Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Chiyo Nishida


Associate ProfessorPh.D.-Linguistics, University of Arizona

Chiyo Nishida

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-4514
  • Office: BEN 3.124
  • Office Hours: TTh 10-11 / 12:30-1
  • Campus Mail Code: B3700

Interests


Spanish morphosyntax

Biography


My past research has focused on Spanish morph-syntax, with a particular interest in the behavior of pronominal clitics and related constructions.  I have published on such topics as the reflexive clitic se and aspect, the second-position clitics in Old Spanish, and restructuring.  I am also one of the few to apply Categorial Grammar to the analysis of Spanish syntax. 

My current research interests include argument realization variation in ditransitive and gustar-type verb constructions. I am also interested in word order issues in unaccusative verb constructions. In the last few years I have conducted corpus studies on these topics, publishing and giving conference presentations. I base my analyses broadly on lexical semantics,  information structure, and performance theory to account for the data.  

Most recently, I have begun working on how we can teach information structure and word order to intermediate to advanced students of Spanish.

Courses


ILA 386 • Interface Issues In Romance

45805 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.118

I.  Description and objectives. This course explores some interface issues involving morphosyntax in Spanish and other Romance languages within the context of language variation, language acquisition (2nd and heritage) as well as language maintenance and change in language contact situations.   

A sentence does not exist in a vacuous but it is situated in a specific context and uttered to fulfill certain communicative needs.  Therefore, it is inevitable that any morphosyntactic properties in any given language are shaped not only by strictly syntactic rules – like X-bar theory, for instance – but also in interface with components/factors that have been traditionally considered “external” to syntax, such as speech acts (order, request, etc.), information articulation (where to place focus), discourse reference (new vs. old information), grammatical weight (length of expressions), etc.   Furthermore, studies based on experiments and corpora have yielded results exhibiting a great deal of gradiance and variabilities, often contradicting theoretical work based on categorical linguists’ judgments on limited data.   

In this course, we take some of the interface phenomena that have prompted active discussions in recent years and examine them within the context of language variation, heritage and 2nd language acquisition as well as language change.  For instance, one area where we have seen a great surge of studies related to interface phenomena is in heritage language acquisition following the work by Sorace and her cohorts.  These researchers have claimed on the basis of the results obtained through experimental studies that interface areas involving external components (like discourse pragmatics) is more difficult for heritage language learners to acquire or are more prone to loss in language contact situations than those involving internal components such as syntax and semantics (Interface Vulnerability Hypothesis).    

In class lectures, we focus on semantics-(morpho)syntax and pragmatics-(morpho)syntax interface phenomena as summarized in the course outline below.   First, students will be acquainted with some interface phenomena and examine how these phenomena are characterized and treated in linguistics literature within the context of Spanish (or any other Romance language) as a native language.  Second, they will read a variety of studies dealing with interface phenomena in order to see the relevance of these phenomena in various areas of linguistics research (language acquisition, sociolinguistics, and corpus studies, etc.).  Finally, students will propose a research design in order to study an interface phenomenon framed within their research area of interest and compile relevant bibliographical work.  The actual project need not be carried out during the semester, though it may be.

II. Course outline

Introduction:  What kinds of interface exist and what are some examples of the interface phenomena?

Unit ONE:  Issues surrounding verbs and arguments

A. Types of verbs/predicates: unaccusative, unergative, transitive & ditransitive

B. Subject, DO, and IO: their morphosyntactic realization

C. Derived verbs with se and the affected dative (Se le quemó su Galaxy, etc.) 

D.   Reading: Issues treated in existing work 

Unit TWO: Issues surrounding word order

A. Information structure (topic-comment, focus-presupposition, etc.), discourse referent status (new vs. old information) and argument (subject, DO & IO) order in a sentence

B. Other factors conditioning argument word order

C. Placement of Adjetives and adverbs/circumstantial complements (temporal & locative)

D. Reading: Issues treated in existing work

Unit THREE:  Issues surrounding Tense-Aspect-Mood (TAM)

A. Aspect: Lexical and viewpoint aspect/aspect and grounding

B. Mood and pragmatics: Speech acts, presupposition, relevance, and stance-taking

C. Tense and modality

D. Reading: Issues treated in existing work.

Unit FOUR: Research Design

A. Selecting a topic/Setting the objective

B. Determining a methodology

C. Compiling the bibliography             

D.   Working on IRB (if needed)

III. Grading. The final grade will be based on the following breakdown:

1. Exams (2, take-home) 20%

2. Article presentation and discussion (2; by completion) 30%

3. Research Design (Presentation+paper) 30%

4. Class Participation 20%

TOTAL  100%                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

IV.  Prerequisite:  A good knowledge (not necessarily a good command) of one Romance language is mandatory. We will stay in a descriptive level as we characterize the interface phenomena.  However, having taken an advanced upper-division linguistics course or an introductory graduate linguistics course dealing with syntactic structure (such as Introduction to Linguistics in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese or Syntax I in linguistics departments) will facilitate the comprehension of the material and is highly desirable.

V. Bibliography

A. Background information (Tentative)

Becker, Martin G. and Remberger, Eva-Maria (eds.). 2010. Modality and mood in Romance : modal interpretation, mood selection, and mood alternation. Berlin : Mouton De Gruyter.

Bosque, Ignacio and Demonte, Violeta (eds.)  1999.  Gramática descriptive de la lengua españolaVolúmenes I, II, III.  Madrid: Espasa Calpe.

Cassiles-Suárez, Eugenia. 2004.  The Syntax-Information Structure Inbterface: Evidence from Spanish and English. London: Ritledge.

Cruise Alan. 2002.  Meaning in Language: An Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatocs. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Haverkate, Henk. 2002.  The Syntax, Semantics and Pragmatics of Spanish Mood.  Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Hopper, Paul J. and Thompson, Sandra A.. 1980.  Transitivity in Grammar and Discourse.  Language, Vol. 56, No. 2 pp. 251-299.

Lambrecht, Knud. 1994.  Information Structure and Sentence Form: Topics, Focus, and the Mental Representations of  Discourse Referents.  Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Levine, Beth and Lappaport Hovav, Malka. 1999.  Unaccusativity. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press 2005.   Argument Realization.   Cambridge, UK.: Cambridge University Press

Smith, Carlota.  1997.  Parameters of Aspect. Dordrecht: Springer. 2003.  Modes of Discourse.   Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Sperber, Dan and Wilson, Dieardra.  2012.  Meaning and Relevance.   Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Wasow, Thomas.  2003.  Postverbal Behavior.  Stanford: CSLI Publications.

B.  Reading list on specific topics will be compiled later. 

SPN F345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

88280 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM BEN 1.124

SPN 345L:
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to successfully  describe and analyze sounds, words and phrases in Spanish. This course will introduce students to various subfields of linguistics, including:
·   Phonetics: nature and articulation of sounds
·   Phonology: organization and use of sounds to encode meaning
·   Morphology: internal structure of words
·   Syntax: principles underlying construction of phrases and sentences
·   Diachronic linguistics: processes involved in the evolution of language
·   Pragmatics: situational or contextual usage of language
·   Sociolinguistics: effects of society / social variables on language
·   Dialectology: linguistic variation corresponding to geographic distribution
Although this is an introductory linguistics course, it is not an introduction to basic aspects of the Spanish language. Therefore, students should enter the course with an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish as well as a familiarity with grammatical concepts. This is a very challenging course that requires strong analytical skills as well as a willingness to deal with a wide range of technical terminology, definitions, formalizations and abstract concepts.

SPN F345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

88605 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM BEN 1.104

SPN 345L:
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to successfully  describe and analyze sounds, words and phrases in Spanish. This course will introduce students to various subfields of linguistics, including:
·   Phonetics: nature and articulation of sounds
·   Phonology: organization and use of sounds to encode meaning
·   Morphology: internal structure of words
·   Syntax: principles underlying construction of phrases and sentences
·   Diachronic linguistics: processes involved in the evolution of language
·   Pragmatics: situational or contextual usage of language
·   Sociolinguistics: effects of society / social variables on language
·   Dialectology: linguistic variation corresponding to geographic distribution
Although this is an introductory linguistics course, it is not an introduction to basic aspects of the Spanish language. Therefore, students should enter the course with an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish as well as a familiarity with grammatical concepts. This is a very challenging course that requires strong analytical skills as well as a willingness to deal with a wide range of technical terminology, definitions, formalizations and abstract concepts.

SPN 383N • Smnr On Interfaces In Spanish

46715 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.210

SPN F345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

89720 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM BEN 1.108

SPN 345L:
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to successfully  describe and analyze sounds, words and phrases in Spanish. This course will introduce students to various subfields of linguistics, including:
·   Phonetics: nature and articulation of sounds
·   Phonology: organization and use of sounds to encode meaning
·   Morphology: internal structure of words
·   Syntax: principles underlying construction of phrases and sentences
·   Diachronic linguistics: processes involved in the evolution of language
·   Pragmatics: situational or contextual usage of language
·   Sociolinguistics: effects of society / social variables on language
·   Dialectology: linguistic variation corresponding to geographic distribution
Although this is an introductory linguistics course, it is not an introduction to basic aspects of the Spanish language. Therefore, students should enter the course with an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish as well as a familiarity with grammatical concepts. This is a very challenging course that requires strong analytical skills as well as a willingness to deal with a wide range of technical terminology, definitions, formalizations and abstract concepts.

SPN F345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

89900 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM BEN 1.108

SPN 345L:
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to successfully  describe and analyze sounds, words and phrases in Spanish. This course will introduce students to various subfields of linguistics, including:
·   Phonetics: nature and articulation of sounds
·   Phonology: organization and use of sounds to encode meaning
·   Morphology: internal structure of words
·   Syntax: principles underlying construction of phrases and sentences
·   Diachronic linguistics: processes involved in the evolution of language
·   Pragmatics: situational or contextual usage of language
·   Sociolinguistics: effects of society / social variables on language
·   Dialectology: linguistic variation corresponding to geographic distribution
Although this is an introductory linguistics course, it is not an introduction to basic aspects of the Spanish language. Therefore, students should enter the course with an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish as well as a familiarity with grammatical concepts. This is a very challenging course that requires strong analytical skills as well as a willingness to deal with a wide range of technical terminology, definitions, formalizations and abstract concepts.

SPN S367K • Syntax And Stylistics

89445 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 304

Summer 2012 Course Description

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

 

Course Number: SPN 367K

Course Title: Business Spanish: Language and interaction

Instructor Name: Salaberry

Instructor Title: Professor

 

Description:

Español 367K es un curso de fines específicos dirigido a los estudiantes que quieran desarrollar sus conocimientos del español centrándose en el campo específico de la interacción social en la economía y los negocios.

Para participar en el curso es necesario tener un nivel de español intermedio.

Todos los contenidos temáticos irán acompañados de un objetivo lingüístico, gramatical o dirigido a mejorar una de las cuatro destrezas.

 

 Los objetivos generales del curso están enfocados en:

  • Desarrollar las estrategias lingüísticas necesarias para desenvolverse en el mundo empresarial del ámbito hispano.
  • Desarrollar capacidades de auto-aprendizaje a fin de que en el futuro puedan enriquecerse en todas las situaciones que les ofrezca su ámbito laboral.
  • Familiarizarse con el momento actual de la economía española y de Cantabria que es la región donde sucede el curso.
  • Visitar y conocer algunas empresas y empresarios de la región a fin de comparar con el mundo empresarial de los Estados Unidos y enriquecerse con otras culturas y otros sistemas de trabajo.

 

Texts:  

Required: Olga Juan y otros. En Equipo 3. Editorial Edinumen

Recommended: Un diccionario de español inglés.                       

Detlev Wagner, Neus Sans ; Mil palabras de Negocios. Ed. Difusión.

 

Grading:  

2 exámenes                  (2)                                                                   30%

Tareas sobre las visitas            (3)                                                       30%

Participación en las visitas y en la clase                                               15%

Examen final                                                                                        25%

 

 

SPN F345L • Intro To Hispanic Linguistics

88875 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 204

SPN 345L:
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to successfully  describe and analyze sounds, words and phrases in Spanish. This course will introduce students to various subfields of linguistics, including:
·   Phonetics: nature and articulation of sounds
·   Phonology: organization and use of sounds to encode meaning
·   Morphology: internal structure of words
·   Syntax: principles underlying construction of phrases and sentences
·   Diachronic linguistics: processes involved in the evolution of language
·   Pragmatics: situational or contextual usage of language
·   Sociolinguistics: effects of society / social variables on language
·   Dialectology: linguistic variation corresponding to geographic distribution
Although this is an introductory linguistics course, it is not an introduction to basic aspects of the Spanish language. Therefore, students should enter the course with an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish as well as a familiarity with grammatical concepts. This is a very challenging course that requires strong analytical skills as well as a willingness to deal with a wide range of technical terminology, definitions, formalizations and abstract concepts.

SPN S367K • Spanish Grammar

89310 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BAT 318

Summer 2012 Course Description

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

 

Course Number: SPN 367K

Course Title: Business Spanish: Language and interaction

Instructor Name: Salaberry

Instructor Title: Professor

 

Description:

Español 367K es un curso de fines específicos dirigido a los estudiantes que quieran desarrollar sus conocimientos del español centrándose en el campo específico de la interacción social en la economía y los negocios.

Para participar en el curso es necesario tener un nivel de español intermedio.

Todos los contenidos temáticos irán acompañados de un objetivo lingüístico, gramatical o dirigido a mejorar una de las cuatro destrezas.

 

 Los objetivos generales del curso están enfocados en:

  • Desarrollar las estrategias lingüísticas necesarias para desenvolverse en el mundo empresarial del ámbito hispano.
  • Desarrollar capacidades de auto-aprendizaje a fin de que en el futuro puedan enriquecerse en todas las situaciones que les ofrezca su ámbito laboral.
  • Familiarizarse con el momento actual de la economía española y de Cantabria que es la región donde sucede el curso.
  • Visitar y conocer algunas empresas y empresarios de la región a fin de comparar con el mundo empresarial de los Estados Unidos y enriquecerse con otras culturas y otros sistemas de trabajo.

 

Texts:  

Required: Olga Juan y otros. En Equipo 3. Editorial Edinumen

Recommended: Un diccionario de español inglés.                       

Detlev Wagner, Neus Sans ; Mil palabras de Negocios. Ed. Difusión.

 

Grading:  

2 exámenes                  (2)                                                                   30%

Tareas sobre las visitas            (3)                                                       30%

Participación en las visitas y en la clase                                               15%

Examen final                                                                                        25%

 

 

Publications


Nishida, C.  2016.  "El español y el japonés".  Book review.  Hispania.  (In press)

Nishida, C. 2016.  “IO realization variation in Spanish reverse psych verb sentences.” In Thierry Ruchot (ed.) Non-canonical Predicative Relations, John Benjamins.   (In press)

Nishida, C.  2012.  "A Corpus Study of Mexican Spanish Three-participant Constructions with and without Clitic Doubling."   Linguistic Discovery 10.3: 208-240.   

download

Nishida, C & C. Russi (eds).  2012. Building a bridge between linguistic communities of the Old and New World: Current approaches to the study of tense, aspect, mood and modality across languages.  New York: Rodopi.   

Beavers, J. and C. Nishida. 2010.  “The Spanish Dative Alternation Revisited," in Sonia Colina et. al (eds.),  The Selected Proceedings of 39th Linguistics Symposium on Romance Languages. 217-230.   Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. 

download

Nishida, C. 2012.  "Restructuring and Clitic Climbing in Romance: A Categorial Grammar Analysis". In Artemis Alexiadou, Tibor Kiss, and Gereon Mueller (eds.), Local Modelling for Non-local Problems in Syntax. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.   

download

MaCready, E. and C. Nishida. 2008.  "Reflexive Intransitives in Spanish and Event Semantics". In Johannes Dölling, Tatjana Heyde-Zybatow, and Martin Shäfer (eds.), Event Structures in Linguistic Form and Interpretation, Language Context and Cognition 5, 223-245.  Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter. 

download

Nishida, C. & Montreuil, J. (eds)  2006. New Perspectives in Romance Linguistics. Amsterdam :John Benjamins

Nishida, C. & C. Isabelli.  2005.  "Development of the Spanish Subjunctive in a Nine-month Study-abroad Setting."  Cascadilla Press.

Nishida, C. 1996.  Second-Position Clitic Pronouns in Old Spanish and Categorical GrammarIn Aaron Halpern and Arnold Zwicky (eds.), Second Position Clitics and Related Phenomena, 333-373.  Stanford, Ca.: Center for the Study of Language and Information.  

 

download

Conference Presentations


No simple agreement markers: Distribution of Spanish dative clitics in two reverse psych verbconstructions, to be presented at 49th Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea, Naples, Italy.  Fall 2016.

“IO realization variation in Spanish gustar-type verb constructions: a corpus-based study.   Romania Nova IV, Buenos Aires, Argentina.   Fall 2014.

“Referential effects on IO realization in Spanish reverse psych verb constructions.” Conference on Conceptual Structure, Discourse, and Language,  Santa Barbara.  Fall 2014.

English-Spanish Contrastive Morpho-syntax,” Secretaría de Educación Pública (SEP) Special Speaker Series, University of Texas-Austin.  Summer 2014.  Invited lecture.

Optional clitic doubling in Spanish reverse psych verb constructions. Texas Linguistics Society, University of Texas-Austin.   Fall 2013. 

The subject in Italian and Spanish unaccusative constructions: a discourse perspective.    Workshop on Subject: Cognitive, Typological and Functional Approaches organized by Linguistics Society of Finland (SKY), Helsinki, Finland (with Cinzia Russi).  Fall 2013.

Reverse psych verb constructions with and without clitic doubling in the Peninsular Spanish. 43rd Annual Meeting of Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages (LSRL), CUNY, NY.  Spring 2013.

Complement order variation in Spanish ditransitive constructions.” American Association of Corpus Linguistics.  San Diego.  Spring 2013.

Inversion psych verb gustar ‘to appeal’ with and without clitic doubling in the Peninsular Spanish. Colloquium on non-canonical predicative Relations.  Caen, France.  Fall 2012.

 The Oblique/IO Alternation with Give-type and Send-type Verbs in Spanish. 44th Annual Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea.   Universidad de Logroño, Spain.  Fall 2011.

The Oblique/IO Alternation in Three-participant Constructions,” Workshop on Referential Hierarchy in Three-participant Constructions.  Lancaster University, Great Britain.   Summer 2011.

What can a corpus-study tell us about the Spanish dative alternation? 10th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, Indiana University.  Fall 2010.

Localizing the Loss and Attrition of the Subjunctive through Generations

Localizing the Loss and Attrition of the Subjunctive through Generations: The Case of Central Texas Adult Bilinguals, Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico.  October, 2009.  (with Isla Flores-Bayer)

What can a corpus study tell us about the Spanish dative alternation?

What can a corpus-study tell us about the Spanish dative alternation?  Paper presented at the 10th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, Indiana University.  October 2010.

The Oblique/IO Alternation in Spanish Three-participant Constructions

Workshop on Referential Hierarchy in Three-participant Costructions. Lancaster University,  May 2011

The Oblique/IO Alternation with Give-type and Send-type Verbs in Spanish.

44th Annual Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea.   Universidad de Logroño, Spain.  September 2011.

Inversion psych verb gustar 'to appeal' with and without clitic doubling in the Peninsular Spanish

Colloquium on Non Canonical Predicative Relations, University of Caen, France.  November 2012

Complement Order Variation in Spanish Ditranstive Constructions

American Association of Corpus Linguistics, San Diego State University.  January 2013


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  • Spanish and Portuguese

    The University of Texas at Austin
    BEN 2.116
    150 W. 21st Street, Stop B3700
    Austin, TX 78712-1155
    Advising & Registration: 512-232-4506/512-232-4503; Graduate Coordinator: 512-232-4502; Main Office & General Inquiries: 512-471-4936