African and African Disapora Studies Department
African and African Disapora Studies Department

Traci-Ann Wint


Ph.D., African and African Diaspora Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer of African and African Diaspora Studies
Traci-Ann Wint

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-8525
  • Office: GWB 3.200M
  • Campus Mail Code: E3400

Courses


AFR F370 • Power/Place: Making Tex His-Wb

78985 • Summer 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEII HI (also listed as HIS F365G)

What are the stories told about Texas’ history? Where are the places that help those stories be told? The State Capitol grounds, the Alamo in San Antonio, the South Mall on UT’s campus, and even the Barbara Jordan statuary at the Austin Bergstrom Airport are but a few examples of the commemorative and memorialized sites that convey accounts of Texas history. This course explores places in the Texas landscape as windows into Texas history and the political and social thinking that have formed our understandings of Texas’s past. It does this by teaching students to interpret Texas sites that convey public history. We will read these sites by delving into the makings of the histories behind them, including the historic silences that also form them. At the same time, we will interrogate these places and their meanings for what they reveal about the power relations arrayed along lines of race, culture, gender, and economic status that underlie their creation as memorable and historically meaningful. In this way, students are provided with an understanding of the “facts” of Texas history from a variety of positions, an understanding of the work historical narratives do in the present, and how power operates in the making, telling, and remembering of Texas history.

Drawing on anthropological and historical methods, this course uses places in Austin, Texas such as the Josiah Wilbarger state historical marker, the Texas State Cemetery, the Littlefield Fountain, and the Gold Dollar building to examine the history of the peoples of Texas with attention to their racial and gendered histories. At the same time, we will explore how those who were involved in making these sites and their historical narratives, created shared beliefs about the past and how these narratives translate into ongoing ideas about who is and who is not Texan, American, worthy, civilized, or even human in the present.

AFR S303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

79035 • Summer 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

31005 • Spring 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 315W • Race, Sex, And Tourism-Wb

31080 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
EGCII

Please check back for updates.

AFR 303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

29975 • Fall 2020
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 315P • Intro Black Women's Studies-Wb

30030 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
CDII (also listed as WGS 301)

Students will gain a solid foundation in the main themes and theories of Black Women’s Studies. Further, students will learn to think critically about issues of race, gender, sexuality, class, and ability as they impact the lives of Black women globally as well as in scholarship and popular media about them. Using Feminist theory, Black Feminist Theory and Womanist theory as frameworks students will examine the history, development, and importance of Black Women’s Studies as a discipline and taking seriously the feminist statement that the personal is political students will learn to relate these theories to our daily lives. Students will learn to think and read critically and to thoughtfully analyze stereotypes and representations of Black womanhood and their implications. Students will also be exposed to a growing and interdisciplinary body of research, literature and culture material about and by Black women globally.

AFR 330 • Beyonce Fmnsm/Rihanna Wmnsm-Wb

30058-30059 • Fall 2020
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
CDGC (also listed as WGS 335)

Beyoncé’s fifth live album Homecoming chronicled her performance as the first black woman to headline the Coachella festival. As with Lemonade, the film and performance put Beyoncé’s music in conversation with luminaries such as Toni Morrison and W.E.B. DuBois. Beyoncé’s contemporaries Rihanna and Lizzo similarly center black culture in their music and are unapologetic about their work’s engagement with issues specific to black womanhood. By engaging the music and videos of these and other Black femme recording artists as popular, accessible expressions of African American and Caribbean feminisms, this course explores their contribution to black feminist thought and their impact on global audiences. Beginning with close analysis of these artists’ songs and videos, we read their work in conversation with black feminist theoretical works that engage issues of race, location, violence, economic opportunity, sexuality, standards of beauty, and creative self-expression. The course aims to provide students with an introduction to media studies methodology as well as black feminist theory, and to challenge us to close the gap between popular and academic expressions of black women’s concerns.

AFR F303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

78270 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR S303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

78330 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

30510 • Spring 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEGC SB (also listed as ANT 310D)

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 317E • Race, Sex, And Tourism

30525 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.120
EGC (also listed as ANT 310L)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 330 • Beyonce Fmnsm/Rihanna Wmnsm

30575-30595 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM GDC 2.216
CDGC (also listed as WGS 335)

Beyoncé’s fifth live album Homecoming chronicled her performance as the first black woman to headline the Coachella festival. As with Lemonade, the film and performance put Beyoncé’s music in conversation with luminaries such as Toni Morrison and W.E.B. DuBois. Beyoncé’s contemporaries Rihanna and Lizzo similarly center black culture in their music and are unapologetic about their work’s engagement with issues specific to black womanhood. By engaging the music and videos of these and other Black femme recording artists as popular, accessible expressions of African American and Caribbean feminisms, this course explores their contribution to black feminist thought and their impact on global audiences. Beginning with close analysis of these artists’ songs and videos, we read their work in conversation with black feminist theoretical works that engage issues of race, location, violence, economic opportunity, sexuality, standards of beauty, and creative self-expression. The course aims to provide students with an introduction to media studies methodology as well as black feminist theory, and to challenge us to close the gap between popular and academic expressions of black women’s concerns.

AFR 303 • Introduction To Black Studies

29994 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
Two-way Interactive Video
CDEGC SB (also listed as ANT 310D)

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. In the first section of the course we consider the history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora, and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections. The second section of the course focuses on Black cultures, power, and politics. It utilizes the analytical tools provided by the course to forge an understanding of Black gendered cultural forms. The third section of the course focuses in on the expression and use of Black Studies and the ethical questions raised by applying this perspective to everyday concerns in critical areas of social inequity.

AFR 317D • Intro Black Women's Studies

30028 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.132
CD (also listed as WGS 301)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 372G • African Queer Studies

30135 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.122
GC (also listed as WGS 335)

Description:

This course explores queer gender and sexuality in Africa, with particular focus on theoretical issues, the colonial encounter, citizenship and activism, media representations. In the first unit, we will examine some of the theoretical issues that are relevant to studying queer gender and sexuality in Africa and in the African Diaspora more broadly. In the second unit, we will explore some of the literature on the impact of colonialism on queer African identities and practices, and we will pay particular attention to its lasting impact on queer African lives in our post-colonial moment. In the third unity, we will read several ethnographic and literary texts on specific communities in order to expand our understanding of the diverse ways in which queer Africans create identities, experience desire, and redefine dominant notions of citizenships. In the final unit of the course, we will examine representations of queer African sexuality in literature, film, and media, focusing especially on representation in relation to recent events in South Africa, Uganda, Malawi, and Senegal. We will pay particular attention to how such representations are shaped by political economy and influenced by the international community.

 

Texts:

Queer African Reader Sokari Ekine and Hakima Abbas eds.

African Sexualities: A reader Sylvia Tamale ed.

Heterosexual Africa?: The History of an Idea from the Age of Exploration to the Age of AIDS Marc Epprecht

OUT in Africa: LGBT Organizing in Namibia and South Africa Ashley Currier

Allah Made Us: Sexual Outlaws in an Islamic African City Rudolf P. Gaudio

Black Bull, Ancestors, and Me: My life as a Lesbian Sangoma Nkunzi Zandile Nkadinde

AFR F303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

79009 • Summer 2019
Internet; Asynchronous
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 303 • Introduction To Black Studies

30552 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
Two-way Interactive Video
CDEGC SB

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

Curriculum Vitae


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