Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84880
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 208
show description

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.


RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84885 • Echternach, Julia
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308
show description

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.


RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84890 • Rivera-Dundas, Adena
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 2.122
show description

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.


RHE F309K • Rhet Of Sports/Athleticism

84905 • Goheen, Jeremy
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ B0.302
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Rhetoric of Sports and Athleticism

 

In a 2006 New York Times article, David Foster Wallace defined the spectacle of watching Roger Federer play upon the “sacred grass” of Wimbledon as a “religious experience.” Framing such an experience in religious terms, Wallace contends that Federer is “one of those preternatural athletes who appear to be exempt . . . from certain physical laws.” We, as an audience, are asked to imagine Federer’s athleticism and performance on the court less in terms of sheer muscular physicality and more in terms of pure transcendent beauty—a beauty divested of political and cultural meaning. Nine years later, Claudia Rankine would explore in the same venue with a much different agenda “The Meaning of Serena Williams.” Williams, Rankine contends, embodies black excellence, but not the kind of black excellence that performs with “good manners and forgiveness in the face of any racist slights or attacks.” On quite the contrary, Rankine suggests Williams’s performances have rewritten the “unspoken script that demands” black people, and black athletes in particular, to absorb racism without resistance. The “new script” Williams provides is one in which “winning doesn't carry the burden of curing racism, in which [black athletes] win just to win.” While each of these representations of the two athletes could not have more radically different agendas, they share some common denominators. Significantly, both authors ask us to change the way we talk about and perceive sports and athleticism. But in asking us to alter our perspectives, they do something we all do every day (knowingly or not): they subtlety, and sometimes not so subtlety, make arguments. And they do so using a wide range of rhetorical strategies.

 

In this course, Rhet of Sports and Athleticism, we will seek to answer a series of fundamental questions: What are sports? What is athleticism? What rhetorical strategies, specifically, does the media employ as a means of selling the spectacle of sports and athleticism to spectators? What is the price we pay for incessantly talking (and arguing) about sports? What is there to be gained? How is rhetoric used to both destroy and advance individual careers? Whose bodies get talked about and whose bodies do not? Where do sports and politics collapse into one another? Are they (or have they) ever been distinct from one another? In attempt to answer these kinds of questions, students will complete three major assignment divided into three units. In the first unit, students will map a particular sports related controversy of their choice. To help narrow the scope of the project, students will select a single athlete through which they will map the controversy. In the second unit, students will learn to rhetorically analyze televised and live sports events. In the third and final unit, students will make an intervention into the controversy they will have explored over the course of the semester.

 

Required Textbooks and Handbooks

  • Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments, Lester Fairly and Jack Selzer
  • Longhorn Handbook

 

 

1.1 Annotated Bibliography (10%)

2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (televised event) (5&)

2.2 Rhetorical Analysis (live event) (5%)

2.3 Rhetorical analysis revision (10%)

3.1 Argumentative Essay (15%)

3.2 Argumentative Essay Revision (20%)

Short Writing Assignments/participation (20%)

Oral Presentations (5%)

Participation (10%)

Peer Reviews (Mandatory)


RHE F309K • Rhet Of The National Parks

84900 • Senzaki, Sierra
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 2.118
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RHE 309K: Rhetoric of the National Parks

Summer 2017

 

Course Description:

“There can be nothing in the world more beautiful than the Yosemite, the groves of the giant sequoias and redwoods, the Canyon of the Colorado, the Canyon of the Yellowstone, the Three Tetons; and our people should see to it that they are preserved for their children and their children's children forever, with their majestic beauty all unmarred.”

– President Theodore Roosevelt, Outdoor Pastimes of an American Hunter

 

            The dominant discourse surrounding our national parks consists of grand claims about their majesty, purity, and importance to humanity. And yet, since their inception, the national parks have also sparked fierce disagreements about land rights, the treatment of indigenous peoples, accessibility, environmental stewardship, the role of the federal government, and more. Just this January, the National Parks Service and Badlands National Park tweeted inconvenient truths about topics such as climate change – tweets that were hastily deleted, and then continued on new “rogue” Twitter accounts – thereby reviving debates about the role of the parks, the values they uphold, and their place in our national consciousness.

            Together, we will trace how people have argued for the creation, maintenance, and utilization of America’s national parks, and how those arguments have been critiqued and challenged. Our course materials will provide history, context, rhetorical concepts, research advice and writing skills to support your personal research into present-day disagreements and controversies surrounding the parks. You will research one controversy throughout multiple writing assignments (two major papers, one of which will undergo revision, several short writing assignments, and a final project). The course will culminate with a final project in which you will advocate a position your chosen controversy. You are encouraged to be creative with the form and format of these presentations (possibilities include park brochures, promo videos, photograph series, and ranger talks), which will be accompanied by a formal write-up.

 

Major assignments:

Annotated Bibliography 15% Ÿ Rhetorical Analysis 10% Ÿ Rhetorical Analysis Revision 15% Ÿ Final Project 15% Ÿ Final Project Revision 20% Ÿ Oral Presentation 5% Ÿ Short Writing Assignments 15% Ÿ Participation 5% Ÿ Peer reviews: Mandatory

 

Required texts:

-Ken Burns, “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea” (documentary series; free streaming available through UT Libraries or Amazon Prime)

-Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters, Everything’s an Argument (available for purchase at the Co-op)

-The Little Longhorn Handbook (available for purchase at the Co-op)

 

Additional readings will be provided on Canvas. Possible readings include excerpts from This is the American Earth by Ansel Adams and Nancy Newhall, and Nature Writings by John Muir. In addition to in-class and assigned readings, students will conduct individual research on a National Parks-related controversy of their choice. 


RHE F309K • Topics In Writing

84895
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 1.406
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RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Truth

If we are living through a post-truth era, then how do we begin to analyze cultural texts or write our own persuasive arguments? This course surveys a wide variety of 20th and 21st century cultural texts from propaganda to conspiracy theories to consider why these texts hold such persuasive power. In particular, this course is interested in how new media reshapes the possibilities for “truth” claims, whether that media be radio, television, or the Internet. Our readings will introduce students to a wide array of media genres, equipping them to assess the credibility, follow the rhetorical moves, and summarize the argument. These readings and assignments will enable us to answer questions such as: what does it mean to claim something as true? Is there continued value for supposed objectivity in media? How can we respond to arguments that use false evidence to support their claims? How do we navigate credibility in a democratized media landscape? How do we responsibly share or retweet what we read online? What do conspiracy theories and propaganda share with other genres? Is there an ethical value in engaging with suspect sources? In the course of the semester, we will repeatedly return to these questions and topics, asking ourselves how to research, speak, and write responsibly about issues of vital importance to our public lives.

Oxford Dictionary named “post-truth” the 2016 word of the year. The dictionary defines post-truth as “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief." While the Oxford definition will provide the jumping off point for our class, our goal is not to excise argument from emotion rather to learn how to put our emotions and personal beliefs to use in constructing persuasive and ethical arguments. While a lot of the texts we will deal with are considered suspect, rather than dismissing them on the bases of their bias and credibility, we will seek to engage with these instances of “bad” rhetoric through research, analysis, and argument. In order to understand the diminishing importance of the truth and increasing prevalence of fake news, we will research debates about the value of truth and objectivity with particular attention to historical moments when truth has been under siege (Unit 1). We will take seriously the rhetorical strategies of fake news, conspiracy theories, and propaganda in order to understand how these texts work upon their audience and circulate widely (Unit 2). We will craft our own arguments that borrow from these rhetorical strategies in order to speak to publics quite different than our own (Unit 3).

 

RHE 309K carries a writing flag, and as such, includes a substantial research, writing, and revision component.

 

Assignment Breakdown:

This course uses a Learning Record. You will determine your grade by monitoring your progress against the criteria below over the course of the semester and documenting your development and achievements in a portfolio of work, frequent self-assessments, and a formal reflection on your work at midterm and the end of the semester. The portfolio and observations will provide the evidence from which you will build an argument about your performance in the class. After reviewing your argument, I will either agree with or revise your self-assessment based on the evidence provided in your Learning Record. We will discuss grades at midterm and the end of semester, but you are welcome to meet with me in office hours anytime to brainstorm strategies for success in the course.

 

Criteria for Assessment:

·      Writing Process

·      Research

·      Argumentation

·      Digital Literacy

·      Creativity

  

Course Texts:

Rhetoric Textbook:

 

Gerald Graff, They Say, I Say: Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd Edition (2005)

Andrea Lunsford, Easy Writer: A High School Reference

 

Additional Films and Readings to be available on Canvas or viewed as a class.


RHE F325M • Advanced Writing

84910 • Zacks, Aaron
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BEN 1.108
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Rhetoric 325M is an advanced-level writing workshop intended for self-motivated students interested in seeking publication for their work, anywhere from the op-ed column of The Daily Texan to a peer-reviewed, academic journal. The main goal of the course is to make already skilled writers more polished and publishable.   

Toward that end, this course is designed to:

• enhance your critical thinking skills

• teach you to tailor your prose for particular audiences and situations, and to use compelling reasons and evidence to support your arguments

• help you develop editing techniques that will make your prose more stylish and grammatically correct

                       

Students will produce pieces of writing in various genres -- a mixture of personal narratives, reports, and proposal arguments -- and submit early versions of them for peer and instructor review. Most course sessions will focus on drafts, with students in the class weekly showcasing their work-in-progress. At the end of the semester, students will select from these pieces and submit a carefully edited portfolio of their writing. Student/teacher conferences will be frequent.

 

Required Texts:

  • Writing With Style, John Trimble (any edition)
  • Easy Writer, Lunsford, 5th ed. (2014)
  • Course Packet

 

Grade Breakdown:

  • Peer Review                30%                
  • First Submissions         20%
  • Portfolio                      50%   

RHE F328 • Magazine Writing/Publishing

84915 • Buckley, Tom
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM GAR 3.116
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This course is designed to give students an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of both writers and editors. The course offers a broad core of practical knowledge while also exploring issues related to the field. In the first part of the course, students will learn how to generate story ideas; research appropriate magazine markets to pursue; conduct interviews; sell their ideas (and themselves) in query letters; develop the best format for presenting their information; and, finally, organize the materials, write, and revise the article itself, and send it off for publication.

In the second half of the course, students will publish an issue of a magazine, acting as writers, editors, and designers responsible for its content – and beholden to a publisher. They'll identify a niche audience, formulate an editorial vision, and write, revise, edit, fact-check, and generally take part in all aspects of the publication. In short, they'll perform all the editorial functions of a magazine staff. They'll work individually and in teams, devising departments, assigning stories, gathering art, selling ads. They'll write headlines and captions, crop pictures, fit copy, and design layouts. And they'll engage in discussions about issues of advertising, media ethics, and publisher control.

No previous journalistic experience is necessary.

 

Course Requirements

Three articles during the first half of the course (profile, issue of conflict, feature); various tasks associated with publishing a magazine in the second half of the course. During the second half, students will also continue to revise the three articles from the first half of the course.

 

Grading Policy

  • Three articles, with revisions: 25% each
  • Shorter exercises: 15%
  • Participation in second half of the course: 10%

 

Required Texts

  • Writer's Market 2010, Robert Lee Brewer (Editor)
  • Writing for Magazines: A Beginner's Guide, Cheryl Sloan Wray

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84920 • Harring, Emily
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM BEN 1.124
show description

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.


RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84925 • Wells, Jazmine
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.122
show description

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.


RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Superheroes

84940 • Roepke, Rachel
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 208
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Rhetoric of Superheroes

 

Over the past century, superhero comics have given us a glimpse into a world we can only dream about: one where anybody—whether by birth or accident—can have super-strength or telekinesis, x-ray vision or maybe just really cool gadgets. But, as we already know, with great power comes great responsibility. Day after day, these heroes struggle to save humanity from every kind of threat; they sweat and sacrifice, often without compensation or acknowledgment, just because they’re the only ones who can. Superheroes have inspired readers with their resolve since the Great Depression and through other difficult times in our country’s history like the Vietnam War or the 9/11 attacks.

Using Marvel’s Captain America as our central example, this course will examine the history, cultural significance, and rhetorical superpowers of the superhero genre and specifically (though not exclusively) in comic books. We will explore critical questions about the role of superheroes, both in the fictional universe of the books and in our own, and how these roles evolve to match contemporary ideologies; analyze how comic books directly and indirectly reflect and respond to current events and ethical concerns; and evaluate superheroes’ (sometimes) enhanced abilities to appeal to wide audiences who have little in common.

Each student will choose a superhero to work on throughout the semester. As a writing flag course, students will develop their compositional skills in multiple genres, focusing their assignments on their chosen hero. The course will consist of three units of reading and short writing responses, each unit culminating in a major writing assignment and subsequent revision that incorporates peer and instructor feedback. You should expect to write regularly during the semester, as a substantial part of your grade will come from written work. 

Grades will be determined by a Learning Record, a self-reflective method that will ask students to evaluate their own work in the class in six areas: confidence and independence, skills and strategies, knowledge and understanding, use of prior and emerging experience, reflection, and collaboration.At the end of the course, the students will submit a portfolio of their work throughout the semester as well as an evaluation of their work and a grade proposal. I will review these and assign final grades based on the work and their assessment.

Required texts:

Faigley, Lester and Jack Selzer. Good Reasons: Researching and Writing Effective Arguments. 6th edition. Pearson, 2014.

McCloud, Scott. Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Reprint edition. William Morrow, 1994.

Additional texts provided on Canvas or in a course pack.


RHE S309K • Topics In Writing

84930
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 2.410
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Rhetoric of the Sixties

 

America loves the 1960s. “The Sixties” in the U.S. connotes romantic ideals of freedom, rebellion, exploration, civil rights, and political and social radicalism—also, The Beatles. Most pertinent to this course, however, the 1960s were a time when much of the youth of the United States found the injustices of their time too gross to tolerate quietly. During the Birmingham Campaign, the Occupation of Alcatraz, the Greensboro sit-ins, on the Freedom Rides, in protesting the War in Vietnam, and during the Free Speech Movement, young people, against all odds, spoke truth to power. They gathered, marched, picketed, rode, sat-in, sang, spoke, and, of course, wrote in response to a world they had discovered was badly flawed. This course offers students the opportunity to investigate the rhetorical strategies that people about their age employed in redressing seemingly insurmountable social, political, and economic national and global ailments, before encouraging them to ask if their own time doesn’t warrant rhetorical engagement of similar magnitude.

 

This class, however, will not be an uncritical or romantic celebration of student and youth movements of the time, and our mission will not simply be to learn and apply the rhetorical strategies used in The Sixties. We will identify and learn from the mistakes of movements that were too often misogynistic, and that sometimes degenerated into violence. The course also investigates the extent to which the massive social wrongs inspiring redress in the 1960s are still with us today, and the extent to which new problems parallel, extend, or, in some cases eclipse, those of the past.

 

Assignments and Grading

 

1.1 Annotated Bibliography 1 (5%)

 

2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (10%)

 

2.2 Rhetorical Analysis Revision (10%)

 

3.1 Annotated Bibliography 2 (5%)

 

4.1 Intervention and Speech (10%)

 

4.2 Intervention and Speech Revision (15%)

 

Short Writing Assignments (20%)

 

Presentation (15%)

 

Participation (10%)

 

Required Textbooks and Handbooks

 

Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students, Sharon Crowley and Debra Hawhee

 

The Little Longhorn Handbook, Bullock et al.


RHE S330C • Writing About Video Games

84945 • Boyle, Casey
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 104
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In the last decade, we have seen video games escape basement playrooms and spread into science, education, medicine, and even citizenship. This wide impact that video games have had encourage us to not only play games but to think about them and work with them to accomplish personal, educational, professional and public goals. What becomes very clear, however, is how games are not always fun and sometimes they exacerbate problems of sexism, racism, ablism, economic disparaties. Given the multiple aspects of life that games impact, the course will follow a three-part structure: First, the class will write about video games by using genre and cultural analysis to critically explore their social impact; second, the course will write with video games by learning to use screencast and video essay techniques for analysis and building on games as cultural artifacts; third, the course will write forvideo games by designing and building a video game (platform may include Twine or other easily available/accessed platform). Oh, and the class will also play games. A lot.  

 

 

Assignments

10%-Reading Responses

15%-Review Essay of a Video Game

15%-Genre Analysis Short Essay

20%-Video Essay (Critical and/or Creative)

40%-Individual or Collaborative Game Design (Platform TBD)

 

Readings May Include: Jane McGonigal Reality is Broken; Ian Bogost How to Talk About Video Games; Katherine Isbister How Games Move Us; D. Weiss Lucky Wander Boy; and essay selections posted to course website.