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John M Golden


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Biography


John Golden has taught patent law, contracts, administrative law, and writing seminars relating to innovation and intellectual property. He currently serves as faculty director of the Andrew Ben White Center in Law, Science and Social Policy. John has an A.B. in Physics and History from Harvard College, a Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. After law school, John clerked for the Honorable Michael Boudin of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and for Associate Justice Stephen Breyer of the United States Supreme Court. John also worked as an associate in the intellectual property department of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP. John's SSRN author page is http://ssrn.com/author=601231.

Courses


T C 357 • Science And Innovation Policy

42110 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007B

Description:

Science and innovation are crucial drivers of economic growth as well as humanity’s understanding of both its world and itself.  Science and innovation might also be our best hopes for dealing with a number of social, political, and even existential problems.  Nonetheless, consensus on proper approaches to promoting scientific advance and innovation has remained elusive.  In this course, students will develop skill in analyzing and debating questions of how to promote scientific and technological progress.  Students will learn about the history of such progress, the great variety of government policies intended or otherwise thought to help promote it, and the role of private motivations and initiative in bringing about scientific and technological advances.  Students will write short papers responding to some of the course readings.  They will also write a longer research paper on a topic relating to science and innovation policy.  Students will make in-class presentations in relation to their research-paper topics.

Readings:

Sources for readings will include research and/or policy papers as well as portions of the following books: Suzanne Scotchmer’s Innovation and Incentives (2004) (economics and law), Josh Lerner’s Boulevard of Broken Dreams (2009) (business and public policy), Jon Gertner’s The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation (2012) (history), and Matthew Cobb’s, Life’s Greatest Secret: The Race to Crack the Genetic Code (2015) (history).

Assignments:

Final Version of Term Paper: 35%

Initial Draft of Term Paper: 10%

Presentation of Term-Paper Project: 10%

Draft Abstract, Table of Contents, and Bibliography for Term Paper: 5%

Draft of Part 1 of Term Paper: 5%

Prospectus for Term Paper: 5%

Short Response Papers: 10%

Class Participation and Attendance: 20%

About the Instructor:

Professor Golden has an A.B. in Physics and History from Harvard College, a Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  After law school, he clerked for the Honorable Michael Boudin of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and for Associate Justice Stephen Breyer of the United States Supreme Court. He also worked as an associate in the intellectual property department of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP.  At the University of Texas School of Law, Professor Golden has taught patent law, contracts, administrative law, and writing seminars relating to innovation and intellectual property.  He currently serves as faculty director of the Andrew Ben White Center in Law, Science and Social Policy.  His research has generally focused on questions relating to United States patent law.  Since moving from Massachusetts to Texas in 2006, he has run six marathons, including the Twin Cities Marathon in October 2015.

T C 357 • Science And Innovation Policy

43455 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007B

Title: Science and Innovation Policy

Semester: Fall 2014

Instructor: John M. Golden, Professor, School of Law

 

Description:

Science and innovation are crucial drivers of economic growth as well as critical tools for humanity’s understanding of both its world and itself.  Science and innovation might be our best hopes for dealing with a number of social, political, and even existential problems.  Nonetheless, consensus on proper approaches to promoting scientific advance and innovation remains elusive.  In this course, students will develop skill in analyzing and debating questions of how to promote scientific and technological progress.  Students will learn about the history of such progress, the great variety of government policies intended or otherwise thought to help promote it, and the role of private motivations and initiative in bringing about scientific and technological advances.  Students will write short papers responding to course readings.  They will also write a longer research paper on a topic relating to science and innovation policy.  Students will make in-class presentations in relation to their research-paper topics.

 

Readings:

Sources for readings will include research papers and books such as Joel Mokyr’s The Lever of Riches: Technological Creativity and Economic Progress (1990) (history) and Suzanne Scotchmer’s Innovation and Incentives (2004) (economics and law).

 

Assignments:

Term Paper (including separate initial and final drafts): 50%

Shorter Response Papers: 20%

Class Participation and Attendance: 20%

Term-Paper Presentation: 10%

 

About the Instructor:

Professor Golden has an A.B. in Physics and History from Harvard College, a Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  After law school, he clerked for the Honorable Michael Boudin of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and for Associate Justice Stephen Breyer of the United States Supreme Court. He also worked as an associate in the intellectual property department of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP.  At the School of Law, Professor Golden has taught patent law, contracts, administrative law, and writing seminars relating to innovation and intellectual property.  He currently serves as faculty director of the Andrew Ben White Center in Law, Science and Social Policy.  His research has generally focused on questions relating to United States patent law.  Since moving from Massachusetts to Austin, Texas, in 2006, he has run four marathons, including the Boston Marathon in 2011 and the Baystate Marathon in 2013.

 

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    University of Texas at Austin
    305 East 23rd St
    CLA 2.102
    Austin, Texas, 78712-1250
    512-471-1442