John Hoberman


ProfessorPh.D. Scandinavian Languages and Literature, University of California, Berkeley

John Hoberman

Contact

Interests


European cultural and intellectual history with special interests in Sportwissenschaft and the history of ideas about race.

Biography


John Hoberman is a social and cultural historian who has researched and published extensively in the fields of sports studies, race studies, human enhancements, medical history, and globalization studies. His work in sports studies encompasses race relations, politics and the Olympics, and performance-enhancing drug use. His interests in medical history include the social and medical impacts of androgenic drugs (anabolic steroids) and the history of medical racism in the United States. He has lectured at many medical schools and other medical institutions on this topic.

 Prof. Hoberman is the author of Sport and Political Ideology (1984), The Olympic Crisis: Sport, Politics, and the Moral Order (1986), Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (1992), Darwin’s Athletes: How Sport Has Damaged Black America and Preserved the Myth of Race (1997), Testosterone Dreams: Rejuvenation, Aphrodisia, Doping ((2005), Black & Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism (2012), and Age of Globalization, the text of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) broadcast on the edX global platform during 2013 and 2014 and published online by the University of Texas Press in January 2014.

Prof. Hoberman has also published widely for general audiences. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street JournalForeign PolicyThe NationThe Wilson QuarterlySocietyScientific American, the Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionThe National (Canada), and Der Spiegel (Germany). Interviews with Prof. Hoberman have appeared in Norwegian, Swedish, French and German publications. Interviews on media outlets include all of the national networks: PBS, ABC. NBC, CBS, FOX, ABC (Australia), CBC (Canada), and BBC (UK).

 

Courses


EUS 348 • Sports/Politics In Germany

36335 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as GSD 360)

Description:

Sport and other forms of physical culture have played important political roles in German history over the past two centuries. The gymnastics movement of the early 19th century promoted an intense German nationalism based on racial/ethnic identity. The late-19th century gymnastics movement was both politically conservative and engaged in an unsuccessful struggle with the foreign “sport” culture that eventually conquered the world in the form of the Olympic Games and global soccer. The 1936 Berlin (“Nazi”) Olympics promoted Hitler’s foreign policy objectives by serving as a propaganda platform that persuaded much of the world that Nazi Germany would not go to war. An anti-Nazi boycott effort in the United States did not succeed. The next German dictatorship to adopt sport as a political strategy was East Germany (1949-1989), which produced huge numbers of internationally successful athletes by creating a system of early recruitment, expert coaching, and a secret doping program that fed anabolic steroids to thousands of young men and women, including children: criminal medicine in the service of sportive nationalism. In recent decades, democratic Germany has pursued a very successful program to become a world soccer power. The 2006 World Cup competition in Germany marked a turning point by producing a politically acceptable form of German nationalism. The German victory at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil has confirmed traditional stereotypes about German efficiency that reflect well on Germany’s political system. The inclusion of players of non-German origin on the national team serves as a symbol of German multicultural policy in an era of troubled race relations across the face of Europe.

 

Selected Readings:

  • Léon Poliakov, “Arndt, Jahn and the Germanomanes,” in The History of Anti-Semitism: From Voltaire to Wagner (New York: The Vanguard Press, 1975): 380-391.
  • John Hoberman, “The Origins of Socialist Sport: Marxist Sport Culture in the Years of Innocence,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 170-189.
  • John Hoberman, “Fascism and the Sportive Temperament,” “Nietzsche and the Authority of the Body,” “Fascist Style and Sportive Manhood,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 83-109.
  • John M. Hoberman, “”Nazi Sport Theory: Racial Heroism and the Critique of Sport,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 162-169.
  • Marcel Reinold and John Hoberman, “The Myth of the Nazi Steroid,” The International Journal of the History of Sport  (2014).
  • Allen Guttmann, “’The Nazi Olympics’,” in The Games Must Go On: Avery Brundage and the Olympic Movement (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984): 62-82.
  • Richard Mandell, The Nazi Olympics (1971).
  • Alan Tomlinson, “FIFA and the Men Who Made It,” Soccer & Society 1 (2000): 55-71.
  • Werner Krauss, “Football, Nation and Identity: German Miracles in the Post-War Era,” in Dyck, Noel and Eduardo P. Archetti, eds., Sport, Dance and Embodied Identities (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2003): 197-216.
  • John Hoberman, “The Politics of Doping in Germany,” “The German Sports Medical Establishment,” in Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (New York: Free Press, 1992): 237-252, 252-265.
  • John Hoberman. "The Reunification of German Sports Medicine, 1989-1992," Quest 45 (1993): 277-285.
  • Werner W. Franke and Brigitte Berendonk, “Hormonal doping and androgenization of athletes: a secret doping program of the German Democratic Republic government,” Clinical Chemistry 43 (1997): 1262-1279.

 

Grading:

  • Examination #1 (25%)
  • Examination #2 (25%)
  • Quizzes (5 worth 5% apiece)
  • Term paper (25%)

J S 364 • Anti-Semitism In Hist & Lit

40050 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, EUS 346, GSD 360)

Description:

The origins of Western (Christian) anti-Semitism can be traced to the Gospel of St John in the New Testament, which stigmatizes the Jews as “the children of the Devil.” Anti-Semitism thus originates in the religious feud that gradually intensified between the Jewish community and the followers of Jesus Christ. The early Church Fathers denounced the Jews using the most violent language, and a pattern was established. The first part of the course consists of an examination of the Christian critique of the Jews through the Middle Ages.

The second part of the course focuses primarily on the development of an intensified anti-Semitism in Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries, culminating in the Holocaust in Europe. Literary texts by Henri de Montherlant, Somerset Maugham, Aharon Applefeld, Ernest Hemingway, and Georges Perec are used to explore the nature of anti-Semitic perspectives on the Jews as a group or “tribe.” The course covers anti-Semitic developments up to the present day.

 

Selected Readings:

  • Ashley Montagu, "Are 'the' Jews a Race?" in Man's Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race (1974): 353-377.
  • Léon Poliakov, "The Fateful Summer of 1096," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 41-72. 
  • Léon Poliakov, "Activated Anti-Semitism: Germany," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 210-245.
  • Joshua Trachtenberg, The Devil and the Jews (1943): 11-52.
  • David I. Kertzer, "Introduction," in The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican's Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism  (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2001): 3-21.
  • George L. Mosse, "Eighteenth-Century Foundations," "The Birth of Stereotypes," "Nation, Language, and History," in Toward the Final Solution (1978): 1-50. 
  • John M. Efron, "The Jewish Body Degenerate?" in Medicine and the German Jews: A History (2001): 105-150.
  • Maurice Fishberg, "Pathological Characteristics," in The Jews: A Study of Race and Environment (1912): 270-295.
  • Somerset Maugham, “The Alien Corn” (1931).
  • Henri de Montherlant, “A Jew-Boy Goes to War” (1926).
  • Jean-Paul Sartre, Anti-Semite and Jew (1946): 7-54.
  • Michael H. Kater, “Everyday Anti-Semitism in Prewar Nazi Germany: The Popular Bases” (1984): 129-159.

 

Grading:

  • Examination #1  — 20% of grade
  • Examination #2 — 20% of final grade
  • Paper #1 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade
  • Paper #2 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade
  • Paper #3 (10 pages) — 40% of final grade

EUS 306 • Race/Gndr Stereotype In Ger

35445 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 114
(also listed as GSD 311D)

Please check back for updates.

LAH 350 • Race And Medicine In Amer Life

29155 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 1.134

This course examines the relationship between African Americans and the American medical profession from the era of plantation slavery to the present day. The course divides the history of this relationship into several periods: the era of plantation medicine during the antebellum period; the formation and propagation of ideas about African American health following Emancipation; the practice of segregated medicine up until the 1960’s; interactions between black physicians and the American Medical Association prior to and during the Civil Rights era; and the period from the 1960’s to the present. The course examines the persistence of medical racism in American medicine up to the present day.

The course is built around two major themes: the history and dynamics of the estrangement of African Americans from the white medical establishment, and how racial folklore has influenced the diagnosis and treatment of black patients. Many inaccurate accounts of “racial” differences in anatomy, physiology, psychology, and immunity to disease persisted in the medical, psychiatric, and anthropological literatures for much or all of the twentieth century. Most of this history has remained unknown to successive generations of American physicians. We will examine the copious evidence of racially differential treatment and diagnosis that has appeared in medical literature over the past 25 years. We will then examine how white physicians have reacted to these findings and have talked among themselves and with others about physician behaviors they cannot explain because they do not think historically about race and medicine. Required reading:

John Hoberman, Black & Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012). 

John Hoberman, “Examining Tuskegee,” Social Science and Modern Society 46 (November/December 2009).

John Hoberman, “Medical Racism and the Rhetoric of Exculpation: How Do Physicians Think About Race?” New Literary History 38 (Summer 2007): 505-525.

John Hoberman, "The Primitive Pelvis: The Role of Racial Folklore in Obstetrics and Gynecology During the Twentieth Century," in Body Parts: Critical Explorations in Corporeality, Christopher E. Forth and Ivan Crozier, eds. (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2005): 85-104.

William W. Dressler, “Health in the African American Community: Accounting for Health Inequalities,” Medical Anthropology Quarterly 7 (1993): 325-345. 

Ford Fessenden, “A Difference of Life & Death,” Newsday [Long Island, New

York] (November 29, 1998): A4-A6, A55-A57.

Newton G. Osborne and Marvin D. Feit, "The Use of Race in Medical

Research," JAMA 267 (January 8, 1992): 275-279. 

Ritchie Witzig, "The Medicalization of Race: Legitimization of a Flawed Social

Construct," Annals of Internal Medicine 125 (1996): 675-679. 

Stephen B. Thomas, "The Color Line: Race Matters in the Elimination of Health Disparities," American Journal of Public Health 91 (July 2001): 1046-1048 

Michelle D. Holmes, David Hodges, John Rich, “Racial Inequalities in the Use of Procedures for Ischemic Heart Disease,” JAMA (June 9, 1989): 3242-3243.

H. Jack Geiger, “Race and Health Care,” NEJM 335 (September 12, 1996): 815-81

Peter B. Bach et al., “Racial Differences in the Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer,” NEJM 341 (October 14, 1999): 1198-1205.

Charles F. Whitten, "Sickle-Cell Programming – An Imperiled Promise," NEJM 288 (February 8, 1973): 318-319.

Doris Y. Wilkinson, "For Whose Benefit? Politics and Sickle Cell," The Black Scholar (May 1974): 26-31

William F. Mengert, "Racial Contrasts in Obstetrics and Gynecology," Journal of the National Medical Association (November 1966): 413-415

Stanley M. Garn, Nathan J. Smith, and Diane C. Clark, "Lifelong Differences in Hemoglobin Levels Between Blacks and Whites," Journal of the National Medical Association 67 (1975): 91-96

 

GRADING CRITERIA: 

3 two-hour take-home examinations

1 five-page paper

12-15-page paper

attendance (absences require medical documentation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EUS 348 • Sports/Politics In Germany

35530 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as GSD 360)

FLAGS:   GC  |  Wr

Description:

Sport and other forms of physical culture have played important political roles in German history over the past two centuries. The gymnastics movement of the early 19th century promoted an intense German nationalism based on racial/ethnic identity. The late-19th century gymnastics movement was both politically conservative and engaged in an unsuccessful struggle with the foreign “sport” culture that eventually conquered the world in the form of the Olympic Games and global soccer. The 1936 Berlin (“Nazi”) Olympics promoted Hitler’s foreign policy objectives by serving as a propaganda platform that persuaded much of the world that Nazi Germany would not go to war. An anti-Nazi boycott effort in the United States did not succeed. The next German dictatorship to adopt sport as a political strategy was East Germany (1949-1989), which produced huge numbers of internationally successful athletes by creating a system of early recruitment, expert coaching, and a secret doping program that fed anabolic steroids to thousands of young men and women, including children: criminal medicine in the service of sportive nationalism. In recent decades, democratic Germany has pursued a very successful program to become a world soccer power. The 2006 World Cup competition in Germany marked a turning point by producing a politically acceptable form of German nationalism. The German victory at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil has confirmed traditional stereotypes about German efficiency that reflect well on Germany’s political system. The inclusion of players of non-German origin on the national team serves as a symbol of German multicultural policy in an era of troubled race relations across the face of Europe.

Selected Readings:

Léon Poliakov, “Arndt, Jahn and the Germanomanes,” in The History of Anti-Semitism: From Voltaire to Wagner (New York: The Vanguard Press, 1975): 380-391.

John Hoberman, “The Origins of Socialist Sport: Marxist Sport Culture in the Years of Innocence,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 170-189.

John Hoberman, “Fascism and the Sportive Temperament,” “Nietzsche and the Authority of the Body,” “Fascist Style and Sportive Manhood,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 83-109.

John M. Hoberman, “”Nazi Sport Theory: Racial Heroism and the Critique of Sport,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 162-169.

Marcel Reinold and John Hoberman, “The Myth of the Nazi Steroid,” The International Journal of the History of Sport  (2014).

Allen Guttmann, “’The Nazi Olympics’,” in The Games Must Go On: Avery Brundage and the Olympic Movement (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984): 62-82.

Richard Mandell, The Nazi Olympics (1971).

Alan Tomlinson, “FIFA and the Men Who Made It,” Soccer & Society 1 (2000): 55-71.

Werner Krauss, “Football, Nation and Identity: German Miracles in the Post-War Era,” in Dyck, Noel and Eduardo P. Archetti, eds., Sport, Dance and Embodied Identities (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2003): 197-216.

John Hoberman, “The Politics of Doping in Germany,” “The German Sports Medical Establishment,” in Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (New York: Free Press, 1992): 237-252, 252-265.

John Hoberman. "The Reunification of German Sports Medicine, 1989-1992," Quest 45 (1993): 277-285.

Werner W. Franke and Brigitte Berendonk, “Hormonal doping and androgenization of athletes: a secret doping program of the German Democratic Republic government,” Clinical Chemistry 43 (1997): 1262-1279.

Grading:

Examination #1 (25%)

Examination #2 (25%)

Quizzes (5 worth 5% apiece)

Term paper (25%)

J S 364 • Anti-Semitism In Hist & Lit

39290 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, EUS 346, GSD 360)

FLAGS:   GC  |  Wr  | EL

Description:

The origins of Western (Christian) anti-Semitism can be traced to the Gospel of St John in the New Testament, which stigmatizes the Jews as “the children of the Devil.” Anti-Semitism thus originates in the religious feud that gradually intensified between the Jewish community and the followers of Jesus Christ. The early Church Fathers denounced the Jews using the most violent language, and a pattern was established. The first part of the course consists of an examination of the Christian critique of the Jews through the Middle Ages.

The second part of the course focuses primarily on the development of an intensified anti-Semitism in Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries, culminating in the Holocaust in Europe. Literary texts by Henri de Montherlant, Somerset Maugham, Aharon Applefeld, Ernest Hemingway, and Georges Perec are used to explore the nature of anti-Semitic perspectives on the Jews as a group or “tribe.” The course covers anti-Semitic developments up to the present day.

Selected Readings:

Ashley Montagu, "Are 'the' Jews a Race?" in Man's Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race (1974): 353-377.

Léon Poliakov, "The Fateful Summer of 1096," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 41-72. 

Léon Poliakov, "Activated Anti-Semitism: Germany," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 210-245.

Joshua Trachtenberg, The Devil and the Jews (1943): 11-52.

David I. Kertzer, "Introduction," in The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican's Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism  (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2001): 3-21.

George L. Mosse, "Eighteenth-Century Foundations," "The Birth of Stereotypes," "Nation, Language, and History," in Toward the Final Solution (1978): 1-50. 

John M. Efron, "The Jewish Body Degenerate?" in Medicine and the German Jews: A History (2001): 105-150.

Maurice Fishberg, "Pathological Characteristics," in The Jews: A Study of Race and Environment (1912): 270-295.

Somerset Maugham, “The Alien Corn” (1931).

Henri de Montherlant, “A Jew-Boy Goes to War” (1926).

Jean-Paul Sartre, Anti-Semite and Jew (1946): 7-54.

Michael H. Kater, “Everyday Anti-Semitism in Prewar Nazi Germany: The Popular Bases” (1984): 129-159.

Grading:

Examination #1  — 20% of grade

Examination #2 — 20% of final grade

Paper #1 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade

Paper #2 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade

Paper #3 (10 pages) — 40% of final grade

EUS 306 • Race/Gndr Stereotype In Ger

35570 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as GSD 311D)

Please check back for updates.

EUS 347 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

35725 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as GSD 341D)

Please check back for updates.

GER 382M • Sports In Germany: Cul/Pol Dim

38275 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 232

Sport in Germany: Cultural and Political Dimensions

"Sport in Germany: Cultural and Political Dimensions" examines the sociocultural and political roles physical culture [Korperkultur] and sport [Sport] have played in German society over the past two centuries. Nascent German sportive nationalism begins during the early 19th century with the anti-Napoleonic movement of Friedrich Ludwig ("Turnvater") Jahn. Toward the end of the 19th century the cultural conservatism of the gymnastics movement [Turnbewegung] inspired by Jahn enters into a “cultural struggle” [Kulturkampf] against a foreign (English) sport culture that the gymnasts will eventually lose, viz. the global triumph of the competitive sports and cosmopolitan ideology of an Olympic movement of French origin. A sign of things to come is the fact that the pioneering sports medicine of the early 20th century, building on decades of German leadership in the biological sciences, is primarily German. The competition between xenophobic and cosmopolitan German attitudes emerges again before and during the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games and is resolved pragmatically (and successfully) by the Nazi regime, which wins the medals competition and achieves foreign policy goals in the process. Postwar Germany (East and West) will adopt high-performance sport [Hochleistungssport] as "a national priority," as Interior Minister Manfred Kanther phrased it many years after the establishment of the BRD and DDR. The postwar period produces unique collaborations linking the political, academic, and sports establishments on behalf of German sportive nationalism in both West and East Germany. The SED dictatorship proved to be more determined, resourceful, unscrupulous, and successful than its West German competitors. Recent German scholarship has demonstrated, however, that doping ambitions in West Germany were comparable to (if less extensive and

effective than) those of the East German sports bureaucrats led by Manfred Ewald. In recent decades the political and cultural significance of German sportive nationalism has persisted and is evident in Germany's long and successful campaign to become a world football power. Along another political axis, the 2006 football World Cup competition in Germany produced a politically acceptable version of German sportive nationalism in partnership with an impressive demonstration of a modernized German cosmopolitanism that put to rest the lingering nightmares produced by the German Olympiads of 1936 and 1972. The course also looks at sports commentaries by prominent German intellectuals such as Peter Schneider ("Die deutsche Lähmung” [The German Paralysis], 2004), Peter Sloterdijk ("Ein Team von Hermaphroditen," 2006), and various essays by other authors.

Class format/ method of instruction: The class will be conducted in a primarily discussion/secondarily lecture format. The course will be conducted in English. Course readings can be done: (1) in German and English OR (2) entirely in English.  The course will be of greatest interest to students in Germanic Studies, History, and Sports Studies.

 

Course Objectives

The principal objective of the course is to show graduate students how to find and analyze substantial aspects of German social, cultural, and political history within the history of the pre-modem physical culture movement of the 19th century and the modem sport culture of the 20th century and beyond. A second objective is to point out to graduate students significant connections that link the modem sports culture to German racial ideologies, such as those of the German nudist movement [der deutsche Naturismus] and the Nazi party [NSDAP], and to an enduring modern nationalism that welcomes forms of sportive self-assertion in addition to economic and military expressions of national viability and willpower.

 

Grading

Two short essays (25% each) and a long essay (50%).

The seminar will be conducted in English and German, with materials available in (mostly) German and English.

C L 323 • Social Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

34375 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as E 322, EUS 347, SCA 323)

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

EUS 306 • Bad Blood

36820 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A217A
(also listed as GRC 301)

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives: 

     1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

     2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

     3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

     4) to assist you in refining your writing skills.  

EUS 346 • Scandinavia And Globalization

36735 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 337
(also listed as SCA 335)

Description:

Globalization, the greatest project in human history, is an historical process that encompasses worldwide cultural and economic integration. This new global order is characterized by multinational corporations and an increasingly free flow of capital and labor across the world, internationalizing the products, services, careers, travel opportunities, and mass media programming that are now available to people everywhere. All countries must now adapt to changing economies and the cultural trends transnational markets carry around the world. Cultural globalization has been driven largely by American influences -- popular music, television programming, and Hollywood films -- along with the sheer power of the English language to insinuate itself into virtually all aspects of modern experience. 

Scandinavia consists of five small countries (Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Iceland) which, like nations everywhere, must adapt to the merciless competition of globalization by innovating and drawing upon their own social, cultural, and natural resources. In fact, Scandinavia is a conspicuously prosperous and peaceful region that has developed the most effective welfare state models in the world. This is one reason why Scandinavian societies have met the challenges of globalization and labor competition from low-wage countries so effectively. At the same time, these very small countries are vulnerable to various globalization pressures such as military threats, world economic instability, European Union policies, the charismatic influence of American popular culture, U.S.- based social media platforms, and the power of the English language to infiltrate small languages and even threaten their eventual extinction.

Yet these small Scandinavian countries also have ways of asserting themselves, via diplomatic initiatives, displays of moral leadership, the exporting of cultural products (especially films), and the production of medal-winning athletes and chess champions (Magnus Carlsen of Norway). In summary, this course examines how the small Scandinavian countries have coped with political and cultural vulnerability while cultivating the components of national identity that sustain small populations through traumatic national experiences as severe as military occupation and as intractable as peacetime economic competition with much more powerful economies and cultural products. 

Selected Texts:

Manfred Steger: Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2009)

"Can the Scandinavian Model Adapt to Globalization?" (Scandinavian Studies, 2004)

Christine Ingebritsen, "Ecological Institutionalism: Scandinavia and the Greening of Global Capitalism" (Scandinavian Studies, 2012)

Hans Hognestad, "Transglobal Scandinavian? Globalization and the contestation of identities in football" (Soccer & Society, 2009)

Grading/Requirements:

Examination #1      20%

Examination #2      20%

4-page Paper         20%

Term Paper             40%

AMS 370 • War On Drugs: A Hist/Critique

30705 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM ETC 2.132
(also listed as ANT 324L)

The "War on Drugs" in the United States can be dated back to the US Opium Exclusion Act of 1909 and the Harrison Narcotic Act of 1914, which provided the model for drug prohibition legislation over the next hundred years both in the United States and around the world. President Richard M. Nixon officially declared an official "war on drugs" in 1971, two years after he identified drug abuse as "a serious national threat." This course examines the ongoing struggle between prohibitionist values and policies on one side and public demand for drugs on the other. At the same time, we must distinguish between two types of "drugs." The first category comprises the so-called "recreational drugs" that have been used by millions of people as mood-altering substances; this category includes alcohol, heroin, cocaine, marijuana, and Ecstasy among many others. The second category comprises drugs that are believed to enhance human performance in various ways. These drugs include amphetamines, the anti-narcoleptic Modafinil (Provigil), blood-boosting drugs such as Erythropoeitin, the anti-depressant Prozac, as well as testosterone and the other anabolic steroids. While all of these drugs have been used by elite athletes, much greater numbers of people have used them for other goal-oriented purposes either on the job or to pursue an ideal of self-enhancement. This course focuses primarily on these performance-enhancing drugs that are consumed in pursuit of allegedly therapeutic or utilitarian goals. Regulating these drugs is more problematic than in the case of first-category drugs, because they can be presented as serving useful or therapeutic purposes. The evolving social and medical status of these drugs will be one of the important scientific dramas of the twenty-first century.

 

Requirements

Two examinations                  40%

Four papers                           50%

Attendance                            10%

 

Possible Texts

John Hoberman, Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport

Peter D. Kramer, Listening to Prozac

John Hoberman, "Listening to Steroids," The Wilson Quarterly

Verner Møller, The Doping Devil

Richard Davenport-Hines, The Pursuit of Oblivion: A Global History of Narcotics

David T. Courtwright, Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World

John Hoberman, Testosterone Dreams: Rejuvenation, Aphrodisia, Doping

 

Upper-division standing required. Students may not enroll in more than two AMS 370 courses in one semester.

Flag(s): Writing

LAH 350 • The Origins Of Pol Correctness

30095 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.124

This course examines the development of a “politically correct” racial etiquette in the United States over the past century. These conventions arose for the purpose of facilitating cross-racial communication and minimizing offensive words and behaviors that might disrupt relationships between black and white Americans in social, political, and academic venues. We should recognize that this is a limited definition of political correctness, in that it is limited to the sphere of race relations. Politically correct standards have also been used to “minimize social and institutional offense” (Wikipedia) that might be perceived by people with respect to occupation, gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability, or age. (The University of Texas has published its own regulations regarding freedom of expression and verbal “defamation” and “harassment” that fall within this category.)  We should also be aware that “political correctness” has frequently been used as an epithet over the past two decades. One opponent describes political correctness as “a communal tyranny that erupted in the 1980s,” and many other hostile commentators have equated political correctness with illegitimate censorship. These ideological conflicts belong to the larger “culture war” of which racial issues constitute only one dimension.

 

The course therefore focuses on public comments and exchanges between black and white Americans bearing on race relations, as well as the various, and often pejorative, images of African Americans that have appeared in print and other media over the past century. To what degree have black people in the United States been able to represent themselves, as opposed to being represented, for better or for worse, by members of the white majority? A fundamental claim of the course is that the racial politics of representing African Americans changed in a fundamental way following the publication of “The Negro family: The case for national action” (The Moynihan Report) in 1965. The firestorm of controversy provoked by this traumatic event created a new universe of racial discourse that created in turn the new racial politics of “political correctness” that continues to be the dominant conceptual framework within which race matters are discussed to this day.

E 322 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

35190 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 347, SCA 323, WGS 345)

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

Texts:

Haugen, Einar.  Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, University of Minnesota Press; Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.); The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL; Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

Requirements & Grading:

Students will write three papers between six and eight pages in length, one of which may be substantially revised (60%). There will also be a final examination and occasional quizzes (40%).

 

EUS 306 • Bad Blood

36255 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as GRC 301)

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives:

      1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

      2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

      3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

      4) to assist you in refining your writing skills. 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

1. Course Packet available at Jenn’s Copy (approx. $45),2200 Guadalupe St (Lower Level), 473-8669.

2. Films on reserve at the Flawn Academic Center (FAC, formerly UGL)

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING (See Guidelines and Grading for Assignments section)

40%    Homework Assignments and Quizzes (in-class quizzes on homework assignments; worksheets to accompany assigned readings and prepare for class discussions)

20%    In-class examinations.

40 %    Critical Review Papers (5 papers, each 2-3 pp). 

Final grades will be assigned based on the traditional scale:A = 90-100%; B = 80-89%; C = 70-79%; D = 60-69%; F = 0-59%

NOR 612 • Accelerated Second-Year Nor

38460 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-1:00PM BUR 234

Course Description:

Third and fourth semester Norwegian in which the students read copiously from a variety of texts, solidify their knowledge of Norwegian grammar and discuss the readings in Norwegian. The reading materials present a broad cross-section of Norwegian culture both past and present. Writing in Norwegian is also stressed.

Grading Policy:

Exams 50%.

Homework 30%.

Class Participation 20%.

Texts:

O'Leary and Shackelford. Norsk i sammenheng: Intrmediate Norwegian. (textbook). O?Leary and Shackelford. Norsk i sammenheng: Intermediate Norwegian (arbeidsbok).

C L 323 • Social Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

32930 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as E 322, EUS 347, SCA 323, WGS 345)

Description:
This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others.

Possible Texts/Readings:
Haugen, Einar. Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, Univ. of Minnesota Press
Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.) The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL
Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

35950 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 337

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36075 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLM 5.112

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

T C 357 • Race And Medicine In Amer Life

43600 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM CRD 007A

TC 357. Race & Medicine in American Life
[Spring 2010]

Meeting Time and Room: TTH 5:00-6:30 p.m. @CRD 007A
Instructor: John Hoberman <hoberman@mail.utexas.edu>
Office hours: WF 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. or by appointment in BUR @322
 Phone: 512-232-6368
This course fulfils the substantial writing component.

January 19.

1. Introduction to the Course


January 21.

1. Race & Medicine in the 20th Century: An Historical Introduction


1. Charles H. Garvin, "Negro Health," Opportunity (November 1924): 341-342.

2. "Negro Health, Time (April 8, 1940).

3. Ralph G. Martin, “Doctor’s Dream in Harlem,” The New Republic (June 3, 1940): 798-800.

4. "Negro in Florida," Time (January 14, 1952): 71-72.

5. Alfred Maund, "The Negro and Medicine," The Nation (May 9, 1953): 396-397.

6. “You’re Black and Sick,” Newsweek (July 7, 1969): 83.

7. "Racially Rationed Health," Time (April 6, 1970): 90-91.

8. Daniel S. Greenberg, "Black health: grim statistics," The Lancet (March 31, 1990): 780-781.

9. "Poor and Black Patients Slighted, Study Says," New York Times (April 20, 1994).

10. “Health Gap Grows, With Black Americans Trailing Whites, Studies Say,” New York Times (January 26, 1998).

11. "Nashville Clinic Offers Case Study of Chronic Gap in Black and White Health," New York Times (March 21, 1998).

12. “Aggression Study of Kids Assailed,” Austin American-Statesman (April 18, 1998).

13. Bob Herbert, “The Quiet Scourge,” New York Times (January 11, 2001).
January 26, 28.

2. Racial Health Disparities and Social Stress


Mid-20tth Century Commentary

14. Louis I. Dublin, “The Problem of Negro Health as Revealed by Vital Statistics,” Journal of Negro Education 6 (1937): 268-275.

15. Charles S. Johnson, “The Socio-Economic Background of Negro Health Status,” Journal of Negro Education 18 (1949): 429-435.

16. Chester M. Pierce, M.D., "Is Bigotry the Basis of the Medical Problems of the Ghetto?" in John C. Norman, ed., Medicine in the Ghetto (New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1969): 301-314.

17. “The Daily Irritations,” Time (April 6, 1970): 74, 77, 78.

18. Richard A. Schweder, “It’s Called Poor Health for a Reason,” New York Times (March 9, 1997).

19. Michael Marmot, “Life at the Top,” New York Times (February 27, 2005).



Early 21st-Century Commentary

1. Erma Jean Lawson and Tanya L. Sharpe, “Black Men and Divorce: Implications For Culturally Competent Practice,” Minority Health Today (July 2000).

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0HKU/is_5_1/ai_66918338/

2. Dorothy E. Roberts, “The Social and Moral Coast of Mass Incarceration in African American Communities,” Stanford Law Review 56 (2003-2004): 1271-1305. [440.45] [OPTIONAL READING]

3. Jonathan Tilove, "Numbers tell toll on black men," Austin American-Statesman (May 8, 2005).  [219.1] [Blackboard]

22. Sandra L. Gadson, “The Third World Health Status of Black American Males,” Journal of the National Medical Association 98 (April 2006): 488-491. [440.525]









February 2, 4.

3. African-American Perspectives on Race & Medical Practice

116.  David Satcher, “Does Race Interfere With the Doctor-Patient Relationship?” JAMA 223 (March 26, 1973): 1498-1499. [1138.]

4. Samuel C. Bullock and Earline Houston, "Perceptions of Racism by Black Medical Students Attending White Medical Schools," JNMA 79 (1987): 601-608. [651.2] [Blackboard]

5. Mark B. Wenneker and Arnold M. Epstein, "Racial Inequalities in the Use of Procedures for Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease in Massachusetts," JAMA 261 (January 13, 1989): 253-257.  [463.] [Blackboard]

45. Michelle D. Holmes, David Hodges, John Rich, “Racial Inequalities in the Use of Procedures for Ischemic Heart Disease,” Journal of the American Medical Association (June 9, 1989): 3242-3243.  [464.] [Blackboard]

6. Mitchell F. Rice and Mylon Winn, “Black Health Care in America: A Political Perspective,” Journal of the National Medical Association 82 (1990): 429-437. [Blackboard] [466.7]




February 9, 11.

4. Racial Attitudes Among Whites

7.  “How Whites Feel About Negroes: A Painful American Dilemma,” Newsweek (October 21, 1963): 44-50, 55. [1136.5]

8. Nicholas D. Kristof, “Racism Without Racists,” New York Times (October 5, 2008). [1154.64]

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/05/opinion/05kristof.html

9. David Glenn, “Our Hidden Prejudices, on Trial,” Chronicle of Higher Education (April 25, 2008): B12-B14. [WTWMS 462.] [1154.63]

http://chronicle.com/article/Our-Hidden-Prejudices-on/4421








February 16, 18.

5. Medical Liberals Respond to Medical Racism

48. H. Jack Geiger, “Race and Health Care,” NEJM 335 (September 12, 1996): 815-816.

10. H. Jack Geiger, “Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Diagnosis and Treatment: A Review of the Evidence and a Consideration of Causes,” in Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare (Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press, 2003): 417-454. [PDF] [522.1515A]

11. Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Cara James, Byron J. Good, Anne E. Becker, “The Culture of Medicine and Racial, Ethnic, and Class Disparities in Healthcare,” in Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare (Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press, 2003): 594-625. [PDF] [522.1515B] [OPTIONAL READING]

120. John Hoberman, “Medical Racism and the Rhetoric of Exculpation,” New Literary History  38 (2007). [154.59]



February 23.

6. The Conservative Critique of Medical Liberalism

12. Sally Satel, "Race and Medicine," in PC, M.D. (New York: Basic Books, 2000): 155-192. [1145.3]

49. Sally Satel, "The Indoctrinologists Are Coming," The Atlantic Monthly (January 2001): 59-64. [46-51] [1145.]

119. Sally Satel, "I Am a Racially Profiling Doctor," New York Times Magazine (May 5, 2002): 56, 58. [⇒ RACE CONCEPT IN MEDICINE] [1151.]



February 25.

7. Early Commentaries on and by White Physicians

13. John M. Eisenberg, "Sociologic Influences on Decision-Making by Clinicians," Annals of Internal Medicine 90 (1979): 957-964. [1139.]

117. David R. Levy, “White Doctors and Black Patients: Influence of Race on the Doctor-Patient Relationship,” Pediatrics 75 (1985): 639-643. [228.]




March 2, 4.

8. Types of “Difficult” Patients

(1922)

35. S.W. Douglas, “Difficulties and Superstitions Encountered in Practice Among the Negroes,” Journal of the Arkansas Medical Society 18 (1922): 155-158. [1132.]

(1931)

14. C. Jeff Miller, “Special Medical Problems of the Colored Woman,” Southern Medical Journal 25 (1931): 733-739. [1134.] [ALSO: HARDINESS, PAIN, WHITE PHYSICIAN]

15. James E. Groves, "Taking Care of the Hateful Patient," New England Journal of Medicine 298 (April 20, 1978): 883-887. [1138.7]

16. Karen J. Armitage et al., "Response of Physicians to Medical Complaints in Men and Women," JAMA 241 (May 18, 1979): 2186-2187. [1139.5]

17. Solomon Papper, "The Undesirable Patient," in Dominant Issues in Medical Sociology, Howard D. Schwartz, ed. (New York: Random House, 1987): 259-261. [1142.2]

18. Chris Anne Raymond, “Lesbians Call for Greater Physician Awareness, Sensitivity to Improve Patient Care,” Journal of the American Medical Association 259 (January 1, 1988): 18. [637.5]

19. “How the Topic of Homosexuality is Taught at U.S. Medical Schools,” Academic Medicine 67 (September 1992) 601-603. [637.55]

http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Abstract/1992/09000/How_the_topic_of_homosexuality_is_taught_at_U_S_.13.aspx

20. 637.6 Ginger Thompson, “New Clinics Seek Patients Among Lesbians, Who Often Shun Health Care,” New York Times (March 30, 1999): A25.

21. Dorothy E. Roberts, "Reconstructing the Patient: Starting with Women of Color," in Susan B. Wolf, ed., Feminism & Bioethics (1996): 116-143] [1143.]

When the Doctor Is the Problem

118. Delthia Ricks, “Medical Myths,” Newsday [Long Island, New York] (December 6, 1998): A4, A52-A55.

22. Richard A. Friedman, "Learning Words They Rarely Teach in Medical School: 'I'm Sorry'," New York Times (July 26, 2005). 1154.52

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A01EFDB123FF935A15754C0A9639C8B63&sec=health

23. "When the Doctor Is In, But You Wish He Wasn't," New York Times (November 30, 2005). 1154.54a

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F06E3DE1531F933A05752C1A9639C8B63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=3



March 9, 11.

9. Race & Medical Education

24. Frederic W. Hafferty and Ronald Franks, “The Hidden Curriculum, Ethics Teaching, and the Structure of Medical Education,” Academic Medicine 69 (November 1994): 861-871. [644.7]

25. Jack Coulehan and Peter C. Williams, “Vanquishing Virtue: The Impact of Medical Education,” Academic Medicine 76 (June 2001): 598-605. [645.5]

http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Fulltext/2001/06000/Vanquishing_Virtue__The_Impact_of_Medical.8.aspx

26. Sandra Turbes et al., “The Hidden Curriculum in Multicultural Medical Education: The Role of Case Examples,” Academic Medicine 77 (March 2002): 209-216. [647.1]

http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Abstract/2002/03000/The_Hidden_Curriculum_in_Multicultural_Medical.7.aspx

27. Brenda L. Beagan, “Teaching Social and Cultural Awareness to Medical Students: “It’s All Very Nice to Talk about It in Theory, But Ultimately It Makes No Difference’,” Academic Medicine 78 (June 2003): 605-614. [647.2]

28. Manish C. Champaneria and Sara Axtell, "Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Schools," JAMA 291 (May 5, 2004): 2142. [647.5]

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/291/17/2142

29. Manabu Murakami et al, “The perception of the hidden curriculum on medical education: an exploratory study, Asia Pacific Family Medicine 8 (December 2009): 9pp. [649.31]

http://www.apfmj.com/content/8/1/9










March 23.

10. Racial Health Disparities

20. William W. Dressler, “Health in the African American Community: Accounting for Health Inequalities,” Medical Anthropology Quarterly 7 (1993): 325-345.

21. Ford Fessenden, “A Difference of Life & Death,” Newsday [Long Island, New York] (November 29, 1998): A4-A6, A55-A57.


March 25.

11. Colonial Medicine & the Origins of Medical Racism

23. Albert Schweitzer, "Medicine in the Jungle," JAMA 156 (December 25, 1954): 1547-1549, 1586.

24. Franz Fanon, "Medicine and Colonialism," in A Dying Colonialism (1959): 121-145.

25. Winthrop D. Jordan, "First Impressions: Initial English Confrontation with Africans," in The White Man's Burden: Historical Origins of Racism in the United States (1974): 3-25.

26. Jean Comaroff, "The Diseased Heart of Africa: Medicine, Colonialism, and the Black Body," in Shirley Lindenbaum and Margaret Lock, eds. Knowledge, Power, and Practice: The Anthropology of Medicine and Everyday Life (1993): 305-329.

27. Daniel J. Ncayiyana, "Africa can solve its own health problems," BMJ 324 (March 23, 2002): 688-689.



March 30.

12. Plantation Medicine & the Origins of Medical Racism

28. John S. Haller, Jr., "The Negro and the Southern Physician: A Study of Medical and Racial Attitudes 1800-1860," Medical History (1972): 238-253.

29. Felice Swados, "Negro Health on the Ante Bellum Plantations," Bulletin of the History of Medicine 10 (1941): 460-472.

30. Samuel Cartwright, M.D., "The Diseases and Physical Peculiarities of the Negro Race," De Bow's Review 11 (1851): 504-508.


Medical Experimentation

31. Todd L. Savitt, “The Use of Blacks for Medical Experimentation in the Old South,” Journal of Southern History (1982): 331-348.

32. Walter Fisher, "Physicians and Slavery in the Antebellum Southern Medical Journal," in August Meier & Elliott Rudwick, eds. The Making of Black America: Essays in Negro Life & History (1969): 153-164.

33. Durrenda Ojanuga, "The medical ethics of the 'Father of Gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims," Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1993): 28-31.



April 1.

13. Southern Medicine & the Origins of Medical Racism

Public Health

34. C.E. Terry, "The Negro: His Relation to Public Health in the South," American Journal of Public Health 3 (1913): 300-310.


The “Negro Patient”

35. S. W. Douglas, “Difficulties and Superstitions Encountered in Practice Among the Negroes,” Southern Medical Journal (October 1926): 736-738.

Blood Segregation

36. “Impossibility of Race Identification by Blood Tests,” JAMA 76 (March 5, 1921): 674.

37. “No Blood Test for Race Differentiation,” JAMA 112:5 (1939): 465.

38. “Use of Negro Blood for Blood Banks,” JAMA 119:3 (1942): 307.

39. “Opposition to Segregation of Bloods From White and Negro Donors in Blood Banks,” JAMA 119:10 (1942): 801.

40. “Labeling of Blood for Transfusion,” JAMA 224 (June 4, 1973): 1425-1426.

41. “Racial Discrimination in Blood Transfusions,” JAMA 232 (June 30, 1975): 1410.

April 6.

14. The Race Concept in Medicine

42. Newton G. Osborne and Marvin D. Feit, "The Use of Race in Medical Research," JAMA 267 (January 8, 1992): 275-279.

43. Ritchie Witzig, "The Medicalization of Race: Legitimization of a Flawed Social Construct," Annals of Internal Medicine 125 (1996): 675-679.

44. Stephen B. Thomas, "The Color Line: Race Matters in the Elimination of Health Disparities," American Journal of Public Health 91 (July 2001): 1046-1048.




April 8.

Differential Diagnosis & Treatment


47. Marcia Angell, "Privilege and Health – What is the Connection?" New England Journal of Medicine 329 (July 8, 1993): 126-127.

50. Kevin A. Schulman et al., “The Effect of Race and Sex on Physicians’ Recommendations for Cardiac Catheterization,” NEJM (February 25, 1999): 618-626.

51. L.M. Schwartz et al., “Misunderstandings about the Effects of Race and Sex on Physicians’ Referrals for Cardiac Catheterization,” NEJM 341 (July 22, 1999): 279-283. See also 284-288]

52. Peter B. Bach et al., “Racial Differences in the Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer,” NEJM 341 (October 14, 1999): 1198-1205.

53. Talmadge E. King, Jr. and Paul Brunetta, “Racial Disparity in Rates of Surgery for Lung Cancer,” NEJM 341 (October 14, 1999): 1231-1233.

54. Stephen B. Thomas, "The Color Line: Race Matters in the Elimination of Health Disparities," AJPH 91 (July 2001): 1046-1048.

55. "Minorities Get Inferior Care, Even if Insured, Study Finds," New York Times (March 21, 2002).

56. M. Gregg Bloche, "Health Care Disparities – Science, Politics, and Race," NEJM 350 (April 8, 2004): 1568-1570.  [DHHS & Tommy Thompson]    

30. "Trends in Racial Disparities in Care," New England Journal of Medicine 353 (November 10, 2005): 2081-2085. [522.315]

April 13, 15.

15. African-American Health Issues

Sickle-Cell Disease

57. Charles F. Whitten, "Sickle-Cell Programming – An Imperiled Promise," NEJM 288 (February 8, 1973): 318-319.

58. Doris Y. Wilkinson, "For Whose Benefit? Politics and Sickle Cell," The Black Scholar (May 1974): 26-31.


Hypertension

59. Richard S. Cooper, Charles N. Rotimi and Ryk Ward, “The Puzzle of Hypertension in African-Americans,” Scientific American (February 1999): 56-63.

60. Jay S. Kaufman and Susan A. Hall, "The Slavery Hypertension  Hypothesis: Dissemination and appeal of a modern race theory,"  Epidemiology 2003; 14(1): 111-126.

Organ Transplants

61. Bertram L. Kasiske et al., "The Effect of Race on Access and Outcome in Transplantation," New England Journal of Medicine 324 (January 31, 1991): 302-307.

62. Joye M. Carter, "Reform Organ-Tissue Transplantation" [Letter to the Editor], Journal of the National Medical Association 86 (1994): 647, 666, 685.

31. Phillip S. Pang et al., “The Effect of Donor Race on the Survival of Black Americans Undergoing Liver Transplantation for Chronic Hepatitis C,” Liver Transplantation 15 (2009): 1126-1132. [1120.87]

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/122579756/PDFSTART



April 20, 22.

16. Biomedical “Racial” Differences: Facts or Artifacts?
April 27.
Eyes/Glaucoma

63. H. Phillip Venable, “Glaucoma in the Negro,” Journal of the National Medical Association 44 (January 1952): 7-14

64. "Glaucoma in the Negro" [discussion], Journal of the National Medical Association (May 1952): 196-204.

65. “Blacks, Whites Benefit from Different Surgical Glaucoma Treatments” [NIH News Release] (July 6, 1998).
Obstetrics & Gynecology

66. William F. Mengert, "Racial Contrasts in Obstetrics and Gynecology," Journal of the National Medical Association (November 1966): 413-415.


Hematocrit (Red Blood Cell Volume)

67. Stanley M. Garn, Nathan J. Smith, and Diane C. Clark, "Lifelong Differences in Hemoglobin Levels Between Blacks and Whites," Journal of the National Medical Association 67 (1975): 91-96.

68. Stanley M. Garn and Diane C. Clark, "Problems in the Nutritional Assessment of Black Individuals," American Journal of Public Health 66 (1976): 262-267.

69. Diana B. Dutton, "Hematocrit Levels and Race: An Argument Against the Adoption of Separate Standards in Screening for Anemia," Journal of the National Medical Association (1979): 945-954.

Eating Disorders (Anorexia)

70. Tomas J. Silber, "Anorexia Nervosa in Black Adolescents," Journal of the National Medical Association (1984): 29-32.

71. Alan H. Goodman, "Is Race a Useful Variable in Nutritional Research?" CommuNicAtor [American Anthropological Association] 17:2 (1994): 4-8.

Pain Threshold

72. "Angina Pectoris in the Negro," JAMA (August 19, 1939).

73. David S. Strogatz, "Use of Medical Care for Chest Pain: Differences Between Blacks and Whites," American Journal of Public Health 80 (1990): 290-294.

Bone Density

74. Robert P. Heaney, "Editorial: Bone Mass, the Mechanostat, and Ethnic Differences," Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 80 (1995): 2289-2290.

32. Anne Fausto-Sterling, “The Bare Bones of Race,” Social Studies of Science 38 (October 2008): 657-694. [259.7]  [⇒ 964.3951] [OPTIONAL READING]

http://sss.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/38/5/657

The “Crack Baby”

75. Barry Zuckerman, Deborah A. Frank, and Linda Mayes, "Cocaine-Exposed Infants and Developmental Outcomes," JAMA 287 (April 17, 2002): 1990-1991.

76. Mariah Blake, "Crack Babies Talk Back," Columbia Journalism Review (September/October 2004).

Pharmacology

77. W. Kalow, "Race and Therapeutic Drug Response," New England Journal of Medicine 320 (March 2, 1989): 588-589.

78. William B. Lawson, "The Art and Science of the Psychopharmacology of African Americans," The Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine 63 (October/November 1996): 301-304.

79. Alastair J.J. Wood, "Racial Differences in the Response to Drugs – Pointers to Genetic Differences," New England Journal of Medicine 344 (May 3, 2001): 1393-1396.

80. Robert S. Schwartz, "Racial Profiling in Medical Research," New England Journal of Medicine 344 (May 3, 2001): 1392-1393.

81. "Race and Responsiveness to Drugs for Heart Failure," NEJM 345 (September 6, 2001): 766-768.


The Racial Politics of BiDil

82. M. Gregg Bloche, "Race-Based Therapeutics," New England Journal of Medicine 351 (November 11, 2004): 2035-2037.

83. Troy Duster, "Race and Reification in Science," Science 307 (February 18, 2005): 1050-1051.

84. "Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee: Volume II." Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (June 16, 2005): 1-403.  [EXCERPTS FROM ELECTRONIC ATTACHMENT]

85. Jonathan Kahn, “Race in a Bottle,” Scientific American (August 2007): 40-45.









April 27.

17.  Racial “Hardiness” as Medical Doctrine

Self-Defined Black Hardiness

86. "Slavery Was 'Great Biological Experiment' Negro MD Claims," JAMA 181 (September 1, 1962): 58-59.

Cardiac Hardiness (Heart)

87. Stewart K. Roberts, “Nervous and Mental Influences in Angina Pectoris,” American Heart Journal 7 (1931-1932): 31-35.

88. Edward H. Schwab and Victor E. Schulze, “Heart Disease in the American Negro of the South,” American Heart Journal 7 (1932): 710-717.

89. William S. Hunter, “Coronary Occlusion in Negroes,” JAMA 131 (May 4, 1946): 12-14.

90. John P. Mihaly and Neville C. Whiteman, "Myocardial Infarction in the Negro: Historical Survey as It Relates to Negroes," American Journal of Cardiology 2 (October 1958): 464-474.

91. Clyde W. Yancy, "Does race matter in heart failure?" American Heart Journal 146 (2003): 203-206.


Analgesic Hardiness (Pain)

92. Knox H. Todd et al., "Ethnicity and Analgesic Practice," Annals of Emergency Medicine 35 (January 2000): 11-16.


Obstetrical Hardiness (Childbirth)

93. Wilbur A. Drake, "The Gynecologist: Some of His Problems and His Obligation to the Present and the Future," JNMA (January-March 1920): 16ff., esp. 18.

94. C. Jeff Miller, “Special Medical Problems of the Colored Woman,” Southern Medical Journal 25 (1931): 733-739.

95. Robert A. Hingson, "Comparative Negro and White Mortality During Anesthesia, Obstetrics and Surgery," Journal of the National Medical Association 49 (July 1957): 203-211. [= 964.5]

96. Laura Briggs, "The Race of Hysteria: 'Overcivilization' and the 'Savage' Woman in Late Nineteenth-Century Obstetrics and Gynecology," American Quarterly 52 (June 2000): 246-273.

Neurological Hardiness (Nervous System)

97. Morris M. Weiss, “The Problem of Angina Pectoris in the Negro,” American Heart Journal 17 (1939): 711-715.


Dermatological Hardiness (Skin)

98. John M. Knox, Earl G. Cockrell, and Robert G. Freeman, "Etiological Factors and Premature Aging," JAMA 179 (February 24, 1962): 136-142.

99. “Skin problems in blacks receive scrutiny,” JAMA 242 (December 21, 1979): 2747-2748.

Dental Hardiness (Teeth)

100. Clifton O. Dummett, “Dental health problems of the Negro population,” Journal of the American Dental Association 61 (1960): 308-314.


April 29, May 4.

The Racial Politics of AIDS

101. James H. Jones, "AIDS: Is It Genocide?" in Bad Blood (1981): 220-241.

102. Harlan L. Dalton, “AIDS in Blackface,” Daedalus 118 (Summer 1989): 205-227.

103. Stephen B. Thomas and Sandra Crouse Quinn, "The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community," American Journal of Public Health 81 (1991): 1498-1505.

104. Michael Berger, "Mbeki's Aids letter defies belief," Mail & Guardian (April 28 to May, 2000).

105. "Suspend all HIV testing … Mbeki expert panel recommends," New African (September 2000): 14-18.

106. Lynette Clemetson, "Links Between Prison and AIDS Affecting Blacks Inside and Out," New York Times (August 6, 2004).

107.  Linda Villarosa, "Patients With H.I.V. Seen as Separated By a Racial Divide," New York Times (August 7, 2004).

108. Sheryl Thorburn Bird and Laura M. Bogart, "Conspiracy Beliefs About HIV/AIDS and Birth Control Among African Americans: Implications for the Prevention of HIV, Other STIs, and Unintended Pregnancy," Journal of Social Issues 61 (2005): 109-126.

109. Kathleen Johnston Roberts et al., "HIV Vaccine Knowledge and Beliefs among Communities at Elevated Risk: Conspiracies, Questions and Confusion," Journal of the National Medical Association 97 (December 2005): 1662-1671.



May 6.

Racial Stereotyping in Psychiatry

110. E.M. Green, "Psychoses Among Negroes – a Comparative Study," Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 41 (1914): 697-708.

111. W.M. Bevis, “Psychological Traits of the Southern Negro With Observations as to Some of His Psychoses,” American Journal of Psychiatry (1921): 69-78.

112. Rutherford B. Stevens, “Racial Aspects of Emotional Problems of Negro Soldiers,” American Journal of Psychiatry 103 (1947): 493-498.

113. Harvey R. St. Clair, “Psychiatric Interview Experiences With Negroes,” American Journal of Psychiatry (1951): 113-119.

114. Melvin Sabshin et al., “Dimensions of Institutional Racism in Psychiatry,” American Journal of Psychiatry 127 (December 1970): 787-793.

115. James H. Carter, "Frequent Mistakes Made with Black Patients in Psychotherapy," Journal of the National Medical Association 71 (1979): 1007-1009.
























COURSE REQUIREMENTS

(1) Attendance and active participation: Class attendance is mandatory. You will be asked to sign in at the beginning of each class. Unsatisfactory attendance unsupported by medical documentation will preclude a student’s receiving a grade higher than C. Active participation means being involved in discussions and discussion groups, being curious and asking in the event you don’t understand something, questioning statements and findings if you disagree, and defending your own findings and opinions, according to your own capacity to perform in a group. It also means doing your homework regularly (being prepared for class).

 (2) Each of you will have to present ‘minutes’ of one previous session, in oral and written form. Minutes consist of a resume of the session’s content (incl. readings), how it relates to the overall topic of the course, and of the main results of the discussions. You will also add one or two examples from latest ‘news from Europe’ as presented in media such as the New York Times, Google-news or other media sources, and you will comment shortly on them. The oral presentation consists of a 5 min segment, on which you will prepare a written paper of 2 pages in length to hand in on the day of your presentation.

(3) You will be assigned two 4-page papers and a final paper of 8-10 pages. I will suggest topics and approve topics of your choosing. These papers are due on February 18, March 25, and April 27, respectively. The instructor reserves the right to assign additional short writing assignments, such as short “minutes” of a previous class meeting.

(4) Grading is based on attendance and participation (20%), Paper #1 (20%), Paper #2 (20%) and Paper #3 (40%).

 (5) For each class, please bring a hard copy of the respective course readings.

(6) I will be happy to discuss writing issues with you. The Writing Centre offers support and help for student writing and research: http://uwc.utexas.edu.




Additional Information / Rules of Conduct

CLASS AND CLASSROOMS:
Cell phones must be turned off in class; computers may be used only for note-taking. If a student uses electronic devices for non-class related activities and creates a disturbance s/he will be asked to leave for the remainder of that class.

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE
Academic Assistance is provided by the UT Learning Center, in Jester Center, Room A332A.  It offers help with college-level writing, reading, and learning strategies.  It is free to all currently enrolled students.  
See:  <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/assistive/policy.html>  for requesting help you need in using the main library (PCL) or the Fine Arts Library (for films).

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
The University of Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.   Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact the Service for Students with Disabilities as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.  These letters must be given to your TAs to receive accommodations.  See: <http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/index.php>.

SYLLABUS AND ASSIGNMENTS:
All requirements have been given to you in writing, in the package including this sheet.  If you don't read it and miss something, it's your problem.  NO LATE WORK ACCEPTED; the conditions for making up work for medical and other leaves are listed in the next section.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS AND OTHER ABSENCES
•    Students can make up work missed because of a religious holiday as long as they provide the instructor with documentation at least one week before the holiday occurs.  
•    The same applies to official university obligations like Club or Varsity sports.
•    Documentation from a physician is required for medical absence; arrangements for work to be made up must be made promptly, and in no case should the work be completed more than 2 weeks after the absence.  
•    Other absences (e.g. family events) must be arranged for at least TWO WEEKS IN ADVANCE and missed work must be turned in at the NEXT CLASS SESSION upon return.

CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM
Cheating and other forms of scholastic dishonesty, including plagiarism, will be reported to the Dean of Students. Cheating on tests or plagiarism on  papers is an F for the assignment, with no makeup possible.  If you engage in any form of scholastic dishonesty more than once, you will receive an automatic F for the course.
If you are unsure about the exact definition of scholastic dishonesty, you should consult the information about academic integrity produced by the Dean of Students Office: <http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php>.
Plagiarism means using words or ideas that are not your own without citing your sources and without indicating explicitly what you have taken from those sources. If you are unsure about what constitutes plagiarism, consult: <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/learningmodules/plagiarism/>
What does "citing your sources" mean?  It means providing appropriate footnotes and bibliographic entries.  See <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/learningmodules/citations/>.  To make correct citations, researchers often use bibliographic software like UT's "Noodlebib" <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/noodlebib/>  or Zotero  <http://www.zotero.com.  

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON PLAGIARISM:  
The Student Judicial Services Website provides official definitions of plagiarism and cheating:
•    Definitions of plagiarism and other forms of scholastic dishonesty, based on Section 11-802d of UT’s Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities:
    http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php
•    The University’s Standard of Academic Integrity and Student Honor Code (from Chapter 11 of the University’s Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities):
    http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php
•    Consequences of scholastic dishonesty: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_conseq.php
•    Types of scholastic dishonesty: unauthorized collaboration, plagiarism, and multiple submissions:  http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_whatis.php

EUS 347 • Socl Dramas Henrik Ibsen-W

36720 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A307A

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race/Medicine In Afr Amer Life

35790 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 310

Please check back for updates.

NOR 612 • Accelerated Second-Year Nor

34560 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM EPS 4.108

Course Description:

Third and fourth semester Norwegian in which the students read copiously from a variety of texts, solidify their knowledge of Norwegian grammar and discuss the readings in Norwegian. The reading materials present a broad cross-section of Norwegian culture both past and present. Writing in Norwegian is also stressed.

Texts:

Lie and Aarsvold,  Sett i gang 2 (textbook). Lie and Aarsvold,  Sett i gang 2 (workbook).

GER 382M • Germans & Jews In Cent Europe

33775 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM EPS 4.102A

Please check back for updates.

NOR 604 • Accelerated First-Year Nor

35170 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM EPS 4.102A

Description:

Norwegian 604 is the first of two semesters of the accelerated Norwegian sequence and emphasizes three main areas: 1) learning Norwegian vocabulary, structures and functions; 2) using the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening; and 3) exploring Norwegian and American cultures as well as culture in general.

 

Texts/Readings

Sett i gang, Aarsvold & Lie

 

Grading/Requirements

Skills Development (40%)

25%: Written Assignments
15%: Oral Assignments

Skills Assessment (47.5%)

20%: Oral Assessments (5% each)
15%: Test Chapters (5% each)
7.5%: Book I exam 5
5% Quizzes

Misc. (12.5%)

7.5%: Participation (active participation in and preparation for class)
5%:  Cultural Activities

NOR 612 • Accelerated Second-Year Nor

34020 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 203

Course Description:

Third and fourth semester Norwegian in which the students read copiously from a variety of texts, solidify their knowledge of Norwegian grammar and discuss the readings in Norwegian. The reading materials present a broad cross-section of Norwegian culture both past and present. Writing in Norwegian is also stressed.

Texts:

Lie and Aarsvold,  Sett i gang 2 (textbook). Lie and Aarsvold,  Sett i gang 2 (workbook).

NOR 604 • Accelerated First-Year Nor

34835 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 211A

Description:

Norwegian 604 is the first of two semesters of the accelerated Norwegian sequence and emphasizes three main areas: 1) learning Norwegian vocabulary, structures and functions; 2) using the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening; and 3) exploring Norwegian and American cultures as well as culture in general.

 

Texts/Readings

Sett i gang, Aarsvold & Lie

 

Grading/Requirements

Skills Development (40%)

25%: Written Assignments
15%: Oral Assignments

Skills Assessment (47.5%)

20%: Oral Assessments (5% each)
15%: Test Chapters (5% each)
7.5%: Book I exam 5
5% Quizzes

Misc. (12.5%)

7.5%: Participation (active participation in and preparation for class)
5%:  Cultural Activities

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