Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Keith Livers


Associate ProfessorPh.D., University of Michigan

Keith Livers

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-9128
  • Office: BUR 468
  • Office Hours: Fall 2016: М: 1:00 – 5:00
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Courses


REE 325 • Contemporary Russian Cinema

44545 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 306

This course will use both contemporary Russian film as a means of exploring the confusion that resulted from the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the search for a new sense of identity in Russia throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. We will look at the work of Russia's best contemporary (and not quite so contemporary) directors, such as Pavel Lungin,  Aleksei Balabanov, Nikita Mikhalkov, Andrei Zviaginstev and Aleksandr Sokurov as an entry-point into the soul of contemporary Russia.

Requirements: Active in-class participation, three 6-page papers and one presentation (approx. 15 minute presentation) with a partner.

Required/recommended films: 

  • The Brother (1997), Aleksei Balabanov
  • Close to Eden (1993), Nikita Mikhalkov
  • Father and Son (2003), Aleksandr Sokurov
  • Four (2003), Ilya Krzhanovskii
  • House of Fools (2002), Andrei Konchalovsky
  • Luna Park (1991), Pavel Lungin
  • Mermaid (2007), Anna Melikyan
  • Nightwatch (2004), Timur Bekmabetov
  • Of Freaks and Men (1997), Aleksei Balabanov
  • Prisoner of the Mountains (1996), Sergei Bodrov
  • The Return (2003), Andrei Zviagintsev
  • Russian Ark (2002), Aleksandr Sokurov
  • Siberian Barber (1998), Nikita Mikhalkov
  • The Thief (1997), Pavel Chukhrai

Grading:

Participation   20%

3 essays (5-6 pages) 60%

1 presentation 20%

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

44865 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BUR 228

Prerequisites: RUS 611C or 412L. Or a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate?mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

  • Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.
  • Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.
  • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

43735 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 134
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345)

Description:

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky — Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the semester we will read a number of Dostoevsky’s greatest works, including Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.

 

Required Texts:

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Great Short Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky

 

Most classes will consist of both lecture and discussion.  Since part of the course grade is based on informed participation, it is imperative that you do ALL of the readings by the day in which they appear in the syllabus. 

 

?OURSE REQUIREMENTS:

  • Regular attendance/participation
  • 2. Completion of required readings by date indicated in          syllabus
  • Course work/Course Credit:
  • 3 essays (5-6 pages each): 70%   
  • Participation: 20%
  • Attendance: 10%

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

44025 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 228

Course Content:

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals: 1) Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; and 2) acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. We will cover seven chapters from the second half of the textbook. This review survey will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the semester, most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Prerequisites: Russian 324 here at UT Austin or the equivalent. All students are responsible for the material of chapters 1-12 of the textbook and accompanying workbook, which were covered in this section of Russian 324 in the Fall semester.

Grading: The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Three in-class exams: 40%.
  • Vocabulary quizzes: 10%.
  • Homework assignments: 15%.
  • Class participation: 15%
  • Individual project: composition (in several stages) and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exam (scheduled individually at the end of the semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply. 

Texts:

  • Grammatika v kontekste: Russian Grammar in Literary Contexts. Benjamin  Rifkin, published by McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0070528314.
  • Advanced Russian: From Reading to Speaking, (?? ?????? ????) by Slava Paperno (with Sophia Lubensky and Irina Odintsova), published by Lexicon Bridge. ISBN: 1-58269-055-3.

Additional material will either be distributed in class or made available on-line.

REE 302 • Russia After Communism

44175 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ B0.302

This course will look at the development of Russian culture since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Literature, film and cultural studies materials will be combined to present students with a broad perspective on the major developments and trends that have shaped Russian life since the end of communism. Topics ranging from post-communist transition, the Chechen conflict, globalization, the rise of Russian nationalism and others will be covered over the course of the semester.

 

TEXT:

Course pack (compiled by instructor)

Thirst (Andrei Gelasimov)

The Life of Insects (Viktor Pelevin)

Homo Zapiens (Viktor Pelevin)

Sin (Zakhar Prilepin)

The Day of the Oprichnik (Vladimir Sorokin)

The Living (Anna Starobinets)

 

LIST OF FILMS:

 

The Brother (Aleksei Balabanov)

The Brother 2 (Aleksei Balabanov)

Freaks and Men

Prisoner of the Mountains (Sergei Bodrov)

Night Watch/Day Watch (Sergei Luk’ienko)

Elena, Leviathan (Andrei Zviagintsev)

 

GRADING:

Participation                            20%                            

2 essays (5-6 pages)                60%

1 presentation                          20%

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

44460 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 114

Course Content:

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals: 1) Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; and 2) acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. We will cover seven chapters from the second half of the textbook. This review survey will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the semester, most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Prerequisites: Russian 324 here at UT Austin or the equivalent. All students are responsible for the material of chapters 1-12 of the textbook and accompanying workbook, which were covered in this section of Russian 324 in the Fall semester.

Grading: The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Three in-class exams: 40%.
  • Vocabulary quizzes: 10%.
  • Homework assignments: 15%.
  • Class participation: 15%
  • Individual project: composition (in several stages) and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exam (scheduled individually at the end of the semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply. 

Texts:

  • Grammatika v kontekste: Russian Grammar in Literary Contexts. Benjamin  Rifkin, published by McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0070528314.
  • Advanced Russian: From Reading to Speaking, (?? ?????? ????) by Slava Paperno (with Sophia Lubensky and Irina Odintsova), published by Lexicon Bridge. ISBN: 1-58269-055-3.

Additional material will either be distributed in class or made available on-line.

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45525 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 228

Prerequisites: RUS 611C or 412L. Or a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate?mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

  • Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.
  • Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.
  • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

REE 385 • History Of Russian Cinema

45575 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 127

This seminar is a survey of Russian Cinema from the 1910s to approximately 1980. The goal is to give students an overview of the historical, political and cultural contexts that produced some of the most important films of the 20th century. The course will emphasize the main genres, styles and directors of each period, beginning with the silent film era and ending with the with several films from the 1970s and 1980s. Particular attention will be paid to the political and cultural ideologies that inform the films in question. Class meetings will consist of lecture and discussion and viewing of relevant clips.

Readings:

Course pack containing all relevant materials

Grading requirements:

participation = 30%, in-class presentation = 10%, final research paper = 60%

Course prerequisite: Graduate standing.

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45830 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.124

Course Content: This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals:

  • Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • Acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, with a plethora of multi-media materials, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year, most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Prerequisites: Grade C or higher in Russian 324 here at UT Austin or the equivalent: two-and-a-half years (five semesters) of formal study or a demonstrated proficiency level of 1+ on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-high on the ACTFL scale).

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework (written, oral, and preparatory), and take all quizzes and exams.

Readings:   Course pack containing all relevant materials

Grading

The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • 4 in-class exams (??????????? ??????): 50%
  • Vocabulary quizzes (????????? ?????): 10%
  • Homework assignments (???????? ???????): 15%
    • Homework assignments should be submitted on the day they are due. No late assignments will be accepted. I will only grant extensions for family or medical emergencies, with my explicit advance permission.
    • In order to receive credit, you must submit each written assignment in its entirety on a separate full-size sheet of paper identified by the date for which it was assigned (e.g., ???????? ??????? ?? 15 ??????).
  • Reading project (?????????????? ??????): 5%
  • Class participation (?????? ?? ???????): 10%. Participation is based on attendance, active involvement in class activities, and preparedness (which includes familiarity with grammar explanations assigned for reading at home).
  • Oral proficiency exam (?????? ???????) at the end of the semester: 10%

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

45250 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLM 5.122
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, E 322, EUS 347, RUS 360)

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky — Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the semester we will read a number of Dostoevsky’s greatest works, including Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.

Required Texts:

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Great Short Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky

READINGS SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY DATE INDICATED BELOW

Most classes will consist of both lecture and discussion.  Since part of the course grade is based on informed participation, it is imperative that you do ALL of the readings by the day in which they appear in the syllabus. 

?OURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

            1. Regular attendance/participation

            2. Completion of required readings by date indicated in          syllabus

            3. Course work/Course Credit:

            3 essays (5-6 pages each): 70%   

            Participation: 20%

            4. Attendance: 10%

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45595 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM NOA 1.110

Prerequisites: Two years (four semesters) of formal study or the equivalent: a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate?mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

REE 385 • Russian Lit And The Devil

44880 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106

This course will examine Russian literature’s extensive reflection on the nature and place of evil in human existence. After looking at a few key texts from the medieval period, we will move on to the most important 19th and 20th century authors and texts that use the Devil as a point of departure in their exploration of the darker corners of the human spirit. Among these are Lermontov’s “Demon,” Gogol’s Petersburg Stories, Dostoevsky’s Demons, Sologub’s Petty Demon, Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita and others.

Readings :

Lermontov’s Demon

Gogol’s Petersburg Stories

Dostoevsky’s Demons

Sologub’s Petty Demon

Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita

Requirements and Grading

  1. Regular attendance and participation.
  2. Completion of required readings by date assigned (consult syllabus).
  3. Course Work/ Course Credit:

1 presentations (15-20 minutes); 20 page research paper.

Prerequisite

Graduate Standing

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45155 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.118

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction, the natural successor to Russian 324 offered in the fall. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the course most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

REE 325 • Consprcy Contemp Amer/Rus Cul

44630 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 301
(also listed as RUS 356)

There is no denying that conspiracy thinking has become an important—perhaps even unavoidable—part of the cultural landscape in the past decades. The spectrum of paranoia in contemporary (American) culture extends from fiction to film and television, and beyond. This course examines a rich and constantly growing body of conspiracist expression, from such historical texts as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion to the intricately woven fictional worlds of Phillip K. Dick, Don DeLillo, Thomas Pynchon and Viktor Pelevin. We will also be looking at such pop cultural explorations of the theme as Chris Carter’s The X-Files, Wachowski Brothers’ The Matrix, and Timur Bekmambetov’s Night/Day Watch. Theoretical works by Jodi Dean, Peter Knight, Daniel Pipes and others will be used to provide a theoretical frame for the primary materials.

Required Texts:

Dick, Phillip K. Ubik.

DeLillo, Don. Libra.

Pelevin, Viktor. Homo Zapiens

Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying of Lot 49.

Pelevin, Viktor. Homo Zapiens.

Pelevin, Viktor. Omon Ra.

Sorokin, Vladimir. The Ice Trilogy

Grading:

Three essays: 70%

Presentation: 20%

Participation: 10%            

REE 325 • Contemporary Russian Cinema

44665 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 284
(also listed as RUS 330)

This course will use both contemporary Russian film as a means of exploring the confusion that resulted from the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the search for a new sense of identity in Russia throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. We will look at the work of Russia's best contemporary (and not quite so contemporary) directors, such as Pavel Lungin,  Aleksei Balabanov, Nikita Mikhalkov, Andrei Zviaginstev and Aleksandr Sokurov as an entry-point into the soul of contemporary Russia.

Requirements: Active in-class participation, three 6-page papers and one presentation (approx. 15 minute presentation) with a partner.

Required/recommended films: 

The Brother (1997), Aleksei Balabanov

Close to Eden (1993), Nikita Mikhalkov

Father and Son (2003), Aleksandr Sokurov

Four (2003), Ilya Krzhanovskii

House of Fools (2002), Andrei Konchalovsky

Luna Park (1991), Pavel Lungin

Mermaid (2007), Anna Melikyan

Nightwatch (2004), Timur Bekmabetov

Of Freaks and Men (1997), Aleksei Balabanov

Prisoner of the Mountains (1996), Sergei Bodrov

The Return (2003), Andrei Zviagintsev

Russian Ark (2002), Aleksandr Sokurov

Siberian Barber (1998), Nikita Mikhalkov

The Thief (1997), Pavel Chukhrai

Grading:

Participation   20%

3 essays (5-6 pages) 60%

1 presentation 20%

REE 385 • History Of Russian Cinema

44715 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM CBA 4.338

Course Description

 This course is a survey of Russian Cinema from the 1920s to the present day. The goal is to give students an overview of the historical, political and cultural contexts that produced some of the most important films of the 20th century. The course will emphasize the main genres, styles and directors of each period, beginning with the revolutionary 1920s and ending with the most recent trends and developments in Russian film. Particular attention will be paid to the political and cultural ideologies that inform the films in question. Class meetings will consist of lecture and discussion and viewing of relevant clips. A separate screening of the films will precede each week’s discussion. 

 

Texts:

Beumers, Birgit. A History of Russian Cinema: Berg Publishers, 2009.

Course pack (available at the Dobie Mall).

FILMS:

Yakov Protozanov, Aelita (1924), Sergei Eisenstein, The Battleship Potemkin (1925), Dziga Vertov, Man With A Movie-Camera (1929), Aleksandr Dovzhenko, Earth (1930), Grigorii Aleksandrov, Circus (1936), Mikhail Kalatozov, Cranes Are Flying (1957), Andrei Tarkovsky, Ivan’s Childhood (1962), Aleksandr Askol’dov, Commissar (1967), Vladimir Menshov, Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears (1980), Vasilii Pichul’, Litte Vera (1988), Pavel Lungin, Taxi Blues (1992), Nikita Mikhalkov, Burnt By The Sun (1994), Aleksei Balabanov, The Brother (1997), Aleksandr Sokurov, Russian Ark (2003), Andrei Zviagintsev, The Return (2003).

 

Requirements and Grading

Active in-class participation, one presentation, one 15-20 page research paper.

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

44985 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 310

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction, the natural successor to Russian 324 offered in the fall. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the course most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

44467 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM PAR 301
(also listed as CTI 345, RUS 360)

Course Description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky—Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph.  Over the course we will immerse ourselves in three of Dostoevsky’s most important works—Notes From the Underground, Crime and Punishment, and finally The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends, as well as the political realities relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.  In addition, we will view several film adaptations of these works.  Classes will consist of lecture and discussion. All readings are in English.

Texts:

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground, tr. Michael Katz (Norton Critical Edition)

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volkhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volkhonsky

Course pack (available at Speedway in Dobie Mall

Requirements and Grading

Two short essays (3 pages)                        30%

Long Essay (10 pages)                              40%

In-Class Presentation                                10%

Quizzes/Informed Participation/In

Class Discussion                                       20%

NOTE:  Course essays are an opportunity for you to explore in greater depth the issues raised in lectures and class discussions.  They DO NOT require you to do extensive outside/secondary research.  First and foremost, they should be based on an informed and creative reading of the texts in question.  If you are interested in finding out more about Dostovsky on the internet, I suggest that you go to the following site:  http://222.kiosek.com/dostoevsky/links.html.

Prerequisites

Upper Division Standing.

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

44807 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.204

Course Content: This is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. Our goal in the course is do develop a working proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The textbook provides the student with a systematic review of Russian grammar and will be used as the basic skeleton of the course. It will be supplemented using authentic materials taken from the contemporary Russian media. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after taking Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

• Unit exams: 40%

• Daily homework assignments: 20%

• Class participation: 20%

• Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%

• Oral proficiency exams (end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

REE 325 • Contemporary Russian Cinema

45165 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 206
(also listed as RUS 330)

This course will use both contemporary Russian film as a means of exploring the confusion that resulted from the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the search for a new sense of identity in Russia throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. We will look at the work of Russia's best contemporary (and not quite so contemporary) directors, such as Pavel Lungin,  Aleksei Balabanov, Nikita Mikhalkov, Andrei Zviaginstev and Aleksandr Sokurov as an entry-point into the soul of contemporary Russia.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45535 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.210

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

44525 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as CTI 345, RUS 360)

Course Description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky—Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the session we will read three of Dostoevsky’s most important works—Notes From the Underground, Crime and Punishment and finally The Brothers Karamazov. Contemporary intellectual and social trends, as well as the political realities relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker will be included as the necessary background for understanding Dostoevsky’s career. In addition, we will view several film adaptations of these works. Classes will consist of lecture and discussion.

Texts:

Notes From Underground, ed. & tr. Michael Katz

Crime and Punishment, tr. Larissa Volkhonsky & Richard Pevear 

Demons, tr. Larissa Volkhonsky & Richard Pevear 

The Brothers Karamozov, tr. Larissa Volkhonsky & Richard Pevear 

Requirements and Grading

5-7 page essay         20%

Rewrite                   15%

5-7 page essay         20%

Mid term                  10%

Final                           10%

Weekly critiques         15%

Attendance                  5%

Prerequisites

Upper division standing or consent of the instructor.

 

REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

44610 • Fall 2010
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 210

Course Description

This course, required for the M.A. in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, is a team-taught seminar designed to prepare graduate students for advanced interdisciplinary study and research in the field. The seminar provides a topical overview of disciplinary studies of the region and of faculty and research resources at the University. Various invited faculty members associated with the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies will rotate through over the course of the semester in conducting seminars on their areas of research and expertise.

Text

A course packet of readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.

Course Requirements

Each weekly seminar will be structured as follows. The invited faculty member will use the first half of the session to lecture on the assigned topic, followed by questions and discussion based on both the lecture itself and assigned readings on the topic. It is imperative that participants attend all sessions and carefully prepare any pre-seminar assignments. The course also requires that the student design a research project, which will require a prospectus, annotated bibliography, oral presentation, and final paper of at least 3000 words.

Grading

50% of the course grade will be based on active class participation during the seminar meetings and 50% will be based on the research project, distributed over the prospectus, bibliography, oral presentation, and paper.

Prerequisite:

Graduate Standing

 

 

RUS F324 • Third-Year Russian I

87805 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CAL 422

ADVANCED RUSSIAN I

Class time:

M-F: 8:30 – 10:00, CALHOUN 422.

Office hours: M,W, 1:00 – 2:00.

 

Required texts:

1. S.Rosengrant, E.Lifschitz, Focus on Russian, John Wiley&Sons, 2nd edition, 1996;

 

Course description: The purpose of this course is to increase students’ vocabulary and to review those grammatical points that are most troublesome for the students at this level. Special attention will be given to the development of writing skills by writing compositions on assigned topics. Supplemental readings will facilitate the development of reading proficiency.

 

Class time will be devoted primarily to exercises, oral and writing practice, listening comprehension practice, and discussions of readings.

 

Grade Breakdown:

Exams: - Tests/exams 70%

Participation, classwork, home work: grammar exercises, reading assignments -30%

Total: 100%

 Schedule

 

?????????? ??????? ?? ????? 1: «?? ?? ????, ???? ????».

 

??????????? ????: ???????, ???????????? ????

?????????????? ????: ??????????? ????? ?????????????? ?????, verbs of putting/placing.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 3 ????

Intros. Reading Handout.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 4 ????

????? 1, ???. 1-18. Vocab., vocab notes, grammar.

?????????? 3,4.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????????, 7 ????.

????? 1, ??????? ??? ??????? ?? ???????? 4, ??? 7-8.

???? ?? ????????.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 8 ????.

????? 1, ???. 9-10, ?????? (???. 21), ????????? ?? ??????? (???. 21).

 

???????? ??????? ?? c????, 9 ????

????? 1, C???????? (???. 22), ???. 2 (???. 23).

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 10 ????

?????????? ? ???????????.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 11 ????.

??????????? ?? ?????? ?????.

 

            ?????????? ??????? ?? ????? 2: «? ?????? ??????, ? ???? ?????»

 

??????????? ????: ????? ? ??????

?????????????? ????: ?????????????? (??????? ?????) (adjectives, short form), ??????? (adverbs), ???????????????-??????????? (nouns as modifiers), ????????? (measurement)

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????????, 14 ????.

????? 2, Vocab. and vocab. notes, grammar, ???. 27-40, ???. 2-3.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 15 ????

????? 2, ???. 40-43, ???. 4, 6.

???? (??????)

 

???????? ??????? ?? c????, 16 ????

????? 2, ???. 43-47, ???. 7-8. ?????? (???. 47).

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 17 ????

????? 2, ?????????: ??? ???????? (??? ??? ???). ??????? ???? ????????. ??????????, ??? ??? ?????????. ????? ?????? ?? ?? ???????, ????? ??????? ?? ????? ???????????????? ???. 3 (???. 50).

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 18 ????

????????????? ? ??????????? ??????

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????????, 21 ????

??????????? ?????? ?? ?????? ?????

 

            ?????????? ??????? ?? ????? 3: «?? ????? ?????? ????????, ? ??????? — ?????».

 

??????????? ????: ????????? ? ??????

?????????????? ????: ???????????

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 22 ????

????? 3, Vocab. and vocab. notes, grammar, ???. 52-62, ???. 3,5.

 

???????? ??????? ?? c????, 23 ????

????? 3, c??. 63-65, ???. 7-9.

???? (?????????)

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 24 ????.

????? 3, c??. 66-71, ???. 11-13.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 25 ????.

????? 3, ???. 72-74, ???. 14-15.

 

???????? ????? ?? ???????????,  28 ????.

????? 3, ???. 79, ??????? ???????? ??????? ?????????.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 29 ????.

??????????? ?? ??????? ?????.

 

            ?????????? ??????? ?? ????? 4: «?? ?????? ?????????, ?? ??? ?????????».

 

??????????? ????: ????????

?????????????? ????: ????????????? ? ???????????? ??????? ??????????????, «????», ????? ? ???».

 

???????? ??????? ?? ?????, 30 ????.

????? 4, ???. 82-90, ???. 1-3, 5.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 1 ????.

VOCAB QUIZ (personality/????????)

????? 4, ???. 93-95, ???. 6. ???. 96-98, ???. 7-8.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 2 ????.

????? 4, ???. 9 ? ?????? (???. 101).

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????????, 5 ????.

??????????? ?? ????????? ?????.

 

???????? ??????? ?? ???????, 7 ????.

TBA

 

???????? ??????? ?? c????, 8 ????.

???

 

Prerequisite

RUS 612, 412L (or 312L), or appropriate score on  Russian Placement Examination

 

REE 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

45585 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 1

Description:

Why did communism collapse? Are we in another Cold War? Is Putin the next Stalin? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these and other key issues, topics, and events that are central to the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies.  It features frequent UT faculty guest speakers from across the university with diverse disciplinary specialities including History, Slavic languages and literature, Anthropology, Geography, Political Science, and Ethnomusicology. The course format consists of lectures, discussion, and frequent interactive, student-driven exercises and projects. This is a core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and it carries a global studies flag.  

 

Readings Include the Following:

  1. Barbara Engel and Clifford Rosenthal, Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar.

  2. Bob Weinberg and Laurie Bernstein, Revolutionary Russia: A History in Documents.

  3. Heda Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968.

  4. Thomas Blatt, From the Ashes of Sobibor.

  5. Aleksandar Zograf, Regards from Serbia: A Cartoonist’s Diary of the War in Serbia.

  6. Additional readings will be posted to canvas.

REE 385 • Russian Lit And The Devil

45690 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 422

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Contemporary Russian Cinema

44700 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM JES A203A

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • Political Russian

44817 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 422

Please check back for updates.

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45086 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 303

Course Content:

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals: 1) Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; and 2) acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. We will cover seven chapters from the second half of the textbook. This review survey will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the semester, most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Prerequisites: Russian 324 here at UT Austin or the equivalent. All students are responsible for the material of chapters 1-12 of the textbook and accompanying workbook, which were covered in this section of Russian 324 in the Fall semester.

Grading: The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Three in-class exams: 40%.
  • Vocabulary quizzes: 10%.
  • Homework assignments: 15%.
  • Class participation: 15%
  • Individual project: composition (in several stages) and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exam (scheduled individually at the end of the semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply. 

Texts:

  • Grammatika v kontekste: Russian Grammar in Literary Contexts. Benjamin  Rifkin, published by McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0070528314.
  • Advanced Russian: From Reading to Speaking, (?? ?????? ????) by Slava Paperno (with Sophia Lubensky and Irina Odintsova), published by Lexicon Bridge. ISBN: 1-58269-055-3.

Additional material will either be distributed in class or made available on-line.

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

45650 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SZB 380

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • 20th-Cen Russian Literature

45770 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 422

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Russian 20th-C Masterpieces-W

45560 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 203

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45930 • Spring 2008
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A205A

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

46585 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SZB 380

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

47140 • Fall 2007
Meets MTWTH 9:00AM-10:00AM CAL 422

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

 

 

REE 325 • Russian Lit/Film After 1990-W

45225 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 203

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • Russian Postmodernism

45325 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A205A

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

46375 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SZB 380

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

46960 • Fall 2006
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 419

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

 

 

REE 325 • Russian Cinema-W

44460 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM JES A215A

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45020 • Spring 2006
Meets MTWTH 9:00AM-10:00AM CAL 419

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Russian 20th-C Masterpieces-W

44540 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 203

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

45065 • Fall 2005
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 221

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

 

 

REE 325 • Contemporary Russian Cinema-W

43015 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 7

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

43555 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 308

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

44000 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 306

Please check back for updates.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

44545 • Fall 2004
Meets MTWTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 419

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

 

 

REE 325 • Russian 20th-C Masterpieces-W

41435 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 3.124

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • Russian Postmodernism

41530 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 21

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

42585 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PHR 2.114

Please check back for updates.

REE 385 • Russian Prose Of The 20s & 30s

42730 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 323

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Contemporary Russian Cinema-W

41733 • Spring 2003
Meets MF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

42580 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 201

Please check back for updates.

REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

42650 • Fall 2001
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 214

This is the introductory seminar to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  It consists of a series of guest lectures by a   diverse cast of CREEES faculty in order to give the students as  broad an overview of the field as possible.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. 

Readings:  Distributed by visiting lecturers a week before each lecture

Grading:   Participation:             10%

              Oral presentation:       40%

               Final research paper:  50%

REE 325 • Natlsm/Natl Ident Rus Cinema-W

41240 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 4:00PM-5:00PM CAL 323

Please check back for updates.

CZ 506 • First-Year Czech I

42475 • Fall 2000
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM WEL 3.402

Description:

The course is an introduction to Czech language and culture. Students will learn the fundamentals of Czech grammar and a wide range of everyday vocabulary with an emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Videos, music, film, and literature will be used in class to practice language skills, as well as expose students to Czech culture.

 

Textbook and Materials will be distributed through the course website.

 

Grading:

Attendance/Participation                                            10%

Homework                                                                  15%

Weekly vocabulary/grammar quizzes                         15%

Tests (4 tests, 10% each)                                           40%

Final                                                                            20%

 

Total                                                                           100%

REE 325 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky-W

42290 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 210

Please check back for updates.

Undergraduate Courses


Fall 2010 REE 325/RUS 360 "The Major Works of Dostoevsky"

Course Description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky—Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the session we will read three of Dostoevsky’s most important works—Notes From the Underground, Crime and Punishment and finally The Brothers Karamazov. Contemporary intellectual and social trends, as well as the political realities relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker will be included as the necessary background for understanding Dostoevsky’s career. In addition, we will view several film adaptations of these works. Classes will consist of lecture and discussion.

Fall 2011 RUS 360/REE 325 "The Major Works of Dostoevsky"

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky — Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the semester we will read a number of Dostoevsky’s greatest works, including Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.

Fall 2011 RUS 324 "Third-Year Russian I"

Course Content: This is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. Our goal in the course is do develop a working proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The textbook provides the student with a systematic review of Russian grammar and will be used as the basic skeleton of the course. It will be supplemented using authentic materials taken from the contemporary Russian media. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after taking Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

• Unit exams: 40%

• Daily homework assignments: 20%

• Class participation: 20%

• Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%

• Oral proficiency exams (end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.