Joan Neuberger


ProfessorPh.D., 1985, Stanford University

Joan Neuberger

Contact

Interests


modern Russian culture in social and political context

Biography


Research interests

Professor Neuberger studies modern Russian culture in social and political context.

Courses taught

Her teaching interests include modern Russia, nineteenth-century Europe, gender, film, and visual culture.

Courses


HIS 381 • Public And Digital History

38915 • Spring 2016
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM GAR 4.100
(also listed as AMS 391)

This course introduces students to the main practices of public history.  We will be learning by doing (and, of course, reading). The goal is to complement students’ academic work and preparation for dissertation writing and to both encourage students to include public history in their professional profile as historians and to offer experience, skill-building, and credentials in a variety of forms of public history. We will meet with a variety of people doing public and digital history (museum curators, archivists, preservationists, public librarians, bloggers, website managers, documentary film makers, podcasters, digital technology specialists). Visits with specialists will be coordinated with hands-on activities, such as:

  • Writing historical background for paintings on historical subjects in the university art museum, to be posted alongside the paintings and available on a phone app developed by students in the UT Digital Humanities Lab.
  • Designing exhibits of various scales, based on research in the Austin History Center (an archive and small museum), the Briscoe Center for American History (a UT archive), the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum.
  • Doing research in online repositories of texts and images.
  • Running workshops at public libraries for interested members of the public to write their own histories
  • Doing oral histories; designing exhibits that showcase oral history, making podcasts
  • Designing public history websites
  • Using new mapping programs to show site-specific events and documents.
  • Making short documentary films.
  • Blogging about all of it on a course-specific blog.
  • Additional projects that derive from students’ interests

At this point, my plan is to organize each of these activities around one or two specific projects, one of which will be a website and exhibit about the UT Tower Shooting of August 1, 1966. We may choose to work on a different project, depending on student interest.

HIS 350L • Russian Empire In Russian Film

39905 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.132

In this course we will explore the nature of Russian and Soviet imperialism through studying Russian films about empire. The goals of the course include:

•    Learning to “read” films critically and creatively  

 •    Learning about the ways political ideology and social concepts are represented and disseminated in cultural forms

•    Learning about different perspectives on imperial rule    

•    Learning to write very brief, concise, articulate essays  

•    Enjoying the research and writing of an extended essay on ways imperialism is represented in filmTwo kinds of writing assignment are used in this class.

1. Very short weekly response papers based on the reading and screening.These are intended to help you think through at least one aspect of the week’s topic and be better prepared for discussion. Papers may be no longer than 250 words.

2. Research paper. Each student will write a 3000-3500 word research paper based on a topic related to the course. The final paper will be preceded by a schedule of preliminary writing exercises and much class discussion about topics, resources, research and writing tactics, and your results. Each of you will present a final oral report of no more than 5 minutes about your project.

 

Texts:

Readings include but are not restricted to

Burbank, VonHagen, and Remnev, Russian Empire: Space, People, Power, 1700-1930.

Suny, Martin, A State of Nations: Empire and NationBuilding in the Age of Lenin and Stalin

Harsha Ram, The Imperial Sublime

Bartlett, A HIstory of Russia

 

Grading:

Participation in Discussion: 25%

Very Short Weekly Assignments 25%

 

Research Paper 50%, of which:

            Topic and bibliography 5%

            Prospectus 5%

            Book Review 10%

            1000-word section 10%

            Final Paper 20%

Additional information on writing assignments will be distributed in class

T C 357 • Visual Cultures In Russn Hist

43140 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007B

Description:

This course will introduce students to Russian history through its visual culture. It will also introduce visual culture through Russian history.

By comparing a variety of visual and verbal sources, we will analyze the ways in which different kinds of sources shape our views of history and our views of the world around us. We will read widely in Russian visual culture and contemporary visual theory and each student will write a research paper on a topic of his or her own choice.

The goals of this course include:

  • Improving students’ ability to read visual documents analytically
  • Improving students’ ability to write coherent, persuasive essays
  • Gaining an appreciation for Russian history and culture
  • Thinking about the role of visual culture in history, politics, public ethics, and everyday life

Texts/Readings:

Valerie Kivelson and Joan Neuberger, eds Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture

Richard Howells and Joaquim Negreiros, Visual Culture

Roger Bartlett, A History of Russia

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History

Other chapters and articles posted on Blackboard as pdfs

 

Assignments:

Participation in discussion (10%)

Regular 1-page (300 word) essays on the reading (20%)

Research Project:

Prospectus (5%)

Source review (5%)

1000-word excerpt-draft (10%)

Peer-review (10%)

Oral presentation (10%)

15-page (4500 word) completed paper (30%)

 

About the Professor:

Professor Neuberger studies modern Russian culture in social and political context, with a focus on the politics of the  arts. She is the author of an eclectic range of publications, including Hooliganism: Crime and Culture in St Petersburg, 1900-1914 (California: 1993), Ivan the Terrible: The Film Companion (Palgrave: 2003); co-author of Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914 (Oxford: 2005); and co-editor of Imitations of Life: Melodrama in Russia (Duke: 2001) and Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture (Yale: 2008). Her teaching interests include modern Russia, nineteenth-century Europe, film, and visual culture.

 

HIS 383 • Visual Evidence In History

39710 • Spring 2012
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 1.134

The historiographical purpose of this course is to examine various ways of interpreting the visual-- things we see and the things we make to be seen – in order to develop strategies for using visual documents in historical (or other) research. The explosion of literature about the visual, visuality, visual culture, and visual studies makes it impossible to be comprehensive. So we will tackle a handful of case studies in the theory and practice of visual studies designed to help us think about how we read images, how we know what we know, how we use what we find, how our thinking about the past is shaped by visual evidence and experience.

            The practical purpose of this course is to study the structure and composition of scholarly articles to compose one of our own. Here the literature is almost infinite, so I have chosen readings that offer a variety of strategies, structures, origins, purposes, evidence, and narrative styles.

 

Course Requirements

            Reading: Weekly theoretical discussions and practical applications.

            Discussion: active participation in course discussions,

oral presentations on reading and writing

            Writing: Weekly short responses.

Periodic assignments leading to publishable article (20-25pp)

 

Required Reading to Purchase:

Martin Jay, Downcast Eyes

Lilya Kaganovsky, How the Soviet Man Was (Un)Made

Tamara Chaplin, Turning On the Mind: French Philosophers on Television

Gyan Prakash and Kevin M. Kruse, eds.,The Spaces of the Modern City: Imaginaries, Politics, and Everyday Life

Troben Grodal, Embodied Visions: Evolution, Emotion, Culture and Film

Robert Hariman and John Louis Lucaites, No Caption Needed: Iconic Photographs, Public Culture, and Liberal Democracy

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

39305 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.304
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural life in the modern Russian Empire, autocracy as a political system, national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society, political opposition and the revolutionary movement.

 

Readings (Required): available at bookstores 

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

 

Assignments & Grading

Map Exercise - 10% 

Short Essays/Participation: 10%  

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each = 40%

Take-home Final Exam 40%

 

Attendance in class is required. In case of absence it is your responsibility to find out about scheduling or other changes. Additional information on assignments will be distributed in class. No make-up exams will be allowed without written documentation for a family or medical emergency. Students who will miss class for religious holidays or other University sanctioned events should contact me in advance to make accommodations.

T C 357 • Visual Culs In Russian History

43485 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007B

This course will introduce students to Russian history through its visual culture.

We will explore the political uses of art and the contributions of art to politics in four case studies: medieval Orthodox icons, eighteenth-century palace architecture, modern realistic painting, and twentieth-century film and photography (see below for more detail). By comparing a variety of visual and verbal sources, we also will analyze the ways in which different kinds of sources shape our views of history and our views of the world around us. We will read widely in Russian visual culture and each student will write a research paper on a topic of their own choice.

 

The goals of this course include:

  • Improving students’ ability to read visual documents analytically
  • Improving students’ ability to write coherent, persuasive essays
  • Gaining an appreciation for Russian history and culture
  • Thinking about the role of visual culture in history, politics, public ethics, and everyday life

 

Requirements and Grading

Participation in discussion (10%)

Bi-weekly 1-page (300 word) essays on the reading (20%)

Research Project:

Prospectus (5%)

750-word excerpt-draft(15%)

Peer-review (10%)

Oral presentation (10%)

15-page (4500 word) completed paper (30%)

 

Reading Assignments:

W Bruce Lincoln, Between Heaven and Hell: 1000 Years of Russian Culture

Valerie Kivelson and Joan Neuberger, eds, Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture

Robin Cormack, Icons

George Munro, The Most Intentional City: St Petersburg in the Reign of Catherine the Great

The Memoirs of Princess Dashkova

David Jackson, The Wanderers and Critical Realism in Nineteenth-Century Russian Art

Peter Brooks, Realist Vision

Christina Kiaer, Imagine No Possessions: Socialist Objects of Russian Constructivism

Lilya Kaganovsky, How the Soviet Man was (Un)Made

Oksana Bulgakowa, Eisenstein: A Biography
plus

Excerpts from selected memoirs, plays, manifestos, state decrees on the following topics

 

CASE STUDIES

1. Icons, Frescos and Apocalypse, 1480s-1580s

In this segment of the course we will study the cooperation of church and state in promoting public and private codes of conduct. We will study the gradual centralization of state efforts to direct icon painting, and as a case study--the production and uses of Orthodox icons and frescos of the Last Judgment during the reign of Ivan the Terrible.

 

2. Catherine the Great and St Petersburg, 1770-80s

In this segment of the course we will study the Empress’s efforts to “westernize,” “civilize,” “enlighten” Russians though written and visual arts: her commission of plays and palaces, purchase of art, and building of museums.

We will read the memoirs of Catherine’s friend, the Princess Dashkova, and the play, Woe from a Carriage, to study the successes and limitations of the campaign. (Woe is a satire about two serf owners so obsessed with French culture that they break up a serf family -- selling them for the money to buy the latest French carriage)

 

3. Russian Realist Painting, 1870s-1880s

In this segment we will study the rise of a generation of artists who saw themselves as the “conscience of society” and sought to use “Realism” in paintings for social and political critique. We will also examine those artists who resisted being categorized as “political.”

We will read fiery political manifestos of the painters’ contemporaries and compare them with the works of the painters known as the Wanderers, including Ilya Repin and Izaak Levitan, whose works were both controversial and popular.

 

4. Soviet Socialist Realism in the Visual Arts,

In this segment of the course we will study the ways in which Soviet visual artists (primarily in photography and film) implemented the policy known as socialist realism.

 

Dr. Neuberger studies modern Russian culture in social and political context. Her teaching interests include modern Russia, nineteenth-century Europe, gender, film and visual culture. She is the author of "Hooliganism: Crime, Culture and Power in St. Petersburg, 1900-1914" (1993); and "Ivan the Terrible: The Film Companion" (2003). She co-authored "Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914" (2005); co-edited Imitations of "Life: Two Centuries of Melodrama in Russia" (2001) and produced the special-feature documentary, "The Politics and History of Ivan" for the Criterion Collection DVD, "Eisenstein: The Sound Years."

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

39950 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.110
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

HIS 350L • Rus & Sov Film: Uses Of Hist-W

39155 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.132
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 383 • Visual Evidence In History

39385 • Spring 2009
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 2.128

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

40215 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.110

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

HIS 383 • Modern Russian Culture

40470 • Spring 2008
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 2.124

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 362G • 19th-Century Europe

39795 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.132
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 383 • Visual Cul In European History

39960 • Spring 2007
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM BUR 436A

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

40500 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.134
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

HIS 350L • Rus & Sov Film: Uses Of Hist-W

40585 • Fall 2006
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM UTC 4.120

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • 19th-Century Europe

38970 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.132
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 383 • Visual Evidence In History

39135 • Spring 2006
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM MEZ 1.118

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

38565 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.124
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

HIS 350L • Art, Power, & Public Ethics-W

38595 • Fall 2005
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 2.124

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • 19th-Century Europe

37465 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.112
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

38205 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

REE 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

43980 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 112
(also listed as HIS 306N)

Description:

Why did communism collapse? Are we in another Cold War? Is Putin the next Stalin? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these and other key issues, topics, and events that are central to the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies.  It features frequent UT faculty guest speakers from across the university with diverse disciplinary specialities including History, Slavic languages and literature, Anthropology, Geography, Political Science, and Ethnomusicology. The course format consists of lectures, discussion, and frequent interactive, student-driven exercises and projects. This is a core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and it carries a global studies flag.  

 

Readings Include the Following:

  1. Barbara Engel and Clifford Rosenthal, Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar.

  2. Bob Weinberg and Laurie Bernstein, Revolutionary Russia: A History in Documents.

  3. Heda Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968.

  4. Thomas Blatt, From the Ashes of Sobibor.

  5. Aleksandar Zograf, Regards from Serbia: A Cartoonist’s Diary of the War in Serbia.

  6. Additional readings will be posted to canvas.

HIS 350L • Rus & Sov Film: Uses Of Hist-W

35835 • Spring 2004
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 301
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • 19th-Century Europe

35930 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.112
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

36550 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.122
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

REE 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

42565 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 112
(also listed as HIS 306N)

Description:

Why did communism collapse? Are we in another Cold War? Is Putin the next Stalin? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these and other key issues, topics, and events that are central to the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies.  It features frequent UT faculty guest speakers from across the university with diverse disciplinary specialities including History, Slavic languages and literature, Anthropology, Geography, Political Science, and Ethnomusicology. The course format consists of lectures, discussion, and frequent interactive, student-driven exercises and projects. This is a core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and it carries a global studies flag.  

 

Readings Include the Following:

  1. Barbara Engel and Clifford Rosenthal, Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar.

  2. Bob Weinberg and Laurie Bernstein, Revolutionary Russia: A History in Documents.

  3. Heda Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968.

  4. Thomas Blatt, From the Ashes of Sobibor.

  5. Aleksandar Zograf, Regards from Serbia: A Cartoonist’s Diary of the War in Serbia.

  6. Additional readings will be posted to canvas.

REE 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

42560 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 212
(also listed as HIS 306N)

Description:

Why did communism collapse? Are we in another Cold War? Is Putin the next Stalin? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these and other key issues, topics, and events that are central to the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies.  It features frequent UT faculty guest speakers from across the university with diverse disciplinary specialities including History, Slavic languages and literature, Anthropology, Geography, Political Science, and Ethnomusicology. The course format consists of lectures, discussion, and frequent interactive, student-driven exercises and projects. This is a core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and it carries a global studies flag.  

 

Readings Include the Following:

  1. Barbara Engel and Clifford Rosenthal, Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar.

  2. Bob Weinberg and Laurie Bernstein, Revolutionary Russia: A History in Documents.

  3. Heda Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968.

  4. Thomas Blatt, From the Ashes of Sobibor.

  5. Aleksandar Zograf, Regards from Serbia: A Cartoonist’s Diary of the War in Serbia.

  6. Additional readings will be posted to canvas.

HIS 383 • Rsch Smnr: Modern Russian Cul

35745 • Spring 2001
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM GAR 107

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 343L • History Of Russia To 1917

36280 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM ART 1.120
(also listed as REE 335)

In this course we will examine fundamental issues regarding political, social, cultural

life in the modern Russian Empire.

o        autocracy as a political system

o        national identity at the crossroads of Europe and Asia;

o        poverty & modern industry in a predominantly rural society

o        political opposition and the revolutionary movement

Texts:

Nicholas Riasanovsky & Mark Steinberg, A History of Russia

V. Kivelson and J. Neuberger, eds., Picturing Russia:Explorations in Visual Culture

Anna Labzina, Days of a Russian Noblewoman

B. Engel & C. Rosenthal, eds., Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar

Orlando Figes, A People's Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution

Additional required readings will be on-line on our Blackboard site on the "Course Documents" page

Grading:

Map Exercise - 10%

Short Essays/Participation: 10%

Two In-Class Exams, 20% each

Take-home Final Exam 40%

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