Approved Courses

The following classes have been approved for the Native American and Indigenous Studies Undergraduate Certificate for the Fall 2017 Semester

The following information is provided for your convenience and is accurate at its posting.  Please check the official course schedule for the most up-to-date information.

(1Courses approved for the introduction to NAIS requirement; *Courses approved for the capstone course requirement)

Strand: Native Territories and Indigenous Environmentalisms

ANT 314C Introduction to Mesoamerican Archaeology (Rodríguez Alegría) Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 4.124
This course is an introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, the area roughly covering Mexico and the northern half of Central America, from the time of emerging social inequality in the Formative Period until the Spanish conquest of Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century. By studying archaeological evidence from several sites in this region we will address a few important theoretical issues in archaeology. These issues include: 1) the relationship between people, the environment, and social organization 2) the study of elites and commoners in archaeological cultures, and 3) the use of historical and archaeological data in reconstructing the past. During the course of the semester we will examine varied lines of evidence, including archaeological artifacts (especially pottery, obsidian, and ceramic figurines), human remains, architecture, murals, sculpture, and historical evidence (esp. codices and colonial accounts) to assess the role of evidence and theory in how we conceptualize the past in Mesoamerica. In addition, we will address issues that have captured the general public’s imagination in recent years, including the end of the world, the Maya collapse, human sacrifice, and others. Thus, the class will be of interest to archaeology majors and other students as well.

ANT 322L Cultures in Contact (Covey) Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.112
"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Strand: Indigenous Peoples, Migration, and Diasporas

HIS 350L/LAS 366 - History of the Caribbean (Twinam)  Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 2.128 
This first half of this course uses documentaries, film, lectures and readings to provide an overview of Caribbean history from 1492 to the present. The prominent theme will be to explore how the dynamic among differing conquerors, natives, and slaves forged the distinctive Caribbean nations of the present with their Spanish, British, French, Dutch, Danish and United States cultural heritages. The focus throughout will be to measure the extent to which these distinctive cultural and colonial heritages shaped historical development. Topical themes include: contact between European and Native cultures, piracy, the impact of sugar and slavery, colonialism, de-colonization, the impact of the U.S. as a Caribbean power (Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands), Caribbean revolutions (Cuba, Grenada), the Caribbean in the twenty-first century.

Strand: Indigenous Literatures, Arts and Media  

E 314V/AMS 315F1 - Native American Literatures and Cultures (Grewe)  Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.128 
When Pharrell appeared in a headdress on the cover of Elle UK, it raised many questions, among them: how are Native Americans portrayed in popular culture?  In response to this question, we might ask: how do Native Americans represent themselves?  Native Americans, in fact, have been representing themselves in writing for hundreds of years.  This class will focus on Native American literature from a range of different tribal nations, regions, and histories.  We will examine Native American activism and forced assimilation as well as continuing conflicts between Native and non-Native belief systems and between tribal nation communities and US federal and state governments.  Together, we will uncover the surprising way that indigenous literature has fundamentally shaped American literature and is beginning to impact world literature.  The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

MUS 334/AFR 374F/LAS 326 - Music of African Disapora (Moore) Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MRH 2.634 plus discussion
Studies of both indigenous and borrowed traditions in the popular, folk,and art music of the Americas from the colonial period to the present. The musical legacy of the African slave trade in the Americas, the social contexts in which black musical forms have developed, and their varied forms. Subjects include the shifting meanings of "black music" invarious contexts; the notion of hybridity; the uses of African influenced music as a political or oppositional tool; and African ethnicgroups represented prominently in the New World, the traditions they brought with them, and the ways they have been adapted to new ends.

SPN 356/LAS 370S - Indigenous Voices - Contemporary Mexico* (taught in Spanish) (McDonough)  Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 214
As evidence of a continuous (yet changeful) trajectory of indigenous participation in modernity as intellectuals and writers, our focus will be on the literary and cultural production of Nahuas (native speakers of Nahuatl, common language of the Aztec Empire, and more than 1.5 million Mexican citizens today) from pre-Hispanic times through the present day. Specifically, through a deep exploration of Nahua literary and cultural texts—painted and alphabetic histories; song; huehuehtlahtolli (words of elders); cartographies; political speeches; testimony, short stories; autobiography; drama; and poetry— we will focus on how Nahuas have expressed their own understanding and critique of their personal and collective past, present, and future as indigenous peoples, and as citizens of the Mexican nation. Through our analysis of Nahua intellectual work, we will appreciate indigenous aesthetics while attending to an often overlooked—yet extraordinarily rich—vein of human expression in Latin America. Throughout the semester we will consult several rare manuscripts related to Nahua culture at the Benson Latin American Collection. We will also have the opportunity to speak directly with present-day Nahua intellectuals, as guest visitors to our class (via Skype or in person).

UGS 302 - Indigenous Global Media1 (McDonough) Meets TTH 12:00PM-1:30PM UTC 4.120
This course offers a historical overview and critical exploration of Indigenous media producers, writers, directors, and audiences around the globe. We will survey a wide range of mediums from film, radio, animation, video games, and new media and explore how they have been taken up by Indigenous mediamakers to serve local needs and reach a wider audience. We will maintain a global perspective throughout the course, examining discourses about Indigenous peoples formulated from contact to the post-colonial era, highlighting issues of representation, modernity, and cultural continuity. In understanding how these discourses have been shaped through local assertions of cultural specificity and appeals to global Indigenous identity, the course maintains a critical interest in how Indigenous people have been defined and how they are now using media technologies to speak back and define themselves. We will also consider case studies while engaging with theoretical works that investigate the phenomenon of global Indigenous media movements. Through group presentations, we will also learn about many other Indigenous cultures, politics, and media efforts.

Strand: Indigenous Languages, Linguistic and Cultural Revitalization

UGS 302 Languages and Cultures of Amazonia (Epps) Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MAI 220F
The Amazonian region of South America is incredibly diverse in its indigenous peoples and their languages. Described only recently as a ‘linguistic black box’, research over the past few decades has yielded fresh insights into the languages and cultures of indigenous Amazonians, their histories, and their contemporary adjustments to the changes they face. In this course, we will investigate the languages and cultures of indigenous Amazonian peoples, with an eye to understanding their past and the challenges of their present. In the process, we will develop skills in academic writing and in finding and evaluating information.

Strand: Local Histories and Native Heritages (i.e. Indigenous Borderlands; Indigenous Texas and the Southwest; Mesoamerica, etc.)

ANT 322M/MAS 374/LAS 324 - Mexican American Indigenous Heritage* (Menchaca) Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present.  The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans.  The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest.

SPN 356/LAS 370S - Indigenous Voices - Contemporary Mexico* (taught in Spanish) (McDonough) Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 214
As evidence of a continuous (yet changeful) trajectory of indigenous participation in modernity as intellectuals and writers, our focus will be on the literary and cultural production of Nahuas (native speakers of Nahuatl, common language of the Aztec Empire, and more than 1.5 million Mexican citizens today) from pre-Hispanic times through the present day. Specifically, through a deep exploration of Nahua literary and cultural texts—painted and alphabetic histories; song; huehuehtlahtolli (words of elders); cartographies; political speeches; testimony, short stories; autobiography; drama; and poetry— we will focus on how Nahuas have expressed their own understanding and critique of their personal and collective past, present, and future as indigenous peoples, and as citizens of the Mexican nation. Through our analysis of Nahua intellectual work, we will appreciate indigenous aesthetics while attending to an often overlooked—yet extraordinarily rich—vein of human expression in Latin America. Throughout the semester we will consult several rare manuscripts related to Nahua culture at the Benson Latin American Collection. We will also have the opportunity to speak directly with present-day Nahua intellectuals, as guest visitors to our class (via Skype or in person).


The following classes have been approved for the Native American and Indigenous Studies Undergraduate Certificate for the Spring 2017 Semester

The following information is provided for your convenience and is accurate at its posting.  Please check the official course schedule for the most up-to-date information.

Courses approved for the Introduction to Native American/Indigenous Studies requirement 

E 314V (34840): Native American Literature and Culture (Anne Stewart) TTH 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MEZ 1.212
This course will begin from the premise that all students can benefit from studying Native American and indigenous literature and culture as part of the process of decolonizing their own heritage, one version of which begins with the question “whose (traditional) land are we on?”  We will read a variety of contemporary native and indigenous writers whose work has challenged colonial representations of native people and fostered indigenous resistance and resurgence.  Seeking to approach learning from an indigenous perspective, we will also explore more generally the role of literature and other forms of writing and culture in visions for social justice.

Courses approved for the Native American/Indigenous Studies certificate
(*Courses approved for the capstone course requirement)

ANT 320L-4 (31230) / LIN 373 (41000): American Indian Languages and Cultures (Anthony Webster)* TTH 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. SAC 5.118
This course explores the myriad of indigenous languages of the North America and how they are intertwined with culture. The focus of this course is both descriptive and anthropological. That is, the indigenous languages of the Americas will be considered with respect to their phonologies, complex morphologies, discursive structures, and historical relations as well as their place within the sociocultural milieu of speakers. Language is made real in use. We will look to the uses and users of language.

ANT 324L (31305) / LAS 324L-15 (40410): Global Indigenous Issues (Paola Canova)* TTH 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. SAC 4.120
This course examines contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples around the world. It takes an historical and ethnographic approach to critically analyzing the ways in which indigenous peoples have been impacted and continue to respond to forces such as colonialism and capitalism in different regions of the world. Topics include: Self Determination the Nation State, Human Rights, Gender, Ecologies, Migration and Social Movements.

ANT 326C (31345): Native Americans in Texas (Mariah Wade)* MWF 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. SAC 4.174
The past pursues us into the future. Archaeologists and historians learn about Native American groups in three ways: archaeological artifacts, texts written by Europeans after the latter arrived in the New World and Native American oral history accounts. This course is designed to 1) expose the students to these three sources of information, 2) familiarize students with the earliest narratives written by the European explorers who entered Texas, 3) develop skills and strategies to read, analyze, and extract information from these documents, and 4) engage in discussions of the evidence for Native American cultural behavior, resource utilization, conflict, disease, and related topics. The course uses concepts and evidence from Anthropology, History, Archaeology, Historical Geography and Native American Studies, and it is structured to provide information to students interested in those disciplines. 

ARH 347L (20225) / LAS 327-3 (40445): Art and Architecture of Ancient Mesoamerica (Julia Guernsey)* TTH 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ART 1.120
This course surveys the art, architecture, and material culture of a number of the ancient civilizations of Precolumbian Mesoamerica, which flourished in what are now the modern countries of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras.  The course spans the time of the Olmec through that of the Aztecs, or from the 2nd millennium BC until the arrival of the Spanish in 1519.  The goal of this course is to provide students with a general knowledge of the history, ritual traditions, and belief systems of ancient Mesoamericans, as expressed through sculpture, painting, architecture, archaeological remains, and ancient writing systems. 

GRG 319 (37315) / LAS 319 (40370): Geography of Latin America (Gregory Knapp) TTH 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. CLA 0.128
This course is a general introduction to the environmental, cultural, economic and political geography of Latin America and the Caribbean. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can also benefit from the exploration of such topics as environmental hazards, indigenous life ways and resource management, globalization and modernization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, ??frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The course examines major environmental zones as defined by geomorphology, climate, and biogeography, in terms of risks and hazards, resources, and human impacts. Students also study social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods, social structures, and cultures, including early migrants to the Americas, the rise of chiefdoms and indigenous civilizations including Aztec and Inca, the European conquest and spread of Iberian colonial culture and economic relationships, and the inception and spread of modernization as related to neoliberal and alternative forms of development including indigenous discourses of sustainability in contemporary Latin America. A range of environmental and social science theories and methods are discussed, including plate tectonics, basic climate models, hazards research, circumscription theory, and theories of modernization, dependency, and development. Communication skills are developed through graphical and essay questions on quizzes and exams, the written course project, and discussion in lectures.

GRG 323K-3 (37320) / LAS 330-3 (40480): South America-Nature, Society and Sustainability (Gregory Knapp)
Maymester Course: This Maymester course is conducted in Ecuador, June 1-July 1. Ecuador is a small country with outstanding environmental and cultural diversity, and is a perfect location for the study of environmental and social change and sustainability. Coastal mangrove wetlands, mountain valleys and peaks and Amazonian lowland forests are home to diverse indigenous peoples and immigrants. The recent Constitution of Ecuador enshrines respect for environmental and cultural diversity as essential for a sustainable buen vivir. This Maymester uses Ecuador as a classroom, maximizing student experiences of a wide range of urban, rural and wild landscapes where students gain insight into current debates about environmental change, agriculture and development.

LAL 601C (40300): Intensive Nahautl I (Sabina Cruz de la Cruz) MTWTH 12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m. SRH 1.319

LAL 611C (40305): Intensive Nahautl II (Sabina Cruz de la Cruz) MTWTH 9:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m. SRH 1.319

LAS 322 (40394) / SPC 320C (46131): Nahuatl Texts and Histories (Sergio Romero)* TTH 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. SRH 1.320
This course will be an introduction to the study of the Nahuatl literary traditions of Mesoamerica. It will include an overview of genres and manuscripts as well as their genealogies and cultural role. After a discussion of a few advanced grammar topics and philological techniques, we will read and translate representative texts of different genres including annals, letters, doctrines, plays, huehuetlahtolli and oral narratives. Our focus will be on the ways history is entextualized across the ample geographic and temporal spaces inhabited by Nahuatl speakers in Mesoamerica. 

MAS 374 (36110) / AMS 321 (30745): Indigenous Film and Television (Dustin Tahmahkera)* TTH 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. WEL 3.260
This course critically engages Native and non-Native productions, portrayals, and perceptions of the indigenous in cinematic and televisual texts from the 20th and 21st centuries. Teaching critical thinking and writing skills for interpreting diverse cultural, social, and ideological functions of indigenous representations and media, the course involves deconstructing/analyzing and reconstructing/reimagining images and discourses related to how indigenous identities have been historically and contemporarily produced, represented, and received in media.

Previously Approved Courses

American Studies

AMS 311S (Whitewolf, Edwin) Mythic Indian in American Culture – Fall 2016

Anthropology

ANT 310L (Rodríguez-Alegría, Enrique) Aztecs and Spaniards – Spring 2016
ANT 314C (Rodriguez, Enrique) Intro to Mesoamerican Archeaology (crosslisted as LAS 315 topic 2) – Fall 2014, Fall 2015
ANT 320L (Webster, Anthory) American Indian Languages and Cultures (crosslisted as LIN 373) – Spring 2014, Fall 2015
ANT 322M (Menchaca, Martha) Mexican American Indigenous Heritage (crosslisted as LAS 324 and MAS 374) - Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
ANT 322M (Stross, Brian) Indians of Mexico and Guatemala – Spring 2013
ANT 322M (Webster, Anthony) Native American Cultures of the Greater Southwest (crosslisted as AMS 321) – Fall 2016
ANT s324L (Speed, Shannon) Global Indigenous Issues - Summer 2014
ANT 324L (Sturm, Circe) The Black Indian Experience - Fall 2013
ANT 324L (TallBear, Kim) Indigenizing Queer Theory - Spring 2015
ANT 324L (Covey, Alan) Inca World – Spring 2016
ANT 324L (Canova, Paola) Global Indigenous Issues – Spring 2016
ANT 325L (Campbell, Craig) Cultures and Ecologies (crosslisted as REE 345) – Fall 2016
ANT 326D (Wade, Mariah) Native Americans in the Plains - Fall 2014, Spring 2014
ANT 326L (Wilson, Sam) Cultures in Contact (crosslisted as LAS 324L) - Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2016
ANT 336L (TallBear, Kim) Native American Cultures North of Mexico - Fall 2014
ANT 340C (Sturm, Circe) Ethnographic Research Methods - Fall 2014

Art and Art History

ARH 347L (Guernsey, Julia) Mesoamerican Art and Architecture - Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015
ARH 347L (Strauss, Stephanie) Mesoamerican Art and Architecture - Spring 2016
ARH 347M (Stuart, David) Maya Art and Architecture – Fall 2016
ARH 347N (Stuart, David) Aztec Art and Civilization (crosslisted as LAS 327) - Fall 2015
ARH 370 (Stuart, David) Aztec Art and Civilization - Fall 2012

English

E 314V (Stewart, Anne) Native American Literature and Culture - Fall 2012, Fall 2014, Fall 2016
E 314V (Uzendoski, Andrew) Native American Literature and Culture (crosslisted as AMS 315F) – Fall 2013
E 379R (Cox, James) Native America Literature - Spring 2014

Geography

GRG 319 (Knapp, Gregory) Geography of Latin America (crosslisted as LAS 319) - Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016
GRG 323K (Knapp, Gregory) Topic 3 South America-Nature, Society and Sustainability - Spring (Maymester) 2015, Spring (Maymester) 2016
GRG 331K (Knapp, Gregory) Topic 17 Cultural Ecology (crosslisted as ANT 324L) - Spring 2014, Spring 2015

History

HIS 317L (Bsumek, Erika) Intro to American Indian History - Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2016, Fall 2016
HIS 350L (Deans-Smith, Susan) Rethinking the Conquest of Mexico (crosslisted as LAS 366) - Spring 2013, Fall 2014
HIS 350L (Deans-Smith, Susan) Visual and Material Culture of Colonial Latin America (crosslisted as LAS 366) - Spring 2014
HIS 350L (Garrard-Burnett, Virginia) History of Modern Central America – Spring 2016
HIS 350R (Martínez, Anne M.) Race & Citizenship In US History - Fall 2013
HIS 363 (Deans-Smith, Susan) Religion, Conquest, and Conversion in Colonial Mexico and Peru (crosslisted as LAS 366 and RS 368) - Spring 2013, Spring 2014

Linguistics

LIN 350 (England, Nora) Indigenous Languages of the Americas (crosslisted as ANT320L, LAS 322) – Fall 2016

Mexican-American and Latina/o Studies

MAS 319 (Tahmahkera, Dustin) Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies (crosslisted as AMS 315, ANT 310L) – Fall 2016
MAS 374 (Colomina-Almiñana, Juan) Sociolinguistics for MALS majors - Spring 2015
MAS 374 (Tahmahkera, Dustin) Indigenous Film and Television – Spring 2016
MAS 374 (Tahmahkera, Dustin) Comanches in Literature and Film – Summer 2016

Religious Studies

RS 346 (Graber, Jennifer) Native American Religions (crosslisted as AMS 327) - Fall 2014

Spanish and Portuguese

SPC 320C (Romero, Sergio) Colonialism, Indigenous Languages and Revolution in Mesoamerica – Spring 2016
SPN 328C (McDonough, Kelly) Intro to Iberian and Latin American Lit/Cultures (crosslisted as LAS 370S) - Fall 2015
SPN 350 (McDonough, Kelly) Indigenous Voices in Latin American Literature: Nahua Literary and Cultural - Fall 2013
SPN 352 (Arias, Arturo) Literatura Indígena Contemporánea (crosslisted as LAS 370S) - Fall 2012 *taught in Spanish
SPN 355 (McDonough, Kelly) Topics in Latin American Literatures and Cultures: Cultures in Contact in Colonial Spanish America - Fall 2014
SPN 356 Topic 3 (Arias, Arturo) Contemporary Mesoamerican Indigenous Literatures - Fall 2014
SPN 356 (Cárcamo-Huechante) Indigenous Resurgence – Fall 2016

Undergraduate Studies

UGS 302 (McDonough, Kelly) Indigenous Cultures: A Global Approach – Fall 2016
UGS 302 (Epps, Patience) Languages and Cultures of Amazonia – Fall 2016
UGS 302 (Deans Smith, Susan) When Worlds Collide: Indigenous Peoples Under Spanish Colonial Rule - Fall 2014
UGS 303 (Knapp, Gregory) Latin America: Environmental History and Sustainability - Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016