Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

M. Rafael Salaberry


ProfessorPh.D.-Spanish Applied Linguistics, Cornell University

Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
M. Rafael Salaberry

Contact

Courses


SPN S367K • Business Spanish-Spn

89115 • Summer 2012

Summer 2012 Course Description

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

 

Course Number: SPN 367K

Course Title: Business Spanish: Language and interaction

Instructor Name: Salaberry

Instructor Title: Professor

 

Description:

Español 367K es un curso de fines específicos dirigido a los estudiantes que quieran desarrollar sus conocimientos del español centrándose en el campo específico de la interacción social en la economía y los negocios.

Para participar en el curso es necesario tener un nivel de español intermedio.

Todos los contenidos temáticos irán acompañados de un objetivo lingüístico, gramatical o dirigido a mejorar una de las cuatro destrezas.

 

 Los objetivos generales del curso están enfocados en:

  • Desarrollar las estrategias lingüísticas necesarias para desenvolverse en el mundo empresarial del ámbito hispano.
  • Desarrollar capacidades de auto-aprendizaje a fin de que en el futuro puedan enriquecerse en todas las situaciones que les ofrezca su ámbito laboral.
  • Familiarizarse con el momento actual de la economía española y de Cantabria que es la región donde sucede el curso.
  • Visitar y conocer algunas empresas y empresarios de la región a fin de comparar con el mundo empresarial de los Estados Unidos y enriquecerse con otras culturas y otros sistemas de trabajo.

 

Texts:  

Required: Olga Juan y otros. En Equipo 3. Editorial Edinumen

Recommended: Un diccionario de español inglés.                       

Detlev Wagner, Neus Sans ; Mil palabras de Negocios. Ed. Difusión.

 

Grading:  

2 exámenes                  (2)                                                                   30%

Tareas sobre las visitas            (3)                                                       30%

Participación en las visitas y en la clase                                               15%

Examen final                                                                                        25%

 

 

SPN 383N • Cognitv Appro To Sec Lang Acqu

46665 • Spring 2012
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM BEN 1.118

DESCRIPTION:

A complete theory of SLA must address two separate dimensions of acquisition: a property theory (representation of the construct), and a transition theory (development through stages) (e.g., Ellis, 1998; Gregg, 1993). But how do these sub-theories become a single, unified theory? That is, even if we accept that language knowledge is modular and encapsulated, such linguistic knowledge interacts with other components of our cognitive apparatus. This dilemma is typically encountered when we discuss interfaces of different types of knowledge, as is the case of the discourse-semantics-syntax interface.

This course will focus on the analysis of the theoretical tenets and empirical evidence that substantiate the use of cognitive-based models to understand second language acquisition as a unified property and transition theory. The main theoretical frameworks to be analyzed are Cognitive linguistics (e.g., Langacker, 1999; Robinson & Ellis, 2008), Functional linguistics (e.g., Bybee, 2010; Pütz, & Sicola, 2010), Constructionism (e.g., Tomasello, 2003), and complex-adaptive systems (Ellis & Larsen-Freeman, 2009). These models will be further analyzed in contrast with the claims and empirical evidence from strictly linguistic-modular hypotheses.

COURSE PRE-REQUISITES:

Introduction to SLA

GRADING:

10%:    Class participation.

10%:    Discussion leader of one reading.

30%:    Two in-class exams.

10%:    Final Paper Proposal: (2-4 pages double-space, 12 pt.).

40%:    Final Paper: (20-25 pages double-space, 12 pt.).

TEXTBOOKS AND/OR CLASS MATERIALS:

Bybee, J. (2010). Language, Usage and Cognition. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Ellis, N., & Larsen-Freeman, D. (2009). Language as a Complex Adaptive System. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Langacker, R. (1999). Grammar and Conceptualization. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Pütz, M., & Sicola, L. (2010). Cognitive Processing in Second Language Acquisition: Inside the learner's mind. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: Benjamins.

Robinson, P., & Ellis, N. (2008). Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition. New York, NY: Routledge.

Tomasello, M. (2003). Constructing a Language: A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition. Harvard, MA: Harvard University Press.

SPN 398T • Supervised Teaching In Spanish

46660 • Fall 2011
Meets W 10:00AM-1:00PM BEN 1.118

Rationale:

Second language (L2) teaching may be considered both art and science. The latter perspective seeks to understand the learning process, the former attempts to facilitate learning. This course will try to integrate both aspects of second language teaching.

 

Objectives:

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students in Spanish and Portuguese with theoretical AND practical knowledge about L2 teaching. Thus, the 398T seminar focuses on both professional development and hands-on teacher training. This dual focus addresses the demands of an increasingly difficult job market and the need of our programs to increase the chances that our students will be hired in strategic positions in the nation and abroad. The specific objectives of the course are:

  1. To acquire practical experience with language teaching at the college level
  2. To acquire a critical, reflective attitude with respect to one's own teaching
  3. To become familiar with some second language acquisition approaches
  4. To take the first steps towards the creation of a teaching portfolio for future professional development

SPN F611D • Intermediate Spanish II-Arg

88995 • Summer 2011

The University of Texas at Austin                                                

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

                                                 Taught in Buenos Aires, Argentina

SPANISH 611 D –SUMMER 2012

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

  • This document contains important information and represents an agreement between the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and its students.
  • You are responsible for knowing all of the information contained in this document.
  • You indicate acceptance of these policies by registering for this course.

 

 

1.  PURPOSE, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES OF THE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

The objective of the Spanish language program addresses the basic tenet of a liberal arts education: the development of a critical thinking approach towards the analysis of language in society. This objective is framed in an overall worldwide trend towards political and economical internationalization and an increasingly diverse and multicultural work environment.

 

The Spanish language program focuses on the development of multilingual literacies through the analysis and use of Spanish as a second language. The program focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

 

(1)  linguistic competence (Spanish phonetics/phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2)  communication / interactional competence (sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background / perspectives)

(3)  metalinguistic competence (language as a conceptual, symbolic system)

 

 

2.  COURSE DESCRIPTION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

A. SPN 611D is the third course in The University of Texas lower-division Spanish program. This is a six-credit course.  The course focuses on further developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish while building vocabulary, learning basic rules and terminology of Spanish grammar, and gaining a better understanding of Hispanic cultures in order to communicate in an accurate, effective, and informed manner within a variety of sociocultural situations.

 

B. PREREQUISITE FOR 611D: the prerequisite for this course is a passing grade (C or better) in SPN 610 D, equivalent credit transferred from another university, or credit by exam. If you do not have the prerequisite, please drop the course now. For questions concerning prerequisites or eligibility, talk to your instructor or make an appointment with one of the Liberal Arts Advisors for Spanish: Liz Hastings (eyhastings@mail.utexas.edu) and Christine Fisher (fisher@mail.utexas.edu).  Their office is located in BEN 2.108.

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. GOALS FOR SPN 611 D

By the end of this course you should be able to do the following:

 

(a) describing in detail 

(b) narrating in the  past

(c) narrating past events and reacting subjectively to them

(d) expressing opinions and reacting to dramatic events and situations

(e) reporting what other people said

(f) discussing past actions affecting the present

(g) recognizing dialectal, social and contextual variation

(h) talking about actions completed before other past actions

(i) talking about hypothetical situations in the future or past

(j) understanding the main ideas in moderately complex written texts (with improved skimming, cognate recognition, and inference skills)

(k) understanding the main ideas of  moderately complex oral discourse (with improved recognition of tone, content, context, intonation, etc.)

(l) maintaining conversations of a substantial length (with improved fluency strategies, such as circumlocution, discourse markers, etc.)

(m) producing written work of a substantial length (with improved organization, connectors, and appropriateness of register)

SPN F322K • Civilizatn Of Spanish Amer-Arg

89010 • Summer 2011

 

SPAN 322K/LAS 370S: Civilization of Spanish America

 

Summer (first) 2012                                                                 Instructor: L.E. Porto, Ph.D.

                                                                                                Office/Hrs: BEN 1.114;

 

Description:

 

To grab at a composite is to overlook the particulate. And yet, in order to deal with systems, histories, identities... even language as a semi-stable continuum, we must grab at composites. In our case, as we embark upon the study of a so-called Spanish American Civilization, we are certainly at risk of over-extension, as the contours and constituents of this space are—in spatial, temporal, and qualitative terms—quite vast. The designated space points to “established” cultures which are, in the strictest sense, well over 3200 years old, to more than 360 million living human beings who make their homes in 18 countries (and the “Estado Libre Asociado” of Puerto Rico) which spread across 8.6 million miles2 (22.3 million km2) and range from the wettest lands on Earth (the Chocó region of Pacific Coastal Colombia) to the driest (Atacama Desert in Chile), from the largest tropical rain forest on Earth (Amazon) to the glaciers of Patagonia. The people of this vast space represent hundreds of ethnic and linguistic groups; and though the ethnicities are too many and too diverse to mention, the major indigenous and African linguistic groups are Tupi-Guarani in south-central South America, Maya (Cakchiquel, Kekchi, Mam, Quiché, or Yucatec) throughout Central America, Aymara in Bolivia, Quechua in Peru, Nahuatl in Mexico, and Yoruba in Cuba.

      Even this most cursory depiction of the vastness of Spanish America already presents the complexity of our subject. Our positioning vis-à-vis this course, therefore, will actually be where we most often reside in consciousness: between narrative and specimen; that is, between a story that “makes sense” and the details which seem to be left out of the seemingly complete jig-saw puzzle, between a sense of describable identity and a slew of idiosyncratic traits.

      Why then, or how, can we speak of a Spanish American Civilization? Leaving aside the fact that we have probably engaged in the common practice of “othering” the unknown, there is also the fact that the region has undergone four distinct periods or processes: i) a time before European domination; ii) the period of conquest and colonization; iii) the period of national independence; and iv) a “modern” and, in a more complex sense, post-modern period. Though these categories may not look all that different from the periods and processes that occurred to the north, the particular ways that they were experienced in Spanish America certainly did differ. Also, the region differs markedly from the rest of the Americas by way of its predominantly Hispanic and Portuguese cultural heritage, its predominantly Catholic religious culture, and a judicial system based in Roman Law.

 

 

The lectures and discussions will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Very rarely, a particular topic or text may warrant a brief switching into English, but only rarely. On the other hand, you will note that a few readings are in English—these were either originally written in English, in a third language (i.e., Quiché or French), or are too long to include in Spanish. Students are responsible for completing the assigned readings before each class.

 

 

Important: If you have any questions or concerns regarding these qualifications, or if any other concerns arise during the semester, please see me in my office immediately to discuss them. Remember that summer classes cover a lot of material in a brief amount of time, so the sooner we discuss your concerns, the better.

 

 

Texts/Class Materials:

Required: Course Packet, Spanish American Civilization, Porto; available at Jenn’s Copies (22nd /Guadalupe)

 

Grading Criteria:

Participation: 10%

Weekly Topic Report; 5 x 3 15%

Weekly Topic Presentation: 5%

Midterm Exam: 30%

Final Exam: 40%

SPN F327G • Adv Grammar & Compositn I-Arg

89030 • Summer 2011

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

SPANISH 327 G-Advanced Grammar and Composition I

Summer 2012

 

This document contains important information and represents an agreement between the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and its students. You indicate acceptance of these policies by registering for this course.  Read it carefully and refer to it frequently. You are responsible for knowing all of the information in it. Please note especially the sections on Academic Honesty and the Attendance Policy.

 

INSTRUCTOR:                      Irma Celina Nevárez-Carter

COURSE TITLE:                    Advanced Grammar and Composition I

MEETING TIME / PLACE:     M-F 10:00-11:30 / MEZ 2.118

E-MAIL:                                  celina@austin.utexas.edu

OFFICE:                                 MEZ 4.108

OFFICE HOURS:                  MWF 9:30-10:00 and 11:30-12:00

PHONE:                                 471-1686                    

 

 

1. COURSE PURPOSE, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

 

The language program at The University of Texas focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

 

(1)  linguistic competence (linguistic proficiency in Spanish including knowledge of phonetics/phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2)  communication/ interactional competence (communicative abilities in Spanish including knowledge of sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background/perspectives)

(3)  metalinguistic competence (awareness of language as a conceptual, symbolic  system)

 

Within the language program, SPN 327G is the first in the Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition two-course sequence. It is a bridge course between lower and upper-division Spanish designed to

  • help you inductively master grammar points of particular concern to speakers of English
  • perfect your grammar skills through a variety of tasks designed to clarify grammatical points, including oral, reading, and writing activities
  • acquire and apply strategies of composition development (pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, and evaluation)
  • promote critical and integrative thinking skills.

 

This learner-based course will lead you through a “guided inductive approach” that presents you with selected samples to analyze in order to

  • discover patterns of oral and written discourse,
  • formulate hypotheses about the linguistic and communicative functions of the Spanish language
  • develop an understanding of Hispanic culture and literature.

 

All in-class activities, readings, movies, and assignments are in Spanish.

 

Expectations: This is a fifth-semester course designed to strengthen and advance your knowledge of Spanish. Students enrolled in this course are expected to

  • have mastered basic grammatical concepts (agreement; verb conjugations: present, past, future; pronouns)
  • understand indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods
  • read and write at a fourth-semester level or at an advanced proficiency level

If you are weak in any of these skills, it is your responsibility to study and master them and/or visit your instructor at the beginning and throughout the semester to help you reach the expected basic level that is necessary for you to understand and master advanced notions.

The course will be entirely taught in Spanish

 

2. PREREQUISITE

 

Spanish 312L, 612, or the equivalent with a grade of C. 

 

 

3. REQUIRED MATRIALS

 

 Iguina, Zulma and Dozier, Eleanor. Manual de gramática: Grammar Reference for

Students of Spanish. Fouth Edition: Thomson and Heinle.

 

SPN F345L • Intro Hispanic Linguistics-Arg

89055 • Summer 2011

SPN 345L:
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to successfully  describe and analyze sounds, words and phrases in Spanish. This course will introduce students to various subfields of linguistics, including:
·   Phonetics: nature and articulation of sounds
·   Phonology: organization and use of sounds to encode meaning
·   Morphology: internal structure of words
·   Syntax: principles underlying construction of phrases and sentences
·   Diachronic linguistics: processes involved in the evolution of language
·   Pragmatics: situational or contextual usage of language
·   Sociolinguistics: effects of society / social variables on language
·   Dialectology: linguistic variation corresponding to geographic distribution
Although this is an introductory linguistics course, it is not an introduction to basic aspects of the Spanish language. Therefore, students should enter the course with an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish as well as a familiarity with grammatical concepts. This is a very challenging course that requires strong analytical skills as well as a willingness to deal with a wide range of technical terminology, definitions, formalizations and abstract concepts.

SPN F327G • Adv Grammar & Compositn I-Spn

88490 • Summer 2010

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

SPANISH 327 G-Advanced Grammar and Composition I

Summer 2012

 

This document contains important information and represents an agreement between the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and its students. You indicate acceptance of these policies by registering for this course.  Read it carefully and refer to it frequently. You are responsible for knowing all of the information in it. Please note especially the sections on Academic Honesty and the Attendance Policy.

 

INSTRUCTOR:                      Irma Celina Nevárez-Carter

COURSE TITLE:                    Advanced Grammar and Composition I

MEETING TIME / PLACE:     M-F 10:00-11:30 / MEZ 2.118

E-MAIL:                                  celina@austin.utexas.edu

OFFICE:                                 MEZ 4.108

OFFICE HOURS:                  MWF 9:30-10:00 and 11:30-12:00

PHONE:                                 471-1686                    

 

 

1. COURSE PURPOSE, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

 

The language program at The University of Texas focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

 

(1)  linguistic competence (linguistic proficiency in Spanish including knowledge of phonetics/phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2)  communication/ interactional competence (communicative abilities in Spanish including knowledge of sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background/perspectives)

(3)  metalinguistic competence (awareness of language as a conceptual, symbolic  system)

 

Within the language program, SPN 327G is the first in the Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition two-course sequence. It is a bridge course between lower and upper-division Spanish designed to

  • help you inductively master grammar points of particular concern to speakers of English
  • perfect your grammar skills through a variety of tasks designed to clarify grammatical points, including oral, reading, and writing activities
  • acquire and apply strategies of composition development (pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, and evaluation)
  • promote critical and integrative thinking skills.

 

This learner-based course will lead you through a “guided inductive approach” that presents you with selected samples to analyze in order to

  • discover patterns of oral and written discourse,
  • formulate hypotheses about the linguistic and communicative functions of the Spanish language
  • develop an understanding of Hispanic culture and literature.

 

All in-class activities, readings, movies, and assignments are in Spanish.

 

Expectations: This is a fifth-semester course designed to strengthen and advance your knowledge of Spanish. Students enrolled in this course are expected to

  • have mastered basic grammatical concepts (agreement; verb conjugations: present, past, future; pronouns)
  • understand indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods
  • read and write at a fourth-semester level or at an advanced proficiency level

If you are weak in any of these skills, it is your responsibility to study and master them and/or visit your instructor at the beginning and throughout the semester to help you reach the expected basic level that is necessary for you to understand and master advanced notions.

The course will be entirely taught in Spanish

 

2. PREREQUISITE

 

Spanish 312L, 612, or the equivalent with a grade of C. 

 

 

3. REQUIRED MATRIALS

 

 Iguina, Zulma and Dozier, Eleanor. Manual de gramática: Grammar Reference for

Students of Spanish. Fouth Edition: Thomson and Heinle.

 

SPN S327G • Adv Grammar And Composition I

90145 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.122

Within the language program, SPN 327G is the first in the Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition two-course sequence. It is a bridge course between lower and upper-division Spanish designed to:

  • help you inductively master grammar points of particular concern to speakers of English
  • perfect your grammar skills through a variety of tasks designed to clarify and expand your knowledge about particular grammatical points. The oral, reading, and writing activities used to present the grammar offer relevant cultural knowledge that you will be expected to investigate and compare with your own culture.
  • acquire and apply strategies of composition development (pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, and evaluation), and
  • promote critical and integrative thinking skills.

 

This learner-based course will lead you through a guided inductive approach that presents you with selected samples to analyze in order to

  • discover patterns of oral and written discourse,
  • formulate hypotheses about the linguistic and communicative functions of the Spanish language, and
  • develop an understanding of Hispanic culture.

 

All in-class activities, readings, and assignments are in Spanish.

 

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  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712