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Plan II Honors

Henry W. Brands


ProfessorPh.D., 1985, University of Texas at Austin

Henry W. Brands

Contact

Courses


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39045 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 106

The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

 

Required texts:

1. Revel online text, with online chapter exams.

2. The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr (paperback)

 

Grading:

 

There will be fifteen chapter exams, taken online, worth a total of 40 percent of the semester grade. There will be two in-class essay tests, worth 15 percent together. There will be two take-home essays, worth 15  percent. There will be one book review, worth 10 percent. Class participation will be worth 20 percent.

 

A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38480 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM BUR 106

Subject and themes

The course covers American history from the end of the Civil War to the present. The basic themes are (1) the struggle to define the boundary between the public sector and the private sector in American life, or between democracy and capitalism; and (2) the striking fact that a nation that professes to love peace has so often gone to war.

 

Course objectives

The course has two primary objectives: (1) to make students more familiar with the major events and developments of American history since the Civil War, and (2) to help students learn to think like historians: that is, to imagine how the world looked to people in the past, to try to understand why they did what they did, to formulate historical explanations and test them using historical evidence.

 

Texts:

Required materials

- Revel online text and quizzes for "The United States since 1865 - HIS 315L (38445)." The access code can be purchased athttps://console.pearson.com/enrollment/ejn4q2

 (Links to an external site.)

 or at the UT Co-op.

- The Murder of Jim Fisk for the Love of Josie Mansfield, paperback book. At UT Co-op.

- Four movies, to be assigned and placed on reserve.

 

Grading:

Assignments

 

Chapter quizzes

These online quizzes are in the Revel text. The deadline for each chapter is Friday at 6 pm. Extensions will be granted only for sudden documented illness or grave family emergency. Computer and network problems are not acceptable excuses. It is the responsibility of students to monitor their grades for the quizzes. The exams will add up to 40 percent of the semester grade.

 

Essays

Two, on topics to be assigned. 20 percent total.

 

Movie responses

Two, from prompts to be given. 15 percent total.

 

Book report

On The Murder of Jim Fisk for the Love of Josie Mansfield. 15 percent total.

 

Attendance

10 percent.

HIS 381 • Advanced Writing Workshop

38905 • Spring 2016
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 2.124
(also listed as WRT 380W)

Advanced Writing Workshop:  History’s Greatest Hits

The goal of the workshop is to enhance the writing skills of the participants, who will (1) read and discuss the works of great authors of history and (2) develop their own writing projects.

The weekly meetings will consist of discussions of the readings, and presentations by participants of their work. In the first two weeks, each student will devise a writing agenda for the semester, to be approved by the instructor. The finished product will be due on the last day of the class.

Grading:

Grades will be based on participation in the seminars and on the final products.

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38240 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 1.402

The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

 

Required texts:

1. Revel online text, with online chapter exams.

2. The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr (paperback)

 

Grading:

 

There will be fifteen chapter exams, taken online, worth a total of 40 percent of the semester grade. There will be two in-class essay tests, worth 15 percent together. There will be two take-home essays, worth 15  percent. There will be one book review, worth 10 percent. Class participation will be worth 20 percent.

 

A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38445 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 1.402

The course will cover American history from the end of the Civil War to the present.

The basic themes will be (1) the struggle to define the boundary between the public sector and the private sector in American life, or between democracy and capitalism; and (2) the striking fact that a nation that professes to love peace has so often gone to war.

 

Texts:

 American Stories, 2nd edition, volume 2, with MyHistoryLab access. The

book-and-access package can purchased at the UT Co-op. A digital edition (which includes volumes 1 and

2 together, plus MyHistoryLab) is available at www.mypearsonstore.com/bookstore/new-myhistorylabwith-

pearson-etext-instant-access-0205065600.

 

Grading:

 Chapter Exams: There will be one exam for each assigned textbook chapter. The exams will be taken

online in MyHistoryLab. The deadline for the exams is Friday at 12 noon. Extensions will be given only for

sudden documented illness or grave family emergency. Computer problems are not an acceptable excuse.

Each exam may be taken only once. It is the responsibility of students to monitor the MyHistoryLab

gradebook to see that their exam grades are being properly recorded. The exams will total to 40 percent of

the semester grade.

 Blue Book Tests: Three, in class. Students will write on one essay question per test, given below. Students

may bring one note card (3 by 5 inches) to class with notes. 20 percent total.

 Papers:Three, on documents provided on Canvas. Writing prompts are on Canvas also. 20 percent. The

papers will be submitted in class on the due dates.

 Classroom Exercises: Periodically during the semester, students will be given writing exercises in class.

These will be graded on a pass/fail basis. They will be unannounced and there will be no makeups without

approved excuse (documented illness, family emergency, etc.). 20 percent.

 Makeup and late policy: The Chapter Exams and the Papers will not be accepted after the deadlines. You

have plenty of lead time on these, so plan ahead and allow for the unforeseen. Makeups for the Blue Book

Tests will be given only for approved absences.

 Grades: A = 90s; B = 80s; C = 70s; D = 60s; F = below 60. Straight letter grades only; no +/-.

 Academic

HIS 365G • Hist Of American Presidency

38850 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 2.246

Subject

For more than a century, the presidency has occupied the center of American politics. Yet the modern presidency bears faint resemblance to the institution the founders created in the 1780s. This course will examine the presidency and the individuals who have held it, with an eye toward discovering trends of historical and contemporary interest. Topics will include the presidency in the Constitution, the emergence of political parties, the role of the president as diplomat-in-chief, the presidency and the sectional crisis, the president at war, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the president as a celebrity, the family lives of presidents, and the president and the evolving media.

Method

An essential part of the course will be the attempt to understand what goes into presidential decisions. Successful presidents differ from unsuccessful presidents chiefly in their ability to make good decisions: to do the right thing. How does a president know what is the right thing? Whose interests and opinions does he weigh? How does he enact or enforce right decisions? Students will examine case studies of crucial presidential decisions. By close reading of primary historical documents – letters, diaries, speeches, government documents, newspaper accounts – students will reconstruct the presidential decision process. They will make the arguments for and against presidential decisions. They will explain and defend the decisions they would have made in the president’s place.

Required books

George Washington, by James MacGregor Burns and Susan Dunn

Thomas Jefferson, by Joyce Appleby

Woodrow Wilson, by H. W. Brands

Harry S. Truman, by Robert Dallek

Richard M. Nixon, by Elizabeth Drew

Case study materials

Jefferson and the Louisiana Purchase

Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation

Theodore Roosevelt and Panama

Wilson and the Lusitania

Truman and the atom bomb

Nixon and the Pentagon Papers

Assignments

Daily in-class writing assignments (100 words each)

Two book reviews (500 words each)

Three case studies (1000 words each)

Grading

Daily writing assignments: 25 percent

Book reviews: 25 percent

Case studies: 50 percent

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39320 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM UTC 2.112A

The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

 

Texts:

Required text: H. W. Brands et al., American Stories, 2nd ed., vol. 1, with My History Lab.

 

Grading:

There will be fifteen chapter exams, taken online, worth a total of 40 percent of the semester grade. There will be three in-class essay tests, worth 20 percent. There will be three take-home essays, worth 20 percent.There will be no comprehensive final exam.

 

A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39710 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 2.112A

The course will cover all aspects of American history since the end of the Civil War. Topics will include industrialization, populism and progressivism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Great Depression and the New Deal, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, feminism, the gay rights movement, the Great Society, the Vietnam War, the Reagan Revolution, the end of the Cold War, the war on terror and the Great Recession.

T C 357 • 1960s: At Home And Abroad

43805 • Spring 2014
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM CRD 007A

The Sixties at Home and Abroad

The 1960s were an eventful decade for America. The civil rights revolution, the Great Society, the counterculture, feminism, and the realignment of political parties transformed American life at home. The Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Six Day War in the Middle East, the Cultural Revolution in China, and student revolts in dozens of countries reshaped the landscape of American foreign affairs. Students in this course will study the decade in general and one topic in detail. While reading and discussing a common set of books, they will choose research topics that can be investigated at one or more of the archives on campus. Each student will produce an original paper of publishable quality. 

 

Texts:

Malcolm X. The Autobiography of Malcolm X. ISBN: 9780345350688

Philip Caputo. A Rumor of War. 9780805046953

Norman Mailer. Armies of the Night. 9780452272798

Tom Wolfe. Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers. 9780553380620.

Hunter S. Thompson. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. 9780679785897

 

Assignments:

Two book reviews (500 words each)

Research paper (5000 words)

 

Grading: Participation in discussions (25%); book reviews (25%); paper (50%)

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39630 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 2.112A

The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

Texts:

Required text: H. W. Brands et al., American Stories, 2nd ed., vol. 1, with My History Lab.

Grading:

There will be fifteen chapter exams, taken online, worth a total of 40 percent of the semester grade. There will be three in-class essay tests, worth 20 percent. There will be three take-home essays, worth 20 percent.There will be no comprehensive final exam.

A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59.

HIS 381 • Adv Wrt Wrkshp: Hist Grt Hits

40065 • Fall 2013
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM SZB 284
(also listed as WRT 380W)

The goal of the workshop (reading seminar) is to enhance the writing skills of the participants, who will (1) read and discuss the works of great authors of history and (2) develop their own writing projects.

 

The weekly meetings will consist of discussions of the readings, and presentations by participants of their work. In the first two weeks, each student will devise a writing agenda for the semester, to be approved by the instructor. The finished product will be due on the last day of the class.

 

Grading:

Grades will be based on participation in the seminars and on the final products.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39350 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 2.112A

The course will cover all aspects of American history since the end of the Civil War. Topics will include industrialization, populism and progressivism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Great Depression and the New Deal, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, feminism, the gay rights movement, the Great Society, the Vietnam War, the Reagan Revolution, the end of the Cold War, the war on terror and the Great Recession.

HIS 376F • The Us And Second World War

39745 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.132

This course fulfills part of the requirements for the Normandy Scholars Program as well as part of the American history requirement for the University.  It explores American involvement in the Second World War.  Among the topics covered are: American isolationism; the controversy over Pearl Harbor and American entry into the war; the rise of air power and strategic bombing; the conduct of war and diplomacy; everyday life and politics on the home front; the experience of battle; the use of the atomic bomb; the seeds of the Cold War; and conflicting visions of the postwar world

No course can be encyclopedic.  This one will divide its time between events in Europe and the Pacific without trying to cover either theater in all its detail.  Two events, one in each theater, will serve as case studies for in-depth analysis: 1) the D-Day invasion and the opening of the “Second Front” in Europe; and 2) the atomic bombs and the surrender of Japan in the Pacific.

 

Texts:

David Kennedy, The American People in World War II

E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

John W. Dower, War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War

Michael B. Stoff et al., eds., The Manhattan Project: A Documentary Introduction

to the Atomic Age

Cornelius Ryan, The Longest Day

John Hersey, A Bell for Adano

 

Grading:

Class work consists of lectures and discussions of weekly reading assignments, lectures, and films.  Discussions constitute 20 percent of the course grade.  Five in-class quizzes based on lectures and readings make up another 20 percent of the grade.  A research paper, done in three stages, serves as the written portion of the workload and is worth 50 percent of the course grade.  Each student will also present his or her work orally.  The oral presentation is worth 10 percent of the grade.

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39165 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM WCH 1.120

The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

 

Required text: H. W. Brands et al., American Stories, 1st ed., vol. 1, with My History Lab.

 

Tests: There will be three tests, each worth one sixth of the semester grade and consisting of identifications and short essays. Each test will cover one third of the course material. There will be no comprehensive final exam.

 

Papers: There will be three papers of 500 words each, and each worth one sixth of the semester grade. Each paper will analyze one of the assigned documents, placing it in historical context and assessing its argument or description.

 

Grading: A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59. No plus/minus.

 

This course partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 350R • History Of The Amer Presidency

39445 • Fall 2012
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 2.128

Description:

For more than a century, the presidency has occupied the center of American politics. Yet the modern presidency bears faint resemblance to the institution the Founders framed in the 1780s. This course will examine the presidency and the individuals who have held it, with an eye toward discovering trends of historical and contemporary interest. Topics will include the presidency as conceived by the framers of the Constitution, the emergence of political parties, the role of the president as diplomat-in-chief, the presidency and the sectional crisis, the president at war, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the president as a celebrity, the family lives of presidents, and the president and the evolving media.

 

Readings:

H. W. Brands, A Brief History of the Presidency (in progress)

Richard E. Neustadt, Presidential Power

David McCullough, John Adams

Garry Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg

John Milton Cooper, The Warrior and the Priest

Robert A. Divine, Roosevelt and World War II

Ronald Reagan, The Reagan Diaries

 

Assignments:

Students will write two book reviews (500 words each) and one research paper (5000 words). The reviews will cover books from the common reading list. The paper will examine one president in detail.

 

Grading

Class preparation and participation: 25%

Book reviews: 25%

Research paper: 50%

HIS 333M • Us Foreign Relatns, 1914-Pres

39305 • Spring 2012
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 0.102

Course Description

The course will cover the history of American foreign relations from the early twentieth century to the present. It will focus on a single question:  Why has America gone to war?

Texts

Woodrow Wilson, by H. W. Brands

The Specter of Communism, by Melvyn P. Leffler

The Vietnam War, by Mark Atwood Lawrence

The Commanders, by Bob Woodward

The Limits of Power, by Andrew J. Bacevich

Quizzes: Five short quizzes on the books. 5 points eachDocument summaries: Five 250-word summaries of five documents, identifying the main points and setting in historicalcontext. 5 points eachPaper: A 1000-word essay answering the question "Why has America gone to war?" 50 points

 

HIS 381 • Adv Wrt Wrkshp: Hist Grt Hits

39645 • Spring 2012
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as WRT 380W)

The goal of the workshop is to enhance the writing skills of the participants, who will (1) read and discuss the works of great authors of history and (2) develop their own writing projects. 

 

The weekly meetings will consist of discussions of the readings, and presentations by participants of their work. In the first two weeks, each student will devise a writing agenda for the semester, to be approved by the instructor. The finished product will be due on the last day of the class. 

 

Grades will be based on participation in the seminars and on the final products.

 

Schedule (all readings can be found on the Blackboard site for the course):

Week 1: Introduction

Week 2: Herodotus

Week 3: Tacitus

Week 4: Caesar

Week 5: Plutarch

Week 6:  Cellini

Week 7:  Shakespeare

Week 8:  Gibbon

Week 9:  Franklin

Week 10: Carlyle, Dickens

Week 11: Parkman

Week 12:  Tolstoy

Week 13:  Strachey

Week 14: Adams

Week 15:  Summaries

 

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39130 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM WCH 1.120

The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

 

Required text: H. W. Brands et al., American Stories, 1st ed., vol. 1, with My History Lab.

 

Tests: There will be three tests, each worth one sixth of the semester grade and consisting of identifications and short essays. Each test will cover one third of the course material. There will be no comprehensive final exam.

 

Papers: There will be three papers of 500 words each, and each worth one sixth of the semester grade. Each paper will analyze one of the assigned documents, placing it in historical context and assessing its argument or description.

 

Grading: A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59. No plus/minus.

 

This course partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

T C 357 • The Sixties At Home And Abroad

42930 • Fall 2011
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM CRD 007A

Description

The 1960s weren’t as big a deal at the time as they have often seemed afterward. But they were eventful nonetheless. The civil rights revolution, the Great Society, the counterculture, and the emergence of new media transformed American life at home. The Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Six Day War in the Middle East, the Cultural Revolution in China, and student revolts in dozens of countries reshaped the landscape of international affairs.    Luckily for students at the University of Texas, there are few better places to study the 1960s than Austin. The LBJ Library, the Center for American History, and the Harry Ransom Center house documents and other materials that shed primary light on the decade and allow scholars to engage its issues as directly as historians ever can.    Students in this class will become their own historians.

After reading and discussing a common set of books, the students will choose research topics that can be investigated at one or more of the archives on campus. Each student’s research will culminate in an original paper of between 6,000 and 8,000 words, and of potentially publishable quality.    Besides attuning students to the issues and events of the 1960s, the course will allow students to decide whether they like doing original historical research. For some students, the research project will lead naturally into a senior thesis; for some of these and perhaps for some others, it will inspire them to do graduate work in history.

For all the students, the course will enable them to discover—through their own experience—how the past is recreated by and for the present.

Readings

Terry Anderson, The Sixties George Herring, America’s Longest War Paul Conkin, Big Daddy from the Pedernales

Requirements

Reviews of two of the three books:Proposal, outline, introduction, half draft, full draft, final version of a major research paper

About the Professor

H. W. Brands writes about and teaches American history, broadly conceived. His books and articles cover topics from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first, and include works of narrative history, interpretive history, and biography. He examines politics and foreign policy, business and economics, society and culture. He is currently writing a general history of the United States during the Gilded Age. His classes include introductory surveys, upper-division lecture courses, and undergraduate and graduate seminars. His graduate students have written dissertations and theses on diverse aspects of American politics and foreign policy. His former students have taken jobs at research universities, at liberal arts and community colleges, in government and non-profit agencies, and in private business.

HIS 333M • Us Foreign Relatns, 1914-Pres

39570 • Spring 2011
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WCH 1.120

This course introduces the history of American foreign relations from the First World War to the present. During this period, the United States fully joined the ranks of the great powers and then, following a period of hesitation, surpassed all its rivals in exercising influence around the world. We will explore the course and causes of this rise to power and seek to understand current dilemmas and debates within their historical context.

 

The class aims for both breadth and depth. Some lectures and readings are aimed at providing a wide view of the political, economic, and ideological currents that fed into the making of foreign policy. Other lectures and readings focus on particular topics – the debate over the League of Nations, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Vietnam War, the American interventions in Central America during the 1980s, and the American response to the September 11 attacks, among others.

 

Texts:

Emily Rosenberg, Spreading the American Dream;

James Mann, Rise of the Vulcans;

Melvin Leffler, The Specter of Communism;

Mark Danner, Massacre at El Mozote;

Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler, Fail-Safe.

 

Grading:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of a midterm (30 percent of term grade), paper (30 percent), and final (40 percent).

HIS 381 • Adv Wrt Wrkshp: Hist Grt Hits

39950 • Spring 2011
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as WRT 380S)

A workshop for graduate students devoted to the craft of writing history in both nonfiction and fictional form. Students will read selections from some of the greatest writers of history (Herodotus, Plutarch, Gibbon, Carlyle, Parkman, Dickens, Tolstoy, Strachey, and many others), and will assess what makes for compelling historical writing. Students will meanwhile develop writing projects of their own. Some students will bring drafts to the workshop and polish these. Other students will commence drafts during the semester. All will present their works-in-progress to the seminar, with the ultimate goal of writing history in the most riveting manner possible.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39105 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 1.308

HIS 315L - The United States Since 1865 - 39105
MW 3:30-5:00 - WEL 1.308
H. W. Brands - GAR 3.306 – W 2:30-3:30 and 5-6 -
hwbrands@mail.utexas.edu

TAs: Jessica Achberger (SI), Neel Baumgardner, Peter Hamilton

Themes: The basic themes of the course will be

1. The struggle to define the boundary between the public sector and the private sector in American life, or between democracy and capitalism

2. The striking fact that a nation that professes to love peace has so often gone to war

Textbook: H. W. Brands et al., American Stories, volume 2, with My History Lab (digital resources)

Tests: Three, worth 20 percent of the course grade each. Identifications and short essays. There will be no final exam.

Papers: Two, 20 percent each.

1. A 750-word analysis of one of the documents assigned for the course. Identify the key points of the document, place it in historical context, assess its accuracy and importance.

2. A 750-word essay explaining either (a) how democracy and capitalism have cooperated and conflicted in American history since 1865, or (b) how and why America has gone to war and what it has accomplished in doing so. In either case cite specific examples to support general statements and evaluations.

 

Academic accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

 

Schedule

 

Week of Aug 25
American Stories
chapter 16
Document: Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments (1865-70)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3558070-content,00.html

 

Aug 30
American Stories
chapters 17-18
Document: Accounts of the Wounded Knee massacre (1890)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124543-content,00.html

 

Sept 6
American Stories
chapter 19
Document:  Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3558072-content,00.html

 

Sept 13
American Stories
chapter 20
Document: Mary Elizabeth Lease, “The Popular Crusader” (1892)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124813-content,00.html

 

Sept 20       (Test 1 Sept 20 on chapters 16-20 and corresponding documents)
American Stories
chapter 21
Document: Platt Amendment (1901)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124861-content,00.html

 

Sept 27
American Stories
chapter 22
Document: Mary Antin, from The Promised Land (1912)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124811-content,00.html

 

Oct 4
American Stories
chapter 23
Document: Louis Brandeis, from Other People’s Money (1913)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124797-content,00.html

 

Oct 11
American Stories
chapter 24
Document: President Wilson’s war message to Congress (1917)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124874-content,00.html

 

Oct 18       (Paper 1 Oct 18)
American Stories
chapter 25
Document: Immigration Act (1924)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124528-content,00.html

 

Oct 25
American Stories
chapter 26
Document: Huey Long, “Share Our Wealth” (1935)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124705-content,00.html

 

Nov 1        (Test 2 Nov 1 on chapters 21-26 and documents)
American Stories
chapter 27
Document: Franklin D. Roosevelt, “The Four Freedoms” (1941)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124661-content,00.html

 

Nov 8
American Stories
chapter 28
Document: Harry S Truman, Address to Congress (Truman Doctrine) (1947)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124690-content,00.html

 

Nov 15
American Stories
chapter 29
Document: From Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124584-content,00.html

 

Nov 22       (Paper 2 Nov 22)
American Stories
chapter 30
Document: LBJ on Vietnam (1965
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3124873-content,00.html

 

Nov 29       (Test 3 Dec 1 on chapters 27-32 and documents)
American Stories
chapters 31-32
Document: George W. Bush, “National Security Strategy of the United States of America” (2002)
http://wpscms.pearsoncmg.com/long_longman_mhlus_0/0,11867,3125123-content,00.html

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 350R • America At War

39310 • Fall 2010
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM CBA 4.340

HIS 350R • America at War • 39310 • M 5-8 • CBA 4.340
H. W. Brands • GAR 3.306 • W 2:30-3:30, 5-6 • hwbrands@mail.utexas.edu

“Why is there war?”  ~  There is a fundamental paradox in American history: that a nation that considers itself peace-loving has gone to war more often than any other nation during the last two centuries. The course will examine why and how America has gone to war and whether America’s wars have accomplished what Americans expected.  ~  Students will investigate all major wars from the Revolutionary War to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. They will comment on the readings orally and in writing and will research one war in depth, producing an original paper answering the question, for the conflict of their choice, “Why is there war?”

 

Grading
Two reviews of 500 words each – 20 percent together
One research paper of 3000 words – 60 percent
Class participation – 20 percent

 

Texts
Robert Divine. Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace. ISBN 9781585441051
James McPherson. For Cause and Comrades. 9780195124996
Kristin Hoganson. Fighting for American Manhood. 9780300085549
H. W. Brands. Woodrow Wilson. 9780805069556
Michael Beschloss. The Conquerors. 9780743244541
Mark Lawrence. The Vietnam War. 9780199753932

 

Schedule
Aug 30: Divine
Sept 6: McPherson. Review 1
Sept 13: Hoganson
Sept 20: Brands. Paper proposal
Sept 27: Beschloss
Oct 4: Bibliography
Oct 11: Lawrence. Review 2
Oct 18: Outline
Oct 25: Introduction (300 words)
Nov 1: First section draft (750 words)
Nov 8: Second section draft (750 words)
Nov 15: Third section draft (750 words)
Nov 22: Conclusion (450 words)
Nov 29: Final version of whole paper

This course contains a Writing and an Independent Inquiry flag.

HIS 355F • The United States, 1877-1920

39740 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 112

History 355F (39740) / The United States, 1877–1920
Spring 2010 / MW 3:30–5 / Burdine 112
H W Brands (GAR 3.306; W 1:30-3:30; hwbrands@mail.utexas.edu)

 

Teaching assistant:

Summary: The course will cover all aspects of American history from the end of Reconstruction to the end of World War I. The basic themes of the course will be the ongoing contest between capitalism and democracy, and the emergence of the United States as a world power.

 

Required books

Booker T. Washington. Up from Slavery. ISBN-13: 978-1449547776
John G. Neihardt. Black Elk Speaks. 978-1438425405
Willa Cather. My Antonia. 978-0743487696
H. W. Brands. The Reckless Decade. 978-0226071169
William L. Riordon. Plunkitt of Tammany Hall. 978-1607960126
H. W. Brands. Woodrow Wilson. 978-0805069556

 

Tests: There will be two tests, each worth one fifth of the semester grade and consisting of identifications and short essays. Each test will cover one half of the course material. There will be no comprehensive final exam.

Papers: There will be two papers of 1000 words each, in which students will elaborate on a topic or theme from one of the assigned books. The papers will require additional research, and will include bibliographies. Each paper will be worth one fifth of the semester grade.

Class participation: Attendance, preparation, and contribution to discussion are essential, and will count one fifth of the semester grade.

Grading: A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59. No plus/minus.

Academic accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

 

Schedule

Jan 20                    Introduction
Jan 25-27               The legacy of Reconstruction. Read Up from Slavery
Feb 1-3                  Industrializing America                
Feb 8-10                The war for the Plains. Black Elk Speaks
Feb 15-17              Old cities and new
Feb 22-24               Settling the West, once and for all. My Antonia
Mar 1-3                  Immigrants and their worlds. Paper 1 (Mar 3)
Mar 8-10                The money question and other chestnuts. Test 1 (Mar 10)
Mar 22-24              Republicans, Democrats, Populists. The Reckless Decade
Mar 29-3               Temptations of empire
Apr 5-7                  Bully!
Apr 12-4               The progressive reformers. Plunkitt of Tammany Hall
Apr 19-21              Dollar diplomacy
Apr 26-28              World War I. Woodrow Wilson. Paper 2 (Apr 28)
May 3-5                 The failure of the peace. Test 2 (May 5)

HIS 381 • Adv Wrt Wrkshp: Hist Grt Hits

39905 • Spring 2010
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 1.122

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865

39705 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM GAR 0.102

History 315K (39705)
The United States to 1865
Fall 2009 — MW 3-4:30 — GAR 0.102
H. W. Brands (GAR 3.306; hwbrands@mail.utexas.edu; M 1-3 and by appt.)

Teaching assistants: Rachel Hermann (SI), Yehonathan Brodski

Summary: The course will cover all aspects of American history to the end of the Civil War. The basic themes of the course will be the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government, and the expansion of American territory.

Required text: H. W. Brands et al., American Stories, 1st ed., vol. 1, with My History Lab.

Tests: There will be three tests, each worth one sixth of the semester grade and consisting of identifications and short essays. Each test will cover one third of the course material. There will be no comprehensive final exam.

Papers: There will be three papers of 500 words each, and each worth one sixth of the semester grade. Each paper will analyze one of the assigned documents, placing it in historical context and assessing its argument or description.

Grading: A = 90 to 100. B = 80 to 89. C = 70 to 79. D = 60 to 69. F = 0 to 59. No plus/minus.

Supplemental Instruction: This class will include Supplemental Instruction discussion sections (SI).  These optional sessions, led by Rachel Hermann,  will help reinforce and clarify course content. Regular participation in SI discussions has been shown to improve students' performance significantly.

Academic accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

Schedule
Aug. 26                   AS 1-2; Cabeza de Vaca, “Indians of the Rio Grande,” from MHL
Aug. 31 – Sept. 2     AS 3; Olaudah Equiano, “The Middle Passage”
Sept. 9                    AS 4; Jonathan Edwards, “Sinners in the Hands”
Sept. 14-16             AS 5; Franklin against the Stamp Act
Sept. 21-23             AS 6; Publius (Madison), Federalist Number 10; Test 1
Sept. 28-30             AS 7; Washington’s Farewell Address; Paper 1
Oct. 5-7                  AS 8; Jefferson to Meriwether Lewis
Oct. 12-14              AS 9; Memorial of the Cherokee Nation
Oct. 19-21              AS 10; Davy Crockett
Oct. 26-28              AS 11; Frederick Law Olmsted; Test 2
Nov. 2-4                 AS 12; Elizabeth Cady Stanton; Paper 2
Nov. 9-11               AS 13; William B. Travis
Nov. 16-18             AS 14; George Fitzhugh
Nov. 23                  AS 15; Lincoln, Gettysburg Address
Nov. 30 – Dec. 2     Test 3; Paper 3

T C 357 • 1960s At Home And Abroad

43835 • Fall 2009
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM CRD 007B

TC357 - 43835
The Sixties at Home and Abroad
Fall 2009; W 12 - 3; CRD 007B
H. W. Brands
(hwbrands@mail.utexas.edu; GAR 3.306;
M 1 -3 and by appt)
 
The 1960s weren’t quite as big a deal at the
time as they have often seemed afterward,
but they were eventful nonetheless. The civil
rights revolution, the Great Society, the
counterculture, and the emergence of new
media transformed American life at home.
The Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Six
Day War in the Middle East, the Cultural
Revolution in China, and student revolts in
dozens of countries reshaped the landscape
of international affairs.
 Luckily for students at the
University of Texas, there are few better
places to study the 1960s than Austin. The
LBJ Library, the Briscoe Center for
American History, and the Harry Ransom
Center house documents and other materials
that shed primary light on the decade and
allow scholars to engage its issues as
directly as historians ever can.
 Students in this course will become
their own historians. While reading and
discussing a common set of books, the
students will choose research topics that can
be investigated at one or more of the
archives on campus. Each student’s research
will culminate in an original paper of about
5000 words and of potentially publishable
quality.
 Besides attuning students to the
issues and events of the 1960s, the course
will allow students to decide whether they
like doing original historical research. For
some students, the research project will lead
naturally into a senior thesis; for some of
these and perhaps for some others, it will
inspire them to do graduate work in history.
For all the students, the course will enable
them to discover—through their own
experience—how the past is recreated by
and for the present.
 
 
Texts:
Malcolm X. The Autobiography of Malcolm
X. ISBN: 9780345350688
Philip Caputo. A Rumor of War.
9780805046953
Norman Mailer. Armies of the Night.
9780452272798
Tom Wolfe. Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing
the Flak Catchers. 9780553380620.
Hunter S. Thompson. Fear and Loathing in
Las Vegas. 9780679785897
 
Assignments:
Two book reviews (500 words each).
Proposal, bibliography, outline,
introduction, half draft, full draft, final
version of major research paper
 
Grading:
Participation in seminar: 25 percent
Book reviews: 25 percent
Paper: 50 percent
 
Academic accommodations: The
University of Texas at Austin provides
upon request appropriate academic
accommodations for qualified students
with disabilities. For more information
contact the Office of the Dean of
Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.
 
Schedule:
Aug 26. Introduction
Sep 2. Malcolm X. First thoughts re papers 
Sep 9. Review of Malcolm X 
Sep 16. Caputo. Paper proposal
Sep 23. Bibliography
Sep 30. Mailer
Oct 7. Outline
Oct 14. Wolfe. Review of Wolfe
Oct 21. Introduction
Oct 28. Thompson
Nov 4. Half draft
Nov 11. Conclusion
Nov 18. Full draft
Nov 25. (no class)
Dec 2. Final papers

HIS 350L • America At War-W

39100 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 2.112

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 333M • Us Foreign Relatns, 1914-Pres

40185 • Fall 2008
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM WEL 2.308

This course introduces the history of American foreign relations from the First World War to the present. During this period, the United States fully joined the ranks of the great powers and then, following a period of hesitation, surpassed all its rivals in exercising influence around the world. We will explore the course and causes of this rise to power and seek to understand current dilemmas and debates within their historical context.

 

The class aims for both breadth and depth. Some lectures and readings are aimed at providing a wide view of the political, economic, and ideological currents that fed into the making of foreign policy. Other lectures and readings focus on particular topics – the debate over the League of Nations, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Vietnam War, the American interventions in Central America during the 1980s, and the American response to the September 11 attacks, among others.

 

Texts:

Emily Rosenberg, Spreading the American Dream;

James Mann, Rise of the Vulcans;

Melvin Leffler, The Specter of Communism;

Mark Danner, Massacre at El Mozote;

Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler, Fail-Safe.

 

Grading:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of a midterm (30 percent of term grade), paper (30 percent), and final (40 percent).

HIS 381 • Seminar In Writing

40535 • Fall 2008
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 2.134

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 381 • Advanced Writing Workshop

40400 • Spring 2008
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM GAR 1.122

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

40665-40710 • Fall 2007
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM ART 1.102

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 389 • Us Diplomatic History

41270 • Fall 2007
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM BUR 234

 

 

 

HIS 333M • Us Foreign Relatns, 1914-Pres

39560 • Spring 2007
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM WAG 214

This course introduces the history of American foreign relations from the First World War to the present. During this period, the United States fully joined the ranks of the great powers and then, following a period of hesitation, surpassed all its rivals in exercising influence around the world. We will explore the course and causes of this rise to power and seek to understand current dilemmas and debates within their historical context.

 

The class aims for both breadth and depth. Some lectures and readings are aimed at providing a wide view of the political, economic, and ideological currents that fed into the making of foreign policy. Other lectures and readings focus on particular topics – the debate over the League of Nations, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Vietnam War, the American interventions in Central America during the 1980s, and the American response to the September 11 attacks, among others.

 

Texts:

Emily Rosenberg, Spreading the American Dream;

James Mann, Rise of the Vulcans;

Melvin Leffler, The Specter of Communism;

Mark Danner, Massacre at El Mozote;

Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler, Fail-Safe.

 

Grading:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of a midterm (30 percent of term grade), paper (30 percent), and final (40 percent).

HIS 381 • Advanced Writing Workshop

39915 • Spring 2007
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM BUR 554

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865

40215 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 106

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

 

HIS 350L • Lyndon Johnson/His Times-W

40630 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BUR 228

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 333M • Diplomat Hist Of Us Since 1890

38715 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GEO 2.216

This course introduces the history of American foreign relations from the First World War to the present. During this period, the United States fully joined the ranks of the great powers and then, following a period of hesitation, surpassed all its rivals in exercising influence around the world. We will explore the course and causes of this rise to power and seek to understand current dilemmas and debates within their historical context.

 

The class aims for both breadth and depth. Some lectures and readings are aimed at providing a wide view of the political, economic, and ideological currents that fed into the making of foreign policy. Other lectures and readings focus on particular topics – the debate over the League of Nations, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Vietnam War, the American interventions in Central America during the 1980s, and the American response to the September 11 attacks, among others.

 

Texts:

Emily Rosenberg, Spreading the American Dream;

James Mann, Rise of the Vulcans;

Melvin Leffler, The Specter of Communism;

Mark Danner, Massacre at El Mozote;

Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler, Fail-Safe.

 

Grading:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of a midterm (30 percent of term grade), paper (30 percent), and final (40 percent).

HIS 381 • Advanced Writing Workshop

39085 • Spring 2006
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.122

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

38335 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GEO 2.216

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 389 • Us Diplomatic History

38935 • Fall 2005
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM UTC 1.142

 

 

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

37045-37085 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM ART 1.102

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

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