GRG 373K • Fld Meths Lndscp Charactrzatn

37575 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 3.102

GRG 396T • Physcl Geog Of Global Tropics

37630 • Spring 2013
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM CLA 3.106

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic description: Aspects of soil geomorphology: soil formation, earth surface processes (erosion, sedimentation, and salinization) soil sustai nability, and landscape interactions in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and t he American Corn Belt. Will explore management and policy, soil interact ions in watersheds, and field and laboratory methods through readings, l abs, and field trips.

MEETS WITH LAS 388.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

37390 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PHR 2.116

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 356T • Envir Chng/Mgmt Of Large River

37420 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GRG 408

Please check back for updates.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

37210-37250 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAI 3.02

This course is called The Natural Environment, and focuses on the study of the general structure and functioning of Earth with emphasis on the physical processes that create and modify landscapes of continental areas.

GRG 396T • Physcl Geog Of Global Tropics

37495 • Spring 2012
Meets T 7:00PM-10:00PM GRG 408

Course Description

The tropics are fundamental at a global scale in terms of water, mineral, biological resources and biodiversity. They are also unique in terms of landscape evolution. Because they have acted as a sort of last environmental frontier, the tropics have been suffering most dramatically with recent environmental human impacts in Earth. This course provides a fundamental but advanced understanding on the Physical Geography of the Global Tropics. The framework of the geotectonic, climatic, organization through the geologic times of the tropical landscapes (mountains, rivers, forests and savannas, etc) across the world will be provided. Additionally we will discuss the effect of Quaternary climatic changes and their consequences on biodiversity and bio-geographic patterns. Considering that the major equatorial forest is located in South America, some emphasis will be provided on the Amazon and other South American tropical areas.

GRG 373K • Fld Meths Lndscp Charactrzatn

37445 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GRG 316

Landscape is a fundamental concept in Geography and Environmental Sciences. Landscape analysis enclose techniques and methods from a complex body of sciences and disciplines such as geographers, ecologists, geoscientists, hydrologists, socio-economists, planners among others

The identification and mapping of land units is a main objective in landscape analysis and fluvial watersheds are the more versatile unit to consider because of different reasons: a) it is easily delimited in the space, b) the limits are “natural;  3) it can be modeled as an open physical system whit inputs and outputs  of matter and energy. For those and other reasons, fluvial basins have been a key unit for management of natural resources and environmental planning.

In this course the students are trained on several field and laboratory methods and techniques used to characterize the flux of matter (water and sediments) through a fluvial basin and on the application of these methods in landscape analysis. Specific topics include field methods and lab techniques on water discharge estimations, sampling, sediment characterization, sediment transport, hydrochemistry, vegetation cover, land use trends data, etc.  Students have the opportunity of participating of field surveys and laboratory practices.

LAS 330 • Envir Chng/Mgmt Of Large River

40150 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GRG 408
(also listed as GRG 356T)

Large rivers are essential to global environments and require an interdisciplinary analysis. This course provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the physical geography of large rivers. Because many of the largest rivers are located in the tropics, the course will emphasize large tropical rivers, particularly in South America.  The course will stress the importance of considering geologic and human controls on fluvial systems and the challenges for management. The course exposes students to both theoretical and applied fluvial geomorphology, and students will gain exposure to basic skills used to analyze fluvial systems through reading discussions and laboratory assignments. Specific topics to include land degradation, deforestation, river engineering, flood processes, sedimentology; floodplains management, ecohydrology, Quaternary fluvial geomorphology and paleohydrology.

GRG 301C • The Natural Environment

37440-37480 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAI 3.02

This course is called The Natural Environment, and focuses on the study of the general structure and functioning of Earth with emphasis on the physical processes that create and modify landscapes of continental areas.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

37580 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GRG 316

This course examines the processes that shape the Earth landforms. We will consider the major components of geomorphology, including fluvial, glacial, periglacial, aeolian, slope, coastal, and weathering processes. Students will be exposed to fundamental concepts in geomorphology, as well as analytical skills for conducting geomorphic analysis. Particular attention is given to understanding the variability of geomorphic process and form to anthropogenic and climatic controls. A major goal of the course is for students to understand the practical value of possessing knowledge of geomorphology, especially for understanding environmental change.

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

37160 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GRG 316

 Fall 2010- GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology 

Instructor: Dr. Edgardo Latrubesse- Associate Professor- GRG 402- (latrubesse@austin.utexas.edu )- phone:    

Office  hours: Tuesday 10:00 AM-11:AM

Teaching Assistant: Maraigh Leitch, PhD Student, Department of Geography and the Environment, (maraighleitch@gmail.com )

Unique

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

37355

TTh

11:00 AM-12:30 PM

GRG 316 and EIS Lab 302

Latrubesse

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

Course Description

This course examines the processes that shape the Earth landforms. We will consider the major components of geomorphology, including fluvial, glacial, periglacial, aeolian, slope, coastal, and weathering processes. Students will be exposed to fundamental concepts in geomorphology, as well as analytical skills for conducting geomorphic analysis. Particular attention is given to understanding the variability of geomorphic process and form to anthropogenic and climatic controls. A major goal of the course is for students to understand the practical value of possessing knowledge of geomorphology, especially for understanding environmental change.

Labs

There are laboratory assignments/exercises for each theme. We will review the material and the methods for each lab, and I will either make the data available, or indicate where it may be obtained. Each lab will involve basic data analysis, and a short write-up of the results. Students must work with a partner. Google Earth will be a main source for labs. Labs will take place mainly at the EIS-302 lab, Geography Building (GRG).  This facility contains about 26 Workstation computers for remote sensing interpretation and processing.

Field trip

The course includes an optional one-day field trip around Austin. It will happen during a Saturday from 9AM to 5PM: We will discuss the specifics and logistics at the appropriate time in the semester. The Department will subsidize the transportation.

Term Paper

Graduate students will complete an in-depth (3,000 - 4,000 words) term paper on an approved topic. The paper is due Thursday, December 2th. The paper must adhere to a journal format, and include appropriate references, tables, and figures. The paper should involve original research and data analysis, but not necessarily field work. Importantly, the paper must include an in-depth literature review and the identification of a specific problem in fluvial geomorphology. This may include thesis or dissertation topics if relevant to the course content. If you do not have a firm paper topic, see me for possible topics.

Course management

Course materials and grade will be posted on Blackboard. Students are required to consult this website frequently.  Selected materials from different textbooks and pdf versions of power points presentations will be provided through Blackboard.

Policies

a) Attendance

This course is intensive and relatively complex. This is due, primarily, to the amount of topics and material to be covered during the semester.  You are required to attend all classes and arrive on time. It is, therefore, my philosophy that your success in this course will surely vary directly with your class attendance. Be aware of the fact that attendance will be taken on a daily basis and this information can be used in the computation of your final class grade (see Grading policy below). Do not routinely arrive 5 minutes late to class with the excuse that parking was a problem (the obvious solution is to routinely depart 5 minutes earlier).

Lateness: Late labs and papers will be assessed as part of your participation and commitment.  Laptops are NOT allowed except with prior permission and in exceptional situations.   

b) Academic Integrity  

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility.

Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. Each student in this course is expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code (see University guidelines on Academic Dishonesty (section 11-802).
In this class, there is zero tolerance for students who violate university rules on scholastic dishonesty with all suspected cases turned over to the University’s Dean of Students office. Penalties for scholastic include possibility of failure of course and dismissal from the University. Since dishonesty harms the individual, fellow students and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be STRICTLY ENFORCED in this class. Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. Using other person’s work without appropriate citation is plagiarism.

Disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Present the letter to the professor at the beginning of the semester so that needed accommodations can be discussed. The student should remind the professor of any testing accommodations no later than five business days before an exam. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641. http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

Grading Policy

Undergrads: Grades will be assigned on the plus and minus scale (A-, B+ and so forth). We will apply 3 Exams @ 33.3% each. The professor can provide a 6% bonus on the exams grade, taking into consideration the level of participation and commitment of the student with the course. It will not affect in a negative way the grade obtained by exams.

Graduate students: 3 Exams @ 25% each, term paper at 25%

Examination Absence Policy

If you miss any exam, and you have a valid written excuse, you will be given an opportunity to make up a similar exam but with different questions or approach that previously applied. In order to be allowed to makeup the exam you will need to present to Prof. Latrubesse a copy of a valid written excuse. If you miss more than one exam due to valid written excuses, you may be asked to take an incomplete and to complete the course requirements the following semester.

What is a valid written excuse?

- Doctor’s note. This note should specifically say that you were unable to come to class because of a verified illness. It must be signed.

- Note from athletic department, music department, etc. asking for an excuse due to a university function. These notes need to be presented well before the exam.

-  Military Service activation note.

-  Trial or jury duty note.

-  Religious holy day. Religious holy day conflicts must be brought to the attention of Prof. Latrubesse in advance.  Please check the syllabus calendar to be sure that your religious holy days don’t conflict with exams. If there is a conflict: please provide a written, signed request before the end of the second week of class.

- If you do not have a valid excuse, you will receive a zero for that exam.

? All notes must be on letterhead, signed, include a contact name and phone number.

 Texts

Course readings will include the text, as well as readings and figures. Selected materials from different textbooks and pdf versions of power points presentations will be provided through Blackboard.  It is my philosophy that an experienced professor with a strong background on research does not necessarily follows and uses a textbook but contributes to student education transmitting his own experience to the students  and discussing a variety of sources from the specialized literature.  It is essential that you read prior to coming to class so that you may contribute to class discussions.


Recommended books (but not exclusive textbooks)

Ritter, D.F., Kochel, R.C., and Miller, J.R. 2002. Process Geomorphology, 4th ed., Waveland Press.

Summerfield, M, 1997. Global Geomorphology, Logman Ed.

UT POLICY ON EMAIL NOTIFICATION

Instructor to student email is a recognized and accepted form of official communication here at the University of Texas. For the University policy, read this. It is critically important that (1) you make sure to have your current and most frequently checked email address on file in UT Direct and (2) you check it on a daily basis. I will send class email frequently during the semester and you'll be given updates and notices in references to lectures as well as exams.

Religious Holidays

By UT Austin policy, students must notify the professor of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day in special if it is coincident with the date of a test. 

Office Hours

My office hours this semester are Tuesdays 10:00AM-11:00PM. You may also arrange to meet with me at another time by e-mailing me to set up an appointment.

Calendar-Activities (it can be slightly modified suffering minor adjustments)

AUGUST

GRG 316

Exercises-  Lab

Thursday 26

Introduction-planning-definitions-planned activities

 

Monday 31

Geomorphology: main concepts-Geomorphologic systems. processes, agents, proxies, etc.

 

SEPTEMBER

 

 

Thursday 2st

Global Tectonics Geomorphology

 

Tuesday 7

Global Tectonics (final) and igneous landforms

 

Thursday 9

 

Exercise Tectonic

Tuesday 14

Weathering: concepts. Physical and biological weathering

 

Thursday 16

Chemical weathering  (including Karst)

 

Tuesday 21

Mass wasting- slope processes

 

Thursday 23

Fluvial processes- drainage networks

 

Tuesday 28

 

Exercise mass wasting-

Thursday 30

 

TEST 1 (Tectonic-Weathering and Mass Wasting)

OCTOBER

 

 

Tuesday 5

Fluvial processes-channel patterns

 

Thursday 7

 

Exercise fluvial (drainage patterns morphometry)

Tuesday  12

 

Exercise fluvial (channel patterns-hydrology)

Thursday 14

Fluvial processes-floodplains and terraces

 

Tuesday 19

 

Exercise fluvial (floodplains-terraces)

Thursday 21

Aeolian processes-inbtroduction and erosional landforms

 

Tuesday 26

Aeolian deposits and landforms

 

Thursday 28

 

Exercise on aeolian landforms

SATURDAY 30

Field work (from 9AM-to 5PM)

 

NOVEMBER

 

 

Tuesday 2

 

TEST 2 (Fluvial and Eolian processes and landforms)

Thursday 4

Periglacial

 

Tuesday 9

Glacial

 

Thursday 11

 

Exercise glacial-periglacial

Tuesday 16

Coastal

 

Thursday 18

Optional Review-field “compensatory day”

 

Thursday 23

 

TEST 3 (Glacial-Periglacial-Coastal processes and landforms)

Thursday 25

THANKS GIVING

 

Thursday 30

Long term landscape development

 

DECEMBER

 

 

Thursday 2

Applied Geomorphology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRG 396T • Physcl Geog Of Global Tropics

37310 • Fall 2010
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM GRG 408

Fall 2010- GRG 396T • The Physical Geography of the Global Tropics

Instructor: Dr. Edgardo Latrubesse- Associate Professor- GRG 402- (latrubesse@austin.utexas.edu )- phone:    512-2321592

Office  hours: Tuesday 9:00: AM-10:00AM

Unique

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

 

T

4:00PM-7:00 PM

GRG

Latrubesse

Course Description

The tropics are fundamental at a global scale in terms of water, mineral, biological resources and biodiversity. They are also unique in terms of landscape evolution. Because they have acted as a sort of last environmental frontier, the tropics have been suffering most dramatically with recent environmental human impacts in Earth. This course provides a fundamental but advanced understanding on the Physical Geography of the Global Tropics. The framework of the geotectonic, climatic, organization through the geologic times of the tropical landscapes (mountains, rivers, forests and savannas, etc) across the world will be provided. Additionally we will discuss the effect of Quaternary climatic changes and their consequences on biodiversity and bio-geographic patterns. Considering that the major equatorial forest is located in South America, some emphasis will be provided on the Amazon and other South American tropical areas.

The role of the tropics in terms of erosion, production, and the transference of sediments and nutrients to the ocean and related human impacts will also be addressed. The geoenvironmental impacts produced by human activities (land use impact, loss of biodiversity, water resources impacts, etc) will be analyzed.

Term Paper

Graduate students will complete an in-depth (3,000 - 4,000 words) term paper on an approved topic. The paper is due Thursday, December 2th. The paper must adhere to a journal format, and include appropriate references, tables, and figures. The paper should involve original research and data analysis, but not necessarily field work. Importantly, the paper must include an in-depth literature review and the identification of a specific problem on tropical physical geography. This may include thesis or dissertation topics if relevant to the course content.

Course management

Course materials and grade will be posted on Blackboard. Students are required to consult this website frequently.  Selected materials from different textbooks, articles from specialized journals and pdf versions of power points presentations will be provided through Blackboard.

Policies

a) Attendance

This course is intensive, overlaps a variety of disciplines and is relatively complex. This is due, primarily, to the amount of topics and material to be covered during the semester.  You are required to attend all classes and arrive on time. It is, therefore, my philosophy that your success in this course will surely vary directly with your class attendance. Be aware of the fact that attendance will be taken on a daily basis and this information can be used in the computation of your final class grade (see Grading policy below). Do not routinely arrive 5 minutes late to class with the excuse that parking was a problem (the obvious solution is to routinely depart 5 minutes earlier).

Laptops are allowed but with prior permission by the professor.

b) Academic Integrity  

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility.

Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. Each student in this course is expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code (see University guidelines on Academic Dishonesty (section 11-802).
In this class, there is zero tolerance for students who violate university rules on scholastic dishonesty with all suspected cases turned over to the University’s Dean of Students office. Penalties for scholastic include possibility of failure of course and dismissal from the University. Since dishonesty harms the individual, fellow students and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be STRICTLY ENFORCED in this class. Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. Using other person’s work without appropriate citation is plagiarism.

Disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Present the letter to the professor at the beginning of the semester so that needed accommodations can be discussed. The student should remind the professor of any testing accommodations no later than five business days before an exam. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641. http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

Grading Policy

Undergrads: Grades will be assigned on the plus and minus scale (A-, B+ and so forth). The students will present, orally, two individual seminars in front of the class (30%each). Additionally a 30% will be assigned to the term paper.  The professor will provide a 10% of the total grade taking into consideration the level of participation and commitment of the student with the course.

Examination Absence Policy

If you miss any seminar, and you have a valid written excuse, you will be given an opportunity to make up a similar seminar but with different questions or approach that previously applied. In order to be allowed to makeup the seminar you will need to present to Prof. Latrubesse a copy of a valid written excuse. If you miss more than one seminar due to valid written excuses, you may be asked to take an incomplete and to complete the course requirements the following semester.

If you do not have a valid excuse, you will receive a zero for that seminar.

? All notes must be on letterhead, signed, include a contact name and phone number. 

Texts

Course readings will include the text, as well as readings and figures. Selected materials from different textbooks , specialized peer reviewed journals and pdf versions of power points presentations will be provided through Blackboard.  It is my philosophy that an experienced professor with a strong background on research does not necessarily follows and uses a textbook but contributes to student education transmitting his own experience to the students and discussing a variety of sources from the specialized literature.  It is essential that you read prior to coming to class so that you may contribute to class discussions.


Recommended books (but not exclusive textbooks)

Adams, W., Goudie, A. and Orme, A. 1999. The Physical Geography of Africa. Oxford University Press, 429p.

Gupta, A. 2005. The Physical Geography of Southeast Asia, Oxford University Press, 898p.

Veblen, T. Young, K., Orme, A. The Physical Geography of South America, Oxford University Press, 361p.

UT POLICY ON EMAIL NOTIFICATION

Instructor to student email is a recognized and accepted form of official communication here at the University of Texas. For the University policy, read this. It is critically important that (1) you make sure to have your current and most frequently checked email address on file in UT Direct and (2) you check it on a daily basis. I will send class email frequently during the semester and you'll be given updates and notices in references to lectures as well as exams. 

Religious Holidays

By UT Austin policy, students must notify the professor of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day in special if it is coincident with the date of a test.

Office Hours

My office hours this semester are Tuesdays 9:00AM-10:00PM. You may also arrange to meet with me at another time by e-mailing me to set up an appointment.

 

GRG 339 • Process Geomorphology

37355 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GRG 312

Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and credit or registration for Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401.

GRG 356T • Envir Chng/Mgmt Of Large River

37358 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GRG 316

Please check back for updates.

GRG 356T • Envir Chng/Mgmt Of Large River

37795 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GRG 312

Please check back for updates.

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712