Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Naomi Lindstrom


ProfessorPh. D., Arizona State University

Gale Family Foundation Professor in Jewish Arts and Culture; Professor, Department of Spanish & Portuguese
Naomi Lindstrom

Contact

Interests


Gender studies; Jewish studies; online scholarly resources; women's writing

Courses


LAS 370S • Fantastic Fiction Lat Amer

39750 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.212
(also listed as SPN 355)

Topic of Course: Short stories by South American writers that are either out-and-out fantastic or in some other way represent an alternative to realism.

LAS 370S • Latin American Jewish Writers

40880 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.122
(also listed as SPN 352)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers, filmmakers, and other creators from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English, in addition to relevant films. Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

            One of the requirements of the class is to write a term paper of at least 1700 words (approximately 6-7 pages in normal-size type) on a topic not covered in the syllabus.  Each student will need to analyze literary works that are not in the course readings, although other writings by the same author may appear in the syllabus.  Any student with a reading knowledge of Portuguese is welcome to write his or her term paper on a Brazilian Jewish writer. The alternative to writing a literary analysis for the term paper is to research and write a paper on a Latin American Jewish creative figure working in some other medium, such as a painter, sculptor, or film director.  

SPN 380K • Spanish Amer Writing & Gender

46935 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.118

Description

This course involves reading selected Spanish American narrative works that have especially attracted critics with a feminist or genre approach. We will read the primary texts together with relevant examples of criticism on those works. The purposes of the course are: to read some important works of Spanish American narrative, to examine some of the main currents in feminist and gender studies of literature, and to practice evaluating literary criticism.

Required Readings

Course packet with critical articles on the primary works read for the course as well as some more general articles on feminist criticism and gender studies of Spanish American writing.

Tentative list of primary works (some of these may need to be replaced if available editions cannot be located)

Avellaneda, Sab 

Gorriti, Sueños y realidades

De la Parra, Ifigenia: Diario de una señorita que escribió porque se fastidiaba

Puig, El beso de la mujer araña 

Ferré, Papeles de Pandora

Santos-Febres, Sirena Selena vestida de pena

 

Required Activities and Grading Criteria:

Each member of the class will write a term paper of approximately 4200 words (17 pages), which will analyze a work or works of Spanish American literature from some feminist or gender-studies perspective.  While all the works read in common by the students in the course are narrative prose, the term papers can focus on texts in any literary genre or on testimonios.

Term paper topics that go beyond these guidelines may be accepted, but before proposing such a topic the student must consult with the instructor to see how the topic can fit into the course.

Detailed proposal for paper, 35%

Final version of term paper, 60%

Attendance and participation, 5%

 

LAS 370S • Latin American Jewish Writers

40310 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A207A
(also listed as SPN 352)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries. The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English. Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

LAS 392S • Spanish Am Narratv/Critcl Anly

40510 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.118
(also listed as SPN 380K)

Nature of Course:  General.  Please note that it is a course not only on Spanish American narrative but also on literary and cultural criticism.

In this course, we will examine five significant works of Spanish American narrative and a sampling of recent critical commentary on these texts.  The five texts, all of which have been attracting considerable critical study in recent years, represent Spanish American writing of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. The emphasis of the course is not so much on introducing the narrative works as on examining varying critical approaches to a given text and how problems or issues in literary research are identified, explored, and, in many cases, abandoned in favor of newer perspectives.  A closely related issue is how literary and cultural criticism is assessed and what is meant by such evaluative terms as “well written, “original,” “coherent,” and “based on sound scholarship.”

Each student will be required to write a term paper of 17-20 pages. The approach must be metacritical, surveying and analyzing a particular problem or question in the scholarship on a given text.  The text may be either a literary work or some other type of cultural artifact.  The term paper cannot be first and foremost a textual analysis; its primary focus must be a current problem in literary and cultural research and commentary.

Grading Criteria:

term paper:  proposal, 30% of final grade

final version:  60% of final grade (17-22 pages double spaced and following either MLA or Chicago bibliographic style)

reports in class, 10%

Provisional list of readings:

Each primary text will be read together with a number of critical articles, which will be collected in a course packet.

Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Sab

María Luisa Bombal, La última niebla, “El árbol,” “Las islas nuevas”

Alejo Carpentier, Los pasos perdidos

Mayra Santos Febres, Sirena Selena vestida de pena

Santiago Gamboa, El síndrome de Ulises

J S 363 • Latin American Jewish Writers

40010 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 210
(also listed as SPN 352)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries. The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English. Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

LAS 370S • Latin American Jewish Writers

40200 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as J S 363, SPN 352)

Course Title: Latin American Jewish Writers

Instructor Name: Naomi Lindstrom

 

Description:

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries.  We will also look briefly at the work of Spanish American (mostly Argentine) writers who have made aliyah and have created a Spanish-language literary scene within Israel.

Another secondary focus will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the short stories of Jorge Luis Borges.

No Brazilian works are included among the required readings because the course is offered in Spanish.  However, any student with a reading knowledge of Portuguese is welcome to write his or her term paper on a Brazilian Jewish writer.

 

Texts:

There will be a course packet containing essays, poetry, and short stories by Spanish American Jewish writers.  In addition, the class will read and discuss several novels,

which will be made available through the University Co-op.  The list below is still provisional because the texts need to be obtained from international suppliers.  If any text proves to be too difficult to order, it will be replaced.

Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

Glantz, Las genealogías

Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros

Goldemberg, La vida a plazos de don Jacobo Lerner

Freilich, Cláper

 

 

Grading: 

proposal for term paper 15%

midterm examination 25%

final version of term paper 27.5%

quizzes and participation 5%

final examination 27.5%

LAS 370S • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

40240 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.128
(also listed as SPN 325K)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism. Taught in Spanish.

LAS 370S • Latin American Jewish Writers

40920 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BEN 1.124
(also listed as SPN 352)

 

 

 

Fall 2009 Course Syllabus:    

 

Latin American Jewish Writers

 

SPN 352 (Unique 48170) JS 363 (Unique 40670) LAS 370S (Unique 40920)

 

Meets in:  BEN 1.124, MWF 11:00-11:50

 

Language of Instruction:  Spanish

 

Instructor:  Prof. Naomi Lindstrom

       voice mail:   232 4527

       e-mail:  lindstrom@austin.utexas.edu

       office:  BEN 4.116, M 2:30-3:30, W 2:30-3:30, Th 3-4

 

Required Texts: 

 

Should be at University Co-op.  In addition, there is a course packet.  You must purchase the packet because it contains required readings.  It is at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2200 Guadalupe Street, Austin 78705, tel. 473 8669, fax 476 6505, or jenns@io.com.

 

Timerman, Preso sin nombre, celda sin número

 

Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

 

Shúa, El libro de los recuerdos 

 

Freilich, Cláper (University Co-op will have bound photocopies of this novel)

 

Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros

 

Grading Criteria:  proposal for term paper, 15%, due Wed., Oct. 7

                            midterm examination, 27.5%, Fri., Oct. 23

                            final version of term paper, 22.5%, due Fri., Dec. 4

                            quizzes and participation 5%

                            final examination 30%, Wed., Dec. 9, 7:00-10:00p

 

Attendance Policy:  Attendance is a requirement.  Four cuts permitted;  subsequent unexcused absences result in 1% grade reduction each.  An excused absence is an absence satisfactorily explained by a note.

 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English.  Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

            One of the requirements of the class is to write a term paper of at least 1700 words (approximately 6-7 pages in normal-size type) on a topic not covered in the syllabus.  Each student will need to analyze literary works that are not in the course readings, although other writings by the same author may appear in the syllabus.  Any student with a reading knowledge of Portuguese is welcome to write his or her term paper on a Brazilian Jewish writer. The alternative to writing a literary analysis for the term paper is to research and write a paper on a Latin American Jewish creative figure working in some other medium, such as a painter or film director.   Please note that the term paper must be on a cultural topic and not on non-cultural themes, such as Jewish education or problems in estimating the population of Jewish communities in Latin America.  Your topic must be approved by the instructor for you to receive credit for this assignment,

Any student who requires accommodation because of a disability may request

it.  He or she may be asked to present a note from the Office of Services for

Students with Disabilities specifying the accommodations needed.  Students in this course are expected not to disrupt the normal progress of the class.  Any student who persists in being disruptive will first receive a warning letter from the instructor.  If the problem persists, it will be reported to the Dean of Students.

 The course syllabus indicates what you should have read ahead of time to

prepare for that day’s class.  In some cases a media activity, such as showing of clips from a film, is planned for that class session.  You do not need to study for such a session beforehand.

 

August

 

26 general introduction to course

 

28 historical background to Jacobo Timerman’s story;  begin reading

            Preso sin nombre, celda sin número

 

31 Timerman, Preso sin nombre

 

September 

 

2  Timerman, Preso sin nombre

 

4  historical background on Jewish immigration to Argentina and

            Alberto Gerchunoff;  Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

 

7   Labor Day, University closed

 

9  Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos 

 

11 Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

 

14 Carlos M. Grünberg, “Un esposo” from Cuentos judíos (in packet)

           Mordejai Alperson, “El coronel Goldsmid” from Colonia Mauricio (in packet)

 

16 Margo Glantz, excerpt from Las genealogías (in packet)

 

18 Glantz, second excerpt (in packet)

 

21 Background on Ana María Shua;  Shua, El libro de los recuerdos  

 

23 Shua, El libro de los recuerdos

 

25 Shua,  El libro de los recuerdos, information on term paper proposal

 

28 scenes from film Legado  (Yom Kippur;  attendance will not be taken)

 

30 Victor Perera, “Guatemala I,” from The Cross and the

            Pear Tree (in packet)    

 

October

 

2  Perera, “Guatemala II” (in packet)

 

5  Leo Spitzer, “Rootless Nostalgia:  Vienna in La Paz, La Paz

               in Elsewhere” (in packet)    

       more about topics for term paper

 

7  Marjorie Agosín, “Osorio,” “My Husband,” both excerpts from A Cross and a Star: 

            Memoirs of a Jewish Girl in Chile (in packet)

    DUE DATE, proposal for term paper

 

9  Jacobo Fijman, “Canto del cisne” (in packet)

             Edna Aizenberg, “How a Samovar Helped Me Theorize Latin American

             Jewish Writing” (in packet)

 

12 Teresa Porzecanski, “Rojl Eisips” (in packet)

             José Luis Nájenson, “Una parábola neojasídica” (in packet)

 

14 Introduction to Isaac Goldemberg;  poems by Goldemberg (in packet)    

 

16 Moacyr Scliar, “El ejército de un solo hombre” (in packet)

 

19 Glusberg, “Mate amargo”,  Marcos Aguinis, “Profeta en Níneve” (in packet)

 

21 review session for midterm

 

23 midterm examination in regular classroom

 

26 scenes from Adió Kerida

 

28 Freilich, Cláper

 

30 Freilich, Cláper

 

November

 

2  Freilich, Cláper

 

4  Jorge Luis Borges, “Emma Zunz,” “El Golem” (in packet)

 

6  Borges, “La muerte y la brújula” (in packet)

        Introduction to Alicia Steimberg

 

9  Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros  

 

11 Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros  

 

13 Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros  

 

16 Ruth Behar, “Juban American” (in packet)

 

18 Ilan Stavans, “Lost in Translation” (in packet)

 

20 Isaac Chocrón, excerpt from Rómpase en caso de incendio (in packet)

         More on final version of term paper

 

23 scenes from documentary film Havana Nagila 

 

25 question and answer session

 

27 day after Thanksgiving, University closed

 

30 Ariel Dorfman, “The Discovery of Life and Language at an Early Age”

            (in packet)

December

 

2  Ricardo Feierstein, “Judíos latinoamericanos:  una nueva forma del

            mestizaje” (in packet)

 

4  last class day;  term paper due;  review for final examination

 

 

                                                 ***FINAL EXAMINATION***

 

                                           ***  WED., DEC. 9, 7:00-10:00 p.m.  ***

 

 

 

 

 

LAS 370S • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

40960 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.128
(also listed as SPN 325K)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Prerequisites: ASL 507 or equivalent with a grade of C (74%) or higher.

ASL 312K is a third-semester American Sign Language (ASL) course that emphasizes not only language mastery but also the understanding of Deaf culture, specifically its cultural values, attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and history.

Integrates and refines expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language (ASL), including recognition of sociolinguistic variation. A practice oriented approach to language acquisition with demonstration of more sophisticated grammatical features of American Sign Language (ASL). Increases fluency and accuracy in finger spelling and numbers. Provides opportunities for interaction within the deaf community. Course requires significant time outside of class.

Course study includes ASL grammatical structures, non-manual behaviors, vocabulary and classifiers, fingerspelling and numbers, communication skills (conversations and discussions), and other language functions. Most of the learning activities are based on the text, Signing Naturally. These activities will include interactive activities such as locating things around the house, complaining, making suggestions and requests, exchanging personal information: life events, and describing and identifying things. Supporting studies include attendance of Deaf events, film and video viewing, ASL literary readings, and other analytical activities.

COURSE RATIONALE: American Sign Language is the language of a sizable minority, estimates range from 500,000 to two million speakers in the U.S. alone. In addition, many Deaf Canadians use ASL. For more information, you can look at this website:
http://library.gallaudet.edu/Library/Deaf_Research_Help/Frequently_Asked_Questions_(FAQs)/Sign_Language/ASL_Ranking_and_Number_of_Speakers.html

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS:
1) SIGNING NATURALLY LEVEL II, STUDENT WORKBOOK AND VIDEOTEXT, Units 14, 15, 16, & 13. Authors: Smith, Lentz, and Mikos.
2) COURSE PACKET: ASL 312K at Speedway Copying, Dobie Mall, 2025 Guadalupe, Suite 140
3) For Hearing People Only, Authors: Matthew S. Moore and Linda Levitan, 3rd Edition
4) One 2 GB (minimum) USB Flash Drive

ADDITIONAL CURRICULUM AND MATERIALS:

http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm (practice your skills)
ASLonline1 tutorials: www.laits.utexas.edu/asl506 (sn: asl506 pw: will announce in class)
ASLonline2 tutorials: www.laits.utexas.edu/asl507

COURSE POLICIES:

Attendance Policy: Beginning September 1st, participation will be graded in the following manner:

You should plan to attend class faithfully, inasmuch as the material covered in class and participation in class discussion are vital to your performance in this course. Attendance will be taken every class period. You should check periodically with me to ensure that the we agree on your number of absences. You are allowed two (2) absences over the course of the semester. For each absence beyond two (2), your final grade will drop by 5%. For example, if you earned an A with a 92 for the course, but you have three (3) absences, your final grade will be a B (87), regardless of the reason. Use your absences as you see fit; however, use them with discretion. These days are given to you to make accommodations for illnesses, doctors’ appointments, observance of religious holy days, etc. A total of three (3) tardies and early departures will be counted as one (1) absence.

The University’s policy on the observance of Religious Holy Days can be found at: http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/gi07-08/ch04/ch04b.html. Observance of Religious Holy Days: Students must notify instructor at least 14 days prior to holy days; otherwise, it will be counted as absence. http://www.interfaithcalendar.org

It is essential that students make every effort to attend each class on time and be prepared to participate in classroom activities. Attention to classroom activities is imperative.

Homework: Homework assignments are not optional; they are required to help prepare you for class activities/discussions. Students who fail to produce completed assignments the day they are due will have two points
deducted from their final grade. **Please bring your Signing Naturally Student Workbook and homework assignments to class everyday.

Classroom Etiquette: Behaviors such sleeping in class, reading the newspaper, talking/mouthing with classmates, using pagers/cell phones/text messaging devices, listening to iPod music, or doing homework for another class are not acceptable or permitted. This is a skill developing lab course involving group and individual practice and skills development using visual/gestural stimuli.

Social/Cultural Rationale:

Visual Environment: Talking/voicing: This policy is the same as in ASL 506 and 507, this policy will not be reviewed this semester, but will be implemented. The intention of the NO VOICE POLICY is to respect Deaf Culture and maximize the student’s learning during class time. Due to the fact that facial expressions are vital in ASL, gum chewing is not permitted during class. Laptops, iPods, cellular phones, paging devices, radios, CD and tape players/recorders, video cameras and still cameras should not be brought into the classroom without MY written consent. (If you need your cell phone with you please make sure that it is turned off so that it does not disrupt the silence in the classroom.)

**Repeated use of voice may result in the deduction of points in the final score or in being asked to leave the classroom.**

NOTE: Repetition of using voice in class may result in deduction of points and/or the deduction of a letter grade from your final score. If you do not understand me, then PLEASE ask me ANYTIME for clarification.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Pass/Fail grades are not allowed; this course may be taken for a letter grade only.

DEAF CULTURE note: In class, you will rehearse ways of informing the lecturer why you are late, why you are leaving early, and why you missed class. These are not to be viewed as giving excuses but rather viewed as a type of
communication within Deaf Culture. So, please apply this situation each time you confront it.

A. Volunteer Assignment (200 points): You are required to do volunteer work with the Deaf community for a total of at least SIX hours (worth 10 points per hour plus 15 points from the supervisor’s evaluation for a maximum of 75 points per activity). Your signing skills (125 points) will be assessed. Turn in your USB flash drive on the schedule date below. Submitting your assignment even one day late will result 25% off of the final grade. See the criteria for more details in your course packet.

All video and ethnographic assignments are due as scheduled for full credit. No late assignments will be accepted for those dates. You are strongly encouraged go to MEZ 2.104 only to be recorded on camera in front of a Mac computer. No other place, such as your dorm room, your apartment, etc., is allowed. If there is a special circumstance, please talk with me about it. No points will be given if you attempt to divert from the requirements.

RATIONALE: Due to the large size of the class and the amount of contact hours per week, it is not possible for the instructor to give each student the desired individual time. It is important that students interact with other Deaf people in order to become fluent in ASL, and more knowledgeable about Deaf culture. Past experience has shown that those students who interact with d/Deaf people do far better on exams than those who do not.

B. LAB REQUIREMENTS: (a total of 180 points) Movie Critique Quizzes -- You are to view THREE (3) DVD movies, selected from the given list (in their respective order). The first two movies will have a multiple choice quiz. The first movie quiz is 20 points. The second movie quiz is worth 100 points. The third movie lab will require you to do a Movie Reaction Video (60 points). The goal of this reaction video (you will record yourself signing it) is for you to express your thoughts, opinions or questions about the movie. The video must include the information pertaining to the questions [See questions handouts]. You are to answer each in a narrative way. Turn in your USB flash drive on the due date below. Submitting a lab assignment even one day late will result 25% off of the final grade. *Please read the criteria in the course packet.*

C. For Hearing People Only written quizzes (50 points): will include, but are not limited to, True/False, based on reading of selected chapters of the textbook. The first quiz is worth 24 possible points and second quiz is worth 26 possible points.

D. COMPREHENSION QUIZZES (150 points): The FIRST TWO Quizzes (worth a total of 50 points) are based on ASL 507 and will be given in class. The first “quiz-type” will be based on Pronouns, Possessives, and Age signs. This will be on the second day of class. The second “quiz-type” will be based on Money and Clock signs – distributed on the third day of class. For Unit 14, 15, 16, and 13, there will be between 6 and 8 quizzes worth a total of 100 points. Some quizzes will be announced in class and some will be “pop” quizzes. You may not make up any quizzes you miss – a missed quiz means a zero. They are derived from reading/viewing from the “Signing Naturally” workbook and DVD, video assignments, and/or class discussions and activities. No make-ups will be given for quizzes missed due to absence. If the absence is caused by extreme circumstances, the lecturer may consider adjusting your final grade points to compensate for the missed quiz.

E. FOUR EXAMS: Four (4) sets of exams worth a total of 650 points.
1. Comprehension portion (100 points – Exams 1 through 4): For all four exams with Unit 14, 15, 16, and 13, I will sign sentences/questions and you will write down answers on a piece of paper, which is given to you right before the test is administered. This written/comprehensive portion is on all of the exams. Each one is worth 100 points = 400 points total.

2. Expressive portions (100 points – 2nd and 4th Exams Only): The exam 2nd will be based on Unit 14 & 15 and Exam 4 will be based on Units 16 & 13. I will give you a scripted dialogue for you and your partner (you pick your partner) to practice a few days before the exam takes place. You practice on your own time outside of class. On the exam day, you and your partner will sit or stand in front of the video camera and sign away, using your scripted dialog as your guide. This portion is on these two exams only and are worth100 points each = 200 points total.

3. Written portion (50 points – 4th Exam Only): This portion is derived from language and cultural notes, and your “Signing Naturally” workbook. This portion is included in the fourth and last exam, which is worth 50 points.

No extra credit allowed! I cannot offer it to one particular student or group.

Pass/Fail grades are not allowed; this course may be taken for a letter
grade only.

No extra credit allowed! I cannot offer it to one particular student or group.

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712