Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Gilbert Rappaport


Professor EmeritusPh.D., UCLA

Gilbert Rappaport

Contact

Courses


REE 325 • Hist Survey Russian Music

45521 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 228

Please check back for updates.

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45825 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 128

Course Content:

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals: 1) Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; and 2) acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. We will cover seven chapters from the second half of the textbook. This review survey will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the semester, most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Prerequisites: Russian 324 here at UT Austin or the equivalent. All students are responsible for the material of chapters 1-12 of the textbook and accompanying workbook, which were covered in this section of Russian 324 in the Fall semester.

Grading: The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Three in-class exams: 40%.
  • Vocabulary quizzes: 10%.
  • Homework assignments: 15%.
  • Class participation: 15%
  • Individual project: composition (in several stages) and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exam (scheduled individually at the end of the semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply. 

Texts:

  • Grammatika v kontekste: Russian Grammar in Literary Contexts. Benjamin  Rifkin, published by McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0070528314.
  • Advanced Russian: From Reading to Speaking, (?? ?????? ????) by Slava Paperno (with Sophia Lubensky and Irina Odintsova), published by Lexicon Bridge. ISBN: 1-58269-055-3.

Additional material will either be distributed in class or made available on-line.

 

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45590 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLM 5.124

Prerequisites: Two years (four semesters) of formal study or the equivalent: a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate?mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

RUS 330 • 20th-Cen Russian Culture

45606 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106
(also listed as C L 323, HMN 350, REE 325)

Course description:

This course is a survey of the political, social, and cultural history of the Russian people during the Soviet period, from the revolutionary events of 1917 until the dissolution of the Soviet government and political system in December 1991. We will set the stage with a sketch of Russia before the twentieth century and will conclude with post-Soviet and contemporary perspective. The three threads of political, social, and cultural history are viewed as different dimensions of same object of study. Moreover, we include cultural developments grounded in the Russian heritage even as if they developed outside the Soviet Union, in the Russian emigré societies of Europe and America. Cultural history focuses on music, art, poetry, theater, film, philosophy, ideology, popular culture, and even sports, with special attention to those developments best understood in their political and social context. Coursework will consist of lectures, reading and discussion in English.

And what lies ahead for the new Russia we now face? As Winston Churchill said, `I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.’

Readings:

Course packet to be made available.

Course requirements:

Four writing assignments                                    50%

In class examinations (3)                                   40%

Class participation                                              10%

REE 325 • Russia And Its World

44640 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304
(also listed as C L 323, RUS 330)

Course Description

This course will attempt the impossible: to explain why Americans are so fascinated by Russia . The answer may lie in the fact that this expansive maxi-country (or mini-world), separated from our own country at the Bering Strait by a mere 2.5 miles of shallow seawater, is both a mirror-image of America and its opposite. The feeling is mutual: Russia has gone from a colonial conquerer of its continent and indigenous people to being the Anti- (Bizarro?) America to unbridled commercial capitalism, all the time trying to relate itself to Europe in particular and history in general. Understanding this relationship could lead to better understanding ourselves.

Coursework will consist of lectures, reading, and discussion in English on the political and cultural history of Russia , from its prehistoric origins to the events of 1917 leading to communist rule.. Special emphasis will be on enduring themes of cultural identity, imagination, and conflict, both with neighboring peoples and within.

The backbone of the course is a sketch of the history of the Russian people, from their origins to today. From this structure we will make forays to sample the best of the cultural world at each period in time. Class presentations will highlight creative work especially in art, architecture, and music. Included will be tours of Russia 's capitals Moscow and St. Petersburg as fascinating preserves of historical and cultural values, alongside the delights of modern urban life.

Text 

Hosking, Geoffrey. Russia and the Russians: A history . Cambridge , MA : Harvard University Press, 2003. Paperback.

Additional readings will be made available in a course packet.

Requirements and Grading

Three in-class exams:         40%

Four writing assignments:    50%

Class participation:            10%

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45005 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.212

Prerequisites: Two years (four semesters) of formal study or the equivalent: a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate?mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

44980 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 303

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction, the natural successor to Russian 324 offered in the fall. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the course most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

T C 357 • Diaspora & Identity: Ethnicity

42960 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007B

Description:

Patterns of origin and dispersal have occurred continuously over the course of human history as people have spread throughout the world and spontaneously developed definitions of group identity in new and changing environments. Scholars are now engaged in innovative multidisciplinary approaches to the study of human diaspora, synthesizing the knowledge and methodologies of individual disciplines such as archaeology, cultural and physical anthropology, linguistics, geology, and genetics, aided by sophisticated computer simulations. In fact, diaspora and the reinvention of group identity in a new environment is the norm, not the exception, and it continues before our eyes.

The course begins by looking at the grand-daddy of diasporas, the spread of our species beginning 50-60,000 years ago, from its origin in Africa throughout the globe. The idea is to understand the mechanisms by which, in simpler times, ethnic and other group identities developed and were transmitted over time. In the second half we will `apply' these principles to their modern analogues in our more complex environment: immigration, life in diaspora, and the confrontation of indigeneous peoples with their conquerors. An important element of modernity is the creation of administrative states and the ideology of nationalism, designed to reinforce, suppress, or manipulate more spontaneous self-identities of social and ethnic identity. While we will read sociological, anthropological, even legal texts, the focus will be on artistic genres of literature and even film, marshaled to confront issues of origin and identity in diaspora as individuals and groups continue to negotiate who they are ... and aren't.

The class will be conducted in seminar format with an emphasis on synthesizing information from various sources, formulating a position, and presenting that position effectively in both written and oral form.

Texts/Readings:

Cavalli-Sforza, L. L. 2000. Genes, peoples, and languages. New York: North Point Press.

Olson, Steve. 2002. Mapping human history: Discovering the past through our genes. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Renfrew, C. 1990. Archaeology and language: The puzzle of Indo-European origins. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wells, Spencer. 2002. Journey of man: A genetic odyssey. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

 

Several films will be viewed, including ‘Do the Right Thing’ (1989) or ‘Jungle Fever’ (1991) by Spike Lee, ‘Mississippi Masala’ by Mira Nair, ‘El Norte’ (1983) by Gregory Nava, and ‘The Gods Must be Crazy’ (1981), by Jamie Uys.

 

Assignments:

Papers: 60%

Two shorter papers (~1000 words each)

Term paper (at least 3000 words, expanding on one of the shorter papers)

Oral presentations (summaries and interpretation of the readings): 25%

General active class participation: 15%

REE 325 • Historcl Survey Russian Music

44455 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304
(also listed as C L 323, HMN 350, MUS 376G, RUS 330)

Coursework will consist of lectures, reading and discussion in English on the political and cultural history of Russia during the Soviet  period from the events of 1917 until the dissolution of the state in December 1991.  Cultural history focuses on music, art, poetry, theater, film, philosophy, ideology, and maybe even sports.

Description: The course will sample (to varying degrees) the following four general areas of music associated with Russia over the course of its history:

  • Sacred (religious, ecclesiastical)  music was intimately bound up with the history and practice of Christianity in Russia, which was officially adopted from Byzantium in the tenth century. Special attention will be paid to the role of music in the religious rites practiced today (documented by the Moscow Patriarchate on its website!).
  • Traditional (folk) music in Russia is extremely rich and varies greatly over the wide terrain of the country. We will sample the variety of genres and structures used in various rites of passage (especially courtship/ weddings and laments), calendar rites, work songs, lyric songs, epics, and dances. Not to mention the famous Russian chastushka, which exercises wit, linguistic invention, and competitive skills.
  • Art (classical) music in Russian is widely considered to have begun with Glinka (1804-57), but its development in the 19th and 20th centuries includes many of the great names in the history of art music, such as Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich, along with other outstanding figures and movements.  We will focus on the most Russian of the Russian composer, Mussorgsky, then the mystical Skriabin, Stravinsky in his Russian period, and Prokofiev and Shostakovich in the Soviet period.
  • Finally, we briefly illustrate the role of popular music in both Czarist and Soviet times, including the popular `romances’ and the Soviet invention of the `mass song’.

While the course begins with a survey of the fundamental and indispensible notions of musical structure and genre, the focus of the course is the role of music in its social and historical context.

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

44805 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 310

Prerequisites: Two years (four semesters) of formal study or the equivalent: a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate?mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
    • Daily homework assignments: 20%
    • Class participation: 20%
    • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
    • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

REE 325 • 20th-Century Russian Culture

45185 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103
(also listed as C L 323, HMN 350, RUS 330)

This course is a survey of the political, social, and cultural history of the Russian people during the Soviet period, from the revolutionary events of 1917 until the dissolution of the Soviet government and political system in December 1991. We will set the stage with a sketch of Russia before the twentieth century and will conclude with post-Soviet and contemporary perspective. The three threads of political, social, and cultural history are viewed as different dimensions of same object of study. Moreover, we include cultural developments grounded in the Russian heritage even as if they developed outside the Soviet Union, in the Russian emigré societies of Europe and America. Cultural history focuses on music, art, poetry, theater, film, philosophy, ideology, popular culture, and even sports, with special attention to those developments best understood in their political and social context. Coursework will consist of lectures, reading and discussion in English.

And what lies ahead for the new Russia we now face? As Winston Churchill said, `I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.’


RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45540 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 210

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction, the natural successor to Russian 324 offered in the fall. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the course most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).


REE 385 • Medieval Slavic Manuscripts

44630 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 210
(also listed as RUS 390)

Course Description

Old Church Slavonic (OCS) is the first literary language in the Slavic world, defined by a set of religious texts translated by the Apostles to the Slavs (Cyril and Methodius) and their followers in the ninth through eleventh centuries, first in Moravia  (today’s Czech Republic), and then in Bulgaria.  This historical language served as the linguistic model for ecclesiastical texts in the Orthodox Slavic world and remains a source of stylistic richness in the corresponding languages today, exploited in everything from poetry to journalistic writing.

 

This course is anchored by the selective study of historical texts forming the OCS canon, but will range from there to include:

The historical and social context in which those original texts arose.

The spread of Church Slavonic literacy in the early Middle Ages and its adaption to local circumstances (including the Dalmatian tradition in Catholic Croatia!)

The medieval evolution of Old Church Slavonic into local ‘recensions’, with special emphasis on the Russian recension.

The use of Church Slavonic for religious purposes in the Russian Orthodox Church up to today, including:

            Inscriptions, which identify icons and other forms of religious art.

            Religious hymns and prayers

Texts:

 

A course packet will be made available, along with extensive texts and handouts distributed in class and on Blackboard.

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Take home examinations (3):                                    25%

Class preparation and participation                        25%

Course project:                                                            25%

            Class presentation                                    10%

            Paper                                                            15%

 

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and reading knowledge of Russian, or permission of the instructor.

 

 

 

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

44905 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 210

Course Number:            Russian 324 (unique number 44905)

Course Title:             Third-year Russian I

Class meetings:            Tuesday, Thursday 11-12.30 in Parlin 210

Instructor:      Prof. Gilbert Rappaport (grapp@mail.utexas.edu).

Prerequisites:                        Two years (four semesters) of formal study or the equivalent: a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or -mid on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:            Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary
            contexts.
McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-0-631-20757-3.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

REE 325 • Russia And Its World-W

45495 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45830 • Spring 2010
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 422

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Historcl Survey Russian Mus-W

45600 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.216

Please check back for updates.

REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

45670 • Fall 2009
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 210

This is the introductory seminar to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  It consists of a series of guest lectures by a   diverse cast of CREEES faculty in order to give the students as  broad an overview of the field as possible.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. 

Readings:  Distributed by visiting lecturers a week before each lecture

Grading:   Participation:             10%

              Oral presentation:       40%

               Final research paper:  50%

REE 325 • Modern Polish Hist And Cul-W

45652 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 310
(also listed as EUS 346)

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • 20th-Century Russian Culture-W

45570 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 310

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • Russian Verb: Form/Meaning/Use

45685 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Russia And Its World-W

45220 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45740 • Spring 2007
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 422

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Shostakovich: Life And Music-W

46390 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.124

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

46965 • Fall 2006
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 419

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

 

 

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

43552 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 422

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Poland Now-W

44010 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.120

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Russia And Its World-W

41430 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 306

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Poland Now-W

41739 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Polish Experience-W

42440 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 419

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • The Polish Experience-W

42310 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 304

Please check back for updates.

Undergraduate Courses


Fall 2011 RUS 330/REE 325/HMN 350/CL 323 "Historical Survey of RUssian Music"

Degree credit. This course:

  • Satisfies core curriculum requirements for an undergraduate degree with flags for Writing and for Global Cultures;
    • Satisfies the Fine Arts/General culture Area D requirement for a B.A., Plan I, as an Alternative course
    • Counts toward a major or minor in either Russian or in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
    • Can serve as an elective in any degree plan
    • Under certain conditions (consult the graduate advisor) it can count toward the M.A. degree in:
        - Slavic Languages and Cultures; or
        - Russian  East European, and Eurasian Studies

Prerequisites: Upper-Division or graduate standing.  Exceptions may be granted with permission of the instructor. No knowledge of Russian or of how to read/play music is required.

Content: The course will survey the following four general areas of music associated with Russia over the course of its history:

  • Art (classical) music in Russian is widely considered to have begun with Glinka (1804‑57), but its development in the 19th and 20th centuries includes many great names in the history of art music, such as Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich, along with other outstanding figures and movements.  We will focus on Glinka as the pioneer, then the most Russian of the Russian composers, Mussorgsky, followed by the mystical Skriabin, Stravinsky in his Russian period, and Prokofiev and Shostakovich in the Soviet period.
  • Sacred (religious, ecclesiastical) music was intimately bound up with the history and practice of Christianity in Russia, which was officially adopted from Byzantium in the tenth century. Special attention will be paid to the role of music in the religious rites practiced today (documented by the Moscow Patriarchate on its website!).
  • Traditional (folk) music in Russia is extremely rich and varies greatly over the wide terrain of the country. We will sample the variety of genres and structures used in various rites of passage (especially courtship/ weddings and laments), calendar rites, work songs, lyric songs, epics, and dances. Not to mention the famous Russian chastushka, which exercises wit, linguistic invention, and competitive skills.
  • We briefly illustrate the role of popular music in both Czarist and Soviet times, including the popular `romances’, the Soviet invention of the `mass song’, the `bards’ of the 60’s and 70’s, and, time-permitting, contemporary popular music.

While the course will survey of the fundamental and indispensible notions of musical structure and genre, the focus of the course is the role of music in its social and historical context. We will be particularly interested in questions of interpretation/reception  and the cultural function of music

Texts: There is no textbook for the course. There will be numerous handouts and postings on the course Blackboard site, including lecture notes, which should be kept in a loose-leaf binder. Course packets may be made available for purchase.

Fall 2011 RUS 324 "Third-Year Russian I"

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals.

  • Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • Acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, with a plethora of multi-media materials, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

The textbook has 25 chapters. We will cover chapters 1-12 in the fall semester, spending more time on some than on others. 

Graduate Courses


Fall 2010 RUS 390/REE 385 Medieval Slavic Manuscripts

Course Description

Old Church Slavonic (OCS) is the first literary language in the Slavic world, defined by a set of religious texts translated by the Apostles to the Slavs (Cyril and Methodius) and their followers in the ninth through eleventh centuries, first in Moravia  (today’s Czech Republic), and then in Bulgaria.  This historical language served as the linguistic model for ecclesiastical texts in the Orthodox Slavic world and remains a source of stylistic richness in the corresponding languages today, exploited in everything from poetry to journalistic writing.

This course is anchored by the selective study of historical texts forming the OCS canon, but will range from there to include:

The historical and social context in which those original texts arose.

The spread of Church Slavonic literacy in the early Middle Ages and its adaption to local circumstances (including the Dalmatian tradition in Catholic Croatia!)

The medieval evolution of Old Church Slavonic into local ‘recensions’, with special emphasis on the Russian recension.

The use of Church Slavonic for religious purposes in the Russian Orthodox Church up to today, including:

            Inscriptions, which identify icons and other forms of religious art.

            Religious hymns and prayers