Christopher Ernst


LecturerPh.D., University of Toronto

Contact

Courses


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39116 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A121A

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39117 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM JES A121A

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 350R • Jews In American Entertainment

39354 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 3.106

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 


HIS F315K • The United States, 1492-1865

83510 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 214

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States. Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War. Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance. We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources. Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

Texts:Of the People: A History of the United States,Volume 1: To 1877, Second Edition, by James Oakes, et al.

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

Grading:Attendance and class participation 20%

Midterm 20%

Essay (2000 words) 30%

Final examination 30%

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38445 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 100

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

 

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States,Volume 1: To 1877, Second Edition, by James Oakes, et al.

 

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

 

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

 

Grading:

Attendance and class participation                                                                                 20%

Midterm                                                                                                                     20%

Essay (2000 words)                                                                                                            30%

Final examination                                                                                                    30%

 

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38450 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CAL 100

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

 

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States,Volume 1: To 1877, Second Edition, by James Oakes, et al.

 

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

 

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

 

Grading:

Attendance and class participation                                                                                 20%

Midterm                                                                                                                     20%

Essay (2000 words)                                                                                                            30%

Final examination                                                                                                    30%

 

HIS 350R • Jews In American Entertainment

38710 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GAR 2.128

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38248 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.306

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

 

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38249 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ B0.306

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

 

HIS S315K • The United States, 1492-1865

84330 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 201

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

Texts

Of the People: A History of the United States,Volume 1: To 1877, Second Edition, by James Oakes, et al.

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

 

Evaluation

 

Attendance and class participation                                                                             20%

Midterm                                                                                                                      20%

Essay  (2000 words)                                                                                                  30%

Final examination                                                                                                        30%

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38425 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM SAC 1.402

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the

social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North

America and the emergence of the United States. Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges

from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War. Lectures will

provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality,

immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance. We will explore the

emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the

expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the

contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the

American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the

dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous

immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding

the Civil War.

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling

primary sources. Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts

and evaluating historical evidence.

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States, vol. 1, concise edition, by James Oakes, et

al. (Referred to as OTP in the Schedule of Lectures below.)

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by

Michael P. Johnson

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

Grading:

Attendance and class participation 20%

Midterm 20%

Essay (8 pages/2000 words) 30%

Final examination 30%

J S 364 • Jews In American Entertainment

39430 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 310
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R)

This course explores the vital role played by commercial amusements such as theater, Broadway, radio, television and film in creating American culture.  From the middle of the nineteenth century to the present day, Jews have helped shape this culture of entertainment—and in so doing, profoundly influenced American identity.  Students will examine the representations and performance strategies of Jewish Americans through the lens of public entertainment.  We will focus on how Jews, as actors and actresses, writers and composers, singers and celebrities, producers and directors have negotiated their Jewish identity within the larger society.  Students will gain an understanding of how Jews have used the entertainment industry as a forum for grappling with important questions of American identity. 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts, evaluating historical evidence and writing historical essays.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Most readings will be available through Blackboard under Course Documents.  Please note that some readings will be links to websites and other material will be accessed online through University of Texas Libraries.

EVALUATION

  • Attendance and class participation, 30%
  • Response 1 (1000 words), 10%
  • Response 2 (1000 words), 10%
  • Midterm, 15%
  • Final Essay (2000 words), 35%

HIS S315K • The United States, 1492-1865

85135 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WEL 2.246

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States,vol. 1, concise edition, by James Oakes, et al.

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

Benjamin Franklin, by Edmund S. Morgan.  (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002)

Grading:

Attendance and class participation                                                                          20%

Two tests (10% each)                                                                                                          20%

Essay (8 pages)                                                                                                       30%

Final examination                                                                                                       30%

J S 364 • Jews In American Entertainment

40702 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 21
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R)

This course explores the vital role played by commercial amusements such as theater, Broadway, radio, television and film in creating American culture.  From the middle of the nineteenth century to the present day, Jews have helped shape this culture of entertainment—and in so doing, profoundly influenced American identity.  Students will examine the representations and performance strategies of Jewish Americans through the lens of public entertainment.  We will focus on how Jews, as actors and actresses, writers and composers, singers and celebrities, producers and directors have negotiated their Jewish identity within the larger society.  Students will gain an understanding of how Jews have used the entertainment industry as a forum for grappling with important questions of American identity. 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts, evaluating historical evidence and writing historical essays.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Most readings will be available through Blackboard under Course Documents.  Please note that some readings will be links to websites and other material will be accessed online through University of Texas Libraries.

EVALUATION

 

Attendance and class participation   30%

Response 1   (1000 words)   10%

Response 2   (1000 words)   10%

Midterm   15%

Final Essay   (2000 words)  35%

HIS F315K • The United States, 1492-1865

85265 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM WEL 2.312

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States, vol. 1, concise edition, by James Oakes, et al.

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

Benjamin Franklin, by Edmund S. Morgan.  (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002)

Grading:

Attendance and class participation                            20%

Two tests (10% each)                                    20%

Essay    (8 pages)                                    30%

Final examination                                    30%

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