Robert H. Abzug


ProfessorPh.D., History, 1977, University of California, Berkeley

Founding Director, Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies, Audre & Bernard Rapoport Regents Chair of Jewish Studies
Robert H. Abzug

Contact

Interests


Social Reform and Religious Life in Antebellum America, America and the Holocaust, and the Interpenetration of Religion and Psychology in Modern American culture

Biography


Robert Abzug taught at Berkeley and UCLA before coming to Texas in 1978. He held the Eric Voegelin Visiting Professorship at the University of Munich, 1990-91. He is also a former chair of American Studies (1990–1996) and Founding Director of Liberal Arts Honors Program (1996–2002) and the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies.

Research interests

Professor Abzug's scholarship explores the formation of social and moral consciousness in American culture. He has worked in three major fields: social reform and religious life in antebellum America, America and the Holocaust, and, most recently, the interpenetration of religion and psychology in modern American culture. His research has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and numerous other foundations.

He is in the final stages of preparing a biography of the American psychologist, Rollo May. In addition, he has published  a new edition for classroom use of William James's Varieties of Religious Experience (2012). He is currently doing research on Jews and other minorities in the state of Montana and will be producing a volume for University of Texas Press’s Texas Bookshelf on insiders and outsiders and the creation of the Texas myth. He also edits a book series for UT Press, Exploring Jewish Arts and Culture.

Courses taught

Professor Abzug regularly teaches courses on Antebellum America, Religion and Psychology in American Culture, America and the Holocaust and, together with Professor Steven Hoelscher, a course on Photography in American Culture.

Courses


LAH 350 • Jewish Identities: Americas

29880 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.204

 

Jews of the Americas comprise 47% of the world's Jewish population and, though a small percentage of the countries in which they live, have greatly influenced the shape of high and popular culture in the United States, Canada, and Latin America (including both the Spanish­ speaking countries and Brazil). In tum, their varied experiences throughout the Westem Hemisphere have challenged traditional Jewish identities in many significant ways. This course will compare and contrast aspects of Jewish presence in the Americas-literature, music, art, dance, photography, filmmaking, and journalism-in order to understand the nature and variety of cultural interactions from the nineteenth century through the present. We also examine the work of Jorge Luis Borges, the celebrated non-Jewish Argentine writer known for his highly imaginative use of Kabbalah and magical Jewish folk beliefs.

Some of the artists, writers, photographers, musicians, and filmmakers referred to in the course include: 

Canada:

Leonard Cohen-songwriter, singer, poet

A. M. Klein-poet

David Cronenberg-film director Mordecai  Richler-novelist

Robbie Robertson-lead  singer of The Band and more

United States:

Leonard Bemstein--composer and conductor, classical and Broadway

Bob Dylan-singer-songwriter, poet

Steven Spielberg, film director

Regina Spektor-singer-songwriter

Helen Frankenthaler-abstract expressionist artist

Michael  Chabon-novelist

Philip Roth-novelist and short-story writer

Jon Stewart-satirical broadcast journalist

George Gershwin--composer  of both classical and popular music and more

Spanish America and Brazil:

Ilan Stavans, Tropical Synagogues: Short Stories by Jewish-Latin American  Writers(anthology)

Moacyr Scliar, selected short stories

Jorge Luis Borges, "Death and the Compass," "The Golem," "Emma Zunz" Cao Hamburger, director (The Year My Parents  Went on Vacation)

Daniel Burman, director (Waiting for  the Messiah; The Lost Embrace)

Jose Judkovski, tango DJ and historian of Jews in Argentine tango. Grading Criteria:

Required ungraded weekly joumal entries on readings and class discussions. (all joumal entries required on time with penalty for late entries)

Term paper and in-class presentation on term paper topic 40%

first exam 20%

In-class second exam 30%

Faithful attendance and participation in class discussion 10%. No final examination during finals week.

 

J S 364 • Psych/Relig In Mod Amer Cul

39455 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRC 2.214
(also listed as LAH 350)

 

            American religious culture is not only exceptional for its vigor but also for an increasingly creative fostering of spiritual experimentation and pluralism. It has been especially unusual in the role that psychotherapy and psychotherapeutic ideas have played in modern American spiritual quests. This seminar explores the historical, religious, and psychotherapeutic manifestations of the “search for meaning” in modern American culture. We will begin in the 19th century with spiritualism and other alternative religious paths, and quickly move to the 20th century and the uneasy and sometimes hostile interactions between formal religion, psychotherapies, and everyday experiences of illumination and transcendence. Our explorations will take us through theology, psychological theory, literature, music, politics, and art. For their term reports, students may write on topics of their choice on any aspect of the intersection of psychology and religion. 

Readings (Viewings, Listenings) (examples open to revision):

Sigmund Freud, selections on religion (pdfs accessed through Canvas)

Jessica Grogan, Encountering America: Humanistic Psychology, Sixties Culture, and the   Shaping of the Modern Self

William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience

Carl Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul 

Rollo May,Psychology and the Human Dilemma

Various examples from music, art, and drama illustrating themes in the course.

Requirements

Perfect Attendance at Seminar and timely completion of reading assignments 

Active Participation in Seminar

Weekly Ungraded Responses to Readings (300 words) (critiqued for content/style) 

Term report presented to class and as 15 page paper on topic chosen by student in conjunction with and approved by professor

Grading:

Class Participation, Including Oral Reports and Reading Discussions (40%)

On Time Completion of All Responses to Weekly Readings (20%)

Graded Oral Report and 15-page term paper (40%)

 

Office Hours: TTH 3:30-5:00PM GAR 3.310 or by appt. zug@austin.utexas.edu

 

 

 

 

 

J S 363 • Jewish Identities: Americas

39284 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 2.606
(also listed as LAH 350)

Jews of the Americas comprise 47% of the world’s Jewish population and, though a small percentage of the countries in which they live, have greatly influenced the shape of high and popular culture in the United States, Canada, and Latin America (including both the Spanish-speaking countries and Brazil). In turn, their varied experiences throughout the Western Hemisphere have challenged traditional Jewish identities in many significant ways. This course will compare and contrast aspects of Jewish presence in the Americas—literature, music, art, dance, photography, filmmaking, and journalism—in order to understand the nature and variety of cultural interactions from the nineteenth century through the present. We also examine the work of Jorge Luis Borges, the celebrated non-Jewish Argentine writer known for his highly imaginative use of Kabbalah and magical Jewish folk beliefs.

The course is being offered in Fall 2015 so that students can attend a major symposium on Jewish Life in the Americas sponsored by the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies, scheduled for November 1-2, 2015, here at UT. All non-English sources are presented in translation and, in the case of films, with subtitles.

Some of the artists, writers, photographers, musicians, and filmmakers referred to in the course include:

Canada:

            Leonard Cohen—songwriter, singer, poet

            A. M. Klein—poet

            David Cronenberg—film director

            Mordecai Richler—novelist

            Robbie Robertson—lead singer of The Band

            and more           

United States:

            Leonard Bernstein—composer and conductor, classical and Broadway

            Bob Dylan—singer-songwriter, poet

            Steven Spielberg, film director

            Regina Spektor—singer—songwriter

            Helen Frankenthaler—abstract expressionist artist

            Michael Chabon—novelist

            Philip Roth—novelist and short-story writer

            Jon Stewart—satirical broadcast journalist

            George Gershwin—composer of both classical and popular music

            and more 

Spanish America and Brazil: 

           Ilán Stavans, Tropical Synagogues: Short Stories by Jewish-Latin American Writers

                       (anthology)

           Moacyr Scliar, selected short stories

           Jorge Luis Borges, "Death and the Compass," "The Golem," "Emma Zunz" 

           Cao Hamburger, director (The Year My Parents Went on Vacation)

           Daniel Burman, director (Waiting for the Messiah; The Lost Embrace)

           José Judkovski, tango DJ and historian of Jews in Argentine tango. 

Grading Criteria: 

Required ungraded weekly journal entries on readings and class discussions. (all journal entries required on time with penalty for late entries)

Term paper and in-class presentation on term paper topic 40%

first exam 20%

In-class second exam 30%

Faithful attendance and participation in class discussion 10% 

No final examination during finals week. 

AMS 390 • Relig/Psych In Amer Culture

30230 • Spring 2015
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 392)

Religion and Psychology in Modern American Culture

 

            If there is one area in which American culture is exceptional, it is in its fostering of spiritual freedom, experimentation, and religious pluralism. It is also unusual in the role that psychotherapy and psychotherapeutic ideas play in American spiritual quests. This course explores the historical, religious, and psychological roots and contexts of the “search for meaning” in modern American culture. We will discuss key primary texts and secondary monographs, and make oral presentations on research or historiographical term papers that elucidate more specific aspects of the general topic. Term papers may be written with a primary emphasis on religious, psychological, or cultural manifestations of the subject, depending upon the interests of the student. These may include, for instance, a consideration of the nexus of religion and psychology in politics, literature, psychotherapy, religious cultures, gender, or some other realm of American society.

 

Readings:

Jessica Grogan, Encountering America: Humanistic Psychology, Sixties Culture, and the   Shaping of the Modern Self

Matthew Hedstrom, The Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American      Spirituality in the Twentieth Century

William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience

Carl Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul 

Rollo May,Psychology and the Human Dilemma

Philip Rieff, The Triumph Of The Therapeutic: Uses of Faith after Freud 

 

(Click on titles for Amazon book descriptions)

Plus pdfs of works by Freud and others.

 

Requirements

Perfect Attendance at Seminar and timely completion of reading assignments

Active Participation in Seminar

Short, Ungraded Paper Responses to Weekly Readings (300 words)

Long (20 page) term paper on topic chosen by student in conjunction with and        approved by professor

Oral Reports on the research for the term paper, followed by class discussion

 

Grading:

Class Attendance and Participation, Including Oral Reports (30%)

Completion of All Responses to Weekly Readings (10%)

Graded 20 page term paper (60%)

 

J S 365 • America And The Holocaust

40390 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.122
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 356R)

The goal of the course is to familiarize you with the history of the Holocaust and how it intersected with American society. It will combine a basic introduction to the Holocaust with a consideration of the ways in which American history, culture, and politics affected and have been affected by these events in Europe. We will consider not only American policymaking and the Nazis but also how the Holocaust became central to the contemplation of evil in the decades after the end of World War II. Issues of race, ethics, national policy, and the ability of cultures to depict and draw lessons from history form the interpretive questions at the heart of the course. .

The course will require students to participate in class discussion on key issues concerning what history can tell us about ethical issues raised in particular crises, as they affect both personal and state action, in the context of historical situations and on the basis of historical evidence.  

Pre-Requisite: There are no specific course pre-requisites, though basic familiarity with modern American and European as well as Holocaust history will of course be helpful. However, I do not assume any such background and a student will most of all need a commitment to the lectures, readings, and questions of the course to do well, and the will to seek additional background if necessary.       

            This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility. 

Texts:

Robert H. Abzug, Inside the Vicious Heart

Doris Bergen, War and Genocide

Edward T. Linenthal, Preserving Memory

Philip Roth, The Ghostwriter

Richard Rubinstein, The Cunning of History

AND Readings Posted on Canvas

 

Grading:

Midterm: 35%                           or

Final:   65%                           

 

Midterm:                                20%

Optional Midterm:    30%

Final:                           50

J S 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

40260 • Spring 2013

Supervised individual reading and research for one semester, followed by writing substantial honors thesis during the second semester. Restricted to Jewish Studies majors. Prereq: For 679HA, admission to the Jewish Studies Honors Programs, and for 679HB, Jewish Studies, 679HA.

J S 383 • Birth Of Psychotherapy

40120 • Fall 2012
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as AMS 390, HIS 392, R S 392T)

Perhaps no other movement in modern culture has had the pervasive and continuing effect on individuals and society as the various forms of psychotherapy that emerged from Freud’s invention in fin de siècle Vienna. This course will explore themes in the history of psychotherapy (not just psychoanalysis) and especially its impact on religion, gender and sexuality, and popular culture. We will concentrate on its basic history and accounts of its roots in Western religion, culture and science, and will also consider the literature attempting to gauge the ways in which it has affected modern life. The shorter writing assignments will be geared toward responses to various approaches to the study of psychotherapy as a historical phenomenon, both in Europe and America. A final paper will focus on some aspect of the general topic, and can either be a review of secondary literature on the history or influence of some aspect of therapy or a research paper, especially if sufficient primary materials are easily available. Students will be encouraged to write in areas that are most relevant to their interests, in consultation with me.

Requirements

Class Participation: 30%--Regular Attendance a Requirement, Includes participation in seminar discussion, presentation of readings, and formal oral presentation on research in last meetings of the term.

2 Short response papers: 20% (to be assigned during the semester)

15-20 page historiographical or research essay: 50%(Topic to be worked out with me and directed toward the seminar member’s particular research interests in a wide range of interdisciplinary fields)

Possible Texts

Buhle, Mari Jo, Feminism and Its Discontents (Harvard University Press)

Frank, Jerome, Persuasion and Healing (Johns Hopkins University Press; third edition)

Freud, Sigmund, The Question of Lay Analysis (Norton)

Heinze, Andrew, Jews and the American Soul (Princeton University Press)

James, William, The Varieties of Religious Experience (Least expensive edition)

Jung, Carl, Modern Man in Search of a Soul (Least expensive edition)

Makari, George, Revolution in Mind: The Creation of Psychoanalysis (Harper)

May, Rollo, Psychology and the Human Dilemma (Norton)

Occasional shorter readings posted on Blackboard

J S 363 • Amer Jewish Lit And Music-Hon

40060 • Spring 2012
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CRD 007B
(also listed as LAH 350, T C 357)

The contribution of Jewish writers and musicians to American literary and musical culture, both in “serious” and “popular” realms, has been enormous. After reviewing a basic history of Jews in America, we will explore the construction and reconstruction of Jewish identity in the modern American setting through select novels, short stories, poetry, and music by American Jewish writers and composers, both popular and classical. We will read and listen with special attention to generational concerns, historical events, cultural contexts, and artistic strategies. We will also compare the varied approaches and themes of Jewish writers to those of other ethnicities. The course will mix introductory short lectures and class discussion. Class requirements will include short reaction papers, substantive class presentations, and an in-class final. Faithful attendance is absolutely essential.

Required Texts AND Musical Pieces for Listening

Literature:

Philip Roth, Selections from Goodbye, Columbus

Saul Bellow, Ravelstein

Anzia Yezierska, Hungry Hearts

Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated

Nathan Englander, selected short stories

Various poems, stories and chapters of novels posted as pdfs on Blackboard

Music:

George Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue

Aaron Copland, El Salon Mexico and Appalachian Spring

Leonard Bernstein, West Side Story, Symphonies #1 and #2

Steve Reich, Different Trains and Tehillim

Various popular music selections will be listed for download or purchase or available online as semester proceeds.

Requirements and Grading Policy

Course requirements will include active participation in a seminar setting, oral reports, brief written responses to assignments, and a longer (c. 15-20 pages) final paper on a topic related to the course materials and to be worked out with and approved by me.Final Grade Based on:  Written Work: Final Paper (50%);  Shorter Papers (cumulatively 20%):    Class Participation and Perfect Attendance (30%)

About the Professor

Robert H. Abzug holds the Audre and Bernard Rapoport Chair of Jewish Studies and is founding Director of the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies.  He taught at Berkeley and UCLA before coming to Texas in 1978. He held the Eric Voegelin Visiting Professorship at the University of Munich, 1990-91. He is also a former chair of American Studies (1990-96) and founding Director of Liberal Arts Honors Programs at Texas (1996-2002). 

 Professor Abzug's scholarship explores the formation of social and moral consciousness in American culture. He has worked in three major fields: social reform and religious life in antebellum America, America and the Holocaust, and, most recently, the interpenetration of religion and psychology in modern American culture. His research has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and numerous other foundations.

 He is in the final stages of preparing a biography of the American psychologist, Rollo May. In addition, he has edited a new edition for classroom use of William James's Varieties of Religious Experience, now in press. He is in the beginning stages of two projects related to Jewish culture.

Professor Abzug regularly teaches courses on American Jewish Music and Literature, Religion and Psychology in American Culture, America and the Holocaust and, with Professor Steven Hoelscher, Photography in American Culture.

AMS 390 • American Photography

30930 • Spring 2011
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM HRC 2.202F
(also listed as HIS 392)

AMS 390/HIS 392                                             Prof. Robert H. Abzug

                                                                               Prof. Steven Hoelscher                          

Tuesday, 2-5 pm                               HRC 2.202F

 

PHOTOGRAPHY AND AMERICAN CULTURE

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This graduate seminar will investigate the history of photography in the United States in relationship to changing currents in America society and culture. Taking as its starting point, the course will follow three distinct, but related, strands of that culture: the history of the medium, from daguerreotypes to digital imaging; the relationship between photography and American history, especially urbanization, the rise of commercial culture, and identity formation; and finally a history of the theory of photography, in particular how photography has been understood as a medium expressive of visual culture. Specific themes that this seminar will address include: art; nature; nation building; ethnicity and race; war; landscapes; urbanization and industrialization; advertising and fashion; documentary expression; photojournalism and picture magazines; postmodernism; and the practice of reading and writing about photographs.

 

CLASS FORMAT

This course will be conducted as seminar with open discussion of the assigned readings and other visual materials. We will meet in the Harry Ransom Center in order to make use of that archive’s superb photography collection. Work requirements include weekly critical essays, an archival presentation, an essay of photographic criticism, and the creation of a photographic exhibit.

 

TENTATIVE READING LIST (Please note that this is a sampling of the kinds of materials we will read in this class, and not the final reading list):

 

Sarah Greenough, Looking in: Robert Frank’s The Americans

Linda Gordon, Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits

Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography

Fred Ritchin, After Photography

Miles Orvell, American Photography

Brigitte Lardinois, Magnum Magnum

Stephen Shore, The Nature of Photographs: A Primer

Laura Wexler, Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in the Age of U.S. Imperialism

Robert Hariman and John Louis Lucaites, No Caption Needed: Iconic Photographs, Public Culture, and Liberal Democracy

Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others

J S 365 • America And The Holocaust

40010 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 4.102
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 356R, R S 346)

HIS 356R, AMS 321, JS 365, RS 346
Fall 2010
Professor Robert H. Abzug
Class Time and Place: MW, 3:30-5, at UTC 4.102
Office Hours: Garrison 2.108: MW 1:00-2:30 (in rare cases F 1:00-3) and by appt. by email)
Email: zug@mail.utexas.edu
Teaching Assistant: Jennifer Eckel (office and office hours to be announced)

America and the Holocaust

The goal of the course is to familiarize you with the history of the Holocaust and how it intersected with American culture. It will combine a basic introduction to the history of the Holocaust with a consideration of the ways in which American history, culture, and politics affected and have been affected these events in Europe. We will consider not only American policymaking and the Nazis but also how the Holocaust became central to the contemplation of evil in the decades after the end of World War II. Issues of race, ethical national policy, and the ability of cultures to depict and draw lessons from history form the interpretive questions at the heart of the course. .

Pre-Requisite: There are no specific course pre-requisites, though basic familiarity with modern American and European as well as Holocaust history will of course be helpful. However, I do not assume any such background and a student will most of all need a commitment to the lectures, readings, and questions of the course to do well.

Required Texts:
Robert H. Abzug, Inside the Vicious Heart
Robert H. Abzug, America Views the Holocaust
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide
Edward T. Linenthal, Preserving Memory
Philip Roth, The Ghostwriter
Edward Wallant, The Pawnbroker
Additional Required Material on Blackboard Site for this Course

Class and Reading Schedule:
August  25: Introduction: Defining the Holocaust: Jews, Roma, and Genocide
            30:    Betwixt and Between: Jews in Europe before 1914
September    06: Holiday: Labor Day
08:    The Age of Race and Nationalism: America and Europe
13:    World War I, Revolution, and the New Europe
15:    Culture and Politics in the 1920s/Jew as Pariah
20:    Discussion
22:    The Nazi Revolution and Germany’s Jews: 1933-39
27:    1933-41: Events in Europe and American Reactions
29:    1941-45: American Knowledge of and Reaction to the Exterminations
October    04:Discussion and Review
06:    Midterm Exam
11:    The Nuremberg Trials and the Cold War
13:    Displaced Persons and the State of Israel
18:    Crimes without Names: Depictions and Discussions in the 1950s
20:    The Eichmann Trial, Civil Rights and the Early Sixties
25:    Vietnam and the Counterculture
27:    The Birth of the “Holocaust” as a Historical Entity
November    01:Optional Midterm (out of class review to be announced)
03:    Holocaust as Literature and Film
08:    Holocaust on Television
10:    Holocaust and the Arts
15:    Holocaust and Music
17:    Museums, Memorialization, and the Holocaust
22:    Uses and Misuses: Exploitation, Metaphor, and History
24:    Discussion
29:    Review for Final Exam
December    01: Last Lecture: The Continuing Relevance of the Holocaust/ Evaluation
03:    Optional Review Hours, Time and Place To Be Announced

Final Exam: December 08: 7-10PM (FINAL WILL BE GIVEN ONLY ON THIS DATE. ROOM TO BE ANNOUNCED)

Schedule for Required Readings:
By September 17: Bergen, War and Genocide, Chapters I and II
By October 4: Bergen, balance of book. Abzug, America Views the Holocaust
By October 13: Abzug, Inside the Vicious Heart
By November 10: Wallant, The Pawnbroker and Roth, The Ghostwriter
By December 01: Linenthal, Preserving Memory
   
Basis for Evaluation (+ and – grades will be utilized):

Midterm: 35%         or      Midterm:    20%
Final:    65%                    Optional Midterm:    30% Final:    50%

Midterm Exam: One essay question (choose 1 of 2) covering material in readings and lectures through September 29th.
Optional Midterm Exam: One essay question (choose 1 of 2) covering material in readings and lectures from the beginning of the course through October 27th. Taking the optional exam is highly recommend for those not happy with their performance on the midterm or those who would like to even out impact of any one exam.
Final Exam: The exam will utilize all the material of the course, though with a focus on material since the first midterm. The exam will consist of two essays (choose 2 of 3) for which you will have the full three hours to write.

Important Points about Evaluation and Office Hours

The exam essays in each case will raise questions of interpretation that need to be answered with the fullest use of the LECTURES AND READINGS as material supporting your point of view. Reasoned arguments rather than mere opinion are at the heart of any good history essay. Review sessions will cover how best to write an essay in this class

Students will be responsible for all material and interpretations introduced in lecture, and therefore perfect attendance is ideal. We will not take attendance. However, students who miss lectures inevitably are at a disadvantage on exams because of the details they have missed. You will be responsible for all material in the course—readings, lectures, and reviews—and neither the TA nor I will provide lecture notes. Make some friends in the course.

Office Hours held by the professor or the TA are invaluable aids to understanding the material and doing well in the course. They should be utilized without fear or a sense that questions and concerns are somehow too small or too obvious to be considered. We are here to help you.



•    For authorized university travel and other legitimate events that take you away from campus, a week’s advance notice with documentation will allow you to take a make-up for either of the midterm exams. Sudden onset of illness will also be a legitimate excuse if documented with evidence from a doctor or the health center. Make-up exams are given at regular hours supervised by the Department of History
•    For all others who miss the first midterm, the final grade in the class will be figured on the basis of the optional midterm and the final.
•    Missing the final creates a far more serious situation, in which a rock-solid and documented reason such as the above must be submitted and, even so, a make-up won’t be available in time to avoid an X in the course and must be made up by the end of the spring semester at the professor’s convenience. Plan your schedule accordingly.
•    IN ANY CASE, YOU MUST HAVE GRADES FOR AT LEAST ONE MIDTERM AND THE FINAL AND A PASSING AVERAGE TO PASS THE COURSE.

University-Wide Policy Information Relevant to this Course

•    Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259 http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.
•    Students seeking assistance with writing may wish to contact The Undergraduate Writing Center http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts.
•    Medical assistance/counseling services are available at http://www.cmhc.utexas.edu/.
•    If you miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a
religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a
reasonable time after the absence.
•    We strictly abide by the UT Honor Code  http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/gi09-10/ch01/index.html on questions of scholastic dishonesty.

This course contains a Cultural Diversity and an Ethics and Leadership flag.

HIS 381 • Birth Of Psychotherapy

39910 • Spring 2010
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 1.122

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

AMS 390 • Birth Of Psychotherapy

30130 • Fall 2008
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 1.134
(also listed as HIS 381)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

HIS 350L • Amer Soc/Cul Before Civ War-W

39635 • Spring 2007
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM NOA 1.110

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

AMS 390 • Psy & Religion In Mod Amer Cul

30065 • Fall 2006
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM NOA 1.110
(also listed as HIS 392)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

38940 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.306

Description: This is a lecture course on postwar American culture and society with special emphasis on the 1950s and 1960s. Issues to be discussed include the domestic impact of the Cold War, the effects of McCarthyism on politics and the entertainment world, the problems of affluence in the 1950s, the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s, the cultural relationships between the United States and the rest of the world, as well as conflicts between blacks and whites, the middle class and blue-collar workers, men and women, parents and children. The lectures will deal primarily with cultural and intellectual history, while the reading draws heavily on novels, journalism and social criticism.  Therefore, no one should enroll in this course who has not already taken at least one, preferably upper-division, course in 20th century American history.  Nor should anyone take the course if they are unfamiliar with trends in modern American literature, art, music, and movies.  In addition, since students will be asked to write two 10-15 page papers (there are no exams) based on the reading, you should not register for the course if you are unaccustomed to writing in-depth analytical essays, especially about novels.

Texts: Partial List, All Required:   

  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
  • John Updike, Rabbit Run
  • Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem
  • Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique
  • Norman Mailer, The Armies of the Night
  • Richard Pells, Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated, and Transformed American Culture Since World War II

Grading:

Two 10-15 page papers, each counting 50% of the course grade.  Each paper will analyze two books on the reading list, one of which must be a novel.  The first paper will deal with the culture of the 1940s and 1950s; the second, with American culture from the 1960s to the present.


AMS 390 • Psy & Religion In Mod Amer Cul

28200 • Fall 2005
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 301
(also listed as HIS 392)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

HIS 365G • America And The Holocaust

38775 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM NOA 1.126

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

AMS 390 • Cul Hist Of Amer Photography

27270 • Spring 2005
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM HRC 2.202F
(also listed as HIS 392)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

HIS 350L • Amer Soc/Cul Before Civ War-W

37265 • Spring 2005
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 301

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 350L • America And The Holocaust-W

38237 • Fall 2004
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 301

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 350L • Amer Soc/Cul Before Civ War-W

35765 • Spring 2004
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 301

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HMN 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course-W

36355 • Spring 2004

Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.

LAH 679TB • Honors Thesis-W

26100 • Spring 2004

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

AMS 390 • Psy & Religion In Mod Amer Cul

26480 • Fall 2003
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 301
(also listed as HIS 392)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

HIS 365G • America And The Holocaust

36795 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 109

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

AMS 390 • Psy & Religion In Mod Amer Cul

26164 • Fall 2002
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 301
(also listed as HIS 392)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

25735 • Spring 2002
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 221

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

AMS 390 • Psy And Relign In Mod Amer Cul

26670 • Fall 2001
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM GAR 301
(also listed as HIS 392)

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

26370 • Fall 2001
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 21

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

26560 • Fall 2000
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 21

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

Publications


Abzug, R. (2005, September) Abolition and Religion. History Now: American History Online.

Abzug, R. & Wetzel, J. (2005) Befreiung. In W. Benz & B. Distel (Eds.), Gesamtgeschichte der nationalsozialistischen Konzentrationslager (pp.313-328). Munchen: Verlag C.H. Beck.

Abzug, R. (2003, April) Rollo May: Philosopher as Therapist. AHP Perspective.

Abzug, R. (1999) America Views the Holocaust, 1933-1945: A Brief Documentary History. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's Press.

Abzug, R. (1999, September) The Deconversion of Rollo May. Review of Existential Psychology and Psychiatry, 24.

Abzug, R. (1996) Love and Will: Rollo May and the Seventies' Crisis of Intimacy. In E. Hurrup (Ed.), The Lost Decade: America in the Seventies (pp.79-88). Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University Press.

Abzug, R. (1994) Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Abzug, R. (1985) Inside the Vicious Heart: Americans and the Liberation of Nazi Concentration Camps. Oxford University Press.

Abzug, R. (1980) Passionate Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld and the Dilemma of Reform. Oxford University Press.

Abzug, R. (2006, December) Review of The Stranger's Religion: Fascination and Fear. Journal of Church and State 48(1), 209-210.

Abzug, R. (2006, September) Borrowing Time.

Abzug, R. (2006, April) Review of Identifying the Image of God: Radical Christians and Nonviolent Power in the Antebellum United States. Journal of Religion 86(2), 322-323.

Abzug, R. (2005, December) Film Review of Imaginary Witness: Hollywood and the Holocaust. Journal of American History, 1099-1100.

Abzug, R. (2004, September) A Modest Proposal. Insights: The Faculty Journal of the Austin Presbyterian Seminary.

Abzug, R. (2002, July) Review of Elie Wiesel and the Politics of Moral Leadership. The Christian Century, 40-41.

Abzug, R. (2000, April) Review of Two Minds: The Growing Disorder in American Psychiatry. Austin American-Statesman.

Abzug, R. (1999, September) Theodore Dwight Weld. Oxford University Press, 22, 928-999.

Abzug, R. (1998, September) Review of The Romance of American Psychology. Journal of American History 85(2), 738-739.

Abzug, R. (1998, June) Review of A Cautious Patriotism: The American Churches and the Second World War. American Historical Review 103(3), 994-995.

Abzug, R. (1997, August) Review of American Reform and Reformers: A biographical dictionary. journal of southern history 63(3), 705-707.

Abzug, R. (1997, March) Review of The Politics of Reason and Revolution: Religion and Civic Life in the New Nation. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 188-189.

Abzug, R. (1997, March) Review of Sheltering the Jews: Stories of Holocaust Rescuers. Church History 66(1).

Abzug, R. (1997, January) Misery Loves Therapy, Review of On the Couch: Great American Stories About Therapy. Austin American-Statesman.

Abzug, R. (1996, December) Review of Moralists and Modernizers. Church History 65(4), 732-733.

Abzug, R. (1996, October) Review of Jonathan Edwards: Religious Tradition and American Culture. William & Mary Quarterly 53(4), 815-817.

Abzug, R. (1996, September) Rollo May, Paul Tillich and Existential Psychotherapy in America. Existential Analysis, 7(1).

Abzug, R. (1996, July) Review of Freedom's Champion: Elijah Lovejoy. Church History 65(2), 289-291.

Abzug, R. (1996, April) Review of The Abolitionist Sisterhood: Women's Political Culture in Antebellum America. American Historical Review 101(2).

Abzug, R. (1996, March) Rollo May as Friend to Man. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 36(2), 17-22.

Abzug, R. (1995, September) American Studies at the University of Texas. Craft: The Newsletter of the CTI (Computer Technology Initiative) for History, Archaeology, and Art History, 10-11.

Publications


Books

America Views the Holocaust, 1933-1945: A Brief Documentary History (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1999 (hc and pb).

Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious Imagination (Oxford University Press, March 1994; Oxford Paperback, September 1994).

Inside the Vicious Heart: Americans and the Liberation of Nazi Concentration Camps (Oxford University Press, 1985; Oxford Paperback, 1987).

Passionate Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld and the Dilemma of Reform (Oxford University Press, 1980; Oxford Galaxy Paperback, 1982.

Co-editor with Stephen E. Maizlish, New Perspectives on Race and Slavery in America: Essays in Honor of Kenneth M. Stampp (University of Kentucky Press, 1986.).

Articles

"The Transatlantic Dialogue in Religion and Psychology: Paul Tillich, Erich Fromm, Rollo May and the Reformulation of Personal Meaning, 1934-1960," in Jurgen Gebhardt, Political Cultures and the Cultures of Politics: A Transatlantic Perspective (Heidelberg: Universitatsverlag Winter, 2010).

Abolition and Religion,” online article commissioned by web magazine, History Now: American History Online, publication of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, September 2005

“Befreiung,” in Wolfgang Benz and Barbara Distel, Gesamtgeschichte der nationalsozialistischen Konzentrationslager (München: Verlag C.H. Beck, 2005) 313- 328. Based on new as well as earlier research, especially in regard to reactions to the liberations, and co-authored in part with a young German historian Juliane Wetzel, who integrated the latest German scholarship in the field.

“A Modest Proposal,” in Insights: The Faculty Journal of the Austin Presbyterian Seminary (Fall 2004). (Interpretive piece on the place of religion in American politics).

“Rollo May: Philosopher as Therapist,” AHP [Association for Humanistic Psychology] Perspective (April/May 2003).

"The Deconversion of Rollo May," Review of Existential Psychology and Psychiatry, XXIV (Special Issue, Nos. 1-3), Fall 1999.

“Rollo May, Paul Tillich and Existential Psychotherapy in America,” Existential Analysis 7.1 (1996) (Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis, London).

"Love and Will: Rollo May and the Seventies' Crisis of Intimacy," in Elsebeth Hurrup, ed., The Lost Decade: America in the Seventies (Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University Press, 1996), 79-88.

"Rollo May as 'Friend to Man'," Journal of Humanistic Psychology (Spring 1996), 17-22.

"The Liberation of the Concentration and Death Camps: Understanding and Using History," Dimensions: A Journal of Holocaust Studies 9:1 (Spring 1995), 3-8.

"The Liberation of the Concentration Camps," Liberation 1945, Exhibition Catalogue for exhibit of the same name at U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC (May 1995), 33-46.

"America and the Holocaust," Discovery, XI V: 2 (Spring 1995), 52-57.

"Facing Survivors in Fiction and Film," Simon Wiesenthal Center Annual V (1988), 241-53.

"Foreword" to Frieda Frome, Some Dare to Dream: Frieda Frome's Escape from Lithuania (Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 1988).

"Introduction" to Brewster Chamberlain and Marcia Feldman, eds. The Liberation of the Nazi Concentration Camps 1945: Eyewitness Accounts of the Liberators (Washington, D.C.: United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 1987).

"Invisible Victims: European Jews in the American Consciousness, 1940-1946," Dimensions: A Journal of Holocaust Studies (Fall 1986).

"The Black Family during Reconstruction," in Huggins, Kilson, Fox, eds. Key Issues in the Afro-American Experience II (Harcourt Brace, 1971), 26-41.

"The Copperheads: Historical Approaches to Civil War Dissent in the Midwest," Indiana Magazine of History, March 1970, 40-55.

"The Influence of Garrisonian Abolitionists' Fears of Slave Violence on the Antislavery Argument, 1829-1840," Journal of Negro History, January 1970, 15-28.

Films


Film

Borrowing Time, Historical Consultant and Advisor for film by David Haspel and Robert Black, concerning the life of Henri Landwirth, Holocaust survivor and philanthropist. Finished and released 2006. Listed in Main Credits as Chief Historical Consultant

Nightmare’s End: The Liberation of the Camps, Chief Consultant and script editing on film by Rex Bloomstein, made for Channel 4 England, and premiered in America on the Discovery Channel, April 23, 1995.