Plan II Honors Logo
Plan II Honors

Elizabeth L. Keating


ProfessorPh.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Elizabeth L. Keating

Contact

Interests


Linguistic Anthropology, Cross-Cultural Communication, New Communication Technologies, Multimodal Communication, Visual Anthropology, American Sign Language,

Biography


Elizabeth Keating is a professor of Anthropology and past director of the Science, Technology and Society program in the College of Liberal Arts. She is a former editor of the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, and has over 50 publications in research journals and one book with Oxford University Press. Her research interests include social impacts of new communication technologies, the role of language in social stratification, language and space (including computer gaming space), multimodality, sign language, and cross-cultural engineering design collaborations. She has conducted fieldwork in Micronesia, the U.S., Romania, India, Brazil, and Germany. For more information and a list of publications see http://www.elizabeth-keating.com

 

Courses


ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

30595 • Spring 2016
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.116

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

41960 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 5.102

Description:

Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language and other symbolic forms in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

 

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

Delaney, Carol, Investigating Culture

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, Brazil, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30475 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.112

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

30825 • Spring 2015
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.116

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

42285 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.102

Description:

Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language and other symbolic forms in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

Delaney, Carol, Investigating Culture

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, Brazil, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching.

 

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31420 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.112

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

31910 • Spring 2014
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.116

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

43645 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.102

Description:

Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language and other symbolic forms in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

 

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

Delaney, Carol, Investigating Culture

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, Brazil, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching.

 

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31265 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the fascinating world of human communication as it emerges within particular cultures and shapes habits, thoughts, and emotions. Students will be able to  sharpen their skills and develop new skills in meta-level analysis of how people use language and other symbolic forms to maintain power or to express identity. Understanding how the everyday language people use is interpreted is an essential part of successful cross cultural communication. We look at both the principles of everyday communication and the many creative ways people use these principles in different cultures. Language shapes unique ways of thinking and of interpreting the world.

 

ANT 393 • Language And Power

31635 • Fall 2013
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.116

This course explores notions of power as they emerge and are constructed in language, ways in which linguistic exchanges can express relations of power, and the role that power can play in the structure of human interaction. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language and power across a range of disciplines and cultures. Early on in the course students will collect language data from a context of their choice, and this data will be analyzed both collaboratively and individually in terms of the concepts and issues examined in the readings and in class discussions.

ANT 393 • Anthropology Of Lang & Gender

31520 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.116
(also listed as LIN 392, WGS 393)

 This course explores ideas about gender as they emerge through language and embodied behavior, and the role gender plays in the structure of human interaction and human society. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language and gender across a range of disciplines and cultures. Early on in the course students will collect language data from a context of their choice, and this data will be analyzed both collaboratively and individually in terms of the concepts and issues examined in the readings and in class discussions.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

42845 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 2.256

Description: Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

 

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

 

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30940 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 216

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 393 • Esociety: Cul, Tech And Comm

31210 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.116

 This course is an introduction to aspects of culture and sociality as they are emerging through technological or computer mediated means. The goals of the course are to introduce students to emerging issues in creating and participating in electronically mediated interactions, and to develop skills in investigating and understanding the roles that technology plays in mediating sign systems that influence culture and ways of thinking. We will also look at the role that culture plays in understanding technology. Readings discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological, technical, and anthropological contributions to the understanding what we are coming to know as E-Society.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

31520 • Spring 2011
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.116
(also listed as LIN 396)

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

43335 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 2.256

Description:

Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

 

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching. 

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30030 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 116
(also listed as LIN 312)

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the study of language use from a sociocultural perspective and to develop skills (through collecting language data) in analyzing the role that language plays in the construction of culture and in the interpretation of human interaction. Topics discussed in lectures and readings include ethnicity, identity, power, status, and gender as these ideas are constructed and negotiated through language.


ANT 393 • Anthropology Of Lang & Gender

30365 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128
(also listed as LIN 392, WGS 393)

This course explores notions of gender as they emerge and are constructed in language in interaction, and the role that gender plays in the structure of human interaction. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language and gender across a range of disciplines and cultures.

ANT 393 • Language And Power

30635 • Spring 2010
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA
(also listed as LIN 396)

ANTHROPOLOGY 393, LINGUISTICS 396

TOPICS IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY: LANGUAGE AND POWER

Wednesday 9-12, Spring 2010, Unique # 30635, EPS 1.130KA

 

Professor:            Elizabeth Keating

                        Office: EPS 2.206, phone 471-8518, email: ekeating@mail.utexas.edu,

                        Office hours: Tuesday 1-3

 

This course explores notions of power as they emerge and are constructed in language, ways in which linguistic exchanges can express relations of power, and the role that power can play in the structure of human interaction. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language and power across a range of disciplines and cultures. Early on in the course students will collect language data from a context of their choice, and this data will be analyzed both collaboratively and individually in terms of the concepts and issues examined in the readings and in class discussions.

 

Work and Grading: Students will be responsible for short written summaries of weekly class readings to be emailed to the professor and the other seminar members before class, one individual research paper, and an oral presentation.

 

Books & Other Materials:

 

Wetherell, Margaret, Stephanie Taylor, and Simeon Yates. 2001/2005. Discourse Theory and Practice.

            Sage Publications (DTP)

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1994. Language and Symbolic Power, Harvard University Press (LSP)

Drew, Paul and John Heritage. 1992. Talk at Work. Cambridge University Press. (TW)

Anderson, Benedict. 2006. Language and Power. Equinox Publishing (LP)

Pdf’s of some readings on the Blackboard site for the class; please download the journal articles cited

 

Week 1 (January 20) Introduction, Course Mechanics

 

 

 Week 2 (January 27) Introduction, Language and Power

 

Bourdieu (LSP), pages 1-42 (various Introductions)

Kress, Gunther (in DTP), Reading 2. From Sassure to Critical Sociolinguisitcs: the turn towards a

            social view of language.

Potter, Jonathan (in DTP), Reading 3. Wittgenstein and Austin.

Dumont, Louis. 1970. From Homo Hierarchicus, pp. 1-21.

Collins, P.  1993. Black Feminist Thought in the Matrix of Domination  from: Lemert, C., ed. Social Theory.

            San Francisco: Westview Press.

Anderson, B. 2006 (LP) Part I, Power, Chapters 1 and 2

 

 

Week  3 (February 3) Prelude

 

Giddens, A. 1987. Structuralism, Post-structuralism and the Production of Culture, from A. Giddens and J. Turner. Social Theory Today. Stanford: Polity Press

Foucault, M. 1972.  The Unities of Discourse, from: The Archaeology of Knowledge, NY: Pantheon

Weatherall. 2005. Reading 7, 16           

Anderson, B. 2006 (LP) Part II, Language, Chapters 4 and 5

 

 

Week  4 (February 10) Signs, Sentences, Meaning

 

Wetherall et al., Reading 4, 6, 8

Goffman, E.  1956. The Nature of Deference and Demeanor  from: Interaction Ritual: Essays on face-to-face

            Behavior, NY: Pantheon Books

Brown, R. and Gilman, A. 1960. The Pronouns of Power and Solidarity. In Sebeok, T., ed. Style in

            Language. MIT Press.

 

 

 

Week  5 (February 17)   Methodologies, Contexts

 

Weatherall, Reading 9, 11, 12, 22

Goodwin, C. 2007.  Formulating the Triangle of Doom. Gesture, 7(1). pp. 97-118.

Taylor, T. 2006/2009. Beyond Fun. Instrumental Play and Power Gamers. In Play Between Worlds: Exploring

            Online Game Culture. MIT Press           

 

 

 

Week 6 (February 24) Talk at Work: Micro-Analysis of Talk-in-Interaction

 

Drew, P. and J. Heritage, 1992. Analyzing Talk at Work: an Introduction, from Talk at Work, Cambridge

            University Press.

Gumperz, J.1992. Interviewing in Intercultural Situations, from Drew and Heritage Talk at Work.

Drew, P. 1992. Contested Evidence in Courtroom Cross-Examination: the Case of a Trial for Rape, from

            Drew and Heritage Talk at Work.

Weatherall, Reading 9

 

 

 

Week 7 (March 3) Theory and Practice: Cross-Cultural Issues

 

Bourdieu, Chapters 1, 3

Bloch, M. Introduction, from M. Bloch, ed. Political Language and Oratory in Traditional Society. NY: Academic

            Press.

Kuipers, Joel. 2007. Comments on ritual unintelligibility.  Text & Talk, 27, 4: 559-566

Gal, S. 1995. Language and the "Arts of Resistance" Cultural Anthropology, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 407-424           

 

 

Week 8.  (March 10) Political Field (s)

 

Bourdieu (LSP), Chapters 7, 8, 9

Keating, E. 1998. Honor and Stratification in Pohnpei, Micronesia. American Ethnologist, 25(3):399-411.                                                             http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~ekeating/Publications/AmerEthnol.pdf

McElhinny, Bonnie. 2003. Fearful, Forceful Agents of the Law: Ideologies about Language and Gender in Police

            Officers’ Narratives about the Use of Physical Force. Pragmatics 13(2):253-284.

 

 

Week 9 (March 17) Spring Break

 

 

Week 10 (March 24) Constructing Authority

 

Bourdieu, Chapter 4, 5

Keating, E. 1997. Honorific Possession: Power and Language in Pohnpei, Micronesia. Language in Society, 26(2):

            247-268. http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~ekeating/Publications/Honorific%20Possession.pdf

Cohn, Carol. 1987. Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals. Signs: Journal of Women

                                                in Culture and Society, vol 12, no. 4

 

 

Week 11 (March 31) More Constructing Authority

 

Bourdieu, Chapter 6, 2,

Philips, S. 1993. Evidentiary Standards for American Trials. From J. Hill and J. Irvine, eds. Responsibility and

            Evidence in Oral Discourse, Cambridge University Press

Irvine, J.  1993. Insult and Responsibility: verbal abuse in a Wolof Village. From J. Hill and J. Irvine, eds.

            Responsibility and Evidence in Oral Discourse, Cambridge University Press

 

 

Week 12 (April 7) Gender, Language and Power

 

LaFrance, M. & E. Hahn.1994. The Disappearing Agent from: Roman, Juhasz, and Miller, The Women and

            Language Debate. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers Univ. Press.

hooks, b. 1990.  Reflections on Race and Sex  and  Representations: Feminism and Black Masculinity 

            from hooks, b. Yearning: Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics. Boston: South End Press.

Weatherall, Reading 24

Goodwin, M. 2003. The Relevance of Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Children's Peer Negotiations. In Handbook

            of Language and Gender. Janet Holmes and Miriam Meyerhoff, eds. Pp. 229-51.            Blackwell.

                http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/anthro/faculty/goodwin/RelevanceEthnicityClassGender.pdf

 

 

Week 13 (April 14) Representations, Reported Speech

 

Bourdieu (LSP), Chapters 10, 11

Keating, E. 2002. Everyday Interactions and the Domestication of Social Inequality, IPRA Pragmatics

            12:3.347-359. http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~ekeating/Publications/Pragmatics%202002%202.pdf

Schieffelin, B. 2000. Introducing Kaluli Literacy. In Kroskrity, Paul, ed. Regimes of Language:

            Ideologies, Polities, and Identities. Santa Fe: School of Am. Research.

            http://homepages.nyu.edu/~bs4/Bambi--Website_Assets/BBS%20PDFs/IntroKaluliliteracy.pdf

Mertz, Elizabeth. 1994. Legal Language: Pragmatics, Poetics and Social Power. In Annual Review of Anthropology

            23: 435-455.

 

Week 14 (April 21) Conclusion and Review

Week 15 & 16 (April 28, May 5) Wrapping Up; Class Presentations

 

Other suggested readings:

Silverstein, Michael. 2000. Whorfianism and the Linguistic Imagination of Nationality. In Kroskrity, P. ed.,

            Regimes of Language: Ideologies, Polities, and Identities. Santa Fe: School of American Research.

Wertsch, J. 1985. Extending Vygotsky’s Semiotic Analysis: Propositional and Discourse Referentiality  from:

            Vygotsky and the Social Formation of Mind. Harvard University Press.

Goodwin, Marjorie. 2006. The Hidden Life of Girls. Blackwell

Duranti, Alessandro. 1994 From Grammar to Politics: Linguistic Anthropology in a Western Samoan Village.             Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.

 

Other Information

 

Religious Holidays:

Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. If you miss an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence. It is the policy of The University of Texas at Austin that you must notify your instructor at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

 

Special Needs:

Students with disabilities who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to me at the beginning of the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. Five business days before an exam the student should remind me of any testing accommodations that will be needed. See following website for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php

 

University Electronic Mail Notification Policy (Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students):

All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html. In this course e-mail will be used as a means of communication with you. You will be responsible for checking your e-mail regularly for work and announcements. Note: if you are an employee of the University, your e-mail address in Blackboard is your employee address.

 

Use of Blackboard in this Class:

This course uses Blackboard, a Web-based course management system in which a password-protected site is created for each course. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for class work and announcements. As with all computer systems, there are occasional scheduled downtimes as well as unanticipated disruptions. Notification of these disruptions will be posted on the Blackboard login page. Scheduled downtimes are not an excuse for late work. However, if there is an unscheduled downtime for a significant period of time, I will make an adjustment if it occurs close to the due date. Blackboard is available at http://courses.utexas.edu. Support is provided by the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400 Monday through Friday 8 am to 6 pm, so plan accordingly.

 

Note about Feedback:

Feedback is an important part of learning. Without feedback on how well you understand the material, it is more difficult for you to make good progress. During this course you will give me feedback on your learning in informal and formal ways, such as assignments or exams. Please let me know when something is not clear. This will enable me to provide additional information when needed or to explain a concept in different terms.

 

Academic Honesty:

Although I encourage you to work together, you are expected to do your own work and acknowledge use of anyone else’s work or ideas. Academic dishonesty includes: (a) copying another student’s work or letting another student copy your work and (b) copying passages or ideas directly from another source and passing them off as your own; that is, without properly referencing them. When scholastic dishonesty is suspected, I am required to notify you and possibly turn the matter over to the Dean of Students office. Penalties for academic dishonesty include a failing grade on the assignment or in this course and possible expulsion form the university. If you have specific questions about these issues, contact the Office of the Dean of Students in FAC 248.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

43465 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 2.256

HONORS  SOCIAL  SCIENCE 301: ANTHROPOLOGY
Unique Number: 43465
Spring, 2010: Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12:30, WEL 2.256
Professor: Elizabeth Keating, Phone: 471-8518; office EPS 2.206
Office Hours:  Tuesday, 1-3


Anthropology is unique in the way it provides knowledge about the human experience from many points of view.  Anthropologists learn about other ways of life by living among people with very different lifeways and lifeworlds, and being a participant observer in these worlds. The challenge of anthropology is to describe, in terms that can be understood cross-culturally, how different groups of people organize their lives and beliefs, for example, relationships, dress, talk, stories, how they define what is sacred, and in general make sense of experience.  This course will explore the anthropological approach, especially focusing on the role of language and everyday symbolic systems in creating and sharing culture. We will read in depth about several different communities in different world areas.  We will discuss social theories that have contributed to anthropological research, and explore how anthropology can be used to investigate many issues about behavior, such as the persistence of social inequalities, the adoption and spread of new technologies, conflicts and misunderstandings, rites of passage, and global flows of expressive forms.  We will emphasize the diverse groups that make up the United States and other world communities as their distinctive experiences are made manifest through such ideas such as gender, the self, social status, age, identity, power and ethnicity.  

Course Objectives: At the end of the semester, each student should be able to:

•    Understand and describe the basic ideas of social theory that have led to current understandings of culture.
•    Distinguish among and critique ideas about the role of human symbolic systems in creating and maintaining coherent belief systems.
•    Discuss and critique the social science methods that have been brought to bear on the study of issues such as cultural difference, social inequality, interpretation of behavior, and cultural change.
•    Discuss the impact of some new communication technologies on individuals, families, and communities.
•    Define a number of key concepts in culture, communication and language.
    
Required Readings:

1. Moore, Henrietta, and Todd Sanders eds. 2006. Anthropology in Theory: Issues in Epistemology, (AT)
    ISBN: 978-0631-22915-5, Publisher: Blackwell
2. Abu-Lughod, Lila. 1986. Veiled Sentiments. University of California Press. (VS)
3. Horst, Heather and Daniel Miller. 2006. The Cell Phone: An Anthropology of Communication, Berg Pub. (CP)
4. Alim, H. Samy. 2006. Roc the Mic Right: The Language of Hip Hop Culture. Routledge. (LHHC)
 5. A series of articles available on the Blackboard web site.

Blackboard Site: The course Blackboard site includes additional information concerning the course including all non-textbook readings, instructions for each assignment, and other information.  

Course Requirements:

1. Class preparation and participation:
•    Read course material prior to the class in order to contribute to class discussions on the materials. Pop quizzes will be given on the readings.
•    List three significant ideas in each reading and bring this list with you to class (for class participation grade), and turn it in each week.

2. Project work:     
•    3 short papers (3-5 pages, single spaced) based on collecting everyday language examples (details explained later).
•    A term paper of approximately 15 pages, double spaced, based on data collection (of language forms) and reasoning through a particular case focusing on, for example, the following themes (more details will be provided later):
        
•    Impacts of technologies on cultural practices and beliefs, including communication
•    Gender as elaborated through multiple semiotic modes (text, the body, images, sound)
•    Poetics, narrative and the role of language styles and forms in organizing our experience
•    Cultural values and social inequality
•    Globalization of work
•    Culture contact and change
    
•    10 PowerPoint slides explaining and summarizing your findings

3. Exams: There will be two exams.  They will each count for 15% of the class grade, a total of 30% for the exams.      
    Each exam is designed to check your understanding of the vocabulary and concepts we are working with.

Grading: The three short papers will count for 30 % of the grade, and the longer paper and PowerPoint slides will count for 30 %. The two exams will count 30%. Class participation, based on attendance, contributions to discussions, pop quizzes, and list of significant ideas in readings will account for 10 %.

Assignments and Exam Schedule:

Exam 1:    Tuesday Feb 16
Assignment 1:     Tuesday Feb 23
Assignment 2:    Tuesday March 23
Assignment 3:    Tuesday April 20
Exam 2:    Tuesday May 4    
Term Paper:     Friday May 7





Course Outline & Reading Assignments:


Week 1
     Jan. 19: Introduction to the Class
     Jan. 21: Introduction to Anthropological Issues
    Readings:    Moore and Sanders, “Anthropology and Epistemology,” in AT pp. 1-21
            Duranti, “Theories of Culture,” Blackboard site


Week 2
     Jan. 26 & 28: Ethnocentrism & Modes of Thought
     Readings:  Oyewumi, “The Invention of Women,” in AT pp. 540-545
            Viveiros de Castro, “Valorizing the Present: Orientalism, Postcoloniality and the
                    Human Sciences, “ in AT pp. 546-551
            Abu-Lughod, “Guest and Daughter,” in VS pp. 1-35
            Alim, “’Talkin Black in this White Man’s World’: Linguistic Supremacy, Linguistic
                    Equanimity, and the Politics of Language,” in LHHC pp. 51-68

Week 3
     Feb 2 & 4: Some Lines of Early Anthropological Thought and Method
Readings:     Malinowski, “The Group and the Individual in Functional Analysis,” in AT, pp. 88-99
    Steward, “The Concept and Method of Cultural Ecology,” in AT, pp. 100-106
    Leach, “Introduction to Political Systems of Highland Burma,” in AT, pp. 128-134

Week 4
     Feb. 9 & 11: Language and Texts, Linguistic Anthropology
    Readings:      Sapir, “Anthropology and Sociology,” in AT, pp. 68-76
            Geertz, “Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture,” AT, p. 235-43
            Keesing, “Anthropology as Interpretive Quest,” AT, pp. 258-266
            Tyler, “The Antinomies,” in AT, pp. 305-310
            Horst & Miller, “Introduction,” in CP, pp. 1-18

Week 5
     Feb. 16: EXAM 1 (covering weeks 1-4)
     Feb. 18: Materiality
    Readings:   Toren, “Introduction to Mind, Materiality and History,” in AT pp. 204-219
            Donham, “Epochal Structures I: Reconstructing Historical Materialism,” AT pp. 397-406

****Assignment 1 due on Feb 23 Tuesday

Week 6
     Feb. 23 & 25: Political Technologies of the Body
    Readings:   Jackson, “Knowledge of the Body,” in AT pp. 322-335
            Martin, “The End of the Body?” in AT pp. 336-351
            Foucault, “The Body of the Condemned,” in AT pp. 352-356
            Bourdieu, “Structures and the Habitus,” in AT pp. 407-416
            Horst & Miller, “Pressure,” in CP pp. 123-136
            
Week 7
    Mar 2 & 4: Space and Globalization
    Readings:      Horst & Miller, “Locations,” in CP pp. 37-58
                Horst & Miller, “Link Up,” in CP pp. 81-102
                Horst & Miller, “Coping,” in CP pp. 103-122
            Alim, “Verbal Mujahidin in the Transglobal Hip Hop Umma,” LHHC pp. 20-50
                Gupta & Ferguson, “Beyond ‘Culture’: Space, Identity, and the Politics of Difference,
                    AT pp. 608-617
                Appadurai, “Grassroots Globalization and the Research Imagination,” AT pp. 622-632

Week 8
     March 9 & 11: Technology  
    Readings:      Horst & Miller, “Possession,” CP pp. 59-80
            Horst & Miller, “Evaluation,” CP pp. 159-182
            Castells, Chapter 1 The Information Technology Revolution. (Blackboard Site)


Week 9 (SPRING BREAK)  March 16 & 18

****Assignment 2 due Tuesday, March 23
    


Week 10
     March 23 & 25: The Language of Sentiment
    Readings:     Veiled Sentiments, Part 1 “The Ideology of Bedouin Social Life,” pp. 39-170

Week 11
     Mar 30 & April 1:  The Language of Sentiment
    Readings:  Veiled Sentiments, Part II “Discourses on Sentiment,” pp. 171-260

Week 12
     April 6 & 8: More Expressive Forms
    Readings: Alim, “’The streetz iz a mutha’: The Street and the Formation of a Hip Hop Linguistics,”
            in LHHC pp. 1-19
            Alim, “‘Bring it to the cypher’: Hip Hop Nation Language,” LHHC, pp. 69-108
            Goodwin, Charles. 1994. Professional Vision. American Anthropologist 96(3): 606-33.
                http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/clic/cgoodwin/94prof_vis.pdf

Week 13
     April 13 & 15: Analysis
    Readings: Alim, “Spittin the Code of the Streets: The Strategic Construction of a Street-Conscious
            Identity,” in LHHC pp. 109-125
            Alim, ‘Every syllable of mine is an umbilical cord through time’: Toward an Analytical
                Schema of Hip Hop Poetics,” LHHC, pp. 126-154
            Bailey, Ben, Communication of Respect in Interethnic Service Encounters, Language in Society 26.3: 327-356 (Blackboard)

****Assignment 3 due Tuesday April 20


Week 14
     April 20 & April 22: Analysis, Language and Culture
    Readings: Basso, K. 1979. excerpts from Portraits of the Whiteman, Cambridge University Press     (Blackboard)
            Ochs and Schieffelin. 1984. “Language Acquisition and Socialization: Three
            Developmental Stories and Their Implications,” from R. Shweder and R. Levine, eds. Culture Theory: Essays in Mind, Self, and Emotion (Blackboard)

Week 15
     April 27 & 29: Some Final Thoughts, Review
    Readings: Castells, Chapter 5, The Culture of Real Virtuality: the Integration of Electronic Communication,
            the End of the Mass Audience, and the Rise of Interactive Networks. (Blackboard)

Week 16
   May 4 & 6: Second Exam, Course Overview and Conclusions

May 7: Final Paper Due

 
Other Information


Religious Holidays:
Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. If you miss an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence. It is the policy of The University of Texas at Austin that you must notify your instructor at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

Special Needs:
Students with disabilities who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to me at the beginning of the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. Five business days before an exam the student should remind me of any testing accommodations that will be needed. See following website for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php

University Electronic Mail Notification Policy (Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students):
All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html. In this course e-mail will be used as a means of communication with you. You will be responsible for checking your e-mail regularly for work and announcements. Note: if you are an employee of the University, your e-mail address in Blackboard is your employee address.

Use of Blackboard in this Class:
This course uses Blackboard, a Web-based course management system in which a password-protected site is created for each course. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for class work and announcements. As with all computer systems, there are occasional scheduled downtimes as well as unanticipated disruptions. Notification of these disruptions will be posted on the Blackboard login page. Scheduled downtimes are not an excuse for late work. However, if there is an unscheduled downtime for a significant period of time, I will make an adjustment if it occurs close to the due date. Blackboard is available at http://courses.utexas.edu. Support is provided by the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400 Monday through Friday 8 am to 6 pm, so plan accordingly.

Note about Feedback:
Feedback is an important part of learning. Without feedback on how well you understand the material, it is more difficult for you to make good progress. During this course you will give me feedback on your learning in informal and formal ways, such as assignments or exams. Please let me know when something is not clear. This will enable me to provide additional information when needed or to explain a concept in different terms.

Academic Honesty:
Although I encourage you to work together, you are expected to do your own work and acknowledge use of anyone else’s work or ideas. Academic dishonesty includes: (a) copying another student’s work or letting another student copy your work and (b) copying passages or ideas directly from another source and passing them off as your own; that is, without properly referencing them. When scholastic dishonesty is suspected, I am required to notify you and possibly turn the matter over to the Dean of Students office. Penalties for academic dishonesty include a failing grade on the assignment or in this course and possible expulsion form the university. If you have specific questions about these issues, contact the Office of the Dean of Students in FAC 248.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30365 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 2.308
(also listed as LIN 312)

ANTHROPOLOGY 307, LINGUISTICS 312

CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION

 

Fall 2009

Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-5 p.m. (Course # ANT 307, 30365; LIN 312, 41420)

Professor:             Elizabeth Keating

                        Office: 2.206 EPS, Phone: 471-8518, email: ekeating@mail.utexas.edu

                       

This course is an introduction to everyday language use in a variety of cultures. The goals are to develop your skills in analyzing and understanding the many creative ways people use language in the formation of culture, in shaping ways of thinking, and in arguing and discussing how to interpret behavior and events. We will use two in-depth cases—a community of Bedouins in the Western Desert of Egypt and the American Deaf community—as examples of very different ways of using language to express culture. Stories and accounts of language use from these two communities will be supplemented by lectures and other materials on language in many different language communities. Each of you will collect everyday language examples for several analytical exercises. You will experience using language data as a basis for examining and questioning concepts such as ethnicity, identity, power, status, and gender as they emerge in everyday communication between people.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Texts:                        1. Duranti, A. (1996)  Linguistic Anthropology, Cambridge U. Press (LA)

                        2. Abu-Lughod, L. (1986) Veiled Sentiments, University of California Press (VS)

                                    3. Lane, H., Hoffmeister, R. and Bahan, B. (1996) A Journey into the Deaf World, Dawn

                                                Sign Press (DW)

4. materials on the Blackboard site.

 

Requirements: There will be two mid-term exams, each covering about half of the course (no final).  There will be material on the exam from the readings and from lectures, so if you have to miss class be sure to get notes from a fellow student. Each of you will be responsible for three written analytical exercises (3-5 pages). Each of these requirements will be fully explained at the time of assignment. Late assignments will be downgraded one letter grade. All assignments must be typed.

Note: do the readings assigned below before class meets that week. Quizzes will be given regularly on readings.

 

Schedule of Due Dates of Assignments

**Assignment 1 Analytical Exercise Due: September 29

** Assignment 2 Analytical Exercise Due:  October 29

**Assignment 3 Analytical Exercise Due: November 24

 

Schedule of Exams

***Midterm #1 (covering weeks 1-7): October 20

***Midterm #2 (Covering weeks 8-15): December 1

 

Grading: Exams count 45% of the grade, and written assignments 45%. Class participation counts 10%. The class participation grade is made up of: a) participating in discussions in class, b) emailing to Prof. Keating newspaper, magazine, or internet articles concerning some aspect of language and culture, c) pop quiz grades on readings, d) attendance at lectures.

 

 

WEEK #1  (Aug 27) Overview and Introduction to the Course and Course Mechanics

 

                        Note: do readings assigned for next week

 

 

WEEK #2  ( Sept 1, 3) Studying Language and Culture: a beginning

 

Readings:            Lane, Hoffmeister, Bahan (DW): “Author’s Note” and Chapter 1

                                    Duranti (LA) Chapter 2, Theories of Culture

                                    Abu-Lughod (VS) Preface and Chapter 1, Guest and Daughter

                                   

 

WEEK #3  (Sept 8, 10) “Everyday” Symbolic Systems & Messages

 

Readings:             Cook, G. (1992) from the book The Discourse of Advertising, NY: Routledge (Blackboard)

                                                            (Note: begin reading the article at the section entitled “Perfume and Cars”)

                                                Lane, Hoffmeister, Bahan (DW) Chapter 3, The Language of the Deaf-World

Duranti (LA), Meaning in Linguistic Forms, pages 162-166 and 204-213 (section 6.1-6.2; 6.8 to end of chapter)

                                   

 

WEEK #4 (Sept 15, 17) Looking at Language as Action; the Importance of Conversation

 

Readings:             Duranti (LA) Chapter 1, The Scope of Linguistic Anthropology, also pages 236-244 (begin at section 7.4) & Chapter 8, Conversational Exchanges

                                               

                                   

WEEK #5 (Sept 22, 24) How to Study Language; Recording Interaction

           

Readings:            Duranti (LA) Chapters 4 (Ethnographic Methods) & 5 (Transcription: from writing to

                                                digitized images), and pages 290-330 (begin at section 9.2.1),  and pages 340-347

                                   

**First analytical exercise due Sept 29:  (Assignment #1)

 

 

WEEK #6 (Sept 29, Oct 1) Language Socialization

 

Readings:             Ochs and Schieffelin (1984) “Language Acquisition and Socialization: Three

                                                            Developmental Stories and Their Implications,” from R. Shweder and R. Levine, eds. Culture Theory: Essays in Mind, Self, and Emotion (Blackboard)

                        Lane, Hoffmeister, Bahan (DW) Chapter 2, Families with Deaf Children

                        Imam, Syeda Rumnaz  (2005) English as a global language and the question of nation-

                                    building education in Bangladesh, Comparative Education, 41: 471–486.

 

 

 

WEEK #7 (Oct 6, 8) The Ethnography of Communication and Verbal Art

 

Readings:            Abu-Lughod (VS), Chapter 2, Identity in Relationship; Chapter 3, Honor and the

                                    of  Autonomy; Chapter 5, The Poetry of Personal Life

 

**Second Analytical Exercise Due Oct 29:  (Assignment 2)           

                                                

 

WEEK #8 (Oct 13, 15) Verbal Art, continued

 

Readings:            Abu-Lughod (VS), Chapter 4, Modesty, Gender, and Sexuality; Chapter 6, Honor and             Poetic Vulnerability; Chapter 7, Modesty and the Poetry of Love

                                    Lane, Hoffmeister, Bahan (DW), pages 104-123 and 144-161

 

**Oct 20: First Midterm (covering weeks 1-7)

 

WEEK #9 (Oct 20, 22) Language, Ethnicity and Class

 

Readings:             Basso, K. (1979) excerpts from Portraits of the Whiteman, Cambridge University Press

                                                            (Blackboard)

                                                Smitherman, Geneva (1997) “The Chain Remain the Same": Communicative Practices in the Hip Hop Nation, Journal of Black Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 3-25 (Blackboard)

                                                Bailey, Ben, Communication of Respect in Interethnic Service Encounters, Language in Society 26.3: 327-356 (Blackboard)

                                               

 

WEEK #10 (Oct 27, 29) Language and Status

 

Readings:            Laitin, David (1989). Language Policy and Political Strategy in India. Policy Sciences 22: 415-436.

                                    Lane, Hoffmeister, Bahan (DW) Chapter 7, Disabling the Deaf-World

                                    Abu-Lughod (VS), Chapter 8, Ideology and Politics of the Sentiment

 

 

WEEK #11 (Nov 3, 5) Multilingualism

 

Readings:            Zentella, Ana Celia (1997) “Bilingualism en Casa” from Growing Up Bilingual: Puerto

                                                            Rican Children in New York. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

                                                Nelson, Cecil L. (1992) My Language, Your Culture: Whose Communicative

                                                Competence? (Blackboard site)

 

           

WEEK #12 (Nov 10, 12)  Language and Technology

 

Readings:            McCloud, Scott, Understanding Comics (selections on Blackboard)

                                                Berger, J. and J. Mohr (1982) The Ambiguity of the Photograph. In Another Way

                                                            of Telling. Writers and Readers Publishing Cooperative, pp. 85-100.

                                                Street, Brian (1995) The Uses of Literacy and Anthropology in Iran, from Social Literacies, Longman: London. (blackboard site)

                                                Cassell, J., and Tversky, D. (2005). The language of Online Intercultural Community Formation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 10(2), http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol10/issue2/cassell.html

 

 

WEEK #13 (Nov 17, 19) Language and Gender

 

Readings:            “Attacking Stereotypes in Toyland” (Blackboard)

                                                Eckert, P. & McConnell-Ginet, S. (1995) “Constructing Meaning, Constructing Selves”

                                                            from Hall, K. and Bucholz, M. Gender Articulated. Routledge. (Blackboard)

                                                                       

**Third Analytical Assignment due November 24

 

WEEK #14 (Nov 24) Review

 

Readings:             Duranti (LA), Chapter 10, Conclusions

                                                Lane, Hoffmeister, Behan (DW), Chapter 16, Journey’s End

 

**Second Midterm: Dec 1 (Weeks 8-15)

 

WEEK #15 (Dec 1, 3) Wrapping Up

                       

                        Second Midterm and Review of Results

 

 

 

Other Information

 

Religious Holidays

 

Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. If you miss an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence. It is the policy of The University of Texas at Austin that you must notify your instructor at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

 

Special Needs

 

Students with disabilities who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to me at the beginning of the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. Five business days before an exam the student should remind me of any testing accommodations that will be needed. See following website for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php

 

University Electronic Mail Notification Policy (Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students)

 

All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html. In this course e-mail will be used as a means of communication with you. You will be responsible for checking your e-mail regularly for work and announcements. Note: if you are an employee of the University, your e-mail address in Blackboard is your employee address.

 

Use of Blackboard in this Class

 

This course uses Blackboard, a Web-based course management system in which a password-protected site is created for each course. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for class work and announcements. As with all computer systems, there are occasional scheduled downtimes as well as unanticipated disruptions. Notification of these disruptions will be posted on the Blackboard login page. Scheduled downtimes are not an excuse for late work. However, if there is an unscheduled downtime for a significant period of time, I will make an adjustment if it occurs close to the due date. Blackboard is available at http://courses.utexas.edu. Support is provided by the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400 Monday through Friday 8 am to 6 pm, so plan accordingly.

 

Note about Feedback

 

Feedback is an important part of learning. Without feedback on how well you understand the material, it is more difficult for you to make good progress. During this course you will give me feedback on your learning in informal and formal ways, such as assignments or exams. Please let me know when something is not clear. This will enable me to provide additional information when needed or to explain a concept in different terms.

 

Academic Honesty

 

Although I encourage you to work together, you are expected to do your own work and acknowledge use of anyone else’s work or ideas. Academic dishonesty includes: (a) copying another student’s work or letting another student copy your work and (b) copying passages or ideas directly from another source and passing them off as your own; that is, without properly referencing them. When scholastic dishonesty is suspected, I am required to notify you and possibly turn the matter over to the Dean of Students office. Penalties for academic dishonesty include a failing grade on the assignment or in this course and possible expulsion form the university. If you have specific questions about these issues, contact the Office of the Dean of Students in FAC 248.

 

 

 

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30500 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 2.308

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30225 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 3.116

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

30200 • Spring 2007
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

27980 • Spring 2005
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

26030-26045 • Spring 2003
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM UTC 3.134

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

26445 • Spring 2003
Meets W 9:30AM-12:30PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

26325-26340 • Spring 2002
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM UTC 3.132

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

26613-26620 • Spring 2001
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:00PM UTC 3.124

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

26995 • Spring 2001
Meets F 9:30AM-12:30PM EPS 1.130KA

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

27285 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 3.122
(also listed as LIN 373)

The goals of this course are to look at language practices in many different communities, to look at issues in cross-cultural communication, and to understand how 'everyday' language use influences how we think about society and personhood, and the role language plays in creating and maintaining cultures. 

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

26265 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 4:00PM-5:00PM UTC 3.124

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

Publications


Books

Keating, Elizabeth and Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa. Words Matter: Communicating Effectively in the NewGlobal Office. University of California Press, 2016.

Keating, Elizabeth. Power Sharing: Language, Rank, Gender and Social Space in Pohnpei,Micronesia. Oxford University Press, 1998.

 

Articles and Book Chapters (*denotes refereed publication)

In press.*  Keating, Elizabeth. “They Blame, They Complain but They Don’t Understand”: Identity Clashes In Cross-Cultural Virtual Collaborations, in Revisiting Identity, eds. Aase Hansen, Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta, Julie Feilberg, Springer.

In press.*  Keating, Elizabeth. Challenges of Conducting Interaction with Technologically-Mediated Bodies, in Intercorporeality: Emerging Socialities in Interaction. Christian Meyer, Jürgen Streeck & J. Scott Jordan, eds. Oxford University Press.

2015         Keating, Elizabeth. The Role of the Body and Space in Digital Multimodality, The Routledge Handbook of Language and Digital Communication, Edited by Alexandra Georgakopoulou and Tereza Spilioti, pages 259-272. Routledge.

2015         Keating, Elizabeth. Space and Place. Deborah Schiffrin, Deborah Tannen, and Heidi Hamilton, eds. The Handbook of Discourse Analysis, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell.

2013         Keating, Elizabeth. “Duranti, Alessandro,” entry in The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics, ed. Carol A. Chapelle. Wiley Blackwell, p. 1788-1790.

2012*       Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. The Eyes Have It: Technomobility and Sign Language Innovations. Semiotica, Volume 2012, Issue 191, pages 287–308.

2012         Keating, Elizabeth and Pirkko Raudaskoski. Theoretical framework: communicative technology for augmented interaction within the field of Science, Technology and Society (STS), in Maria Egbert and Arnulf Deppermann, eds. Hearing Aids Communication: Integrating Social Interaction, Audiology and User Centered Design to Improve Communication with Hearing Loss and Hearing Technologies. Mannheim: Verlag für Gesprächsforschung, pages 35-39.

2012*       Jarvenpaa, Sirkka L. and Elizabeth Keating. Global Offshoring Engineering Project Teams:  Trust Asymmetries across Cultural Borders. Engineering Project Organization Journal, 2:1-2, 71-83

2011*      Keating, Elizabeth and Sirkka Jarvenpaa. Interspatial Subjectivities: Engineering in Virtual Environments, Social Semiotics, Volume 21(2) 219-237.

2011*       Jarvenpaa, Sirkka and Elizabeth Keating. Hallowed Grounds: The Role of Cultural Values, Practices, and Institutions in TMS in an Offshored Complex Engineering Services Project, IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 99:1-13

2011         Keating, Elizabeth and Chiho Sunakawa. A Full Inspiration Tray: Multimodality across Real and Computer-Mediated Spaces. In Goodwin, Charles, Curtis LeBaron, and Jurgen Streeck, eds. Embodied Interaction: Language and Body in the Material World. Cambridge University Press, 194-206.

2011        Keating, Elizabeth and Alessandro Duranti. Discourse and Culture. In Discourse Studies, Teun van Dijk, ed., London: Sage Publications, 331-356.

2010         Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. American Sign Language in virtual space: Interactions between Deaf Users of Computer-Mediated Video Communication and the Impact of Technology on Language Practices. Reprint in: B. Schieffelin and P.  Garrett (eds.), Anthropological Linguistics: Theories and Practices. Routledge. Reprint of Language in Society 32, 693-714, 2003.

2010         Toprac, Paul, Melissa Ossian, Elizabeth Keating, and Joe Sanchez. Leslie Jarmon—1952-2009. Simulation & Gaming, August 2010; vol. 41, 4: pp. 457-460.

2010*       Keating, Elizabeth and R. Neill Hadder. Sensory Impairment. Annual Reviews of Anthropology, Vol. 39: 115-129.

2010*       Keating, Elizabeth and Chiho Sunakawa. Participation Cues: Coordinating Activity and Collaboration in Complex Online Gaming Worlds, Language in Society, 39 (3):331-356.

2009         Keating, Elizabeth. Societal Impacts of Nanomanufacturing. In Nanomanufacturing, Shaochen Chen, ed., Los Angeles: American Scientific Publishers, 263-275.

2009        Keating, Elizabeth. Pragmatics and Technology. Language in Life, and a Life in Language,Studies in Pragmatics. Bruce Fraser and Ken Turner, eds. Emerald Publishing, 231-238.

2009*       Monteiro, Marko and Elizabeth Keating. Managing Misunderstandings: The Role of Language in Interdisciplinary Scientific Collaboration. Science Communication, Vol. 31, No. 1, 6-28.

2009*       Keating Elizabeth. Language and Power. Language and Linguistic Compass, Ken Turner, ed. Blackwell Publishing, 3/4: 996–1009

2008         Keating, Elizabeth. Space Shifting: New Technologies, New Opportunities. Proceedings of the Symposium about Language and Society, Austin. Texas Linguistic Forum, 52: 70-79

2008*       Keating, Elizabeth, Terra Edwards and Gene Mirus. Cybersign: Impacts of New Communication Technologies on Space and Language, Journal of Pragmatics, Volume40, Issue 6: 1067-1081.

2008*       Jarmon, Leslie, Elizabeth Keating, and Paul Toprac. NANO SCENARIO: An Open-ended Issue-Based Role-Play Simulation for Appreciating Societal Impacts of Nanotechnology. Simulation & Gaming (Sage Publications), 39: 168-181.

2008*       Jarmon, Leslie and Elizabeth Keating. NANO SCENARIO: Role-playing to appreciate the        societal effects of nanotechnology. Simulation & Gaming, Vol. 39, No. 2, 282-301.

2006*       Keating, Elizabeth. Habits and Innovations: Designing Language for New, Technologically Mediated Sociality. In Roots of Human Sociality. S. Levinson and N. Enfield, eds, Berg Publishers, pp. 332-350.

2006*       Keating, Elizabeth and Leslie Jarmon. What is Nanotechnology: New Properties of Words as Territories in a Cross-Disciplinary, Cross-Border Flow. Practicing Anthropology, 28:2, 6-10.

2006         Keating, Elizabeth. Language and Spatiality Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd Edition, Keith Brown, ed. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

2006*       Keating, Elizabeth and Alessandro Duranti. Honorific Resources for the Construction of Hierarchy. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 115(2): 145-172.

2005         Keating, Elizabeth Language and Culture. Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. Oxford, UK: UNESCO Eolss Publishers Co Ltd.

2005*       Keating, Elizabeth. Homo Prostheticus: Problematizing the Notions of Activity and Computer-Mediated Interaction. In Models of Language, Interaction, and Culture, Alessandro Duranti, ed.                (special issue of Discourse Studies, 2005, vol. 7(4-5):  527-545)

2005*       Keating, Elizabeth. The Sociolinguistics of Status in Pohnpei. The International Journal of the Sociology of Language 172:7-30.

2004         Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. Signing in the Car: Some Issues in Language and Context. Deaf Worlds 20: 3, pp. 264-273.

2004         Keating, Elizabeth and Maria Egbert. Conversation as a Cultural Activity. In A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology. A. Duranti, ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, p. 169-196.

2003*       Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. American Sign Language in Virtual Space: Interactions between Deaf Users of Computer-Mediated Video Communication and the Impact of Technology on Language Practices. Language in Society 32, 693-714.

2003*       Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. Examining Interactions across Language Modalities: Deaf Children and Hearing Peers at School. Anthropology and Education Quarterly 34(2):115-135.

2003         Keating, Elizabeth. Introduction. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, Issue on Visual Communication, 13,1:3-6.

2003         Keating, Elizabeth. Language Purism and American Sign Language. Purism in Minor Languages, Endangered Languages, Regional Languages, Mixed Languages. Joseph Brincat, Winfried Boeder, and Thomas Stolz, eds. Bochum: Universitatsverlag, 349-365.

2003         Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. New Technologies and Minority Language                 Communities: The Deaf Community, Visual Virtual Language and Computer-Mediated                  Communication. In Thomas Stolz and Joel Sherzer, eds. MINOR LANGUAGES Approaches,                 Definitions, Controversies. Bochum: Universitatsverlag Dr. N. Brochmeyer, pp. 103-120.

2003.        Keating, Elizabeth and Joel Sherzer. The Ethnography of Communication. Oxford International Encyclopedia of Linguistics, William Frawley, ed.

2002*       Keating, Elizabeth. Everyday Interactions and the Domestication of Social Inequality IPRA   Pragmatics 12:3.347-359.

2002         Keating, Elizabeth. Space and its Role in Social Stratification in Pohnpei, Micronesia. In      Representing Space in Oceania: Culture in Language and Mind, Canberra: Pacific Linguistics, Bennardo, Giovanni, ed., 201-213.

2001         Keating, Elizabeth Anthropological Linguistics. Concise Encyclopedia of Sociolinguistics. Raj Mesthrie, ed. Pergamon Press, 5-6.

2001         Keating, Elizabeth. Spanish and the Missionization Effort on Pohnpei: Language and Cultural Influences. Lo propio y lo ajeno en las lenguas austronesicas y amerindias. Klaus Zimmerman and Thomas Stolz, eds., Frankfort am Main: Vervuert, Madrid: Iberoamericana, 295-312.

2001*       Keating, Elizabeth. Language, Identity, and the Production of Authority in New Discursive Contests in Pohnpei, Micronesia. Journal de la Société des Océaniste, 112, pp. 73-80.

2001         Keating, Elizabeth. The Ethnography of Communication, in Handbook of Ethnography,                 Paul Atkinson, Amanda Coffey, Sara Delamont, Lyn Lofland, and John Lofland, eds. London: Sage Publications, 285-301.

2001         Keating, Elizabeth. Space. In Duranti Alessandro, ed. Key Terms in Language and Culture. Malden, MA: Blackwell (reprint of Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, Vol. 9), 234-237.

2001         Keating, Elizabeth. Spazio / Space. In Duranti, Alessandro, ed. Culture e Discorso. Un lessico per le scienze sociali. Roma: Meltemi, pp. 357-361 (translation of ‘Space’).

2000*       Keating, Elizabeth. Moments of Hierarchy: Constructing Social Stratification by means of Language, Food, Space, and the Body in Pohnpei, Micronesia. American Anthropologist 102(2):303-320.

2000         Keating, Elizabeth. How Culture and Technology Together Shape New Communicative Practices: Investigating Interactions Between Deaf and Hearing Callers with Computer‑mediated Videotelephone, Texas Linguistic Forum  43, 2000:99-116.

2000         Keating, Elizabeth. Current Issues in Linguistic Anthropology. Teaching Anthropology: SAAC Notes. American Anthropolog. Assn and Soc. for Anthropology in Community Colleges Publication, 20-23.

2000         Keating, Elizabeth and Gene Mirus. Cross Modal Conversations: Deaf Children and Hearing Peers at School. Crossroads of Language, Interaction, and Culture Conference Proceedings,  Department of  Applied Linguistics and TESL UCLA, 73-90.

1999*       Keating, Elizabeth. Contesting Representations of Gender Stratification in Pohnpei,                 Micronesia, Ethnos  64:3, pp. 350-371.

1999         Keating, Elizabeth. Space. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, Special Issue, Language Matters in Anthropology, A Lexicon for the Millenium, 9(1-2):234-237.

1998*       Keating, Elizabeth. Honor and Stratification in Pohnpei, Micronesia. American Ethnologist, 25(3):399-411.

1998*       Keating, Elizabeth. A woman's role in constructing status hierarchies: Using honorific language in Pohnpei, Micronesia International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 129:103-115.

1997*       Keating, Elizabeth. Honorific Possession: Power and Language in Pohnpei, Micronesia. Language in Society, 26(2): 247-268.

1995        Keating, Elizabeth. Spatial Conceptions of Hierarchy in Pohnpei Micronesia. In Spatial Information Theory, A. Frank and W. Kuhn, eds., pp. 463-474. Berlin: Springer, pp. 463-474.

1994         Keating, Elizabeth. Rank, Language, Gender, and Social Space in Pohnpei, Micronesia. Cultural Performances: Proceedings of the Third Berkeley Women and Language Conference. Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Women and Language Group, pp. 367-377.

1993*       Keating, Elizabeth. Correction/Repair as a Resource for Co-construction of Group Competence. Pragmatics:  Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, pp. 411-423.

1991*       He, Agnes and Elizabeth Keating. Constituting Expertise and Power through Talk: A Case Study of an Academic Counseling Encounter. Issues in Applied Linguistics, Vol II, No. 2: 183-209.

 

Online Publications

2006         Keating, Elizabeth with Emi Nagai. “The role of the mobile phone in the welfare of aged and handicapped people,” NTT Docomo Website, http://www.moba-ken.jp/english/research/research2006/r06-05.html

2005         Keating, Elizabeth with Emi Nagai. Current Societal Problems with Mobile Phone Usage in 15 Countries, NTT Docomo, Japan, website, http://www.moba-ken.jp/english/research/research2005/r05-12.html

 

Book Reviews

2003         Review of Pujolar, Joan. Gender, Heteroglossia and Power: A Sociolinguistic Study of                Youth Culture. Discourse & Society 14(4): 529-532.                                 

2001         Review of  Schieffelin, B., Woolard, K.,  and Kroskrity, P. Language Ideologies:                 Practice and Theory. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 11:1, 152-156.

2000         Review of Linell, Per. Approaching Dialogue: Talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives. Language in Society 29:4, 586-589.

1997         Review of Farnell, Brenda. Do You See What I Mean: Plains Indians Sign Talk and the Embodiment of Action. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 7:2, 226-227.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  •   Map
  • Plan II Honors Program

    University of Texas at Austin
    305 East 23rd St
    CLA 2.102
    Austin, Texas, 78712-1250
    512-471-1442