Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Rachel V. González-Martin


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., Indiana University

Rachel V. González-Martin

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 475-6775
  • Office: GWB 2.314
  • Office Hours: FALL 2016 // by appointment only
  • Campus Mail Code: F9200

Biography


Dr. González-Martin holds a Ph.D. in Folklore & Ethnomusicology from Indiana University. Her research focuses on the verbal and material traditions of communities coming-of-age in the American Latino Diaspora. Her work looks at personal-experience-narratives, body art, materiality and self-portraiture with regard to gender, sexual identities, race, and socioeconomic status. Her teaching interests include courses on Latino expressive culture across the U.S., engaged ethnographic fieldwork, and Critical Latino Folkloristics.  She is currently working on a book manuscript that explores the intersection of consumer citizenship and Latino identity in the 21st century titled, Coming Out Latina: Quinceañera Style and Latina/o Consumer Identities.

Courses


MAS 374 • Latina/O Spirituality

36195 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GEA 127

Please check back for updates.

MAS 319 • Mex Amer/Lat Folk Across Us

36075 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 5.190
(also listed as ANT 310L)

This is an introductory course to the field of Folklore and ethnography among U.S. Latina/o communities. Folklore is the study of artistic communication in everyday life  and gaining meaning through its connections the contemporary and  historical contexts of its artists' communities. This course will introduce students to the form and function of basic genres of folklore study that take the form of verbal and material artistry.

These genres include, but are not limited to: Folk Speech, Jokes, Riddles, Narratives, Festivals, Food Culture, Religion and Spirituality, Body Art and Material Culture.

This course examines  the use of everyday artistry  amongst regional  U.S. Latino communities. As a group, students will be asked to discuss the similarities and  variations  of Latino cultural communities across the United  States  through their expressive traditions. These will include discussions of such communities as Mexican Americans across the Southwest, Dominican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Midwestern Latinos and transnational Latino migrants in the New  South. The examination of everyday artistry will illustrate the process by which U.S. Latina/o communities express their Latino identities differently based on experiences of race, class, region  and migration  experiences. It will further shed light on larger national  (mis)understandings of U.S. Latina/a communities as socially unified, but not culturally homogenous communities of exiles, migrants, nationals, citizens and refugee Americans.

Tentative Grading Policy:

  • Minute papers: 5%
  • Field Write-Ups: 10%
  • Unit Reivew Essays: 25%
  • Writing Meeting: 5%
  • Midterm Exam: 20%
  • Final Exam: 15%
  • Final Collection Portfolio: 20%

MAS 374 • Latina/O Spirituality

35160 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 1.126
(also listed as AMS 370, R S 346, WGS 335)

FLAGS:   CD  |  Wr  |  II

DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces students to the religious and spiritual practices of diverse Latina/o populations living in the United States. Students will work with primary and secondary texts, ethnographic film and museum exhibitions to examine the diverse ways in which Latina/o communities’ create spiritual meaning in their lives. It will examine the religious and spiritual practices from the vantage point of transition and change as a way of understanding larger aspects of cultural and social change within 21st century U.S. Latina/o publics. This course incorporates materials and theoretical approaches relevant to multiple diasporic Latina/o communities including Afro Latino and Indigenous migrant communities. Students will learn about the diverse aspects of Latina/o spiritual, from the history of Latina/o Catholicism, to influences of West African ritual, to the rise of Latina/o Muslim conversion in the United States. It will expressly look at cultural productions from the vantage points of gender and race politics, and incorporate the spiritual tradition of women, queer communities, and various “othered” Latina/o identifying community members.

TEXT:

Aponte, Edward David. 2012. Santo!: Varieties of Latina/o Spirituality. New York: Orbis.

Baez, Edward J. "Spirituality and the Gay Latino Client." Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services 4, no. 2 (1996): 69-81.

Daniel, Yvonne. 2005. Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomble. Urbana: University of Illinois Press Otero, Solimar. 2014.

Yemoja: Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina/o and Afro-Atlantic Diasporas. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Perez, Laura E. 2007. Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities. Durham: Duke University Press

Rodriguez, Roberto C. 2014. Our Sacred Maíz Is Our Mother: Indigeneity and Belonging in the Americas. Tucson: University of Arizona Press

Romero Cash, Marie. 1998. Living Shrines: Home Altars of New Mexico. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press

GRADING:

Minute Papers/Attendance 10%

3 Film/Art-Exhibit Reviews 15%

Project Proposal & Annotated Bibliography 20%

Midterm Exam 20%

Final Exam 15%

Final Project 20%

MAS 390 • Intro To Mexican Amer Studies

35250 • Fall 2015
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM CMA 3.134

.

MAS 319 • Mex Amer/Lat Folk Across Us

35399 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A203A
(also listed as ANT 310L)

This is an introductory course to the field of Folklore and ethnography among U.S. Latina/o communities. Folklore is the study of artistic communication in everyday life  and gaining meaning through its connections the contemporary and  historical contexts of its artists' communities. This course will introduce students to the form and function of basic genres of folklore study that take the form of verbal and material artistry.

These genres include, but are not limited to: Folk Speech, Jokes, Riddles, Narratives, Festivals, Food Culture, Religion and Spirituality, Body Art and Material Culture.

This course examines  the use of everyday artistry  amongst regional  U.S. Latino communities. As a group, students will be asked to discuss the similarities and  variations  of Latino cultural communities across the United  States  through their expressive traditions. These will include discussions of such communities as Mexican Americans across the Southwest, Dominican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Midwestern Latinos and transnational Latino migrants in the New  South. The examination of everyday artistry will illustrate the process by which U.S. Latina/o communities express their Latino identities differently based on experiences of race, class, region  and migration  experiences. It will further shed light on larger national  (mis)understandings of U.S. Latina/a communities as socially unified, but not culturally homogenous communities of exiles, migrants, nationals, citizens and refugee Americans.

Tentative Grading Policy:

  • Minute papers: 5%
  • Field Write-Ups: 10%
  • Unit Reivew Essays: 25%
  • Writing Meeting: 5%
  • Midterm Exam: 20%
  • Final Exam: 15%
  • Final Collection Portfolio: 20%

MAS 361 • Mexican Amer Cul Studies Smnr

35424 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CMA 5.190

DESCRIPTION:

In this course, students will engage with methods, theories and applications of cultural studies.  We will explore the ideas of cultures-­?in-­?practice and culture-­?as-­?practice to engage with multiple authors and discourses about U.S. Latina/o communities.  Together will problematize how ideologies about communities as subjects and objects of inquiry are reified through the academic “creative” process and at the same time show how community-­?scholars work to reclaim voice through counter discourses that take shape as written works and multi-­?platform performance-­?texts.

 

TEXTS:

All articles and chapter excerpts will be made available on CANVAS.

There are 3 required texts to purchase:

  • Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altaraties by Laura E. Perez (Digital copy available through UT Library)
  • Queer Ricans: Cultures and Sexualities in the Diaspora by Lawrence La Fountain-­?Stokes (Digital copy available through UT Library)
  • WeWill Dance Our Truth: Yaqui History and Yoeme Performances by David Delgado Shorter
  • WomenWriting Culture edited by Ruth Behar (OPTIONAL)

 

GRADING:

Participation                       20%

Précises                             30%

Research Project                  50%

            Proposal                                   5%

            Annotated Bibliography                10%

            Interview Review                        5%

            Peer Review Worksheet                5%

            Presentation                              5%

            Final Draft                                20%

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