Department of Psychology
Department of Psychology

Juan M Dominguez


Associate ProfessorPh.D., The State University of New York at Buffalo

Associate Professor and Graduate Advisor
Juan M Dominguez

Contact

Interests


The neural-endocrine regulation of motivated behaviors; using mating behavior as a prototypic model to better understand motivation and its associated disorders, especially the neuroendocrinological factors that regulate depression and addiction.

Biography


Juan Dominguez received his Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience from the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York. His postdoctoral fellowship was conducted with dual appointments in the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Cell Biology at The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Following postdoctoral training, Dr. Dominguez joined the research faculty of the neuroscience program at Florida State University. Before joining the UT faculty, he was an assistant professor of psychology at American University in Washington, DC. The goals of his lab are to elucidate the underlying neural and endocrine mechanisms regulating motivated behaviors, specifically, using the study of sexual behavior as a prototypic model for understanding motivation, its acquisition, and associated disorders like addiction and depression.

Publications

Will, R.G., Martz, J.R., & Dominguez, J.M. (2016). The medial preoptic area modulates cocaine-induced locomotion in male rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 205: 218-222

Tobiansky, D.J., Will, R.G., Lominac, K.D., Turner, J.M., Hattori, T., Krishnan, K., Martz, J.R., Nutsch, V.L., & Dominguez, J.M. (2016). Estradiol in the preoptic area regulates the dopaminergic response to cocaine in the nucleus accumbens. Neuropsychopharmacology, advance online publication.

Will, R.G., Nutsch, V.L., Turner, J.T., Hattori, T., & Dominguez, J.M. (2015). Astrocytes in the medial preoptic area modulate ejaculation latency in an experience-dependent fashion. Behavioral Neuroscience, 129: 68-73. 

Nutsch, V.L., Will, R.G., Hattori, T., Tobiansky, D.J., & Dominguez, J.M. (2014). Sexual experience influences mating-induced activity in nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons in the medial preoptic area. Neuroscience Letters, 579: 92-96.

Will R.G., Hull, E.M., & Dominguez, J.M. (2014). Influences of dopamine and glutamate in the medial preoptic area on male sexual behavior. Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior, 121: 115-123. 

Tobiansky, D.J., Roma, P.G., Hattori, T., Will, R.G., Nutsch, V.L., & Dominguez, J.M. (2013). The medial preoptic area modulates cocaine-induced activity in female rats. Behavioral Neuroscience, 127(2): 293-302. 

Tobiansky, D.J., Hattori, T., Scott, J.M., Nutsch, V.L., Roma, P.G., and Dominguez, J.M. (2012). Sex-relevant olfactory stimuli activate the rat brain in an age-dependent manner. NeuroReport, 23: 1077-1083. 

Kleitz-Nelson, H. K., Dominguez, J. M., & Ball, G. F. (2010). A comparative approach to the study of dopamine and male sexual behavior: What can Japanese quail teach us? A reply to Pfaus (2010) Behavioral Neuroscience, 124(6), 881-883. 

Kleitz-Nelson, H. K., Dominguez, J. M., & Ball, G. F. (2010). Dopamine release in the medial preoptic area is related to hormonal action and sexual motivation. Behavioral Neuroscience, 124(6), 773-779. 

Dominguez, J. M., & Hull, E. M. (2010). Serotonin impairs copulation and attenuates ejaculation-induced glutamate activity in the medial preoptic area. Behavioral Neuroscience, 124(4), 554-557. 

Westerman, A. T., Roma, P. G., Price, R. C., & Dominguez, J. M. (2010). Assessing the role of the medial preoptic area in ethanol-induced hypothermia. Neuroscience Letters, 475(1), 25-28. 

Kleitz-Nelson, H. K., Dominguez, J. M., Cornil, C. A., & Ball, G. F. (2010). Is sexual motivational state linked to dopamine release in the medial preoptic area? Behavioral Neuroscience, 124(2), 300-304. 

Westerman, A. T., Roma, P. G., Creed, E. T., Hurwitz, Z. E., & Dominguez, J. M. (2009). The antiepileptic primidone impairs male rat sexual behavior. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 93(2), 160-164. 

Dominguez, J. M. (2009). A role for preoptic glutamate in the regulation of male reproductive behavior. The Neuroscientist, 15(1), 11-19. 

Kohut, S. J., Roma, P. G., Davis, C. M., Zernig, G., Saria, A., Dominguez, J. M., Rice, K. C., & Riley, A. L. (2009). The impact of early environmental rearing condition on the discriminative stimulus effects and Fos expression induced by cocaine in adult male and female rats. Psychopharmacology, 203(2), 383-397. 

Dominguez, J. M., Balfour, M. E., Lee, H. S., Brown, J. L., Davis, B. A., & Coolen, L. M. (2007). Mating activates NMDA receptors in the medial preoptic area of male rats. Behavioral Neuroscience, 121(5), 1023-1031.

Hull, E. M., & Dominguez, J. M. (2007). Sexual behavior in male rodents. Hormones and Behavior, 52(1), 45-55.

Muschamp, J. W., Dominguez, J. M., Sato, S., Shen, R. Y., & Hull, E. M. (2007). A role for hypocretin (orexin) in male sexual behavior. The Journal of Neuroscience, 27(11), 2837-2845. 

Davis, C. M., Roma, P. G., Dominguez, J. M., & Riley, A. L. (2007). Morphine-induced place conditioning in Fischer and Lewis rats: Acquisition and dose-response in a fully biased procedure. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 86(3), 516-523. 

Dominguez, J. M., Brann, J. H., Gil, M., & Hull, E. M. (2006). Sexual experience increases nitric oxide synthase in the medial preoptic area of male rats. Behavioral Neuroscience, 120(6), 1389-1394.

Hull, E. M., & Dominguez, J. M. (2006). Getting his act together: Roles of glutamate, nitric oxide, and dopamine in the medial preoptic area. Brain Research, 1126(1), 66-75. 

Dominguez, J. M., Gil, M., & Hull, E. M. (2006). Preoptic glutamate facilitates male sexual behavior. The Journal of Neuroscience, 26(6), 1699-1703. 

Dominguez, J. M., & Hull, E. M. (2005). Dopamine, the medial preoptic area, and male sexual behavior. Physiology & Behavior, 86(3), 356-368.

Dominguez, J. M., Muschamp, J. W., Schmich, J. M., & Hull, E. M. (2004). Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-evoked dopamine release in the medial preoptic area. Neuroscience, 125(1), 203-210. 

Powell, W. S., Dominguez, J. M., & Hull, E. M. (2003). An NMDA antagonist impairs copulation and the experience-induced enhancement of male sexual behavior in the rat. Behavioral Neuroscience, 117(1), 69-75. 

Dominguez, J. M., & Hull, E. M. (2003). Medial amygdala regulates mating-induced dopamine release in medial preoptic area. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 985(1), 515-518. 

Lonstein, J. S., Dominguez, J. M., Putnam, S. K., De Vries, G. J., & Hull, E. M. (2003). Intracellular preoptic and striatal monoamines in pregnant and lactating rats: Possible role in maternal behavior. Brain Research, 970(1-2), 149-158. 

Dominguez, J. M., & Hull, E. M. (2001). Stimulation of the medial amygdala enhances medial preoptic dopamine release: Implications for male rat sexual behavior. Brain Research, 917(2), 225-229.

Dominguez, J. M., Riolo, J. V., Xu, Z., & Hull, E. M. (2001). Regulation by the medial amygdala of copulation and medial preoptic dopamine release. The Journal of Neuroscience, 21(1), 349-355. 

Matuszewich, L., Lorrain, D. S., Trujillo, R., Dominguez, J. M., Putnam, S. K., & Hull, E. M. (1999). Partial antagonism of 8-OH-DPAT’s effects on male rat sexual behavior with a D2, but not a 5-HT1A, antagonist. Brain Research, 820(1-2), 55-62. 

Hull, E. M., Lumley, L. A., Matuszewich, L., Dominguez, J. M., Moses, J., & Lorrain, D. S. (1994). The roles of nitric oxide in sexual function of male rats. Neuropharmacology, 33(11), 1499-1504. 

Book Chapters

Male sexual behavior. By EM Hull & JM Dominguez (2014). In McCarthy, M. (Ed.), Knobil and Neill’s: Physiology of Reproduction (pp. 2211-2285). Academic Press.

Sexual behavior. By EM Hull & JM Dominguez (2012). In R.J. Nelson and S. Mizumori (Eds.), Handbook of Psychology, 2nd edition, Vol. 3, Behavioral Neuroscience (pp. 331-364). Wiley & Sons.

Neurochemistry of male sexual behavior. By EM Hull, JM Dominguez, & JW Muschamp (2006). In Abel Lajtha & Jeffrey Blaustein (Eds.). Handbook of Neurochemistry and Molecular Neurobiology 3rd Edition (pp. 37-94). New York, NY: Springer Publishers.

Sex behavior. By EM Hull, & JM Dominguez (2003). In M. Gallagher, R.J. Nelson, & I.B. Weiner (Eds.), Handbook of Psychology, Volume 3, Biological Psychology (pp. 321-353). Wiley & Sons. 

Courses


PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43005 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.126

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

42195 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.126

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43570 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

43900 • Fall 2014
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM SEA 4.244

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43915 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.126

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43635 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

43930 • Fall 2013
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM SEA 4.244

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43265 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43170 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion; biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease.

PSY 341K • Neurosci Of Motivatn & Reward

43325 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SEA 2.108

When finished with this course, you will have a greater understanding of how the brain and hormones modulate motivated behaviors and associated disorders. Additionally, you will be familiar with recent advancements in the field pertaining to neuroendocrine mechanisms of motivation.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43125 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 3.502

When finished with this course, you will have a greater understanding of how the brain regulates behavior and its associated disorders. Additionally, you will be familiar with recent advancements in the field of behavioral neuroscience.

Topics (Presented in approximate order of discussion. We may or may not cover all topics).

  1. Introduction

  2. The Major Issues (Chapter 1)

  3. Nerve Cells and Nerve Impulses (Chapter 2)

  4. Synapses (Chapter 3)

  5. Anatomy of the Nervous System (Chapter 4)

  6. Exam 1

  7. Development and Plasticity of the Brain (Chapter 5)

  8. Vision (Chapters 6)

  9. The Other Sensory Systems (Chapter 7)

  10. Movement (Chapter 8)

  11. Exam 2

  12. Wakefulness and Sleep (Chapter 9)

  13. Internal Regulation (Chapter 10)

  14. Reproductive Behaviors (Chapter 11)

  15. Emotional Behaviors (Chapter 12)

  16. Exam 3

  17. The Biology of Learning and Memory (Chapter 13)

  18. Cognitive Functions (Chapter 14)

  19. Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia (Chapters 15)

  20. Possible additional Topics

  21. Exam 4

PSY 341K • Neurosci Of Motivatn & Reward

43265 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SEA 2.108

Description

This course will focus on the neural and hormonal basis of behavior
reinforcement, including brain mechanisms for incentive motivation,
reward, aversion, and addiction. We will underscore the role of these
neural and endocrine mechanisms on sensory-motor integration in the
hindbrain, hypothalamus and the basal ganglia in the control of behavior
for food, water, sex, affiliation, and drugs. Related clinical topics
include eating disorders, depression, and drug abuse. Reports and
presentations on peer-reviewed research will lead to term papers.

Assignments & Grading

A 20-page research paper will be required by the end of the semester. The
topic will be of the student's choosing, but will be restricted to issues
pertaining to brain and/or endocrine regulation of naturally
rewarding/motivating behavior (e.g. eating, reproduction, affiliation) or
disorders of motivation (e.g. addiction, depression). In addition to their
research paper, students
will be required to submit weekly review papers dealing with a previously
assigned research article. Students will also be required to give in class
presentations.

Course grade will come from the following distribution:
Mid term exam 20%
Final exam 20%
Oral presentation 10%
Review papers 20%
Research paper 30%.

Text

There will not be a required book, but assigned readings, articles, etc.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43070 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Topics (Presented in approximate order of discussion. We may or may not cover all topics).

  1. Introduction

  2. The Major Issues (Chapter 1)

  3. Nerve Cells and Nerve Impulses (Chapter 2)

  4. Synapses (Chapter 3)

  5. Anatomy of the Nervous System (Chapter 4)

  6. Exam 1

  7. Development and Plasticity of the Brain (Chapter 5)

  8. Vision (Chapters 6)

  9. The Other Sensory Systems (Chapter 7)

  10. Movement (Chapter 8)

  11. Exam 2

  12. Wakefulness and Sleep (Chapter 9)

  13. Internal Regulation (Chapter 10)

  14. Reproductive Behaviors (Chapter 11)

  15. Emotional Behaviors (Chapter 12)

  16. Exam 3

  17. The Biology of Learning and Memory (Chapter 13)

  18. Cognitive Functions (Chapter 14)

  19. Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia (Chapters 15)

  20. Possible additional Topics

  21. Exam 4

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43595 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM NOA 1.124

 Topics (Presented in approximate order of discussion. We may or may not cover all topics).

1. Introduction to Psychology and Scientific Methods in Psychology (Chapters 1 and 2)

2. Biological Psychology/ Behavioral Neuroscience (Chapter 3)

3. Sensation and Perception (Chapter 4)

 4. Exam 1

5. Development (Chapter 5)

6. Learning & Memory (Chapters 6 and 7)

7. Cognition & Language (Chapter 8)

 8. Exam 2

9. Intelligence (Chapter 9)

10. Consciousness (Chapter 10)

11. Motivation (Chapter 11)

12. Emotion & Stress (Chapter 12)

 13. Exam 3

14. Social Psychology (Chapter 13)

15. Personality (Chapter 14)

16. Abnormality (Chapters 15)

17. Specific Disorders (Chapter 16)

 18. Exam 4

EXAM DATES: Dates are 2/10 for Exam I, 3/10 for Exam II, 4/12 for Exam III, and 5/5 for Exam IV. If these

dates change, I will make an in-class announcement.

 COURSE OBJECTIVE: Psychology is the science of behavior. This course will serve as an introduction to the field,

especially as it pertains to the specialty areas within psychology. When you complete this course, you should have a

greater understanding of the study of behavior as a science and how it applies to every day life.

 FORMAT: A lecture format will be employed to explore these topics. Attendance to all classes is expected.

 REQUIREMENTS:

Your performance on four exams and several unannounced quizzes and take-home assignments will determine your

grade. There will be no make up exams, quizzes, or assignments, unless there is a documented emergency.

1. Exams (comprise 80% of final grade):

Four multiple choice/short answer exams will be administered during the semester and an optional-cumulative

final. Exam grades will comprise 80% of your final grade. All exams will be administered in class. No make-up

exams will be administered, unless there is a documented emergency.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43025 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.124

Course Description

OBJECTIVE: When finished with this course, you will have a greater understanding of how the brain regulates behavior and its associated disorders. Additionally, you will be familiar with recent advancements in the field of behavioral neuroscience.

FORMAT: A lecture and discussion format will be employed to explore these topics. Attendance to all classes is expected.

Course Requirements

Your performance on four exams, several assignments and quizzes will determine your grade. No make up exams or quizzes will be administered, unless there is a documented emergency.

Grading Policy

Four multiple choice/short answer exams will be administered during the semester and an optional-cumulative final. Exam grades will total 80% of your final grade. No make-up exams will be administered, unless there is a documented emergency.

Quizzes and assignments (total 20% of final grade): Unannounced quizzes and assignments will be administered. The grades you earn in these will count towards 20% of your final grade. Quizzes will be brief (generally 5 to 10 min), but may be given anytime during class. No make-up quizzes or assignments will be administered.

Texts

TBA

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43789 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM NOA 1.124

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43935 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ART 1.120

 

PSY 301, Introduction to Psychology, Fall 2009

 

Juan M. Dominguez

Office hours: Tues. & Thurs. 11:00- 12:30 PM, or by appt.

SEA 5.252

E-mail: dominguez@psy.utexas.edu

 

Teaching assistant:

-Annie Steele, e-mail: steele@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours will be announced during the first week of class.

 

Text/ Readings:

- Psychology

By Schacter, Gilbert, & Wegner

- Additional readings (e.g. assigned articles, online assignments, etc).  These will be assigned throughout the semester.

NOTE: You will have access to grades, assigned articles, and additional information via the Blackboard website.  Please make certain that your Blackboard account is active and you are familiar with using it.

 

Class meetings: Tues & Thu, 12:30 - 2:00 PM, room ART 1.120

 

Topics (Presented in approximate order of discussion. We may or may not cover all topics).

  1. Introduction
  2. Scientific Method in Psychology (Chapters 1 and 2)
  3. Biopsychology/ Behavioral Neuroscience (Chapter 3)
  4. Sensation and Perception (Chapter 4)
  5. Exam 1
  6. Development (Chapter 11)
  7. Learning & Memory (Chapters 5 and 6)
  8. Language (Chapter 7)
  9. Exam 2
  10. Intelligence (Chapter 9)
  11. Consciousness (Chapter 8)
  12. Emotion and Motivation (Chapter 10)
  13. Personality (Chapter 12)
  14. Exam 3
  15. Social Psychology (Chapter 16)
  16. Stress (Chapter 15)
  17. Abnormality (Chapters 13 and 14)
  18. Exam 4

 

EXAM DATES: Dates are 9/24 for Exam I, 10/20 for Exam II, 11/12 for Exam III, and 12/3 for Exam IV.  If these dates change, I will make an in class announcement.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVE: Psychology is the science that studies behavior. This course will serve as an introduction to the field, especially as it pertains to the specialty areas within psychology. When you complete this course, you should have a greater understanding of the study of behavior as a science and how it applies to every day life.

 

FORMAT:  A lecture format will be employed to explore these topics. Attendance to all classes is expected.

 

REQUIREMENTS:

Your performance on four exams and several unannounced quizzes and take-home assignments will determine your grade. There will be no make up exams, quizzes, or assignments, unless there is a documented emergency. Incompletes are entertained only in extreme circumstances, which must be supported by official documentation.

Four exams (will total 80% of your final grade):

You will receive four multiple choice/short answer exams during the semester and an optional-cumulative final; all exams will be administered in class. Exam grades will total 80% of your final grade. If you choose to take the final exam, you’re welcome to come into the classroom, look at the exam, and take the exam; but once you hand it in, it will replace your lowest grade (even if the new grade for your final is lower). There will be NO MAKE-UP EXAMS, unless there is a documented emergency. You are required to bring a picture ID to show when submitting an exam.

Quizzes and assignments (total 20% of final grade):

You will receive unannounced quizzes and assignments. The grades you earn in these quizzes and assignments will count towards 20% of your final grade.  Quizzes will be brief (generally 10 min), but may be given anytime during class.  There will be no make-up quizzes or assignments.

 

Feel free to visit during office hrs or make an appt. if you need additional help.

 

Grading policy:

            -No make-up exams and no extra credit assignments

            -Exam I ………………………            20 points

            -Exam II ……………………..            20 points

            -Exam III …………………….            20 points

            -Exam IV …………………….            20 points

            -Quizzes & Assignments …..            20 points

            ------------------------------------------------------

            -Total …………………………            100 points

 

Total points earned will determine your final grade, using the following distribution:

93-100            =            A           

90-92              =            A-

87-89            =            B+

83-86            =            B

80-82            =            B-

77-79            =            C+

73-76            =            C

70-72            =            C-

67-69            =            D+

63-66            =            D

60-62            =            D-

< 60              =            F

 

Note: Though not foreseeable, any changes or deviations from this syllabus (e.g. order in which topics are covered) will be announced in class. 

 

Academic integrity: Students are expected to uphold the Student Standard of Conduct published in the University of Texas website (http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php), section 11-801. Generally, do not plagiarize, do not collaborate with colleagues when doing work that should be your own, do not cheat on exams, and do not submit work as your own that was obtained or purchased from someone else.

 

Disability services:

If you experience difficulty in this course for any reason, please don’t hesitate to consult with me. In addition to the resources of the department, a wide range of services are available to support you in your efforts to meet the course requirements. The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

             If you qualify for accommodations because of a disability, please notify me in a timely manner so that we can make arrangements to address your needs.

 

Other requirements:

All students enrolled in PSY 301 must fulfill a research requirement consisting of either participation in psychological research studies as a subject or writing a paper on psychological research, in addition to class work. Failure to satisfy this requirement will result in an Incomplete. Information pertaining this requirement will be discussed in class. Please understand that this is a requirement and must be fulfilled by a due date.

 

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42950 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 208

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

44023 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM ART 1.120

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

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  • Department of Psychology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    SEA 4.208
    108 E. Dean Keeton Stop A8000
    Austin, TX 78712-1043
    512-471-1157