African and African Disapora Studies Department
African and African Disapora Studies Department

Traci-Ann Wint


M.A., Anthropology, The University of Texas at Austin, B.A., Anthropology and African Studies, Vassar College; Techniques in Video Production (certificate), Media and Tech Institute (Jamaica)

Ph.D. Candidate
Traci-Ann Wint

Contact

Interests


Tourism, Collective Memory and National Identity, Blackness as Commodity, Conceptualizations of the Caribbean, Representation and Media

Courses


AFR 303 • Introduction To Black Studies

29994 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
(also listed as ANT 310D)

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. In the first section of the course we consider the history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora, and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections. The second section of the course focuses on Black cultures, power, and politics. It utilizes the analytical tools provided by the course to forge an understanding of Black gendered cultural forms. The third section of the course focuses in on the expression and use of Black Studies and the ethical questions raised by applying this perspective to everyday concerns in critical areas of social inequity.

AFR 317E • Race And Tourism

30027 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as ANT 310L)

What does it mean to be a tourist? Who gets to be a tourist? What role do race, class, gender, and sexuality play in our understandings of tourism? How does race impact how, where, and why people travel? This course introduces students to debates, methods and conceptual frameworks in the study of race and tourism. We’ll examine the nuances of how and why people travel, the trials and benefits of being a host location or destination, and we’ll interrogate what happens when tourist and local meet. Through a review of travelogues and travel guides, tourism advertising paraphernalia, novels, and films we’ll discuss tourism and its relationship to colonialism and imperialism, and race, as well as the commodification of culture and the role of the “exotic” in our globalized world. We’ll cover topics such as tourism and development, eco-tourism, cruise and all-inclusive tourism, wellness tourism, sex tourism, dark tourism, and heritage and diaspora tourism. From the Caribbean to Africa, Europe, Asia and the Americas we’ll look at the role of race in travel and the impact of tourism on culture, people, and environment.

AFR 317D • Intro Black Women's Studies

30028 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.132
(also listed as WGS 301)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 372G • African Queer Studies

30135 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.122
(also listed as WGS 335)

Description:

This course explores queer gender and sexuality in Africa, with particular focus on theoretical issues, the colonial encounter, citizenship and activism, media representations. In the first unit, we will examine some of the theoretical issues that are relevant to studying queer gender and sexuality in Africa and in the African Diaspora more broadly. In the second unit, we will explore some of the literature on the impact of colonialism on queer African identities and practices, and we will pay particular attention to its lasting impact on queer African lives in our post-colonial moment. In the third unity, we will read several ethnographic and literary texts on specific communities in order to expand our understanding of the diverse ways in which queer Africans create identities, experience desire, and redefine dominant notions of citizenships. In the final unit of the course, we will examine representations of queer African sexuality in literature, film, and media, focusing especially on representation in relation to recent events in South Africa, Uganda, Malawi, and Senegal. We will pay particular attention to how such representations are shaped by political economy and influenced by the international community.

 

Texts:

Queer African Reader Sokari Ekine and Hakima Abbas eds.

African Sexualities: A reader Sylvia Tamale ed.

Heterosexual Africa?: The History of an Idea from the Age of Exploration to the Age of AIDS Marc Epprecht

OUT in Africa: LGBT Organizing in Namibia and South Africa Ashley Currier

Allah Made Us: Sexual Outlaws in an Islamic African City Rudolf P. Gaudio

Black Bull, Ancestors, and Me: My life as a Lesbian Sangoma Nkunzi Zandile Nkadinde

AFR F303 • Intro To Black Studies-Wb

79009 • Summer 2019

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 303 • Introduction To Black Studies

30552 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

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