Department of Sociology

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45305-45330 • Green, Penny
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.306
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Description:  

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology? (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size.  We’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

 Required Readings: 

Introduction to Sociology (2014, 9th ed., Seagull) by Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, and Carr. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  Students are allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

Exams (3-4)           70%               

Pop Quizzes:          15%               

Paper (2-3 pages)  15%                                                       


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45215-45240 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM JGB 2.324
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Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% 

Three exams 60%

Class project and participation 8%

Quiz 8%

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45275-45300 • Pudrovska, Tetyana
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM ART 1.102
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Description:

Sociology is the scientific study of human societies, human behavior, and social life. This course will introduce you to the major topics that sociologists study, including culture, socialization, social interaction, stratification, gender, family, medical sociology, crime, deviance, and social institutions. An introduction to the theoretical perspectives and research methods of sociology will enhance your critical reasoning about these social issues. Most importantly, this course intends to develop your sociological imagination, which is the ability to understand how private lives are linked to and influenced by larger social processes.

Readings:

Giddens, Anthony, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum and Deborah Carr. 2014. Introduction to Sociology, 9th ed. New York: Norton.

Grading:

Exam 1                                                30%

Exam 2                                                35%

Exam 3                                                20%

Attendance and participation             15%

Extra credit                                          up to 2%


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45185-45210 • Regnerus, Mark
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM WCH 1.120
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Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45245-45270 • Brayne, Sarah
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 2.102A
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Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to the sociological study of society. Sociology is the systematic study of social interaction, social organizations, and social institutions. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including but not limited to inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, gender, family, punishment and social control, sexuality, and education. We will cover different methods sociologists use to understand the relationship between individuals and society. The course is focused on the U.S. context, but global forces will be considered as well. Class format is primarily lecture-based, but students will participate in weekly discussion groups as well. The overall goal of this class is to equip students with the analytic tools to understand structural factors that shape social life. 

Required Readings:

All readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard.

Attendance Policy:

Students are allowed three (3) absences during the semester. These absences are intended to cover unexpected events such as illnesses or family emergencies. If students miss more than three classes, their semester grades will be reduced by one percentage point for each absence beyond the three allowed. The two exceptions to this policy are religious holy days and military service, both of which require advance written notice. For details, please refer to UT-Austin Academic Policies and Procedures: http://catalog.utexas.edu/general-information/academic-policies-and-procedures/attendance/

Grading Policy:

Midterm Exam: 20%

Final Exam: 30%

Research Essay: 30%

Pop Quizzes: 10%

Class Participation/Discussion Groups: 10%

 


SOC 307G • Culture And Society In The US

45345 • Buggs, Shantel
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 108
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Description

This course explores the meanings of culture in contemporary U.S. society, with a focus on cultural representation and cultural (re)production. Course readings and lectures will introduce students to theoretical perspectives on cultural production and representation, emphasizing how culture shapes our experiences and understandings of social phenomena such as class, race, sexuality, and gender. The class will be particularly concerned with the role cultural representation plays in the reproduction of inequality, and therefore will ask students to turn a critical lens toward the cultural practices and representations around them.

Readings

Students should anticipate weekly assigned readings.

Grading

Writing assignments and exams.


SOC 307K • Fertility And Reproduction

45350 • Glass, Jennifer
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description:

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

Texts:  Available at Coop

Liza Mundy, Everything Conceivable, NY: Anchor Books, 2007

Michelle Goldberg, Means of Reproduction , NY: Penguin Bookds, 2010

Grading and Rrequirements:

Two opinion essays: 30%

Midterm exam:       40%

Final exam:             20%

Class participation: 10%

 


SOC 308D • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

45360 • Garcia, Patricia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 101
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The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest U.S., such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the U.S., including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

 


SOC 308D • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

45355 • Alarcon, Wanda
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GDC 4.302
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The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest U.S., such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the U.S., including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

 


SOC 308L • Socl Trnsfmtn Love/Rltnshps

45365 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as MES 310)
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“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%


SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

45375 • Palmo, Nina
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as H S 301)
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principle objective of H S 301/SOC 308S is to offer students a broad overview of health and society from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will examine how social forces influence health and disease in U.S. society, including cultural, economic, and demographic considerations. We will explore why rates of disease vary among different populations and how cultural and structural inequalities shape access to healthcare and affect morbidity and mortality. How do economic factors, politics, public perceptions of morality, and historical biases against specific populations shape our modern-day understandings and experiences of health and illness? We will also examine how social forces shape the very definitions of health, illness, and disease categories, and thereby medical diagnoses and treatments. We will consider the social consequences of the commodification of healthcare and how new technologies are transforming our current healthcare system and the nature of the patient/physicianrelationship. Our course readings and discussions will help us address current bioethical controversies that continue to influence our beliefs about health and illness and shape our very understandings about human rights and personhood. This course is built around lectures (including guest lectures), class discussion, and film screenings and discussion.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze contemporary health issues from a variety of disciplinary and professional perspectives.

• Explain how social location, the media, and economic forces shape health behaviors and outcomes.

• Explain how social and cultural factors shape contemporary understandings and experiences of health and illness and death and dying in the U.S.

• Critically evaluate the assumptions, motives, and evidence that individuals and groups use to make specific claims about health and illness.

COURSE MATERIALS

Gawande, Atul. 2014. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. New York:Metropolitan.

Marmot, Michael. 2005. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity. New York: Holt.

Course readings also include scholarly articles, book chapters, and other required readings available on Canvas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

This course is organized in a lecture format, but it is greatly enhanced by your participation. For variety’s sake, I will often incorporate short video-clips, group activities, and/or writing exercises in our class session. We will also spend considerable time each week discussing the readings and our own experiences, interests, and knowledge in this area. Please remember that discussions will only be as rich as you all make them, so it is essential that everyone come prepared to speak about the readings thoughtfully and critically. Your final evaluation for the course will be broken down as follows:

Attendance and Preparedness (10%)

Students are expected to attend class, read assignments before each class, and actively participate in classroom discussions during the week. Eight times during the semester the instructor will have students sign in on a class roster or complete a group assignment in the first few minutes of class. Students will be granted one unexcused absence with no penalty. If you have a university-related conflict or medical or family emergency that prevents you from attending class, alert your TA (providing relevant documentation) and you will not be penalized for a particular absence, but you must contact your TA in advance of missing class. NOTE: Tardiness will adversely affect your grade; students who arrive late risk missing this activity or sign-in sheet and will not be allowed to receive credit for the day.

Reading responses (10%)

Students are expected to keep up with the reading for the class. Six times during the course of the semester, I will pose a reading question on the course Canvas page relevant to recent reading. The questions will be posted on Sunday evening and students are expected to write a reading response of one page, double-spaced (between 250 and 350 words) and upload a copy to the Canvas page by 5pm on the Thursday that they are due. Responses will be graded as meets/exceeds expectations (100), meets minimum expectations (70), no credit (0). See course schedule for Reading Responses (marked RR).

Exams (60%)

Two exams (worth 30% each) will be given to assess your level of mastery of the course material, including assigned readings, lectures (including guest lectures), and in-class films and other media presentations. . Both exams will be a combination of multiple choice, true-false, fill-in-theblank, short answer, or short essay items.

Essay (20%)

Students are required to write one of two essay assignments offered during the term. The paper will be approximately 5 pages in length (not to exceed 6 double-spaced pages), and will answer a specific prompt related to course topics. Specific assignments will be posted to Canvas on the dates indicated below. Papers are due in class; electronic submissions of papers will NOT be  accepted. Due dates are firm. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late, but papers will not be accepted if they are more than five days late. Late papers cannot be emailed or posted to Canvas, so it a student’s responsibility to submit a hard copy of his/her paper to the appropriate TA.

 


SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45385 • Coffey, Diane
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.118
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Description:

The news is full of statistical claims: just this morning, I read that the brains of people with opioid addictions are less likely to respond to pictures of cute babies than the brains of people who are not addicted to opioids; that 50% more people in India become infected with tuberculosis each year than the World Health Organization previously thought; and that Hillary Clinton has an 89% chance of winning the election. 

Where do the numbers come from?  What can they really tell us about the world?  These are the sorts of questions we will ask in Introduction to Social Statistics.  Answering them is going to involve doing some math.  And while understanding the math behind the statistical concepts we will study is very important, it is even more important that you leave the course with a conceptual understanding of the most commonly used statistical methods. 

Why is important to understand statistics?  Here are a few reasons:

  • The increasing availability of all kinds of data gives us an unprecedented ability to understand how humans behave.  Using numbers to describe the world can help us figure out what is true and important.
  • Statistics are often used to make false or misleading claims: it is important to be able to identify these and explain what the numbers can tell us, and what they cannot.
    • Statistical and analytic skills are marketable: in the government, non-profit, and private sectors, a solid foundation of quantitative and computing skills are often important assets.

Required texts:

McCabe & Moore.  Introduction to the Practice of Statistics, McCabe & Moore, 5th Edition.  We will cover (approximately) Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

Text available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Practice-Statistics-David-Moore/dp/0716764008/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1478098832&sr=8-1&keywords=Introduction+to+the+practice+of+statistics+5th+edition

Students will also need to use Microsoft Excel to prepare projects and assignments. 

I will also use Canvas to post homework, data, and additional readings.

Grading Policy:

TBD.

 

 

 

 

 


SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45380 • Powers, Daniel
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.124
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Required Text:

R. Johnson and P. Kuby (2012) STAT, 2e. Cengage Learning ISBN-10: 0538733500  ISBN-13: 978-0-538-73841-5  (available from http://books.google.com)

Course Requirement:

Exams: There will be 3 in-class examinations graded on a 100 point scale.  Roughly 75% to 90% of the points on the examinations are accounted for by problems requiring the student to work toward a solution, with the remainder accounted for by true and false or multiple choice questions.  Examinations will be based entirely on topics covered in lectures. In-class examinations are non-cumulative; they cover only the material since the previous exam. Students must take all exams to pass the course. Make up exams will be given only in the case of documented emergencies or illness.

Problems: There will be 5 problem sets worth a total of 200 points. Problem sets include material from the book as well as handout problems. Problem sets must be received in class no later than the dates indicated. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

In-Class Assessments: There will be approximately 20 in-class exercises carried out at various points during the course to assess understanding of current topics. These will count 100 points towards the total grade.

 


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45410 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 1.402
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Course Description

This course will center on the topic of research methods and data analysis associated with gender and human sexual behavior for the purposes of prediction, explanation and decision-making. Students will be exposed to the process of quantitative and qualitative research including development of research questions, variables for investigation, conducting a content analysis, development of a database, and using basic statistics to answer hypotheses. 


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45400 • Raley, Kelly
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.118
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Description:

The purpose of this course is to teach basic research skills. You can use these skills in a wide variety of settings (not just the ivory towers of academia).  Specifically, students will learn 1) basic research approaches, 2) how to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and 3) how to apply these methods to a research problem.

To achieve these goals, this course takes a "hands on" approach.  This means that often class time will involve your active participation. It is essential that you come to class and labs having read the assigned material.

Grading:

Three exams:  the first one is worth 10% and the second and third are 15% each

Be sure to mark your calendar!  No make-up exams except in extreme circumstances.  Make ups may be 100% essay.

Analysis paper (20%)

Review Paper (20%) 

 Assignments (20% of your grade)-- There will be approximately 7. You may

drop one. All assignments should be word processed unless instructed otherwise.

Note: All late assignments will receive a grade of 0. If for any reason you are unable to complete one assignment on time you may drop this assignment grade. 

Note Also: Class attendance is required.  Excessive absences will result in a lower grade.

Grades are calculated as a weighted average of grades on assignments, papers, and exams. A=93-100; A-90-92; B+=87-89; B=83-86; B-=80-82; C+=77-79; C=73-76; C-70-72; D+=67-69; D=63-66; D-=60-62; F < 60.

Lab -- Most weeks the lab will meet and often an assignment grade will be related to work conducted during the lab. For some lab assignments you may work as a group, but you should assume that collaboration is not allowed unless you are told specifically that the work is a group effort. Usually, if you miss a lab you can get the assignment from the T.A., another student, or off of the course website. However, if you miss the lab you may not collaborate with anyone. NOTE: The exams occur during lab hours.

Analysis paper -- The purpose of this paper is to teach you how to analyze data, present results, and form a conclusion.  You will use the computer to analyze data from a secondary source (i.e. the General Social Survey). You will present your analyses in tables and/or graphs and discuss your findings.  Four to five pages of text, plus tables/graphs, title page and optional bibliography should be sufficient.

Review paper -- The purpose of this paper is to help you learn how to evaluate and improve on research. You will identify a paper to review through a search of the literature and will write a paper describing this research, evaluating measurement validity, generalizability, and causal validity. 

Text 

Babbie, Earl. 2007. The Practice of Social Research, 13th edition

 


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45390 • Angel, Ronald
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM CLA 0.118
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 Course Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

Course Requirements:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in CLA.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

Grading Requirements:

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  This is a required course and a C or higher is required for it to count toward the Sociology major.  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45395 • Angel, Ronald
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.118
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Course Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

Course Requirements:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in CLA.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

Grading Requirements:

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  This is a required course and a C or higher is required for it to count toward the Sociology major.  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45405 • Regnerus, Mark
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM CLA 0.118
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Description:

Spanning what are known as “qualitative” and “quantitative” approaches, the course covers basic principles in a few main areas: the meaning of variables, understanding causation, study design, basic sampling, and modes and methods in data collection. Throughout, we draw on examples from published studies in sociology and other social sciences, looking at how other researchers have navigated commonplace methodological pitfalls.

By the end of the course, students should be able to both critically evaluate the methodological underpinnings of much social research. They should also be able to construct their own study, on paper at least, without falling into the most common and destructive traps. We also hope that this course will make students more skilled consumers of information in the real world. People are enveloped in data and arguments based in data. It is important to know how to evaluate the quality of those data. Engaged citizenship demands it.

Grading and Requirements:

2 exams, 2 assignments, 1 research proposal, 1 final research paper

 Grades are A, B, C, D, F (no plus/minus)

 

 


SOC 321C • Consumption In Latin Amer

45420 • Fridman, Daniel
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 325)
show description

Consumption is at the same time an economic, political and cultural phenomenon. During the twentieth-century and the beginning of the twenty first, in many parts of the world the promise of extending mass-consumption became a central part of political discourses about the rights and benefits of citizens. In Latin America, the goal of achieving a vibrant internal consumer market was conflated by many with the idea of development, progress, and modernity. Conceptually, consumers have been seen alternatively as the sovereigns of markets, as victims of manipulation, or as a locus of resistance and expression. In this course, we will study the place of consumption in social, economic, and political relations in Latin America. We will read recent literature from various disciplines (sociology, history, anthropology, etc.) on consumer culture in the region, with a special focus on Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Brazil. We will deal with a variety of topics and consumption goods, including consumer policies, popular consumption, advertising, neoliberal consumption, middle class consumer culture, home appliances, jeans and tupperware.


SOC 321G • Global Health Issues/Systems

45425 • Jeon, Jiwon
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ETC 2.102
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Course Description

This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biosocial, cultural and environmental perspectives. A biosocial approach to global health inequity is the underlying theme. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

This course carries both the Writing flag and Global Cultures flag. We will use writing to improve on critical thinking skills and understanding of global health issues as well as to improve on ability to formulate ideas with an emphasis on the ASA writing style.  In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from writing assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group. This course may be used to fulfill the social and behavioral sciences component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, empirical and quantitative skills, and social responsibility.  ?

Course Objectives

 

  1. Describe global health issues, trends, and policies
  2. Understand how population growth, disease, environmental changes, and economic and political activities impact global health
  3. Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts
  4. Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries
  5. Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

Required Text and Readings

Farmer, Paul, J.Y. Kim, A. Kleinman and M. Basilico. 2013. Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction, University of California Press

Journal Articles: In addition to above textbook, other course materials including additional readings will be posted on Canvas each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

There are three paper assignments and two quizzes. The assignments are due at the beginning of class and must be turned in as hard copies. E-mail attachments will not be accepted. Late papers will not be accepted without prior approval.

Assignment 1: Short papers (10%)

These writing assignments are intended to encourage understanding of the assigned readings, develop critical analytic skills for understanding 21st century global health issues, enhance in class discussions and refine writing skills.  Instruction and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Canvas.

 Assignment 2: Individual paper (30%)

Each student is required to write a research paper (5-6 pages) about a global health issue. This assignment should allow the student to critically examine a global health issue in depth.  There will be peer reviews as well as instructor comments on this assignment.  You will submit a memo detailing your revisions with the final draft.  Detailed instructions and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Canvas.

Assignment 3: Group project paper & presentation (25%)

Students are required to form a group to prepare a short presentation at the end of the semester and to write a research paper (not more than 10 pages). Students should work together as a team to analyze the political, social and economic determinants of health and analyze how delivery systems for preventive and curative health services might be strengthened in developing countries. Group members will conduct an evaluation of their fellow group members for the final project and presentation. Detailed instructions and criteria for the group project and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Canvas.

 Two quizzes (20%)

 Class participation (15%)

There will be weekly small group discussions. Each group member will be required to participate and contribute substantially to small group discussions. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in in-class discussions as well.

Course policies

 Attendance:  

You are allowed three non-penalized absences during the semester.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one grade.

Make-up quizzes:

I will allow make-up quizzes for pre-approved reasons (e.g., observing religious holidays) or in the case of documented medical or other emergencies (death of significant others, job interviews, etc.). If you anticipate missing a quiz, please make an arrangement with me at least two weeks in advance. Students who miss quizzes without prior approval or without a documented emergency will receive zero points on that exam.

Student conduct:

Every student will be actively involved in classroom discussions. In order for everyone to feel comfortable voicing opinions or asking questions, a climate of tolerance and respect is essential.

Use of laptops in class for taking notes:  Use of laptops and cell phone in class is not permitted.

 Grading Scale

 

A         93-100  %        B+        87-89.9 %        C+        77-79.9 %        D+       67-69.9%

A-        90-92.9 %        B          83-86.9 %        C          73-76.9 %        D         63-66.9%

                                  B-        80-82.9 %         C-        70-72.9 %        D-        60-62.9%

 

            


SOC 321K • Building The Sustainable City

45430 • Swearingen, William
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.212
(also listed as URB 352)
show description

Course Description:

This course requires a Civic engagement project requiring 12-15 hour of service work with a community organization engaged in sustainability. 

**The course requires some off-campus travel to work with those groups.**

Building the Sustainable City is an interdisciplinary course that examines why we have to create  more sustainable living environments, what we are presently doing to rebuild American cities in more sustainable ways, and where we need to go in the future.  The course adopts the strong definition of sustainability to include the connections between economy, equity, and environment.   80% of the population lives in urban areas today, the vast majority of economic activity occurs in them, and most environmental problems are related to urbanization and industrialization.  Understanding how to build a sustainable city, then, is the key to building a sustainable society.  This course will focus on energy use, transportation policy, housing, and food production/distribution in the city.  Social equity issues will be integrated into all four themes, as all four are both cause and effect of social inequalities. 

The course links our academic understanding of sustainability with “real world”, on-the-ground people doing sustainability today by letting you work with a community organization in Austin,  in a civic engagement project that focuses on some aspect of sustainability.  The middle two weeks of April we will have no class, and instead you will use that time to work with the organization.  The leaders of several organizations will come talk to the class and you will choose which one you want to work with.  **Most of the organizations are off campus, so will require transport off campus.**  At least two are close enough to campus to walk or ride your bike.  One is on campus, but the others would require a car or bus.

Grading:

Your final paper is a write-up final project.

Text:

Girardet, Herbert; Cities People Planet. Wiley and Sons, 2008.

Ethics and Leadership and Writing Flags

This course carries both the Writing and the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations.  The civic engagement project is your primary opportunity to do so, though each essay will also require ethical thinking about the social components of sustainability.

Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. 100% of your grade in this class comes from written work, including the project write-up of your civic engagement work.

Distraction Free Classroom:  the use of cell phones and laptops is prohibited during class time.  Students must take notes on paper, not their laptops.  If you must text or browse the web during class time you will need to leave the classroom to do so.


SOC 321K • Economic Sociology Of Hlth

45435 • Palmo, Nina
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 3.106
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Description  

This course provides a look at the economics of health and health care through a sociological lens. In neoclassical economics, rational behavior and market transactions provide an efficient allocation of goods and services. From a sociological perspective, markets are social institutions that are shaped by the cultural, political, and historical environments in which they operate.   This course will examine how the multidimensional nature and distribution of health and health care are shaped by a variety of social and economic factors. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of the power of incentives, markets, and cost-benefit analysis, as well as the limits of these tools, in creating effective health care policy.     The first part of the course will examine how social environment shapes health and health behaviors and how health disparities are viewed from sociological and economic standpoints. The second part of the course will focus on the institutions that regulate access to health care and the historical developments that led to these arrangements.   Topics include:   - Gender, race, and class differences in health - The creation and reproduction of health disparities - Health behavior and externalities - The demand and supply of health care - Moral hazard, adverse selection, and health care insurance - Health insurance and the labor market - Problems of uninsurance - History of health care reform - Comparative health policies.


SOC 321K • Effective Philanthropy

45440 • Paxton, Pamela
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CLA 0.122
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Description

Effective philanthropy requires understanding the nonprofit sector as well as individual motivations to give and volunteer. At the same time, nonprofits need fundraising professionals to meet their financial goals. Effective Philanthropy: Fundraising and Nonprofit Advancement is designed to meet both goals by introducing students to theories of the nonprofit sector and individual prosocial behaviors like giving and volunteering, while also introducing the components of a successful development program and basic principles and techniques of fundraising. Students will learn theories and research on the nonprofit sector and prosocial motivations and behavior from Professor Pamela Paxton. Simultaneously, students will receive practical instruction from Adrian Matthys and other fundraising professionals in the local nonprofit community on all aspects of effective fundraising and stewardship, from building a solid base of annual contributors to cultivating relationships with major gift prospects. Attention will also be given to behind-the-scenes activities required to have a successful fundraising operation, including appropriate donor stewardship, prospect research, database maintenance, and donor analytics. Students will be exposed to the best practices of fundraising teams at all levels. The course will further provide students with unique hands-on experience raising money, with the assistance of professional fundraising from the UT Austin Office of Development, to be given away to charities through the paired Philanthropy: The Power of Giving course.

Readings:

Available on Canvas

Grading:

Class participation:  10%

Paper One: 10% (250 words)

Paper Two: 10% (500 words)

Paper three: 20% (1250 words)

Project: 50%

Note:  Professor consent required.


SOC 321K • Food And Society

45445 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 105
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Descriptons 

In this course we will explore the social context of food. Topics will include food and identity, social class and culture.  We will also investigate who plans, purchases, and prepares food for our families, including discussion of the recent debates about the value of a home-cooked meal.  We will take a tour through the alphabet soup of government assistance for the hungry, including SNAP, WIC and NSLP.  Finally, we examine food production and policies in the US. 

 This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Readings will include:

Nestle, Marion. 201313.  Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health

Pilcher, Jeffrey.  2012.  Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food

 Pollan,  Michael.  2006.  The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals.

 

Grading:

Portfolio 25%

     A series of short assignments including research article analyses, video analyses, discussion synthesis

Papers 30%

     Food diary analysis

    Literature review

Peer review 10%

Group Presentation  15%

   Groups will research, present findings and lead discussion

Participation 10%

Class synthesis assignment 10%

     Drawing on the themes from the class and current research, explore possibilities for improving food policy

 

 

 


SOC 321K • Reproductive Justice & Race

45455 • Rudrappa, Sharmila
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ETC 2.114
(also listed as AAS 330, WGS 340)
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Description:

Since the Cairo Conference on Population and Development in 1994 state policies concerning women’s health around the world have taken a turn away from population control to reproductive health. Within this context, activists and scholars alike have turned their attention to reproductive justice that envisions the complete physical and mental well-being of women and girls, which can potentially be achieved when they have the economic, social, and political power and resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, sexuality, and reproduction. In this class we ask: how do various social movements define reproductive justice? How is access to reproductive rights stratified by race and class? Through drawing students’ attention to specific case studies, this course illuminates on the specific challenges faced by women of color in the U.S., as well as women in developing countries across the world. Topics we will cover are forcible sterilization, access (or lack of access) to birth control, population control policies, prenatal and postnatal care, maternal and infant health outcomes in various parts of the world, sex selective abortions, new reproductive technologies, and stratified reproduction. As part of the final part of the course the students will think through the reproductive health issues facing women of color on campus, through conducting a survey. 


SOC 321K • Sex/Sexuality Muslim World

45460 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 372, ISL 372, R S 358, WGS 335)
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 Description:

Although issues about sexuality are assumed to be personal, private, and intimate, they are a significant part of the public and political fabric of our society, particularly those nations that are ruled by the religious constitutions or in which religion plays an important role within the culture of the society. Sexuality is related to our status and rights as citizens. For the most part sexual jurisprudence and the issue of sexuality in Islam are covered in the Qur`an (Holy scripture), and in the sayings of prophet Muhammad (hadith), and in the rulings of religious leaders (fatwa). However, there are multiple “Islamic” views on sexuality. The schools of law vary, for instance, in the rulings about the permissibility of the use of contraceptives, abortion, fertility treatment, and acceptance of homosexuality, lesbianism, transsexuality, bisexuality, cross-dressing, and gender re-assignment. In addition, numerous cultural interventions could be responsible for interpretation of sexual behavior of a given society.

In general permissible sexual relationships as described in Islamic sources speak about the pleasure of sex as a normal human desire and explain that sex is a great way for the couples involved to show their love and caring for each other. At the same time there are prohibitions against extra marital sexual relations, and any other form of sexual relationship that is outside the legal and religious binds of marriage between a man and a woman is strictly forbidden.  

This course will introduce students to readings on sexual behavior in several Islamic countries and among Muslims by examining Islamic Sharia (religious law) in literature, scientific biological, psychological, sociological, anthropological studies as well as in the arena of art, and film industry.

Text:

Two-volume reader packet prepared by the instructor

Grading:

Regular Attendance 5%

One time in Class presentation from assigned readings 10%

Four quizzes = 15% (lowest grade will be dropped)

Midterm Exam= 35%

Exam Two= 35%

 


SOC 321K • Socl/Econ Inequalty Brazil-Bra

45465 • Marteleto, Leticia
(also listed as LAS 325)
show description

Restricted to students in the Maymester Abroad Program; contact the Study Abroad Office for permission to register for this class. Class meets May 29-June 29. Taught in Bela Horizonte, Brazil. Students must consult with Study Abroad Program Coordinator as travel and orientation dates may be in addition to these dates.


SOC 321K • Veiling In The Muslim World

45470 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 372, ANT 324L, ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

Description:

This course will deal with the cultural significance and historical practices of veiling, “Hijab”, in the Muslim world. The issue of veiling as it relates to women has been subject to different interpretations and viewed from various perspectives, and with recent political developments and the resurgence of Islam, the debate over it and over women’s roles in Muslim countries has taken various shapes.  A number of Muslim countries are going back to their Islamic traditions and implementing a code of behavior that involves some form of veiling in Public /or segregation to various degrees for women. In some Muslim nations women are re-veiling on their own. In others, women resist the enforcement of such practices. We will examine the various perspectives, interpretations and practices relating to Hijab in the Muslim world with respect to politics, religion, feminism, culture, new wave of women converts and the phenomenon of “Islamic fashion” as a marketing tool.    

Prerequisites:  Upper Division Standing

Grading:

Active participation (assigned article with discussion questions/ is a group activity) 10%

Regular Class Attendance 5%

3 quizzes (Lowest grade will be dropped) 20%

Midterm Exam 30%

Final Research Paper (20%), and Oral Presentation %15 (This is a group activity)

Texts**

1- Reader Packet. 

Book:

 Faegheh Shirazi. The Veil Unveiled: Hijab in Modern Culture. University Press of Florida, 2001, 2003 

 ** I suggest that you to order this book as soon as possible on line from any vender that you normally purchase your books. I have been pleased with amazon.com since I am always able to find used books in good conditions. Another good book store with discount prices will be Half Price Books.

I will announce when the Reader Packet is ready for purchase. We will start with the text first.


SOC 321L • Sociology Of Education

45475 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as AFR 321L, WGS 345)
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Decription

This course examines education in the United States from a sociological perspective. We will use various sociological concepts, methods and theories to explore the institution of education. Specific topics include public education; education and the current legislative session; standardized testing; charter schools; and stratification within and between schools with a focus on race, class and gender. 

Required Texts

 ▪ Arum, Richard, Irenee Beattie and Karly Ford (editors), 2015. The Structure of Schooling:Readings in the Sociology of Education, 3rd Edition.  SAGE Publications.

▪ Lareau, Annette.  2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life, 2nd Updated Edition.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

▪ A collection of readings available on Canvas.

 Evaluation

There will be in-class tests, short papers, and a group project. 

Class participation is a component of the final grade.

 


SOC 322C • Sociology Of Creativity

45480 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM JES A203A
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Description

This course will introduce the students to different aspects of creative insights, human consciousness, social processes, and the ‘invention of reality’.  The class will bring the intellectual abilities and intuitive inclinations together as a complementary process. We’ll pursue and encourage elements of mindfulness, intuition, and creativity at the individual, organizational, societal, and environmental levels.  The course will draw upon a wide range of sources- lectures, group discussions, books, articles, artistic films, documentaries–in order to better understand and appreciate the interconnectedness and interrelationship between ‘inner’ (personal) and the other (‘social’) reality. The media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" and socio-cultural phenomena. No technical aspects will be emphasized.

Required Texts

A selection of articles will be, prepared in a packet.

Michael Schwalbe. 2007. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation.

Otis Carney. 2002. Wars R’ Us: Taking Action for Peace.

Paulo Coelho. 1995. The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream   

Joseph Campbell. 2004. Pathways to Bliss: Mythological and Personal  Transformation                                   

Mitch Albon. Tuesday with Morrie.

 Grading Policy             

20%  Short essays / Journal entries

20% Group Workshops and class participation

10%  Written Critiques of student paper

10% Oral Presentation

10% Final assessment

30% Final course project


SOC 323 • The Family

45490 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.128
(also listed as WGS 345)
show description

Description

This course analyzes the family as a social institution, using the sociological perspective. 

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families.  It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data.  Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family.  Throughout the course we will explore family change. Specific topics will include dating, “hooking up” and marriage; parents and children; cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies; and how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies.

 Grading Policy

Students will be evaluated via short papers, in-class short answer and essay examinations, a group project, and class participation. 

 Texts: (subject to change)

Bogle, Kathleen.  2008.  Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus.  NYU Press.       

Coontz, Stephanie.  2006.  Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.                

Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.).  2010.  Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition.  Boston: McGraw-Hill. 

Lareau, Annette.   2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stone, Pamela.  2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.


SOC 323D • Border Control/Deaths

45495 • Rodriguez, Nestor
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as MAS 374)
show description

 

I. Course Rationale

Since the 1940s, US control of the Southwest border has remained a major challenge in immigration policy. Border control has become one of the most debated topics in the country, including in federal and state legislative bodies. Annually thousands of unauthorized migrants cross the US-Mexico border into the United States to participate in US labor markets and in other social institutions. A consequence of unauthorized immigration, and of the implementation of border control measures for deterrence, has been the deaths of hundreds of migrants annually. Over the years, the deaths have added up into the thousands. The social effects of border control and the occurrence of migrant deaths have become sociological topics investigated by sociologists and other researchers to increase our knowledge and understanding of international migration.

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding of border control and migrant deaths at the US-Mexico border. Of particular importance for the course is research knowledge concerning border control policies and patterns of migrant deaths.

Specific Learning Objectives

  • Gain information and understanding of the development and effects of US border control policies concerning the following: border control campaigns, social and public perceptions of the border, migrant death patterns in border areas, government plans to redirect migration, ethics of border control, human rights and critical perspectives related to migrant deaths, bureaucratic ideology in border control, migrant death forensics, smuggling, community responses to migrant deaths, recent research on border control and migrant deaths.
  • Review and discuss different approaches and measures for border control.

 

  • Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual migrant apprehensions at the border and annual counts of migrant deaths in border sectors.

 

  • Develop an awareness of the significance of border control for the development of US immigration policy.

 

  • Review major impacts of US border control measures for local communities.

Cultural Diversity Objective:

 “This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.”

“Ideally, the Cultural Diversity Flag will challenge students to explore the beliefs and practices of an underrepresented group in relation to their own cultural experiences so that they engage in an active process of self-reflection.”

 III. Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is assumed and expected, and highly encouraged.

Students will have an opportunity to evaluate qualities of the course, including the instructor.  The purpose of the student evaluations is to provide feedback to help improve the teaching experience.

IV.  Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction (constant remaking of societies).

V. Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let the instructor know immediately.

Religious Holidays

UT Austin policy requires that you notify course instructors at least 14 days in advance if you plan to be absent due to a religious holiday. You will be given an opportunity to make up activities (exams, assignments, etc.) that you miss because of your absence due to a religious holiday.  You will be given a reasonable time to make up an exam or assignment after your absence.

2. Course Readings/Materials

a) Required books

Dunn, Timothy J.  2009.  Blockading the Border and Human Rights: The El Paso Operation that Remade Immigration Enforcement. Austin: University of Texas Press.

De Leon, Jason. 2015.  The Land of Open Graves:  Living and Dying in the Migrant Trail.  Oakland: University of California Press.

 b) Websites to review:

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UC-Davis Migration News: http://migration.ucdavis.edu/mn/

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (Immigration Statistics): http://www.dhs.gov/immigration-statistics/

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

3. Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation, Dates

a) The course contains three exams and a paper requirement. The exams will consist of multiple-choice items. All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exceptions to this rule are cases involving an emergency and authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, essay makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the specified sociology room for makeups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with the instructor. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions only. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert the instructor beforehand and consult with the instructor regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the Final Exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

The paper requirement is a research brief of 1,350 words (5 pages) on a class-related border/migration topic for which at least three (3) research journal publications are consulted and cited in the text, and placed in the Reference.  The motive for the paper is to give the student an opportunity to handle research journal publications. Grading of the paper will include checking for the required number of words (1,350), for the three required journal sources, as well for the adequacy and strength of the brief.

b) Students have the option of writing a review of a journal research article on border control and/or migrant deaths for extra credit.  The article and journal must be approved by the instructor, and the possible number of extra credit points gained will be from one (1) to ten (10) added to your cumulative grade points. Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report. 

c) All dates specified in this syllabus for course topics, exams, and papers are subject to change given unforeseen developments.

4. Use of Canvas:  Canvas will be used to help manage the course and to pursue interaction with students.  Canvas will be used to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Canvas to communicate and share relevant comments and information.  Please check your Canvas site regularly to look for communications from the instructor or from other students in the class.  Support for using Canvas can be obtained from the following websites:  https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028/pages/welcome-to-canvas; http://guides.instructure.com/m/4212

VI.  Grading

a) Three exams of 50 multiple-choice items (worth a total of 100 points).

  • 100 points per exam x 3 exams = 300 points

b) Paper requirement worth 50 points

Total possible points = 350

c) Letter grades based on 350 possible cumulative points:

A = 325-350     A- = 315-324

B+= 304-323    B  = 290-303    B-= 280-289

C+= 269-279    C  = 255-268    C-= 245-254

D+= 234-244    D  = 220-233    D-= 210-219

F  = 209 or fewer points

 

 


SOC 323M • Sport And English Society-Gbr

45500 • Carrington, Ben
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Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 


SOC 325K • Criminology

45510 • Warr, Eric
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM CLA 0.126
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Course Description

An investigation into the nature of criminal events including, homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes and white-collar crimes. Also examines the US criminal justice system.

Grading Policy

Three tests (no final) Occasional quizzes

Texts

Mark Warr, Companions in Crime, Cambridge University Press


SOC 325K • Criminology

45505 • Warr, Eric
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM CLA 0.102
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Course Description

An investigation into the nature of criminal events including, homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes and white-collar crimes. Also examines the US criminal justice system.

Grading Policy

Three tests (no final) Occasional quizzes

Texts

Mark Warr, Companions in Crime, Cambridge University Press


SOC 325L • Soc Of Criminal Justice

45515 • Kelly, William
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as URB 354)
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Description

This course is in two parts.  The first will provide an introduction to the American criminal justice system, its policies and procedures.  The primary focus will be on how criminal justice operates.  This will include some discussion of crime and its correlates, crime prevention, law enforcement, courts and corrections.  The second part traces where criminal justice policy has been, what it has accomplished, and where it should go in order to effectively reduce crime, recidivism, victimization and cost.  The primary focus of where do we go from here is on prosecution, sentencing and corrections.

The class periods will be devoted to lectures and discussion. We may have guest speakers and probably a video or two.  The lecture material will sometimes correspond very closely with the material in the texts and sometimes it will not.  I encourage class discussions and questions and hope that the material will be sufficiently interesting and controversial to motivate discussion.

Texts

Experiencing Criminal Justice by Nicole Hendrix

Criminal Justice at the Crossroads; Transforming Crime and Punishment by William Kelly

Grading and Requirements

There will be four exams.  The first two are multiple choice/true false.  The second two are multiple choice and short answer.  Each exam constitutes 25% of the course grade.  The exams will cover all of the material - assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers and videos.

 


SOC 325L • Soc Of Criminal Justice

45520 • Kelly, William
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as URB 354)
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Description

This course is in two parts.  The first will provide an introduction to the American criminal justice system, its policies and procedures.  The primary focus will be on how criminal justice operates.  This will include some discussion of crime and its correlates, crime prevention, law enforcement, courts and corrections.  The second part traces where criminal justice policy has been, what it has accomplished, and where it should go in order to effectively reduce crime, recidivism, victimization and cost.  The primary focus of where do we go from here is on prosecution, sentencing and corrections.

The class periods will be devoted to lectures and discussion. We may have guest speakers and probably a video or two.  The lecture material will sometimes correspond very closely with the material in the texts and sometimes it will not.  I encourage class discussions and questions and hope that the material will be sufficiently interesting and controversial to motivate discussion.

Texts

Experiencing Criminal Justice by Nicole Hendrix

Criminal Justice at the Crossroads; Transforming Crime and Punishment by William Kelly

Grading and Requirements

There will be four exams.  The first two are multiple choice/true false.  The second two are multiple choice and short answer.  Each exam constitutes 25% of the course grade.  The exams will cover all of the material - assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers and videos.

 


SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45525 • Palmo, Nina
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as WGS 322)
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Description:

n this course we will study the meaning of gender in contemporary American society, along with its meaning historically and across cultures. We will chart the ways in which gender is produced and regulated through social institutions such as the workplace, family, and religion, and how this shapes our everyday. The course will also explore how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape conceptions of gender.  
 
Readings:
 
Course readings will consist of peer-reviewed journal articles. 
 
Grading:
 
Grading will be based on exams and 3-4 brief writing assignments. 
 

SOC 336D • Race, Class, And Health

45530 • Jeon, Jiwon
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.128
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Course Description

This course critically examines health status and health care disparities among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. We focus on the patterned ways in which the health of these groups is embedded in the social, cultural, political, and economic context of the U.S. We review the complex relationship between social class (socioeconomic status) and health status, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes and access to healthcare, as well as specific health issues facing major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. Topics include conceptual issues central to understanding how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial bias affects medical care and health outcomes, as well as a consideration of policies for reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities.

Course Objectives

         1.Define concepts of population health, social class, and race/ethnicity

       2.Describe social determinants of health

       3. Understand biological and psycho-social mechanisms through which the determinants of population health operate

       4.Analyze the interaction effect of race/ethnicity and social class in predicting health outcomes

       5. Examine policies that address health disparities in the United States

Required Text and Readings

Barr, Donald A. (2014) Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health, Second edition.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.

Additional readings: In addition to the above textbooks, other course materials, including additional readings, will be posted to blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements:

 Exams (80%)

 There will be three in-class exams worth 80 points each.  The in-class exams will cover all the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true/false, and short/medium-answer questions. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in two-weeks advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

Class participation: In-class quizzes, in-class discussion and participation (20%)

The in-class component will be measured by pop quizzes and class participation.  There will be 10 pop quizzes given periodically at the instructor’s discretion, based on weekly readings, class discussions, and short-films shown during class (10%).   In addition, students will engage in short discussions or working sessions as a group during class and will submit a written report.  This report will include the discussion results and the names of students who participated in the discussion sessions.  In-class discussion and class participation will constitute 10% of semester grade. There will be no in-class make-up quizzes and discussion reports regardless of the reasons for absence.

Course policies

 Attendance:  

You are allowed three non-penalized absences during the semester.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one grade.

Make-up exams:

I will allow make-up exams for pre-approved reasons (e.g., observing religious holidays) or in the case of documented medical or other emergencies (death of significant others, job interviews, etc.). If you anticipate missing an exam, please make an arrangement with me at least two weeks in advance. Students who miss exams without prior approval or without a documented emergency will receive zero points on that exam.

Student conduct:  

Every student will be actively involved in classroom discussions. In order for everyone to feel comfortable voicing opinions or asking questions, a climate of tolerance and respect is essential.

Use of laptops in class for taking notes:  

Use of laptops and cell phone in class is not permitted.

Grading Scale

 

A         93-100  %        B+        87-89.9 %        C+        77-79.9 %        D+       67-69.9%

A-        90-92.9 %        B          83-86.9 %        C          73-76.9 %        D         63-66.9%

                                  B-        80-82.9 %        C-        70-72.9 %         D-        60-62.9%

 

 


SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

45535 • Rose, Mary
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM BUR 108
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Description:

Crimes, trials, evidence, juries, sentences, lawsuits – you hear a lot about issues with which the legal system concerns itself. But people in the legal system are not the only ones who consider these issues. This course will look at courts, legal actors, and legal policies through the lens of social science, especially social psychology.  The goal of the course will be to learn about existing research on law-related topics.  A sample of areas to be covered include: predicting dangerousness, eyewitness testimony, mental health issues in the law (such as competence to stand trial and the insanity defense), children in the law, and jury decision-making on verdicts in criminal and civil cases.  Students enrolling must have taken at least one introductory sociology or psychology course.

Texts:

This course has one required textbook (Greene & Heilbrun, “Wrightsman’s Psychology and the Legal System”); attendance is not mandatory but is gauged through for-credit activities that occur during some class sessions. This course has an “Ethics and Leadership” Flag. 

 

Grading and Requirements:

Three exams:  100 points each

Short Paper:  40 points

Class Participation:  10 points

 

 


SOC 352E • Media Industrs/Entreprenrs

45545 • Chen, Wenhong
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 3.120
(also listed as RTF 365)
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Media industries have been challenged by large social forces such as globalization and technological advancements from analog to digital, wired to wireless, and desktop to cloud. Web 2.0 and social media facilitate former members of the audience to actively participate in media production. While legacy media learn to adapt to a new landscape, new media experiment with and search for viable business models and legitimacy. Great challenges bring unprecedented opportunities and risks for organizational innovations, entrepreneurship, and social change.Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a critical understanding of the media industries. We start with a survey of the media landscape. In the second part, we examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media and culture are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile phone and apps and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media production and consumption. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. ? 


SOC 366 • Deviance

45555 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.106
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Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).


SOC 366 • Deviance

45551 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.118
show description

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).


SOC 369K • Population And Society

45560 • Cavanagh, Shannon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as WGS 322)
show description

Description

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of declining fertility and population aging. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world. 

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics. 

Reading Materials 

Required text: Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, 10th edition, John R. Weeks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. ISBN-10: 0495096377 

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [EL]. These readings can be found in External Links section of the class Blackboard site and should be read prior to class period. 

Grading and Requirement:

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials. 

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 20% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay. 

You must also complete TWO assignments and ONE short paper during the semester. The assignments—on mortality and fertility—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you and that you will explore in more detail in the short paper. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade. The short paper is worth 25% of your grade. 

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the class. 


SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45575 • Young, Michael
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.102
show description

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%?Three one to two page memos on reading 15%?Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton?Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago?Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury?Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago?Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton?Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon?Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon


SOC 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

45565
Meets TH 3:30PM-4:30PM CLA 0.124
(also listed as SOC 679HB)
show description

Description:

This double-semester seminar was created after feedback from former Honors students and faculty supervisors.

The idea is to provide structure, instruction, and assistance throughout the duration of your thesis project, as well as to enable you to interact with and support one another.  Seminar participation should not increase your  workload, but the discussions and assignments will help you become more efficient in your research and writing.  Seminar format is a mixture of discussion, oral presentations, and guest speakers.  

Required Books:

 C. Wright Mills (1959) The Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Howard S. Becker (2007) Writing for Social Scientists. (2nd ed.) University of Chicago Press. Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and active seminar participation are expected of all Honors students.  If you miss more than six (6) classes during the double-semester program, regardless of the reason for the absences, your 679HA grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the six allowed.  This policy excludes absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

 Grading Policy:

First Semester:

1. An annotated bibliography comprised of 20 strong sources relevant to your thesis (20%) 2. A 6-7 page research proposal (20%) 3. A detailed outline of your research project by the end of the first semester (20%) 4. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, discussions, giving peer feedback) (40%)

Second Semester:

1. A well-written draft of a chapter of your thesis (20%) 2. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, class discussions, giving peer feedback) (60%) 3. Oral presentation of your thesis at the Sociology Honors Colloquium (20%) At the end of your first semester in Honors, you’ll be assigned an “incomplete.”  At the end of your second semester, after you’ve submitted your signed thesis to the Sociology Department, I’ll remove the incomplete and assign a grade for SOC 679HA, based on your two semesters of work and participation in the Honors Seminar. Your thesis supervisor will assign your grade for SOC 369HB, based on the quality of your thesis.


SOC 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

45570
Meets TH 3:30PM-4:30PM CLA 0.124
(also listed as SOC 679HA)
show description

Description:

This double-semester seminar was created after feedback from former Honors students and faculty supervisors.

The idea is to provide structure, instruction, and assistance throughout the duration of your thesis project, as well as to enable you to interact with and support one another.  Seminar participation should not increase your  workload, but the discussions and assignments will help you become more efficient in your research and writing.  Seminar format is a mixture of discussion, oral presentations, and guest speakers.  

Required Books:

 C. Wright Mills (1959) The Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Howard S. Becker (2007) Writing for Social Scientists. (2nd ed.) University of Chicago Press. Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and active seminar participation are expected of all Honors students.  If you miss more than six (6) classes during the double-semester program, regardless of the reason for the absences, your 679HA grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the six allowed.  This policy excludes absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

 Grading Policy:

First Semester:

1. An annotated bibliography comprised of 20 strong sources relevant to your thesis (20%) 2. A 6-7 page research proposal (20%) 3. A detailed outline of your research project by the end of the first semester (20%) 4. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, discussions, giving peer feedback) (40%)

Second Semester:

1. A well-written draft of a chapter of your thesis (20%) 2. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, class discussions, giving peer feedback) (60%) 3. Oral presentation of your thesis at the Sociology Honors Colloquium (20%) At the end of your first semester in Honors, you’ll be assigned an “incomplete.”  At the end of your second semester, after you’ve submitted your signed thesis to the Sociology Department, I’ll remove the incomplete and assign a grade for SOC 679HA, based on your two semesters of work and participation in the Honors Seminar. Your thesis supervisor will assign your grade for SOC 369HB, based on the quality of your thesis.



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    CLA 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300