Department of Philosophy
Department of Philosophy

Michael Tye


ProfessorPhD, State University of New York at Buffalo

Contact

Interests


Philosophy of mind, metaphysics, philosophy of language

Biography


Professor Tye, one of the world's leading philosophers of mind, is the author of The Metaphysics of Mind (Cambridge, 1989), The Imagery Debate (MIT Press, 1991), Ten Problems of Consciousness: A Representational Theory of the Phenomenal Mind (MIT Press, 1995), Color, Consciousness, and Content (MIT Press, 2000), and Consciousness and Persons: Unity and Identity (Bradford, MIT, 2003), as well as dozens of articles in top philosophical journals. His recent papers include "Is Content-Externalism Compatible With Privileged Access?" (with Brian McLaughlin) (Philosophical Review, 1998), "Phenomenal Consciousness: The Explanatory Gap as a Cognitive Illusion" (Mind, 1999), "Vagueness and Reality" (Philosophical Topics, 2001), and "Of Colors, Kestrels, Caterpillars, and Leaves" (Journal of Philosophy, 2001, with Peter Bradley). Professor Tye has given talks at major symposia all over the world. In Spring 1997, he was invited to the University of Bielefeld in Germany for a week-long seminar on Ten Problems of Consciousness, which has also been the topic of a symposium in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. Professor Tye has taught at Haverford College and Temple University, and is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King's College, London.

Courses


PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42175-42200 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101
This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots, Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats. We will consider whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with mental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42625 • Fall 2016
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 316

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41470-41472 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots, Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats. We will consider whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41330-41355 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.122

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics coveredinclude whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, thereduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be capturedmaterialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very differentfrom ours, brains in vats. We will consider whether these strange charactershave thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for thesake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings withmental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

41805 • Fall 2015
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 316

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41585-41610 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.126

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42640-42665 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.126

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

43210 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 1:00PM-4:00PM WAG 312

Prerequisites

This course is restricted to graduate students in philosophy doctoral program.

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to

finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at

undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 40%

Teaching Observation Report 40%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

43005-43030 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 101

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-Phl Majors

42700 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 308

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 382 • Phl Of Mind: Color/Color Exper

42845 • Spring 2013
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 316

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and consent of instructor required.

Course Description

In this seminar we will discuss and evaluate a range of theories of color and of color experience – eliminativist, reductivist, dispositionalist, physicalist, etc.

Grading

Three short essays

Texts

Texts will include Byrne and Hilbert Readings on Color Vol 1: The Philosophy of Color MIT Press 1997

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42270-42295 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.122

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42780 • Fall 2012
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42245-42270 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42060-42085 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 100

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42670 • Fall 2011
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42720-42760 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM GSB 2.124

COURSE CONTENT

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.  We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots, Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats.... We will consider whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with mental lives.

 

Prerequisites: None

 

REQUIREMENTS

There are 2 closed book midterm tests and a closed book final exam.  All will be a combination of very short essay questions and questions of an analytical sort designed to test your understanding of the material covered. 

 

      Two midterm tests:  200

      One final exam:      100

                                       ---

                                      300

 

GRADING

A total of 300 points may be accrued through the whole course.  Attendance and class participation may contribute to raising the grades of students within a few points of the cutoff (but this is not guaranteed).  Individual letter grades per test or exam will NOT be recorded, only points earned are recorded.

 

ALL REQUIREMENTS MUST BE MET TO RECEIVE A FINAL GRADE.  This includes students taking the course on a pass/fail basis.

 

TEXTS

 There are three required texts:

     Paul Churchland, Matter and Consciousness

     David Papineau, Introducing Consciousness

     John Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality 

 

Some further readings are available on the web.

 

 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42100-42125 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 100

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42615 • Fall 2010
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42800-42840 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM PAI 3.02

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 382 • Attention

43325 • Spring 2010
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 312

Past topics include basic issues in metaphysics; particulars and universals; identity and individuation; realism and antirealism; mind-body issues. 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

43000-43025 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

43555 • Fall 2009
Meets F 12:00PM-3:00PM WAG 307

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41985-42025 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM PAI 3.02

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42900-42910 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

43485 • Spring 2008
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-W

44295 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 208

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 382 • Philosophy Of Mind

44425 • Fall 2007
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 316

Past topics include basic issues in metaphysics; particulars and universals; identity and individuation; realism and antirealism; mind-body issues. 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42505-42540 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-W

42925 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SZB 286

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

43515-43518 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WEL 2.246

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 382 • Physicalism

44240 • Fall 2006
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include basic issues in metaphysics; particulars and universals; identity and individuation; realism and antirealism; mind-body issues. 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41585-41620 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 375M • Perception-W

42340 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.120

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 380 • Problems Of Consciousness

42330 • Fall 2005
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include pragmatism; postmodernism; contemporary Marxism; critical theory. 

PSY 394U • Intro To Cognitive Science

43292 • Fall 2005
Meets W 2:30PM-5:30PM UTC 1.136

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

40150 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 2.312

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-W

40610 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 111

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-W

41700 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 210

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 380 • Externalism In Philos Of Mind

41860 • Fall 2004
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 316

Past topics include pragmatism; postmodernism; contemporary Marxism; critical theory. 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-W

40175 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 200

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 382 • Nonconceptual Content

40325 • Fall 2003
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include basic issues in metaphysics; particulars and universals; identity and individuation; realism and antirealism; mind-body issues. 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

38730-38765 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM TAY 2.006

Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? 

PHL 327 • Consciousness

39310-39325 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM ART 1.120

We will examine recent work in philosophy that is written from a Christian point of view or that examines philosophical questions that arise within the framework of the Christian faith. The issues to be covered include the relationship between faith and reason, the possibility of demonstrating the existence of God, the problem of evil, the problem of reconciling divine foreknowledge and sovereignty with human responsibility, and the relation of God to time.  Special emphasis will be placed on the relevance of Christian philosophy to foundational questions concerning reality, knowledge and ethics. 

Prerequisites: no prior work in philosophy is expected.  Non-majors are encouraged.

Texts:

G. K. Chesterton, St. Thomas Aquinas

C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

Josef Pieper, Leisure: The Basis of Culture

Francis A. Schaeffer, He is There and He is not Silent

Kelly J. Clark, Return to Reason

Phl 327 Supplemental Readings, available at UT Library electronic reserves. 

Evaluation:

• Three in-class exams (combination of essay and multiple choice): 25% each (including an in-class test on Dec. 7).  There will be an optional, comprehensive final that can be counted for 25% of the course grade, permitting a student to drop the lowest in-class test grade.

• Short papers (eight 2-page responses to the readings): 10%. Short papers are to be turned in at the beginning of class on Monday, responding to the coming week's reading.

• Class and section participation: 15%

• Optional term paper: due the last day of class.  2500-3000 words on a topic pre-approved by the instructor.  The term paper may be used to drop a low midterm grade, or in place of the third in-class exam, at the student's discretion.

 

Instructor: Prof. Rob Koons.  Phone: 471-5530.  koons@mail.utexas.edu

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-W

40055 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 313

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 382 • Consciousness

40247 • Fall 2002
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM WAG 210

Past topics include basic issues in metaphysics; particulars and universals; identity and individuation; realism and antirealism; mind-body issues. 

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