Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Casey A Boyle


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., 2011, University of South Carolina

Casey A Boyle

Contact

Interests


Digital Rhetoric, Digital Humanities, Composition Theory, Posthumanism, Media Studies, Gilbert Simondon

Courses


RHE 330C • Writing With Sound

44155 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM FAC 9

This course will examine recording, editing, and distribution of sound as a form of writing. In a contemporary world where writing is mostly digital, we often overlook the presence of sound—music that accompanies video, voice published as podcasts, noise remixed into an ambient art form. In order to understand the rhetorical effects of sound compositions, this course will read and discuss important works in the field of sound studies and offer an introduction to using open source digital audio editing tools for writing with sound.

Note: This course will be organized as a project-based workshop (especially in the second half of the semester). In addition to readings and discussions, several of our class meetings will be opportunities for hands-on practice with digital audio tools that will involve your classmates and the instructor. Please be advised that such work demands regular attendance and requires active participation.

Texts and Materials

Assignments

Reading Responses (20%)

8 written responses to required readings posted to our course site (300-500 words posted in Canvas). Responses will be opportunities to critically and creatively engage course readings and case studies as well as provide the starting point for much our class discussion. In the first week, I will provide a more detailed assignment sheet for how to organize the responses.

Soundscape Analysis (15%)

Students will script and compose a 4-5 minute analysis that examines and reenacts the various sonic dimensions of a chosen location.

Sonic Remediation (25%)

This assignment asks students to select a print-based writing–a short essay or article from/related to our course readings–to remediate into a sound essay.

Podcast Series (40%)

This final assignment will include a short proposal, three podcast episodes, and a brief prospectus that outlines a digital distribution plan. Of your three podcasts, one will include a site recording, one an interview, and one studio recording.

RHE S330C • Writing About Video Games

84945 • Summer 2017
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM FAC 9

In the last decade, we have seen video games escape basement playrooms and spread into science, education, medicine, and even citizenship. This wide impact that video games have had encourage us to not only play games but to think about them and work with them to accomplish personal, educational, professional and public goals. What becomes very clear, however, is how games are not always fun and sometimes they exacerbate problems of sexism, racism, ablism, economic disparaties. Given the multiple aspects of life that games impact, the course will follow a three-part structure: First, the class will write about video games by using genre and cultural analysis to critically explore their social impact; second, the course will write with video games by learning to use screencast and video essay techniques for analysis and building on games as cultural artifacts; third, the course will write forvideo games by designing and building a video game (platform may include Twine or other easily available/accessed platform). Oh, and the class will also play games. A lot.  

 

 

Assignments

10%-Reading Responses

15%-Review Essay of a Video Game

15%-Genre Analysis Short Essay

20%-Video Essay (Critical and/or Creative)

40%-Individual or Collaborative Game Design (Platform TBD)

 

Readings May Include: Jane McGonigal Reality is Broken; Ian Bogost How to Talk About Video Games; Katherine Isbister How Games Move Us; D. Weiss Lucky Wander Boy; and essay selections posted to course website. 

E 388M • Accessible Rhetorics

35710 • Spring 2017
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM PAR 104

This course, first and foremost, examines relationships between bodies and technologies. To pursue this examination, we focus on accessibility as an opportunity for rhetorical invention. That is, instead of understanding technology as either enhancement (for a "normal" body) or reparative (for a "disabled" body) we shall consider all technology--with a focus on communication technology--as (rhetorically) inventive of new and different kinds of embodiment. After an introduction to theories of embodiment alongside a survey of historical approaches to disability accommodations through key sources in rhetorical and disability studies scholarship, the course closely attends to communication media and accessibility, honing in on the many theoretical and practical accessibility concerns that arise through ongoing innovation of new and emerging media.

Course projects include: regular and routine reading responses; an access-oriented revision plan for an existing online text; a physical computing device for accessibility;  a final project (composed, in part, by the course's prior assignments) into a multimodal text that engages a problem/possibility for accessibility and rhetoric.

NOTE: No prior experience with accessibility, media tools, or physical computing is required. 

RHE 330C • Digital Storytelling

44215 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 104

Digital Storytelling pairs narrative techniques with new media and digital technologies. Using text, audio, visual, and video in concert with research and narrative composition, this course will introduce students to and provide repeated practice in using digital media for composing compelling digital stories. In addition to composing with digital media, students will be introduced to research sites that may include university libraries, community centers, state museums, and many other sites available for further independent exploration. In conversation with our readings, discussions, and the students’ own researched topics, the course assignments and projects will entail learning to compose with digital media by researching and developing short narratives, culminating in a semester-long, digital story.

Please Note: While no prior experience with digital media is needed, a willingness to learn is required. Toward these ends, the course will be organized as a project-based workshop (especially in the second half of the semester) and will require substantial work on the students’ parts to research and develop material to be used for composing the digital stories. In addition to readings and discussions, several of our class meetings will be opportunities for hands-on practice with digital audio tools that will involve your classmates and the instructor. Please be advised that such work requires regular attendance, diligent preparation, and active participation.

Texts and Materials

  • Students will be asked to subscribe to Adobe’s Creative Cloud for the duration of the class (Be advised that Adobe offers an educational discount).
  • Several articles and online texts will be shared via Canvas course site (So, there will be no required books to purchase).

Assignments and Grading

  • Reading Responses - 10%

Multiple written responses to required readings posted to our course site (300-500 words posted in Canvas). Responses will be opportunities to critically and creatively engage course readings and case studies as well as provide the starting point for much our class discussion.

  • Story Proposal and Research Plan - 10%

2-3 page proposal that identifies a story of interest, locates relevant material for independent research, and outlines a production strategy for composing the semester-long digital story.

  • Image Story - 10%

This assignment serves to introduce image manipulation software by composing a short, image-based story.

  • Audio Story - 15%

Using free and open-sourced audio-editing software, students will record, edit, and share a short audio narrative.

  • Video Story - 20%

Students will produce a concise (60 seconds) video story.

  • Digital Story - 35%

The final project builds on the previous smaller assignments, culminating into a substantial Digital Story. Each digital story will be based on students’ independent research and will also vary in form (media and its delivery) depending on each individual student’s chosen material. 

RHE 330C • Digital Self And Rhetoric

43335 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 104

A chief concern for today’s networked age is how we develop, present, and manage our identities in digital spaces. We find easy examples for this concern in our understanding of how companies track our buying habits for precisely targeted marketing campaigns; in our fearing that our identities can be stolen for someone else’s financial gain, in our increasing awareness that security agencies monitor our activities. In each of these examples–and in many others we could list–our anxiety can be traced to not knowing what information we are producing and, further, not knowing who can access that information we produce. In short: we need to know more about how we are known.

While these concerns have intensified through the rise of digital networks and our increasing use of those networks, the underlying problems reach at least as far back as the birth of the western tradition.  In the long rhetorical tradition, concerns over self-presentation and practices for establishing good character have provided an ongoing task for becoming effective and engaged public citizens. As such, this course will draw heavily from rhetorical understandings of ethos–character, credibility, ethics–to develop an understanding of self-construction and self-presentation through digital media and online networks. The course, then, will be an opportunity to develop an understanding for and facility with how digital media can produce, collect, share, and shape identities and how we might use those digital media to further manage our online selves for academic, professional, and public purposes.

 

Assignments

Reading Responses – 10%

  • These will be ongoing short, focused video/audio responses to our readings and will serve as conversation starters for our class discussions.

Case Study – 20%

  • Each student will be responsible for presenting one extended case study that analyzes a recent case/event relevant to our courses readings for that day/week.

Off Grid Analysis – 30%

  • This assignment will include a short multimedia essay that analyzes your gameplay for Off Grid, a game designed to teach its player about metadata and information security.

Quantified Self(ie) – 40%

  • This is a semester long data collection and presentation project that asks you to record and present an (reasonable) account of your own activities in and through digital media. This assignment will include: a brief proposal; a short presentation; and a final report that uses information visualization techniques to present a coherent story of complex data.

NOTE: Many of our assignments will be opportunities for us to research, collect, and present many examples of the kinds of media we will be reading about. We will make use of free and easily accessible software applications to accomplish these tasks (i.e. video editing, information visualization, document design). No prior knowledge of these applications will be required, but students must be willing to explore and practice the software introduced in the course.

 

Required Texts and Materials

  • Marwick, Alice E. Status update: Celebrity, publicity, and branding in the social media age. Yale University Press, 2013.
  • Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor. Delete: the virtue of forgetting in the digital age. Princeton University Press, 2011.
  • Rainie, Harrison, and Barry Wellman. Networked: The new social operating system. MIT Press, 2012.
  • Rettberg, Jill Walker. Seeing Ourselves Through TechnologyPalgrave Pivot, 2014.
  • Rudder, Christian. Dataclysm: Who We Are When No One is Looking. Crown Publishers, 2014.
  • Vaughn, Brian K.  and Marcos Martin, The Private Eye, Panel Syndicate, 2014. 
  • Off Grid, Semaeopus Games, 2014.

Several other readings will be made available via course site may include: Aristotle, On Rhetoric (selection); Jim Corder (selected essays); Michel Foucault, “Self-Writing”; Isocrates, Antidosis (selection); Nigel Thrift, “Lifeworld, Inc.”; Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory(selections).

RHE 330C • Writing With Sound

43340 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 104

This course will examine recording, editing, and distribution of sound as a form of writing. In a contemporary world where writing is mostly digital, we often overlook the presence of sound—music that accompanies video, voice published as podcasts, noise remixed into an ambient art form. In order to understand the rhetorical effects of sound compositions, this course will read and discuss important works in the field of sound studies and offer an introduction to using open source digital audio editing tools for writing with sound.

Note: This course will be organized as a project-based workshop (especially in the second half of the semester). In addition to readings and discussions, several of our class meetings will be opportunities for hands-on practice with digital audio tools that will involve your classmates and the instructor. Please be advised that such work demands regular attendance and requires active participation.

Texts and Materials

 

Additional essays and articles will be provided on the course site

Assignments

Reading Responses (20%)

  • 8 written responses to required readings posted to our course site (300-500 words posted in Canvas). Responses will be opportunities to critically and creatively engage course readings and case studies as well as provide the starting point for much our class discussion. In the first week, I will provide a more detailed assignment sheet for how to organize the responses.

Soundscape Analysis (15%)

  • Students will script and compose a 4-5 minute analysis that examines and reenacts the various sonic dimensions of a chosen location.

Sonic Remediation (25%)

  • This assignment asks students to select a print-based writing–a short essay or article from/related to our course readings–to remediate into a sound essay.

Podcast Series (40%)

  • This final assignment will include a short proposal, three podcast episodes, and a brief prospectus that outlines a digital distribution plan. Of your three podcasts, one will include a site recording, one an interview, and one studio recording.

E 388M • Rhetoric & Digital Humanities

34760 • Fall 2015
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM FAC 7

This course will survey the development of Digital Humanities alongside a careful examination of Rhetoric and Composition’s sub-fields of Computers & Composition and Digital Rhetoric. Set as a conversation between two separate but related scholarly traditions, the course will explore productive overlaps and future potentials for how the two fields may mutually inform one another’s future possibilities.  Readings and assignments will involve an array of media production, providing students an introduction to the many genres that comprise Digital Humanities projects: proposals, data sets, markup practices, promotional websites, project presentations, white papers, grant proposals.  Potential texts may include: Debates in the Digital Humanities, Ed. Matthew Gold; How We Think, Hayles, Rhetoric and Digital Humanities, Eds. Ridolfo & Hart-Davidson; Macroanalysis, Jockers; Understanding Digital Humanities, Ed. Berry; Reading Machines, Ramsay

RHE 330C • Digital Storytelling

43325 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 7

While storytellers have composed narratives (historical, informative, persuasive, and/or reflective) through oral and print-based media for centuries, emerging digital media allows for an ever-increasing array of possibilities to develop and share the narratives that matter to our communities and to our lives. Digital Storytelling pairs narrative techniques with new media and digital technologies. Using text, audio, visual, and video in concert with research and narrative composition, this course will introduce students to and provide repeated practice in using digital media for composing compelling digital stories. In addition to composing with digital media, students will be introduced to research sites that may include the university libraries, community centers, state museums, and many other sites available for further independent exploration. In conversation with our readings, discussions, and the students’ own researched topics, the course assignments and projects will entail learning to compose with digital media by researching and developing short narratives, culminating in a semester-long, digital story.

Please Note: While no prior experience with digital media is needed, a willingness to learn is required. Toward these ends, the course will be organized as a project-based workshop (especially in the second half of the semester) and will require substantial work on the students’ parts to research and develop material to be used for composing the digital stories. In addition to readings and discussions, several of our class meetings will be opportunities for hands-on practice with digital audio tools that will involve your classmates and the instructor. Please be advised that such work requires regular attendance, diligent preparation, and active participation.

Texts and Materials

  • The New Digital Storytelling, Bryan Alexander
  • Digital Storytelling: Capturing Lives, Creating Community, Joe Lambert
  • Several online texts and articles will be shared via Canvas course site

Assignments and Grading

Reading Responses - 10%

  • Multiple written responses to required readings posted to our course site (300-500 words posted in Canvas). Responses will be opportunities to critically and creatively engage course readings and case studies as well as provide the starting point for much our class discussion.

Story Proposal and Research Plan - 10%

  • 2-3 page proposal that identifies a story of interest, locates relevant material for independent research, and outlines a production strategy for composing the semester-long digital story. 

Image Story - 10%

  • This assignment serves to introduce image manipulation software by composing a short, image-based story.

Audio Story - 15%

  • Using free and open-sourced audio-editing software, students will record, edit, and share a short audio narrative.

Video Story - 20%

  • Students will produce a concise (60 seconds) video story.

Digital Story - 35%

  • The final project builds on the previous smaller assignments, culminating into a substantial Digital Story. Each digital story will be based on students’ independent research and will also vary in form (media and its delivery) depending on each individual student’s chosen material. 

RHE 330C • Digital Self And Rhetoric

43780 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 9

A chief concern for today’s networked age is how we develop, present, and manage our identities in digital spaces. We find easy examples for this concern in our understanding of how companies track our buying habits for precisely targeted marketing campaigns; in our fearing that our identities can be stolen for someone else’s financial gain, in our increasing awareness that security agencies monitor our activities. In each of these examples–and in many others we could list–our anxiety can be traced to not knowing what information we are producing and, further, not knowing who can access that information we produce. In short: we need to know more about how we are known.

 While these concerns have intensified through the rise of digital networks and our increasing use of those networks, the underlying problems reach at least as far back as the birth of the western tradition.  In the long rhetorical tradition, concerns over self-presentation and practices for establishing good character have provided an ongoing task for becoming effective and engaged public citizens. As such, this course will draw heavily from rhetorical understandings of ethos–character, credibility, ethics–to develop an understanding of self-construction and self-presentation through digital media and online networks. The course, then, will be an opportunity to develop an understanding for and facility with how digital media can produce, collect, share, and shape identities and how we might use those digital media to further manage our online selves for academic, professional, and public purposes.

 Assignments

Reading Responses – 10%

These will be ongoing short, focused video/audio responses to our readings and will serve as conversation starters for our class discussions.

Case Study – 20%

Each student will be responsible for presenting one extended case study that analyzes a recent case/event relevant to our courses readings for that day/week.

Off Grid Analysis – 30%

This assignment will include a short multimedia essay that analyzes your gameplay for Off Grid, a game designed to teach its player about metadata and information security.

Quantified Self(ie) – 40%

This is a semester long data collection and presentation project that asks you to record and present an (reasonable) account of your own activities in and through digital media. This assignment will include: a brief proposal; a short presentation; and a final report that uses information visualization techniques to present a coherent story of complex data.

NOTE:

Many of our assignments will be opportunities for us to research, collect, and present many examples of the kinds of media we will be reading about. We will make use of free and easily accessible software applications to accomplish these tasks (i.e. video editing, information visualization, document design). No prior knowledge of these applications will be required, but students must be willing to explore and practice the software introduced in the course.

Required Texts and Materials

Marwick, Alice E. Status update: Celebrity, publicity, and branding in the social media age. Yale University Press, 2013.

Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor. Delete: the virtue of forgetting in the digital age. Princeton University Press, 2011.

Rainie, Harrison, and Barry Wellman. Networked: The new social operating system. MIT Press, 2012.

Rettberg, Jill Walker. Seeing Ourselves Through TechnologyPalgrave Pivot, 2014.

Rudder, Christian. Dataclysm: Who We Are When No One is Looking. Crown Publishers, 2014.

Vaughn, Brian K.  and Marcos Martin, The Private Eye, Panel Syndicate, 2014.

Off Grid, Semaeopus Games, 2014.

Several other readings will be made available via course site may include: Aristotle, On Rhetoric (selection); Jim Corder (selected essays); Michel Foucault, “Self-Writing”; Isocrates, Antidosis (selection); Nigel Thrift, “Lifeworld, Inc.”; Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory(selections).

RHE 330C • Writing With Sound

43785 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 9

This course will examine recording, editing, and distribution of sound as a form of writing. In a contemporary world where writing is mostly digital, we often overlook the presence of sound—music that accompanies video, voice published as podcasts, noise remixed into an ambient art form. In order to understand the rhetorical effects of sound compositions, this course will read and discuss important works in the field of sound studies and offer an introduction to using open source digital audio editing tools for writing with sound.

Note: This course will be organized as a project-based workshop (especially in the second half of the semester). In addition to readings and discussions, several of our class meetings will be opportunities for hands-on practice with digital audio tools that will involve your classmates and the instructor. Please be advised that such work demands regular attendance and requires active participation.

Texts and Materials

Sound Reporting: The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism & Production, Jonathan Kern

The Book of Audacity: Record, Edit, Mix, and Master with the Free Audio Editor, Carla Schroder

The Acoustic City, edited by Matthew Gandy and BJ Nilsen

Sound Studies Reader, edited by Jonathan Sterne

Audacity – Open Source Audio Editing Software

Additional essays and articles will be provided on the course site

Assignments

Reading Responses (20%)

8 written responses to required readings posted to our course site (300-500 words posted in Canvas). Responses will be opportunities to critically and creatively engage course readings and case studies as well as provide the starting point for much our class discussion. In the first week, I will provide a more detailed assignment sheet for how to organize the responses.

Soundscape Analysis (15%)

Students will script and compose a 4-5 minute analysis that examines and reenacts the various sonic dimensions of a chosen location.

Sonic Remediation (25%)

This assignment asks students to select a print-based writing–a short essay or article from/related to our course readings–to remediate into a sound essay.

Podcast Series (40%)

This final assignment will include a short proposal, three podcast episodes, and a brief prospectus that outlines a digital distribution plan. Of your three podcasts, one will include a site recording, one an interview, and one studio recording.

E 388M • Spatial Rhetrcs/Locative Media

36060 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 104

Spatial Rhetorics & Locative Media

In the last few decades, rhetorical scholarship--alongside a host of other disciplines--has held a sustained an interest in spatiality. Of particular interest is how spaces affect our shared practices and sense of identity. Further, rhetoric and related scholars seek to explore how we enact boundaries to help create spatial conditions of possibility for personal, pedagogical, and political ends. For instance, any city is in part defined by the many ways its people, roadways, and buildings relate to one another, providing sights, sounds, and speeds of interaction that then fold back and help further characterize that space. To further complicate matters, recent innovations of digital media and tracking technologies--including digital sensors, surveillance cameras, and global positioning systems--have contributed additional possibilities and problems to our sense of space. Now, the spaces we experience are just as much characterized by loose and porous boundaries as any stable or static condition. Spaces, it seems, are on the move. Towards understanding today’s shifting spatial conditions, the class will examine spatial rhetorics in three ways. First the class will focus on rhetoric’s long and rich tradition of inventive spatial practices; second, we will survey what might now be considered canonical critical spatial theory (Bakhtin, Lefebvre, Soja, etc.); finally, we will spend extensive course time exploring spatial rhetorics through mobile and locative media. Ultimately, the course aims to provide students with a foundation of spatial rhetorical theory while also offering an opportunity to consider the methodological demands of composing with mapping applications and locative media.

Course projects will include regular reading responses (20%), a mapping assignment (15%), a book review/response (15%), a working bibliography (10%), and a final project (40%) with which a student can develop for a conference presentation, a dissertation chapter, or an early draft of an article for publication consideration.

Course Texts (Tentative and Partial)

Cooley, Heidi Rae. Finding Augusta.

Farman, Jason. Mobile Interface Theory: Embodied Space and Locative Media.

Grosz, Elizabeth. Architecture from the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space.

Lefebvre, Henri. The Production of Space.

Mackenzie, Adrian. Wirelessness: Radical Empiricism in Network Cultures.

Rice, Jeff. Digital Detroit: Rhetoric and Space in the Age of Networks

Rickert, Thomas. Ambient Rhetoric: Attunements of Rhetorical Being.

Soja, Edward W. Postmodern geographies: The reassertion of space in critical social theory.

Thrift, Nigel. Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect.

Additional Readings will be available on course site/course packet

RHE 330C • Writing With Sound

44785 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 104

In our largely screen-based media culture, we often overlook the pervasive presence of sound. Talk radio, ambient music, mobile device alerts, animal sounds, human voices, and random noise all combine to form an ever present sonic backdrop with and through which we engage our media ecologies. Alone and together, these sounds help write our experience of an entertainment event, a political campaign, an educational venture. Towards understanding the rhetorical effects of sound compositions, this course will examine recording, editing, and distribution of sound as a form of writing. We will be especially keen to explore and examine those writings that are produced and circulated in digital environments. In addition to reading and discussing important works in the multidisciplinary field of sound studies, the course will offer an extended introduction and continued practice in using readily available and open source digital audio editing tools for writing with sound.

Assignments and Grading

0 - Reading Responses (20%)

            Several brief written responses to readings and discussions.

1 - Podcast Analysis (15%)

After selecting and subscribing to a podcast, students will write a 4-5 page analysis of composition and distribution of the selected serial program.

2 - Sonic Remediation (25%)

            This assignment asks students to select a printed writing--a short essay or

article from or related to our course readings--to remediate into a sound essay.

3 - Podcast Series (40%)

This final assignment will include a short proposal, three podcast episodes, and a brief prospectus that outlines a distribution plan.

Required Texts and Course Readings

Sound Reporting: The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism & Production, Jonathan Kern

The Book of Audacity: Record, Edit, Mix, and Master with the Free Audio Editor, Carla Schroder

Sound Unbound: Sampling Digital Music and Culture, edited by Paul D. Miller

Sound Studies Reader, edited by Jonathan Sterne

Additional essays and articles will be provided on the course site

Curriculum Vitae


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