Yasmiyn Irizarry


Faculty Research AssociatePh.D., Indiana University, Bloomington

Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies
Yasmiyn Irizarry

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Biography


Dr. Yasmiyn Irizarry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies and Affiliated Faculty in the Department of Sociology. She earned her PhD in Sociology from Indiana University in 2011, after which she spent three years as an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Mississippi State University. Dr. Irizarry is quantitative sociologist by training with research interests in sociology of education, race and ethnicity, and social inequality. In addition to her work on the quantitative measurement of race, her current research also examines inequality in students' educational experiences across the academic pipeline, including the relationships between (1) race and teacher perceptions in primary school, (2) racialized tracking and inequality in math coursetaking at the high school level, and (3) race, identity integration, and perceived discrimination among undergradaute STEM majors.

Courses


AFR 302M • Numbering Race

30010 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.404

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 374D • Community Research & Analysis

29505 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.404
(also listed as MAS 374)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 376 • Senior Seminar

29571 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.120

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

29535 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.402

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education

29590 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.106
(also listed as SOC 321L, WGS 345)

This course is an introduction to current issues in the sociology of education. The goal of this course is to ask some fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. To answer these questions, we will take an in depth look at the structures, practices, content, and outcomes of schooling, in light of their relationships to the wider society in which schools are situated. We will identify the role(s) of schools and schooling, note the link between schools and social stratification, discuss the outcomes of schooling and how these outcomes are produced, and consider sociological perspectives on contemporary educational inequality and reform. Throughout the course, you will have opportunities to reflect upon your own educational experience and worldview, while also thinking critically about how various social forces have come to shape your own schooling experiences, as well as those of others around you.

Required Texts:

Schools and Society: A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition, edited by Jeanne H. Ballantine and Joan Z. Spade.

Additional readings are available on Canvas. 

Grading Breakdown:

Reflection Papers 30% 

Current Events Essay 15%

 Quizzes 10%

 Exams 45% 

MAS 374 • Community Research & Analysis

35448 • Spring 2015
Meets T 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A303A
(also listed as AFR 374D)

Course Description:

Regardless of the sector, students pursuing careers in community leadership and program development related careers will be tasked with making important decisions that can have huge implications for the populations they serve. Now that we are in the age of big data, students and professionals alike are bombarded with a constant stream of information from a wide variety of sources (e.g., television, the Internet, newspapers, and magazines), which make these decisions all the more challenging. Much of the information we receive comes in the form of or is rooted in statistics, and we are often confronted with contradictory claims based on this statistical information. Knowing how to understand and sort through all of this information---or even better, knowing how to gather and analyze our own information-requires a level of methodological and statistical literacy that many individuals lack. As a result, we tend to either become skeptical of all statistics or only incorporate and utilize statistics that fit our worldview, both of which can lead to poor decision making.

This course is a formal introduction to quantitative methodology and statistical analysis for Latino and Black serving professionals pursuing private, nonprofit, and public sector careers in community and/or organizational leadership. This is also an experiential learning course. In addition to learning about the nuts and bolts of applied quantitative research, including techniques for collecting (or finding), preparing, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data, we will collectively (as a class) undertake a quantitative research study for a Texas-based organization or community agency. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is assumed, you should have a good understanding of basic algebraic concepts. If you have never had a course in algebra at the high school level or above, you should consider taking one before enrolling in this course.

 

Proposed Readings: 

1) Nardi, Peter. 2006. Doing Survey Research: A Guide to Quantitative Methods. 2nd ed.

Boston: Pearson.

2) Nardi, Peter. 2006. Interpreting Data (with Research Navigator). Boston: Pearson.

 

Proposed Grading Policy: 

Problem Sets: 25%   250 points

Academic Reviews:     15%    150 points

Assignments:            30%   300 points

Applied Project:         30%    300 points

AFR 317D • Numbering Race

30413 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A216A
(also listed as SDS 310T)

Description:

As public consumers, we are constantly bombarded by numbers in our daily lives.  We come across reports on the news and articles in magazines about topics like race and obesity or poverty, and assume more often than not that these numbers must be true.  How do we definitely know without the right tools?

 

In this course, we will learn how to critically examine numbers produced by social statistics and presented in our daily lives.  We will accomplish this goal by learning about 1) the history of race and social statistics, 2) the methods used by social scientists to understand relationships, 3) how to approach social statistics with a critical eye, and 4) the use of critical race and feminist methodologies in quantitative research.  This class will cover several topic areas related to race and intersectionality with a focus on quantitative reasoning in the understanding and production of social statistics. 

 

By the end of this course, you will be able to critically evaluate quantitative race research and social science research more generally, both in your studies and in your daily life. 

AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education

30485 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A207A
(also listed as SOC 321L)

This course is an introduction to current issues in the sociology of education. The goal of this course is to ask some fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. In this course, we will look at the structure, practices, content, and outcomes of schooling, in light of their relationships to the wider society in which schools are situated. We will note the link between schools and social stratification, discuss the outcomes of schooling and how these outcomes are produces, and consider sociological perspectives on contemporary education reform.

In addition to having an overview of current topics in schools, this class should help you to start thinking critically about your own schooling experiences, as well as those of others'. You will ultimately begin to understand schools as societal institutions that influence and are influenced by other societal groups, as well as the intersection between schools, family, and community.

Curriculum Vitae


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