South Asia Institute
South Asia Institute

Stephen Phillips


ProfessorPh.D., Harvard University

Stephen Phillips

Contact

Biography


He is a Sanskritist and specialist in classical Indian thought. He is author of over fifty articles and author or co-author of six books: Aurobindo's Philosophy of Brahman (Brill, 1986), Classical Indian Metaphysics: Refutations of Realism and the Emergence of "New Logic" (Open Court, 1995, Indian edition, Motilal Banarsidass, 1998), Gangesa on the Upadhi, the "Inferential Undercutting Condition," Introduction, Translation, and Explanation (with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya, Indian Council of Philosophical Research, 2002) Epistemology of Perception: Gangesa's Tattvacintamani, Vol. I, pratyaksa-khanda, introduction, translation, and commentary (with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya, Indian edition, Motilal Banarsidass, 2009), Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth (Columbia, 2009), and The Ksanabhangasiddhi, Ratnakirti on Momentariness (fprthcoming, American Institute of Indian Studies). He is currently working on a four-volume translation of and commentary on the most important work of late classical Indian philosophy, Gangesa's Tattvacintamani (Jewel of Reflection on the Truth of Epistemology), which founded the 'New Logic' school in the fourteenth century. He has been Visiting Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Jadavpur University, Kolkata.

Courses


ANS 384 • Classical Indian Epistemology

31740 • Fall 2016
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 310
(also listed as PHL 383)

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the classical Indian tradition of reflection about knowledge and justification and a broad survey of epistemological debates of classical India, which are long-running, the latest texts benefiting from centuries of analysis and refinement of theories. In particular we shall probe the Nyaya externalism that recognizes perception, inference, and testimony as knowledge sources. The rival positions of Buddhist Yogacara logicians will also be given special attention. The goal of the course will be to introduce and evaluate what Indian schools have had to say about issues that are debated in analytic epistemology. Each seminar meeting will be divided into two parts, the first introducing historical views and the second considering how the historical treatment might elucidate a contemporary debate. Four examples of epistemological issues where there appear to be good opportunities for interaction: (1) Does a perceiver's background psychology influence the contents of her perceptual experiences, and if so is the effect necessarily negative? (2) Does knowledge gained by testimony depend on an independent premise that the testifier is reliable? (3) Is there an important difference between reflective and unreflective knowledge? (4) Is inference best modeled formally using principles of logic, or is it better modeled informally as a source of knowledge alongside perception and testimony?

Course requirements: A brief paper proposal distributed prior to a short class presentation (10-20 minutes) and a research paper 15-25 pages in length.

Asian Studies students may write an historically oriented paper, and anyone who would like to read pertinent passages from classical texts in Sanskrit may possibly be excused from the paper requirement.

Texts

J. Ganeri, Philosophy in Classical India. Routledge, 2001.

B. K. Matilal, The Character of Logic in India. SUNY, 1998.

S. Phillips, Epistemology in Classical India. Routledge, 2012.

Materials from the Ny?ya-s?tra and other classical texts made available in translation either on-line or by e-mail distribution.

Epistemology entries in the on-line Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

This seminar will satisfy the Epistemology requirement OR the History requirement

CTI 310 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

33770 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 305, R S 305)

An examination of principal issues in contemporary philosophy of religion with special attention to religious pluralism. The views and arguments of Western theologians and philosophers will be taken up along with claims and concepts growing out of Eastern religions (Buddhism and Hinduism, in particular). Special topics include different views of the nature of a Divine Reality, arguments of rational theology, mysticism, and the theological problem of evil.

CTI 310 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

33045 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as PHL 305, R S 305)

An examination of principal issues in contemporary philosophy of religion with special attention to religious pluralism. The views and arguments of Western theologians and philosophers will be taken up along with claims and concepts growing out of Eastern religions (Buddhism and Hinduism, in particular). Special topics include different views of the nature of a Divine Reality, arguments of rational theology, mysticism, and the theological problem of evil.

 

Grading

Four two-page homework assignments, best three count (10% each = 30%)A mid-term exam (15%: true/false and short essay)Rewritten homework, three pages (15%)A final exam (30%)Attendance (10%)

 

Texts

Readings provided by instructor online.

PHL 348 • Indian Philosophies

41670-41680 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as ANS 372, R S 341)

The course is divided roughly into three parts. Approximately the first six weeks are devoted to history and overview. Of special concern (and targeted on the midterm exam) will be the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita, along with the claim that Vedanta philosophy (alternatively the teaching of the Buddha) is justified by mystical or yogic experience. We shall also take up questions of ethics, in particular the ahimsa ("non-injury") precept of Jainism and the karma-yoga teaching of the Gita. An overview of the nature of philosophy will occupy us in connection with an introduction to early Buddhism, as well as the transition to classical philosophy. The second part of the course, five weeks, will be devoted to classical Indian philosophy. We'll examine the controversy between the professional debaters of the Nyaya school ("Logic") and the Buddhist anti-intellectual Nagarjuna who rejects Nyaya's theory of knowledge and the school's identification of perception, inference, and testimony as "knowledge sources." Buddhist idealism and its debate with Nyaya will be our next focus, then the interschool controversy between Sankara's Advaita ("Non-dualistic'') Vedanta and the theistic Vedanta of Ramanuja, and finally the Nyaya view of Gangesa on inference and mukti, the "supreme personal good." The last four weeks, we shall return to Indian spirituality and some of the topics of the first part, looking at the Yoga-sutra, Tantra, neo-Vedanta, and modern works concerning meditation and spiritual discipline.

PHL 348 • Natural Theology East And West

42005 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as ANS 340)

This course surveys and at the same time evaluates arguments for and against the existence of God in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions, along with arguments for Brahman (Hinduism) and Emptiness (Buddhism), that is, considering religious philosophy worldwide.

 

The course takes a global point of view, comparing arguments proferred originally in Arabic, for example, with medieval arguments expressed in Latin and with a collection of arguments originally expressed in Sanskrit.

 

We will also examine the primary atheistic arguments in the West from Epicurus through Bertrand Russell and in India principally from a philosopher of the eighth century named Kumarila Bhatta.

 

We will also consider differing concepts of God. An important Buddhist argument purports to prove the Buddha's omniscience. But the Buddhist idea of omniscience differs from the mainstream view of God's omniscience in the West.

 

Our main focus throughout the course will be on the strengths and weaknesses of each argument.

PHL 356 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practic

42020 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as ANS 372, R S 341G)

This course surveys the origins of yogic practices in early Indian civilization and traces the development of Yoga philosophies through the Upanishads, BHAGAVAD GITA, YOGA-SUTRA, Buddhist, Jaina, and tantric texts, as well as works of neo-Vedanta. We shall try to identify a set of claims common to all classical advocates of yoga. We shall look at both classical and modern defenses and criticisms, especially of alleged metaphysical and psychological underpinnings of the practices. No previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous course work in philosophy or in psychology should contact the instructor.

CTI 310 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

34125-34145 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as PHL 305, R S 305)

An examination of principal issues in contemporary philosophy of religion with special attention to religious pluralism.  The views and arguments of Western theologians and philosophers will be taken up along with claims and concepts growing out of Eastern religions (Buddhism and Hinduism, in particular).  Special topics include different views of the nature of a Divine Reality, arguments of rational theology, mysticism, and the theological problem of evil.

 

List of Proposed Texts /Readings:

On-line texts drawn from Philosophy of Religion: A Global Approach, ed. S Phillips (Harcourt Brace 1996).

 

Proposed Grading Policy:

Five two-page homework assignments (50%)

A mid-term exam (15%)

A final exam (30%)

Attendance (5%)

PHL 356 • Yoga As Philos And Practice

43410 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as ANS 372)

This course surveys the origins of yogic practices in early Indian civilization and traces the development of Yoga philosophies through the Upanishads, BHAGAVAD GITA, YOGA-SUTRA, Buddhist, Jaina, and tantric texts, as well as works of neo-Vedanta. We shall try to identify a set of claims common to all classical advocates of yoga. We shall look at both classical and modern defenses and criticisms, especially of alleged metaphysical and psychological underpinnings of the practices. No previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous course work in philosophy or in psychology should contact the instructor.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

31885-31895 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 214
(also listed as PHL 348, R S 341)

A critical and historical introduction to Indian philosophies and speculative religious thought.  Topics include: the psychology of yoga and Indian mysticism along with the ``enlightenment'' theories and metaphysical positions that are thought to underpin yogic endeavors.  These topics are associated with Indian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) as well as some of the philosophic schools.  We shall also survey, within a properly philosophic sphere, the development of logic (briefly) and theory of knowledge (at greater length).  Metaphysical arguments for momentariness, ``mind-only,'' and ``no-self'' (on the Buddhist side) and counterarguments for realism and theism (on the side of Nyaya and Vedanta) will occupy us, in particular the debate about self and personal identity.  The Tantric philosophy of the eleventh-century Kashmiri Shaivite Abhinava Gupta along with his contributions to classical aesthetics as well as his suggestions of a new "yoga of art and beauty" will occupy us later in the term.  No previous background in philosophy or in Indian thought is required.

Course requirements: best 3 out of 4 glossary tests (15%); 2 two-page papers (topics to be handed out; 30%); mid-term exam (15%) final exam (35%); attendance (5%).

Reading: J. N. Mohanty, CLASSICAL INDIAN PHILOSOPHY The UPANISADS (tr. Roebuck) The BHAGAVAD GITA (tr. Edgerton) a packet of photocopies

PHL 302 • World Philosophy

42775-42785 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 302

This course introduces the major traditions of philosophy by way of cross-cultural examination of important questions. What is knowledge, and how is it acquired? Undr what conditions is a belief justified? What is the self or person? What is real and what mere appearance? How should we live? And so on. Socrates and Plato within acient Greek philosophy, Confuscius and Lao Tzu within Chinese philisophy, the Buddhist Nagarjuna and the schools of classical Indian philosophy, as well as Ibn Sina (Avicenna) within Islamic philosophy and the Ethiopian philosopher, Zera Yacob, will be discuessed along with a few authors of the modern and contemporaray periods.

PHL 321K • Theory Of Knowledge-Phl Majors

42675 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 208

What is knowledge? What are the principal types of knowledge, and what does a person's knowing a claim or proposition p amount to? Philosophers have commonly supposed that a person's having justification, or warrant, for
believing that p is a necessary condition of his/her knowing that p. Accordingly, this course will be concerned with theories of justification as well as of knowledge, along with the question of whether there can be knowledge without what is called epistemic justification. Views in ancient, early modern, and contemporary philosophy—also one Eastern view—will be surveyed.

PHL 356 • Yoga As Philos And Practice

42775 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as R S 341G)

This course surveys the origins of yogic practices in early Indian civilization and traces the development of Yoga philosophies through the Upanishads, BHAGAVAD GITA, YOGA-SUTRA, Buddhist, Jaina, and tantric texts, as well as works of neo-Vedanta. We shall try to identify a set of claims common to all classical advocates of yoga. We shall look at both classical and modern defenses and criticisms, especially of alleged metaphysical and psychological underpinnings of the practices. No previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous course work in philosophy or in psychology should contact the instructor.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31520-31531 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

PHL 375M • Nyaya

42699 • Fall 2012
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 210

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL S321K • Theory Of Knowledge

87365-87370 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTH 1:00PM-2:30PM WRW 113

This course will consider several major ethical theories in the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions as guides to practical living.  The primary question to be addressed is:  What is the good life for human beings, in theory and in practice?

 

This course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations.

PHL 356 • Yoga As Philos And Practice

42585 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as ANS 372, R S 341G)

This course will begin with an examination of the Yoga-sutra by Patanjali and two or three classical Sanskrit commentaries on it. We shall look at the text both as expressing a metaphysics and as a "how-to book" on yogic practice, focusing on certain bridge psychological concepts and theories. We shall also look at scholarly attempts to reconstruct the origins of yogic practices, particularly as proffered by (1) contemporary philosophers and (2) medical researchers. We shall pay some but less attention to modern psychological interpretations. No Sanskrit or previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous coursework in philosophy or psychology should contact the instructor.

 

Texts

Mircea Eliade, Yoga: Immortality and FreedomThe Yogustra by Patanjali and Commentary by Vyasa (edition to be determined)(For list of photocopies see the following website:) http://link.lanic.utexas.edu/asnic/phillips/pages/yoga/yogacoursedes.undergrad.html

Grading

A short paper informing a long paper and a class presentation.

PHL 375M • Classical Indian Aesthetics

42670 • Spring 2012
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 210

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31360-31405 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

31556-31557 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 348, R S 341)

A critical and historical introduction to Indian philosophies and speculative religious thought.  Topics include: the psychology of yoga and Indian mysticism along with the ``enlightenment'' theories and metaphysical positions that are thought to underpin yogic endeavors.  These topics are associated with Indian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) as well as some of the philosophic schools.  We shall also survey, within a properly philosophic sphere, the development of logic (briefly) and theory of knowledge (at greater length).  Metaphysical arguments for momentariness, ``mind-only,'' and ``no-self'' (on the Buddhist side) and counterarguments for realism and theism (on the side of Nyaya and Vedanta) will occupy us, in particular the debate about self and personal identity.  The Tantric philosophy of the eleventh-century Kashmiri Shaivite Abhinava Gupta along with his contributions to classical aesthetics as well as his suggestions of a new "yoga of art and beauty" will occupy us later in the term.  No previous background in philosophy or in Indian thought is required.

Course requirements: best 3 out of 4 glossary tests (15%); 2 two-page papers (topics to be handed out; 30%); mid-term exam (15%) final exam (35%); attendance (5%).

Reading: J. N. Mohanty, CLASSICAL INDIAN PHILOSOPHY The UPANISADS (tr. Roebuck) The BHAGAVAD GITA (tr. Edgerton) a packet of photocopies

PHL S321K • Theory Of Knowledge

87391-87393 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTH 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 302

This course focuses on worldly knowledge, not on mathematical or logical knowledge, along with issues concerning meaning and justification. We shall trace briefly the history of Western empiricism. The theories of knowledge to be examined will be primarily Western, beginning with Plato and extending through Russell and Wittgenstein to recent externalism, such as that of R. Nozick and E. Sosa, but also one Eastern view will be scrutinized, the classical Indian approach of Nyaya which has an externalist view of knowledge but an internalist view of justification. Nyaya identifies four knowledge sources, perception, inference, testimony, and analogical comprehension of new vocabulary, and we shall examine Nyaya's view of perception in particular, comparing it with Russell's foundationalism and internalism, as well as with externalist theories. We shall also look at the views of the later Wittgenstein, and his rejection of foundationalism, as well as the arguments of the Buddhist Nagarjuna who for different reasons rejects the projects of epistemology and questions of justification.

Reading: 1. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE, ed. Moser and vander Nat, 3rd edition. 2. EPISTEMIC JUSTIFICATION, L. Bonjour and E. Sosa 3. A packet of photocopies. 4. Materials on the web as designated on the syllabus.

Grading: Two one-to-two-page homework assignments: 20%. (Three opportunities to turn in two papers.) Rewritten homework (a graded paper to be rewritten taking into account comments and composing with fresh perspective): 20%. Midterm exam = 15% Final exam = 40% Attendance = 5%.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31740-31765 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.102
(also listed as PHL 302)

This course introduces the major traditions of philosophy by way of cross-cultural examination of important questions. What is knowledge, and how is it acquired? Under what conditions is a belief justified? What is the self or person? What is real and what mere appearance? How should we live? And so on. Socrates and Plato within ancient Greek philosophy, Confucius and Lao Tzu within Chinese philosophy, the Buddhist Nagarjuna and the schools of classical Indian philosophy, as well as Ibn Sina (Avicenna) within Islamic philosophy and the Ethiopian philosopher, Zera Yacob, will be discussed along with a few authors of the modern and contemporary periods.

Texts (not yet finally determined):

Confucius, ANALECTS
Plato, MENO
The UPANISHADS (tr. Easwaran)
Bertrand Russell, THE PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY
postings on the web

Grading:

homework: 30% (best three out of four)
midterm exam (part multiple-choice, part essay): 20%
final exam (part multiple-choice, part essay): 40%
attendance and class participation (both section & lecture): 10%

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

31930 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G)

This course surveys the origins of yogic practices in early Indian civilization and traces the development of Yoga philosophies through the Upanishads, BHAGAVAD GITA, YOGA-SUTRA, Buddhist, Jaina, and tantric texts, as well as works of neo-Vedanta. We shall try to identify a set of claims common to all classical advocates of yoga. We shall look at both classical and modern defenses and criticisms, especially of alleged metaphysical and psychological underpinnings of the practices. No previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous course work in philosophy or in psychology should contact the instructor.

Reading (probable):

(books:)
Tantric Yoga and the Wisdom Goddesses, David Frawley
Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth, S. Phillips
The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, J.H. Woods

a packet of photocopies
on-line publications as designated on the syllabus

Requirements (probable):

Midterm exam (50% on glossary items): 25%
Short paper: 25%
Final exam: 50%.

PHL S321K • Theory Of Knowledge

86905 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 302

What is knowledge? What are the principal types of knowledge, and what does a person's knowing a claim or proposition p amount to? Philosophers have commonly supposed that a person's having justification, or warrant, for believing that p is a necessary condition of his/her knowing that p. Accordingly, this course will be concerned with theories of justification as well as of knowledge, along with the question of whether there can be knowledge without what is called epistemic justification. Views in ancient, early modern, and contemporary philosophy--also one Eastern view--will be surveyed.

Texts: (1) Paul K. Moser and Arnold vander Nat, Human Knowledge (HK), 3rd ed., and (2) Laurence BonJour and Ernest Sosa, Epistemic Justification (EJ), and (3) a packet of photocopies (course packet), available at Speedway in the Dobie Mall.

Grading: Midterm exam: 20%. Two one-to-two-page homework assignments: 20%. (Three opportunities to turn in two papers: see below.) Rewritten homework (a graded paper to be rewritten taking into account comments and composing with fresh perspective): 15%. Attendance: 5%. Final exam: 40%. 

 

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

31035-31037 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 216
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 375M • Vedanta-W

43302 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 210

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

ANS 372 • Yoga And Nyaya-W

31172 • Fall 2009
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210
(also listed as PHL 348, R S 341)

-- --

PHL 348(W) (RS 241, ANS 372) YOGA AND NYAYA Stephen Phillips

Fall 2009 <phillips@mail.utexas.edu>

WAG 210 office hrs (WAG 301):

Tues 3:30-6:30 Tues 1:30-3:30 & by appt.

1 Sept Introduction. Reading of the sutras of the Yoga Sutra (YS) in whatever translation is

available, privileging the one in Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth (notes also required). We’ll

read the sutras one by one, skipping some, reading aloud in class around the room.

8 Sept Continuation of YS reading. Please read before class through YS chapter two, sutras only

(consulting Vyasa’s and Vacaspati’s commentaries or Phillips’s notes as necessary for

understanding).

15 Sept Continuation of YS reading. Please read before class through the end (sutras only, notes

or commentaries as necessary). Also read from J.N. Mohanty, Classical Indian

Philosophy (CIP), pp. 51-53 & 153-58.

22 Sept The YS commentary by Vyasa. Please bring to class: James H. Woods (tr.), The Yoga

Sutras of Patanjali. Reading (for this class and the next): Vyasa on sutras 1.1-12, 1.23-

32, 2.1-3.8, and 4.29-34. Recommended: Vachaspati’s subcommentary.

29 Sept Further discussion of the YS commentary by Vyasa. Please bring to class: James H.

Woods (tr.), The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. Reading: see above. Details about the first

paper.

6 Oct First paper due (at the beginning of class). Nyaya in overview. E-mail distribution of

‘‘Nyaya’’ by S. Phillips. Begin readings from the Nyaya Sutra (NyS) with Vatsyayana’s

commentary (Bhashya): purchase and bring to class the photocopies available at

Speedway in the Dobie Mall. Also read: Mohanty, CIP, pp. 11-38. First NyS reading: NyS

1.1.1 (including the introduction or avata-ra by Vatsyayana, the author of the

commentary, bha-s.

ya) through 1.1.21.

13 Oct Continue NyS reading, sutras to be announced in the preceding class (6 Oct). Also read:

Mohanty, CIP, pp. 41-50.

20 Oct NyS reading. Vachaspati Mishra. Selected reading to be handed out or distributed by email.

27 Oct NyS reading. Vachaspati Mishra as YS commentator. Passages from Vachaspati,

beginning with the opening section, Vachaspati’s introductory comments, and then the

section on the i-s´vara, YS 1.23ff, James H. Woods (tr.), The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.

Recommended: Vachaspati’s subcommentary on sutras 1.1-12, 2.1-3.8, and 4.29-34.

3 Nov NyS reading with particular attention to Vachaspati. Details about the second paper.

-- --

- 2 -

10 Nov Second paper due (at the beginning of class). Key issues in the combination, or rivalry,

of Yoga and Nyaya. Review J.N. Mohanty, CIP, on both Nyaya and Yoga. Mimamsa,

Vedanta, and other schools. CIP, pp. 125-30. Glossary for the test on 17 Nov identified in

Mohanty, CIP; please bring your copy to class.

17 Nov Scheduling for class presentations. Details concerning final paper. Further discussion of

key issues in the combination, or rivalry, of Yoga and Nyaya. Further reading from

Vachaspati’s YS commentary, passages to be announced. Glossary test.

24 Nov Class presentations. Outline or abstract for the final paper due (may be submitted by

e-mail, no formatting, no MS Word, hard copy preferred).

1 Dec Class presentations.

4 Dec Final paper due (by 5 p.m., Phillips’ mailbox, WAG 316).

Required reading:

J.N. Mohanty, Classical Indian Philosophy (CIP), available at the University Co-op.

James H. Woods (tr.), The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, available at the University Co-op.

S. Phillips, Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth, available at the University Co-op.

E-mail distributions, class handouts, and on-line materials as designated.

Photocopies of the Nya-ya-su-tra with Va-tsya-yana’s commentary available at Speedway in the Dobie Mall.

Grading:

The course fulfills the University’s requirements for a ‘‘substantial writing component’’: there will be two

short papers, a class presentation, and a final paper (preceded by an outline or abstract), plus a test on

glossary items. The total writing required is sixteen pages (double-spaced, reasonable margins, 12-point

font) plus an outline or abstract of the final paper.

Glossary test = 10%

First paper (4 pages) = 20%

Second paper (4 pages) = 20%

Final paper (8 pages) = 40%

Outline/abstract (1 page) and class presentation = 5%

Class participation including comments and criticism of others’ class presentations = 5%.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

30575 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BUR 216
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31160-31190 • Fall 2008
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

PHL S321K • Theory Of Knowledge

87940 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 302

This course will consider several major ethical theories in the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions as guides to practical living.  The primary question to be addressed is:  What is the good life for human beings, in theory and in practice?

 

This course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations.

PHL 375M • Clas Indian Epistem/Metaphys-W

43398 • Spring 2008
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 210

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31440-31475 • Fall 2007
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.306
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31480-31510 • Fall 2007
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM BEL 328
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31005-31080 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM WEL 1.308
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

31247 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 3.122

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

29590 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

29735-29750 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

29085 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM ART 1.102
(also listed as PHL 302)

Please check back for updates.

ANS 384 • Philosophies Of India

29300 • Fall 2005
Meets TH 7:00PM-10:00PM WAG 210
(also listed as PHL 381)

Study of various aspects and periods of South Asian culture and society.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

28390 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 304 • Contemporary Moral Problems

40155-40190 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 1

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of a number of contemporary moral problems, including problems of abortion, sexual morality, capital punishment, pornography and hate speech.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

29015-29030 • Fall 2004
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 304 • Contemporary Moral Problems

41230-41265 • Fall 2004
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.306

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of a number of contemporary moral problems, including problems of abortion, sexual morality, capital punishment, pornography and hate speech.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

27310 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 356)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 384 • Indian Aesthetics

27370 • Spring 2004
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM WAG 210

Study of various aspects and periods of South Asian culture and society.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 304 • Contemporary Moral Problems

39675-39710 • Fall 2003
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM BEL 328

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of a number of contemporary moral problems, including problems of abortion, sexual morality, capital punishment, pornography and hate speech.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

39840 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 214

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

26845-26860 • Spring 2003
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 212
(also listed as PHL 356)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

26865-26880 • Spring 2003
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 214

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 304 • Contemporary Moral Problems

39485-39540 • Fall 2002
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WCH 1.120

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of a number of contemporary moral problems, including problems of abortion, sexual morality, capital punishment, pornography and hate speech.

PHL 375M • Wittgenstein's Philos Invest-W

40205 • Fall 2002
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM BUR 232

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

38845-38860 • Spring 2002
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM GRG 102

A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. 

PHL 375M • Wittgenstein-W

39440 • Spring 2002
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM CBA 4.346

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism

ANS 384 • Classical Indian Epistemology

27855 • Fall 2001
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

Study of various aspects and periods of South Asian culture and society.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 321K • Theory Of Knowledge

40290 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420

What is knowledge? What are the principal types of knowledge, and what does a person's knowing a claim or proposition p amount to? Philosophers have commonly supposed that a person's having justification, or warrant, for
believing that p is a necessary condition of his/her knowing that p. Accordingly, this course will be concerned with theories of justification as well as of knowledge, along with the question of whether there can be knowledge without what is called epistemic justification. Views in ancient, early modern, and contemporary philosophy—also one Eastern view—will be surveyed.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

27730-27760 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WCH 1.120
(also listed as PHL 302)

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ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

27911-27912 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.124

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

PHL 302 • World Philosophy

37840-37855 • Spring 2000
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302

Basic issues of philosophy in Western and non-Western traditions, such as the nature of philosophy, its relation to religion and science, the self, knowledge, and virtue. 

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