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James D Garrison


ProfessorPh.D., 1972, University of California, Berkeley

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Interests


Restoration and eighteenth-century literature; satire; epic; the Bible in English and American literature.

Biography


James D. Garrison attended Princeton and The University of California Berkeley, receiving his PhD in English in 1972. He has taught at UT since 1973, serving as Chair of the English Department from 1994 to 2006.  He is the author of two books on the poetry of John Dryden -- Dryden and the Tradition of Panegyric and Pietas from Vergil to Dryden – as well as articles on Dryden, Gray, and Gibbon.  His book A Dangerous Liberty: Translating Gray’s Elegy appeared in 2009. In 2011 he received the Chad Oliver Award for Teaching Excellence in Plan II and in 2012 the Regents Outstanding Teaching Award. He holds the Archibald A. Hill Regents Centennial Professorship in English and American Literature and the title Distinguished Teaching Professor.

Courses


E 603A • Composition/Reading World Lit

33775 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 200

Instructor: James Garrison (Fall)/Martin Kevorkian (Spring)

??Fall Description:

This section of E603A will consider foundational texts of western literature.  The semester will be devoted to the study of classical and medieval narrative, from Homer (both the Iliad and the Odyssey) to Dante (we will read all of The Divine Comedy).  The emphasis throughout will be on how these works engage in dialogue with one another, how this cultural heritage speaks across the centuries to us as a class and to each of us individually.

Fall Texts:

Homer, Iliad, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Homer, Odyssey, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Virgil, Aeneid, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Ovid, Metamorphoses, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Dante, The Divine Comedy, trans. Alan Mandelbaum (Everyman)

Fall Assignments:

3 Papers 50% (papers 1 and 2 15% each, third paper 20%)

Reading journal 20%

2 In-class essays 10% each

Oral presentation 10%

About the Professor:

James D. Garrison attended Princeton and The University of California Berkeley, receiving his PhD in English in 1972. He has taught at UT since 1973, serving as Chair of the English Department from 1994 to 2006.  He is the author of two books on the poetry of John Dryden -- Dryden and the Tradition of Panegyric and Pietas from Vergil to Dryden – as well as articles on Dryden, Gray, and Gibbon.  His book A Dangerous Liberty: Translating Gray’s Elegy appeared in 2009. In 2011 he received the Chad Oliver Award for Teaching Excellence in Plan II and in 2012 the Regents Outstanding Teaching Award. He holds the Archibald A. Hill Regents Centennial Professorship in English and American Literature and the title Distinguished Teaching Professor.

Spring Description:

Pursuing Aristotle’s dictum that humans “differ from the other animals as the most imitative of all,” we will consider mimesis as both a descriptive and generative principle for literature. Completing a logic set in motion by the first semester, which focused upon the skills of reading actively and composing, we will look to a tradition of literature that reads us as readers and writers: close and mimetic readers engaged in the pleasures and perils of narrative. We will make the turn, well-prepared for by fall’s focus on epic, to the characteristically modern form of the novel.

Spring Texts:

Please purchase the editions specified by ISBN and available via Amazon - we recommend waiting until the start of the spring semester to purchase any books as the list below is subject to change:

Don Quixote (1605), Cervantes (Grossman translation) 0060934344

Moby-Dick (1851), Herman Melville 0143105957

The Magic Mountain (1912-1924), Thomas Mann 0679772871

Famous Writers I Have Known (2014), James Magnuson 0393350819

Duplex (2013), Kathryn Davis 1555976530

Supplemental readings will be posted to Blackboard or circulated in class. 

Spring Requirements & Grading:

Brief reading responses (one for each week in which no formal writing falls due); four short essays (3-4 pages, i.e., 750-1000 words), two of them peer-edited. Papers will be graded on a “portfolio” basis to afford opportunity and incentive for revisions. Late work will be penalized at a rate of one letter grade per class period; extensions are available upon request. Plagiarism = Failure. Attendance is mandatory; repeated unexcused absences and tardiness will affect your grade. The regular focused responses to the reading should be useful as catalysts for discussion and for the development of paper topics. Also, periodically you may be asked to facilitate discussion, for example by providing a question of the day or word of the day. We will be making an effort to hear consistently from a wide range of participants within the class.

Reading responses, attendance, and participation: 40%

Essay 1, 2, 3, and 4: 15% each

About the Professor:

Martin Kevorkian earned a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in English from UCLA.  He is the author of “Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America” (Cornell Univ. Press, 2006) and articles on Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Herman Melville, Samuel Beckett, and John Ashbery.  Kevorkian is currently completing a book on the literary and spiritual aftermath of the American Renaissance, and he also maintains research interests in cultural representations of technology.

LAH 350 • Johnson And Boswell

29420 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 221
(also listed as E 349S)

E 349S  l  Johnson and Boswell-HONORS

Instructor:  Garrison, J

Unique #:  34520

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  English Honors; Liberal Arts Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

E 349S (Topic: Johnson and Boswell) and 379N (Topic: Johnson and Boswell) may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will consider Johnson as the author of a remarkable array of works in different genres and as the subject of the greatest biography ever written. We will proceed chronologically, taking the year 1763 – the year in which Boswell met Johnson – as the hinge of the course:  the first half will be devoted to Johnson as poet, essayist, fiction writer, and lexicographer; the second half will focus on Boswell’s journals and his Life of Johnson. We will bring the two together in reading the contrasting accounts of their journey in 1773 to the western islands of Scotland, and will conclude by comparing their approaches to biography by reference to Johnson’s last great work, the Lives of the Poets.

Texts:

Johnson, Samuel Johnson: Selected Poetry and Prose, ed. Brady and Wimsatt (University of California Press); Selected Essays from the Rambler, Adventurer, and Idler, ed. Bate (Yale University Press)

Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, ed. Womersley (Penguin); The London Journal, ed. Pottle (Yale University Press); The Journals of James Boswell, ed. Wain (Yale University Press)

Johnson and Boswell, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland and Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, ed. Levi (Penguin)

Requirements & Grading: 

Reading journal (25%)

Two short papers (20% each) One longer paper (25%)

Attendance and contribution (10%)

Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. No exceptions

E 356 • The European Novel

34815 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 105
(also listed as EUS 347)

E 356  l  The European Novel

Instructor:  Garrison, J

Unique #:  34815

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  EUS 347

Restrictions:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E356 will consider representative continental novelists of the 19th and early 20th centuries. We will distinguish three different national traditions of the novel – French, Russian, and German, while at the same time asking how these traditions might converge to create a transnational European form. The reading will be demanding but rewarding, offering a chance to become acquainted with fiction that has an enduring claim on the western imagination.

Texts: Goethe, Elective Affinities; Stendhal, The Red and the Black; Dostoievsky, Crime and Punishment; Flaubert, A Sentimental Education; Tolstoy, Anna Karenina; Mann, Buddenbrooks.

Requirements & Grading: Two one-hour exams (30% each); final exam (40%).

E 603A • Composition/Reading World Lit

34985 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 200

 

Description:

This section of E603A-B will consider foundational texts of western literature.  The first semester will be devoted to the study of classical and medieval narrative, from Homer (both the Iliad and the Odyssey) to Dante (we will read all of The Divine Comedy).  In the spring semester we will resume this literary history in the Renaissance with Cervantes (Don Quixote), followed by a reading of major works by Goethe (Faust), Pushkin (Eugene Onegin), and Proust (Swann’s Way).

The emphasis throughout will be on how these works engage in dialogue with one another, how this cultural heritage speaks across the centuries to us as a class and to each of us individually.

Texts:

Homer, Iliad, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Homer, Odyssey, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Virgil, Aeneid, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Ovid, Metamorphoses, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Dante, The Divine Comedy, trans. Alan Mandelbaum (Everyman)

Assignments:

3 Papers 50% (papers 1 and 2 15% each, third paper 20%)

Reading journal 20%

2 In-class essays 10% each

Oral presentation 10%

About the Professor: James D. Garrison attended Princeton and The University of California Berkeley, receiving his PhD in English in 1972. He has taught at UT since 1973, serving as Chair of the English Department from 1994 to 2006.  He is the author of two books on the poetry of John Dryden -- Dryden and the Tradition of Panegyric and Pietas from Vergil to Dryden – as well as articles on Dryden, Gray, and Gibbon.  His book A Dangerous Liberty: Translating Gray’s Elegy appeared in 2009. In 2011 he received the Chad Oliver Award for Teaching Excellence in Plan II and in 2012 the Regents Outstanding Teaching Award. He holds the Archibald A. Hill Regents Centennial Professorship in English and American Literature and the title Distinguished Teaching Professor.

E 320L • Maj Writ Of Restoratn/18th Cen

35670 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 105

Instructor:  Garrison, J

Unique #:  35670

Semester:  Fall 2013

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E 320L surveys more than a century of English literature from the Restoration to the end of the Eighteenth Century. The course will trace the literary history of the period by exploring its principal genres and major authors in chronological order.

Texts: John Milton, Paradise Lost (Modern Library); Henry Fielding, Tom Jones (Oxford World Classics); Samuel Johnson, Selected Poems and Prose (University of California Press); James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (Penguin Classics)

Requirements & Grading: Reading journal, 60%; Midterm exam, 10%; Final exam, 30%

E 356 • The European Novel

36085 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 105
(also listed as EUS 347)

Instructor:  Garrison, J

Unique #:  36085

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  EUS 347

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E356 will consider representative continental novelists of the 19th and early 20th centuries. We will distinguish three different national traditions of the novel – French, Russian, and German, while at the same time asking how these traditions might converge to create a transnational European form. The reading will be demanding but rewarding, offering a chance to become acquainted with fiction that has an enduring claim on the western imagination.

Texts: Goethe, Elective Affinities; Stendhal, The Red and the Black; Dostoievsky, Crime and Punishment; Flaubert, A Sentimental Education; Tolstoy, Anna Karenina; Mann, Buddenbrooks.

Requirements & Grading: Two hour exams (30% each); final exam (40%).

E 320L • Maj Writ Of Restoratn/18th Cen

35660 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 306

Instructor:  Garrison, J            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35660            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E 320L surveys more than a century of English literature from the Restoration to the end of the Eighteenth Century. The course will trace the literary history of the period by exploring its principal genres and major authors in chronological order.

Texts: John Milton, Paradise Lost (Modern Library); Henry Fielding, Tom Jones (Oxford World Classics); Samuel Johnson, Selected Poems and Prose (University of California Press); James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (Penguin Classics)

Requirements & Grading: Reading journal, 60%; Midterm exam, 10%; Final exam, 30%

E 320L • Maj Writ Of Restoratn/18th Cen

35280 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A215A

Instructor:  Garrison, J            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  34610            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E 320L surveys more than a century of English literature from the Restoration to the end of the Eighteenth Century. The course will trace the literary history of the period by exploring its principal genres and major authors in chronological order.

Texts: John Milton, Paradise Lost (Modern Library); Henry Fielding, Tom Jones (Oxford World Classics); James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (Penguin Classics)

Requirements & Grading:  Reading journal, 50%; Midterm exam, 20%; Final exam, 30%

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34555 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CRD 007A

This section of E603A-B will consider versions of epic narrative from ancient to modern times.  The first semester will be devoted to the study of classical and medieval epic, which we will read in translation.  The second semester will consider transformations of this literary inheritance in English literature beginning with the Renaissance and continuing to the present.  The emphasis throughout will be on how these narratives engage in dialogue with one another, how this cultural heritage speaks across the centuries to us as a class and to each of us individually.

Texts/Readings:

Fall

Homer, Iliad, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Homer, Odyssey, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Virgil, Aeneid, trans. Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Beowulf, trans. Seamus Heaney (Norton)

Das Nibelungenlied: Song of the Nibelungs, trans. Burton Raffel (Yale)

The Song of Roland, trans. Glyn Burgess (Penguin)

The Song of the Cid, trans. Burton Raffel (Penguin)

Spring

Spenser, The Faerie Queene (Penguin)

Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton)

Pope, The Dunciad (Penguin)

Byron, Don Juan (Penguin)

Pound, Cantos (New Directions)

Walcott, Omeros (Farrar, Straus, Giroux)

Assignments/Requirements:

Papers 60% (papers 1 and 2 15% each, third paper 30%)

Reading journal 20%

In-class essay 10%

Final exam 10%

A strong attendance record (5 absences or fewer) provides exemption with a grade of 100 from the final exam. 

About the Professor:

James D. Garrison attended Princeton and The University of California Berkeley, receiving his PhD in English in 1972.  Since 1973 he has taught at UT, serving as Chair of the English Department from 1994 to 2006.  He is the author of two books on the poetry of John Dryden -- Dryden and the Tradition of Panegyric and Pietas from Vergil to Dryden – as well as articles on Dryden, Gray, and Gibbon.  His book A Dangerous Liberty: Translating Gray’s Elegy appeared in 2009 and in 2011 he received the Chad Oliver Award for Teaching Excellence in Plan II.  He holds the Archibald A. Hill Regents Centennial Professorship in English and American Literature and the title Distinguished Teaching Professor.

E 356 • The European Novel

35510 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as EUS 347)

Instructor:  Garrison, J            Areas:  III / F

Unique #:  35510            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  EUS 347            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E356 will consider representative continental novelists from the 18th to the 20th century.  We will try to distinguish the different national traditions of the novel – the erotic novel in French, the psychological novel in Russian, the domestic novel in German, and the historical novel in Italian -- while at the same time asking how these traditions might converge to create a transnational European form.  The reading will be demanding but rewarding, offering a chance to become acquainted with major works of fiction that have an enduring claim on the western imagination.

Texts: Laclos, Dangerous Liaisons, trans. Helen Constantine (Penguin); Flaubert, Madame Bovary, trans. Lydia Davis (Penguin); Dostoievsky, Crime and Punishment, trans. Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokonsky (Vintage); Tolstoy, Resurrection, trans. Anthony Briggs (Penguin); Mann, Buddenbrooks, trans. John E. Woods (Everyman); Roth, The Radetsky March, trans. Joachim Neugroschel (Everyman); Bassani, The Garden of the Finzi-Continis, trans. William Weaver (Everyman); Lampedusa, The Leopard, trans. Archibald Colquhon (Pantheon).

Requirements & Grading: Short (4-5 page) paper or midterm exam (20%); Longer (8-10 page) paper or final exam (50%); Reading journal (20%); Attendance and contribution (10%).

E 350M • English Elegy-Honors

35350 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 323

Instructor:  Garrison, J            Areas:  III / E

Unique #:  35350            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  LAH 350            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

Description: Timor mortis conturbat me – so goes the Latin refrain of William Dunbar’s fifteenth-century Lament for the Makiris. The sentiment echoes across the history of elegy, as poets from medieval to modern times give variable shape to human anxiety over life’s transience: the elegy mourns and memorializes, protests and consoles, confesses mortality even as it confers a kind of immortality. Over its long history, the elegy has engaged the best efforts of the greatest poets of Britain -- Spenser, Donne, Jonson, Milton, Dryden, Gray, Shelley, Tennyson, Hardy, Yeats, Auden – and America – Bradstreet, Dickinson, Whitman, Stevens, Williams, Lowell, Plath. A course on elegy, then, offers a comprehensive view of poetry in English through the lens of a single genre, invented and recurrently reinvented to meet our on-going need for paradigms of mourning, for articulations of grief.

This course will require substantial reading and writing, including two short papers and a longer term paper. As this is a seminar, there will be no lectures and no exams, but regular attendance, occasional oral presentations, and consistent contributions to class discussion will be expected.

Texts: Gilbert, Sandra, ed. Inventions of Farewell (Norton).

Requirements & Grading: Two short papers (20% each); Term paper (40%); Class performance, including oral presentations (20%).

The first short paper (4-5 pages) will be revised and resubmitted in light of the instructor’s written comments; the second will be peer reviewed and edited in draft before being submitted for a grade. The term paper (9-10 pages) will involve research beyond the assigned reading: a prospectus for the project will be circulated for review and comment by other members of the class; the completed paper should provide the basis for a possible senior thesis.

E 320L • Maj Writ Of Restoratn/18th Cen

35135 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 105

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: E 320L surveys more than a century of English literature from the Restoration (1660) to the French Revolution (1789). The course will trace the literary history of the period by exploring its principal genres and major authors in chronological order. 

Texts: Robert Demaria, Jr. (editor), British Literature 1640-1789 (Oxford: Blackwell); Henry Fielding, Tom Jones (Oxford: Oxford World Classics); Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson: Selected Poetry and Prose (Berkeley: UC Press).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm exam, 20%; Final exam, 30%; 2 short papers, 20% each; Attendance and contribution, 10%.

E 379N • Johnson And Boswell-W

35300 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 200

TBD

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    512-471-1442