Department of Philosophy
Department of Philosophy

Alexander Mourelatos


Professor EmeritusPhD, Yale

Alexander Mourelatos

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-6749
  • Office: WAG 200C
  • Office Hours: By appt. only.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3500

Interests


Ancient philosophy, early Greek science, philosophical linguistics

Biography


Fields: ancient philosophy, early Greek science, philosophical linguistics

An internationally renowned specialist in the pre-Socratics and ancient Greek cosmology, he has published widely in classics, ancient philosophy, ancient science, and linguistics. He is author of The Route of Parmenides (1970; expanded and revised edn. Parmenides Publishing, 2008), and editor of an influential collection on The Pre-Socratics (revised edition, Princeton, 1993). He founded, and for many years directed, the Joint Classics-Philosophy Program in Ancient Philosophy. He has held major academic fellowships, NEH, ACLS, and Guggenheim; has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, N.J.; and has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Athens, Greece (1994), and inducted as corresponding member of the Academy of Athens, Greece (2000). 

 

 

 

Courses


PHL 329K • Hist Of Ancient Philosophy

43170-43180 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as C C 348)

This course is an introduction to ancient Greek philosophy. We’ll focus on three major thinkers: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; and we’ll examine their views and arguments on some central questions about human conduct, the natural world, and our knowledge of both. We’ll begin with a brief look at some influential earlier figures known as Presocratics and Sophists, and we’ll end with a brief look at some enduring ideas of Epicurus. The emphasis throughout will be on analyzing both what these thinkers say and their reasons for saying it. The main goal is not to memorize information but to develop a critical understanding of some problems and arguments that remain very much alive today.

PHL 381 • Three Ancient Cosmologists

43317 • Spring 2010
Meets TH 5:00PM-8:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as GK 390)

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 329L • Early Mod Phl: Descartes-Kant

42420-42430 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 214

This course is an introduction to early modern philosophy. The objectives of the class are to identify and analyze arguments in philosophical texts of the early modern period, and to become familiar with central themes and problems. Topics include causation, substance, and the possibility of knowledge. The relationship of philosophical theories to contemporary science will be an ongoing theme.

PHL 375M • Early Greek Philosophy-W

42509 • Spring 2009
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 1.134

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 329K • Hist Of Ancient Philosophy

43475-43485 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as C C 348)

This course is an introduction to ancient Greek philosophy. We’ll focus on three major thinkers: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; and we’ll examine their views and arguments on some central questions about human conduct, the natural world, and our knowledge of both. We’ll begin with a brief look at some influential earlier figures known as Presocratics and Sophists, and we’ll end with a brief look at some enduring ideas of Epicurus. The emphasis throughout will be on analyzing both what these thinkers say and their reasons for saying it. The main goal is not to memorize information but to develop a critical understanding of some problems and arguments that remain very much alive today.

PHL 381 • Xenophanes

43545 • Fall 2008
Meets TH 7:00PM-10:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as GK 390)

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 329L • Early Mod Phl: Descartes-Kant

42980-42995 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 302

This course is an introduction to early modern philosophy. The objectives of the class are to identify and analyze arguments in philosophical texts of the early modern period, and to become familiar with central themes and problems. Topics include causation, substance, and the possibility of knowledge. The relationship of philosophical theories to contemporary science will be an ongoing theme.

PHL 381 • Three Ancient Cosmologists

43105 • Spring 2007
Meets T 7:00PM-10:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as GK 390)

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 329L • Early Mod Phl: Descartes-Kant

42170-42185 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420

This course is an introduction to early modern philosophy. The objectives of the class are to identify and analyze arguments in philosophical texts of the early modern period, and to become familiar with central themes and problems. Topics include causation, substance, and the possibility of knowledge. The relationship of philosophical theories to contemporary science will be an ongoing theme.

PHL 381 • Pre-Socratics

42370 • Spring 2006
Meets TH 7:00PM-10:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as GK 390)

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 329K • Hist Of Ancient Philosophy

42220-42235 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 420
(also listed as C C 348)

This course is an introduction to ancient Greek philosophy. We’ll focus on three major thinkers: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; and we’ll examine their views and arguments on some central questions about human conduct, the natural world, and our knowledge of both. We’ll begin with a brief look at some influential earlier figures known as Presocratics and Sophists, and we’ll end with a brief look at some enduring ideas of Epicurus. The emphasis throughout will be on analyzing both what these thinkers say and their reasons for saying it. The main goal is not to memorize information but to develop a critical understanding of some problems and arguments that remain very much alive today.

PHL 375M • Pre-Socratic Philosophy-W

42300 • Fall 2005
Meets W 7:00PM-10:00PM MEZ 2.118

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 329L • Early Mod Phl: Descartes-Kant

39220-39235 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 302

This course is an introduction to early modern philosophy. The objectives of the class are to identify and analyze arguments in philosophical texts of the early modern period, and to become familiar with central themes and problems. Topics include causation, substance, and the possibility of knowledge. The relationship of philosophical theories to contemporary science will be an ongoing theme.

PHL 381 • Greek Cosmology

39385 • Spring 2004
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 329L • Early Mod Phl: Descartes-Kant

39350-39365 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 214

This course is an introduction to early modern philosophy. The objectives of the class are to identify and analyze arguments in philosophical texts of the early modern period, and to become familiar with central themes and problems. Topics include causation, substance, and the possibility of knowledge. The relationship of philosophical theories to contemporary science will be an ongoing theme.

PHL 365 • Materialism

39460 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 201

Topic 2: Introduction to Cognitive Science

Topic 5: Contemporary American Social Theory

Topic 6: Process Philosophy and Pragmatism

PHL 329K • Hist Of Ancient Philosophy

40105-40120 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 208
(also listed as C C 348)

This course is an introduction to ancient Greek philosophy. We’ll focus on three major thinkers: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; and we’ll examine their views and arguments on some central questions about human conduct, the natural world, and our knowledge of both. We’ll begin with a brief look at some influential earlier figures known as Presocratics and Sophists, and we’ll end with a brief look at some enduring ideas of Epicurus. The emphasis throughout will be on analyzing both what these thinkers say and their reasons for saying it. The main goal is not to memorize information but to develop a critical understanding of some problems and arguments that remain very much alive today.

PHL 381 • Pre-Socratics

40245 • Fall 2002
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as GK 390)

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 329L • Early Mod Phl: Descartes-Kant

39075-39090 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 302

This course is an introduction to early modern philosophy. The objectives of the class are to identify and analyze arguments in philosophical texts of the early modern period, and to become familiar with central themes and problems. Topics include causation, substance, and the possibility of knowledge. The relationship of philosophical theories to contemporary science will be an ongoing theme.

PHL 381 • Plato's Universe

39255 • Spring 2001
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

PHL 381 • Pre-Socratics

38675 • Spring 2000
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as GK 390)

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth - century philosophy. 

Curriculum Vitae


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